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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 4)

Marianne Williamson asked white people to apologize to black audience members on speaking tour for slavery, lynchings, other issues

Westlake Legal Group AP19179096510591 Marianne Williamson asked white people to apologize to black audience members on speaking tour for slavery, lynchings, other issues Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc ffa33693-9699-5a49-9fb7-2ccc63dc0c37 article

Spiritual guru and 2020 Democratic hopeful Marianne Williamson asked white members of her audience at an event last July to apologize to black people also in attendance for slavery, lynching, police brutality and other issues.

According to the Houston Chronicle, Williamson opened a stop of her “Love America” tour by asking all white people in the audience to stand up during an opening prayer.

She then asked them to hold hands with black members of the audience nearby, and start by saying “I apologize.”

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON SHARES  EDITED PHOTO OF HERSELF WITH WOMEN RUNNING FOR POTUS

“With nearly 200 black people in the audience on their feet, Williamson apologized for slavery, lynching, murders, rapes of black women, destruction of the black family, mass incarceration of black men, being called the N-word and systemic and institutionalized racism and more,” the Houston Chronicle’s Joy Sewing wrote at the time.

And, based on video from other times, it seems as though Williamson asked audiences at other events to make similar apologies.

She also wrote a poem in 2016, titled “Prayer of Apology to African Americans.”

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Williamson received lots of attention on social media following her big debut on the national stage during the first round of Democratic debates. In a recent New Hampshire poll, she ranked higher than Sen. Cory Booker, D-NJ, and former congressman Beto O’Rourke.

Westlake Legal Group AP19179096510591 Marianne Williamson asked white people to apologize to black audience members on speaking tour for slavery, lynchings, other issues Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc ffa33693-9699-5a49-9fb7-2ccc63dc0c37 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19179096510591 Marianne Williamson asked white people to apologize to black audience members on speaking tour for slavery, lynchings, other issues Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc ffa33693-9699-5a49-9fb7-2ccc63dc0c37 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘I Don’t Trust You Guys’: Lawmakers Unite to Take Aim at Big Tech

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers leveled stinging criticism and sharp questions at Big Tech executives on Tuesday, attacking Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google for their market power, their perceived bias as gatekeepers of communication and Facebook’s ambitions to reshape the financial industry.

The criticisms came at three hearings on Capitol Hill that showcased Washington’s widening range of concerns with Silicon Valley. Lawmakers from both parties, including Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas who oversees a subcommittee on the Constitution, and Representative David N. Cicilline, Democrat of Rhode Island who leads a subcommittee on antitrust law, took aim at the businesses.

The executives acknowledged that technology had changed, and sometimes hurt, companies in industries like retailing, advertising, music and movies. But their companies, they said, have opened new opportunities to millions of entrepreneurs and small businesses. They insisted they faced competitors at every turn — entrenched big companies, ascendant start-ups and each other.

And consumers, they said, are big winners, benefiting from convenience, lower prices and new products and services.

But their celebration of the virtues of Big Tech did not carry the day. Some lawmakers were sympathetic, but this was not their stage. Most were decidedly unconvinced, even disdainful.

“Facebook has said, ‘Just trust us,’” Senator Sherrod Brown, Democrat of Ohio, said at a hearing focused on the social media company’s cryptocurrency efforts. “And every time Americans trust you, they seem to get burned.”

The hearing performances were a telling moment, showing the rising force of the backlash against the tech giants. Not long ago revered as treasures of American capitalism, they are now targets of political attacks from both parties, growing public criticism and regulatory scrutiny. President Trump has also turned up the volume of his critique of tech companies in recent weeks.

The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission recently decided to divide responsibility for potential antitrust investigations. The Justice Department is taking Google and Apple, while the F.T.C. has Facebook and Amazon. Last week, the F.T.C. voted to fine Facebook about $5 billion for mishandling users’ personal information, by far the agency’s largest fine against a tech company.

The House Judiciary Committee has opened a bipartisan inquiry into the power and practices of major technology companies. The subcommittee announced the investigation last month and planned to request documents from the companies and hear testimony from confidential witnesses, who may fear retribution from the tech giants.

It has also started holding hearings, including one on Tuesday afternoon that was focused on how Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google altered innovation and entrepreneurial activity. The practices under scrutiny included acquiring upstart competitors and favoring their own offerings on the digital marketplaces they operate.

Lawmakers appeared to be zeroing in on the areas that concern them the most. In one exchange, Mr. Cicilline addressed whether the tech companies’ marketplaces — for goods, software apps and online ads — gave them an unfair advantage over rivals who rely on those marketplaces to distribute their own products or services. He pointed to Amazon’s many lines of private label products, which compete for sales on the company’s site with similar products from other brands.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158036511_e41e8ad6-e46a-4065-a5ca-219245717125-articleLarge ‘I Don’t Trust You Guys’: Lawmakers Unite to Take Aim at Big Tech United States Politics and Government Privacy Law and Legislation Innovation House Committee on the Judiciary Google Inc Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Apple Inc Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues Amazon.com Inc

Representative David N. Cicilline addressed whether tech companies’ marketplaces gave them an unfair advantage.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

“Doesn’t that create a conflict of interest?” Mr. Cicilline asked Nate Sutton, Amazon’s associate general counsel.

“I respectfully disagree,” replied Mr. Sutton, who said that many big brick-and-mortar retailers offer private label brands.

Amazon’s control of products on its site, Mr. Cicilline said, is different and stronger than that of a traditional retailer that offers some private-label merchandise.

At one point, Mr. Cicilline pointedly told Mr. Sutton, “I may remind you, sir. You are under oath.”

Isn’t it the case, Mr. Cicilline pressed, that the best sale for Amazon is the sale of an Amazon-branded product, and that Amazon uses the vast amount of data it collects to favor its own offerings?

“No, that is not true,” Mr. Sutton replied.

Representative Joe Neguse, a Colorado Democrat, focused on Facebook.

He pointed out that not only is Facebook the world’s largest social network, but that those ranked third, fourth and sixth — WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and Instagram — are Facebook properties.

Owning the four of the top six players in a market, Mr. Neguse said, spoke for itself. “We have a word for that,” he said. “It is called monopoly.”

Earlier in the day, in the hearing about Facebook’s cryptocurrency project, Libra, lawmakers grilled David Marcus, a top executive.

The company has a bold goal with the project: to offer an alternative financial system that makes it possible to send money around the world with few fees. But the company has run into bipartisan resistance from Washington, including the White House.

The initiative is far from the first effort of its kind. The best-known cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, is in wide circulation, and it introduced the idea of digital currencies that are free from government control.

But the Libra effort has put a spotlight on cryptocurrencies and amplified the voices of critics who say the technology has little value beyond speculative investing and illegal transactions, like online drug sales. Last week, the chair of the Federal Reserve, Jerome H. Powell, said Libra raised “serious concerns” around “money laundering, consumer protection and financial stability.” Mr. Trump and the treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin, have also criticized Libra and other cryptocurrencies in the past week.

Lawmakers questioned David Marcus, a top Facebook executive, about the company’s cryptocurrency project, Libra.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Senator Martha McSally, Republican of Arizona, said, “I don’t trust you guys.”

Mr. Marcus, a former PayPal executive, was handpicked by Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, to lead the Libra effort.

Mr. Marcus, adopting a conciliatory tone, said the company would do its best to fight fraud and earn back the trust of the more than two billion people who use Facebook’s services regularly.

“We’ve made mistakes in the past,” Mr. Marcus said. “We have been working, and are working hard to get better.”

Google was at the center of the day’s third hearing, about censorship in search, held by a Senate subcommittee.

Republican lawmakers used the hearing to air often-repeated but largely unproven claims that Google tilts search results to bias against conservative viewpoints. Democrats called the hearing a charade and raised concerns about Google’s inability to effectively police the content on YouTube.

The Republicans took turns battering Karan Bhatia, Google’s vice president for government affairs and public policy. Senator Josh Hawley, Republican of Missouri, delivered the most pointed attacks. He said it was hard to believe Google’s executives when they say that censoring search results would go against the company’s mission and ideology, considering that the search giant had been working on plans to re-enter China with a censored search engine.

“Clearly, our trust and patience in your company and your monopoly has run out,” said Mr. Hawley, who has been a vocal critic of Google.

Mr. Bhatia responded by saying that Google had abandoned plans to restart its search engine in China.

Mr. Cruz, the chairman of the subcommittee, said Congress needed to rethink the legal immunity for internet companies, established in 1996, that protects them from liability for content posted by users. The law, known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has allowed platforms like Google’s YouTube, Facebook and Twitter to grow rapidly without concern of being held liable for content on those services.

Even before the hearing that focused on Google, the president applied his own brand of pressure with an early morning tweet. He said that his administration “will investigate” remarks from the billionaire investor Peter Thiel, who said that Google had been infiltrated by the Chinese intelligence. Mr. Thiel also accused the technology giant of treason for refusing to work with the Pentagon on a future artificial intelligence project while agreeing to work with the Chinese military. He provided no evidence for his allegations.

A Google spokeswoman said in a statement that the company had not worked with the Chinese military and that it had cooperated with the American government in many areas such as cybersecurity, recruiting and health care.

When asked whether Chinese intelligence had infiltrated the company’s management, software or private data during the hearing, Mr. Bhatia said: “Absolutely not.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘I Don’t Trust You Guys’: Lawmakers Unite to Take Aim at Big Tech

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers leveled stinging criticism and sharp questions at Big Tech executives on Tuesday, attacking Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google for their market power, their perceived bias as gatekeepers of communication and Facebook’s ambitions to reshape the financial industry.

The criticisms came at three hearings on Capitol Hill that showcased Washington’s widening range of concerns with Silicon Valley. Lawmakers from both parties, including Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas who oversees a subcommittee on the Constitution, and Representative David N. Cicilline, Democrat of Rhode Island who leads a subcommittee on antitrust law, took aim at the businesses.

The executives acknowledged that technology had changed, and sometimes hurt, companies in industries like retailing, advertising, music and movies. But their companies, they said, have opened new opportunities to millions of entrepreneurs and small businesses. They insisted they faced competitors at every turn — entrenched big companies, ascendant start-ups and each other.

And consumers, they said, are big winners, benefiting from convenience, lower prices and new products and services.

But their celebration of the virtues of Big Tech did not carry the day. Some lawmakers were sympathetic, but this was not their stage. Most were decidedly unconvinced, even disdainful.

“Facebook has said, ‘Just trust us,’” Senator Sherrod Brown, Democrat of Ohio, said at a hearing focused on the social media company’s cryptocurrency efforts. “And every time Americans trust you, they seem to get burned.”

The hearing performances were a telling moment, showing the rising force of the backlash against the tech giants. Not long ago revered as treasures of American capitalism, they are now targets of political attacks from both parties, growing public criticism and regulatory scrutiny. President Trump has also turned up the volume of his critique of tech companies in recent weeks.

The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission recently decided to divide responsibility for potential antitrust investigations. The Justice Department is taking Google and Apple, while the F.T.C. has Facebook and Amazon. Last week, the F.T.C. voted to fine Facebook about $5 billion for mishandling users’ personal information, by far the agency’s largest fine against a tech company.

The House Judiciary Committee has opened a bipartisan inquiry into the power and practices of major technology companies. The subcommittee announced the investigation last month and planned to request documents from the companies and hear testimony from confidential witnesses, who may fear retribution from the tech giants.

It has also started holding hearings, including one on Tuesday afternoon that was focused on how Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google altered innovation and entrepreneurial activity. The practices under scrutiny included acquiring upstart competitors and favoring their own offerings on the digital marketplaces they operate.

Lawmakers appeared to be zeroing in on the areas that concern them the most. In one exchange, Mr. Cicilline addressed whether the tech companies’ marketplaces — for goods, software apps and online ads — gave them an unfair advantage over rivals who rely on those marketplaces to distribute their own products or services. He pointed to Amazon’s many lines of private label products, which compete for sales on the company’s site with similar products from other brands.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158036511_e41e8ad6-e46a-4065-a5ca-219245717125-articleLarge ‘I Don’t Trust You Guys’: Lawmakers Unite to Take Aim at Big Tech United States Politics and Government Privacy Law and Legislation Innovation House Committee on the Judiciary Google Inc Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Apple Inc Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues Amazon.com Inc

Representative David N. Cicilline addressed whether tech companies’ marketplaces gave them an unfair advantage.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

“Doesn’t that create a conflict of interest?” Mr. Cicilline asked Nate Sutton, Amazon’s associate general counsel.

“I respectfully disagree,” replied Mr. Sutton, who said that many big brick-and-mortar retailers offer private label brands.

Amazon’s control of products on its site, Mr. Cicilline said, is different and stronger than that of a traditional retailer that offers some private-label merchandise.

At one point, Mr. Cicilline pointedly told Mr. Sutton, “I may remind you, sir. You are under oath.”

Isn’t it the case, Mr. Cicilline pressed, that the best sale for Amazon is the sale of an Amazon-branded product, and that Amazon uses the vast amount of data it collects to favor its own offerings?

“No, that is not true,” Mr. Sutton replied.

Representative Joe Neguse, a Colorado Democrat, focused on Facebook.

He pointed out that not only is Facebook the world’s largest social network, but that those ranked third, fourth and sixth — WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and Instagram — are Facebook properties.

Owning the four of the top six players in a market, Mr. Neguse said, spoke for itself. “We have a word for that,” he said. “It is called monopoly.”

Earlier in the day, in the hearing about Facebook’s cryptocurrency project, Libra, lawmakers grilled David Marcus, a top executive.

The company has a bold goal with the project: to offer an alternative financial system that makes it possible to send money around the world with few fees. But the company has run into bipartisan resistance from Washington, including the White House.

The initiative is far from the first effort of its kind. The best-known cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, is in wide circulation, and it introduced the idea of digital currencies that are free from government control.

But the Libra effort has put a spotlight on cryptocurrencies and amplified the voices of critics who say the technology has little value beyond speculative investing and illegal transactions, like online drug sales. Last week, the chair of the Federal Reserve, Jerome H. Powell, said Libra raised “serious concerns” around “money laundering, consumer protection and financial stability.” Mr. Trump and the treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin, have also criticized Libra and other cryptocurrencies in the past week.

Lawmakers questioned David Marcus, a top Facebook executive, about the company’s cryptocurrency project, Libra.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Senator Martha McSally, Republican of Arizona, said, “I don’t trust you guys.”

Mr. Marcus, a former PayPal executive, was handpicked by Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, to lead the Libra effort.

Mr. Marcus, adopting a conciliatory tone, said the company would do its best to fight fraud and earn back the trust of the more than two billion people who use Facebook’s services regularly.

“We’ve made mistakes in the past,” Mr. Marcus said. “We have been working, and are working hard to get better.”

Google was at the center of the day’s third hearing, about censorship in search, held by a Senate subcommittee.

Republican lawmakers used the hearing to air often-repeated but largely unproven claims that Google tilts search results to bias against conservative viewpoints. Democrats called the hearing a charade and raised concerns about Google’s inability to effectively police the content on YouTube.

The Republicans took turns battering Karan Bhatia, Google’s vice president for government affairs and public policy. Senator Josh Hawley, Republican of Missouri, delivered the most pointed attacks. He said it was hard to believe Google’s executives when they say that censoring search results would go against the company’s mission and ideology, considering that the search giant had been working on plans to re-enter China with a censored search engine.

“Clearly, our trust and patience in your company and your monopoly has run out,” said Mr. Hawley, who has been a vocal critic of Google.

Mr. Bhatia responded by saying that Google had abandoned plans to restart its search engine in China.

Mr. Cruz, the chairman of the subcommittee, said Congress needed to rethink the legal immunity for internet companies, established in 1996, that protects them from liability for content posted by users. The law, known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has allowed platforms like Google’s YouTube, Facebook and Twitter to grow rapidly without concern of being held liable for content on those services.

Even before the hearing that focused on Google, the president applied his own brand of pressure with an early morning tweet. He said that his administration “will investigate” remarks from the billionaire investor Peter Thiel, who said that Google had been infiltrated by the Chinese intelligence. Mr. Thiel also accused the technology giant of treason for refusing to work with the Pentagon on a future artificial intelligence project while agreeing to work with the Chinese military. He provided no evidence for his allegations.

A Google spokeswoman said in a statement that the company had not worked with the Chinese military and that it had cooperated with the American government in many areas such as cybersecurity, recruiting and health care.

When asked whether Chinese intelligence had infiltrated the company’s management, software or private data during the hearing, Mr. Bhatia said: “Absolutely not.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ambassador to Germany: Trump deserves credit for bringing Iran to the table, is open to cutting new deal with regime

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Grenell-Reuters Ambassador to Germany: Trump deserves credit for bringing Iran to the table, is open to cutting new deal with regime Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620546eb-e026-5bb7-8ba9-98156112dbef

The U.S. Ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, discussed America’s strategy to push Iranian sanctions abroad on “Special Report with Bret Baier,” and said President Trump is open to cutting a new deal with the current Iran regime.

“First of all, let’s credit the president for bringing people to the table,” he said Tuesday. “The fact is… that we see it play out with Iran where the president has made very clear that he would sit down with this current regime and try to work through all of these issues.

“Not only the nuclear deal but the ballistic missile technology issues, as well as the malign activities. So I’m not surprised that the sanctions are working that President Trump put on and that the pressure that the Iranians are feeling are bringing them to the table.”

DAN CRENSHAW CALLS MAXINE WATERS’ IRAN COMMENTS A ‘DISGRACE,’ ACCUSES HER OF ‘REPEATING LIES’

Grenell said Trump’s goal was to establish an open dialogue between nations with the intention of achieving detente and claimed the “Trump doctrine” will cover both Iran and North Korea.

“That was the goal. That was the goal with North Korea, and we’ve seen the North Koreans come to the table. We’re hoping the Iranians will come to the table,” he said.

“Look, these are very difficult issues. There’s a lot to work through. We have a lot of specific issues that we’re going to have to sit down and talk. But the goal here is to bring the current regime back to the table so that we don’t have any more wars or military action that’s unnecessary. President Trump is putting diplomacy first and I think that’s what the Trump doctrine is all about.”

Grenell also talked about his discussions with high ranking Europeans in the public and private sectors regarding Iran and said European nations and businesses have the same goals as the United States, to deny Iran nuclear capabilities.

AMBASSADOR GRENELL: HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN SHOULD ‘CEASE TO EXIST’ IF THEY STAY SILENT ON ANTIFA ATTACK

“I talked to European CEOs and businesses all the time. They are complying with the U.S. Sanctions, that’s not a problem, that’s not an issue. We’ve made it perfectly clear that companies get to choose either Iran or the United States. They just don’t get to choose both. And I think they are choosing, when we make it clear that we are watching and that we’re going to follow up, they’re choosing to turn away from Iran,” he said.

“That’s the squeezing of the sanctions that are bringing the Iranians back to the table… we have multiple statements from the European foreign ministers making it very clear that they share the same goal as the United States, denying Iran a nuclear weapon and getting rid of the Iranian support for terrorism and ballistic missile pursuits.

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“We share the same goal. We have a little bit different tactics, so my job is to communicate to the Germans and to make it very clear that we share the same goal, and we want to have their support in cracking down on Iranian regime money. And that’s what the sanctions are trying to do.”

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Grenell-Reuters Ambassador to Germany: Trump deserves credit for bringing Iran to the table, is open to cutting new deal with regime Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620546eb-e026-5bb7-8ba9-98156112dbef   Westlake Legal Group Richard-Grenell-Reuters Ambassador to Germany: Trump deserves credit for bringing Iran to the table, is open to cutting new deal with regime Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620546eb-e026-5bb7-8ba9-98156112dbef

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

House Votes To Condemn Trump’s Attack On Congresswomen As Racist

Westlake Legal Group 5d2e59f83b00004d00dac983 House Votes To Condemn Trump’s Attack On Congresswomen As Racist

WASHINGTON ― It was always going to be a contentious vote. 

In response to President Donald Trump telling four congresswomen to “go back” to their original countries, Democrats offered a resolution condemning the president’s words as racist. But the House descended into even more chaos than expected Tuesday as Republicans objected to Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) calling Trump’s comments “racist” ― technically a violation of House rules ― and Democrats upheld House rules in one instance and ignored them in others.

If there was any doubt that Republicans are in lockstep with Trump, the contentious debate and vote Tuesday should put it to rest. The House voted 240-187 to denounce Trump’s statement as racist, with four Republicans ― Fred Upton of Michigan, Susan Brooks of Indiana, Will Hurd of Texas and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania ― joining all Democrats in support of the resolution. 

But the vote was only a small part of the mayhem on the House floor.

The resolution was a tightly worded document meant to castigate the president for his racist attack on Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) and Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.). Democrats had already tortured themselves on the exact wording of the resolution, which carries the same force as a press release. There was an internal debate that spilled out on the floor Monday evening about whether Democrats should actually call Trump’s comments racist ― daring vulnerable Republicans to vote against the resolution ― or whether they should just refer to the tweets and try to divide Republicans as much as possible on the vote.

Ultimately, they went with calling the comments as most members saw it: racist, and they decided it was better to unite their own caucus rather than trying to divide Republicans.

But GOP lawmakers had their own plan.

Republicans had been looking to seize upon a Democrat violating the House rules, which state that a member can’t impugn the president by, among many other things, saying that he or she had made a racist statement. So when Pelosi did just that, the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee, Doug Collins of Georgia, leaped at the opportunity to potentially have Pelosi’s words taken down. (Under House rules, if a member’s comments are struck down, he or she may not speak for the rest of the day.)

The Republicans made the objection when Pelosi said:

“Every single member of this institution should join us in condemning the president’s racist tweets. To do anything less would be a shocking rejection of our values and a shameful abdication of our oath of office to protect the American people.”

Democrats consulted with the House parliamentarian for more than an hour before it looked as if they were ready to make a ruling. The situation was complicated, however, by the member who was presiding over the chamber at the time. Former Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Emmanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.) was acting as the speaker for the debate, and he refused to rule in favor of the Republicans.

Cleaver made a short speech in which he castigated his GOP colleagues for “escalating” all the racial tensions that had flared up over Trump’s attack on the four first-term congresswomen. Cleaver finished the speech by abandoning the chair and not ruling.

Eventually, Democrats found another member who would navigate the situation. Under the advice of the parliamentarian, Democrats ruled that Pelosi’s words were out of order. However, they did not strike them down.  

Collins called for a recorded vote, and, by party line, Democrats voted to not strike down the speaker’s comments, 190-232, with newfound independent Justin Amash of Michigan joining the Democrats. (Amash also eventually voted with Democrats for the underlying resolution.)

Democrats then voted on a motion to allow the speaker to make additional comments in the day. That vote was also party-line, 231-190, with Amash joining Republicans this time to prevent Pelosi from speaking again.

By the time the vote was over, it was clearer than ever how Republicans and Democrats felt about each other. Democrats saw their counterparts as bad-faith defenders of racism, willing to do anything in service to Trump. Republicans saw Democrats as race-baiting rule-breakers.

Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) took to the House floor and waved around the Jefferson Manual ― a rulebook of congressional decorum written by the slave-owning Thomas Jefferson that the House still uses to settle issues of decency ― saying Democrats had put a stain upon the House of Representatives.

“Today is a day historians will write about. It is a sad day for this House,” McCarthy said, seemingly in reference to Democrats ignoring rules that mandate Pelosi’s words be struck down. (Ironically, McCarthy was also violating House rules by using Jefferson’s Manual as a prop.)

To Republicans, there was nothing contradictory about defending the repeated racist attacks from the president upon four of their colleagues. In fact, Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.) came to the floor Tuesday to call his colleagues “anti-American” while willfully ignoring the racism underlying the president’s attacks.

“I see nothing that references anybody’s race. Not a thing. I don’t see anybody’s name being referenced in the tweets,” Duffy said.

Republicans were silent about Duffy’s decorum, and none of them took to the floor to call out Trump’s attacks. Instead, they focused on the rules violation, with Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) calling the debate “beneath the dignity of the House” and Carol Miller (R-Ariz.) calling it “political nonsense.”

Democrats, for their part, half relished in the attention their nonbinding resolution was suddenly getting. But they also seemed genuinely torn about the procedural implications of ignoring rules related to remarks that are ruled out of order.

When Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) took the floor to carefully call the president’s remarks racist ― without actually mentioning the president ― Democratic leaders seemed just as frustrated as Republicans.

“Saying a Mexican judge cannot be fair because of his heritage is racist,” Swalwell said. “Saying immigrants from Mexico are rapists is racist. Saying there were ‘good people on both sides’ in Charlottesville is racist. Calling African countries ‘shithole countries’ is racist.”

Republicans objected, but because Swalwell’s comments were just hanging out there without a noun, it was allowed.

He asked that the word “shithole” be struck from the record, per House rules about language, and then read his statement into the record again.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mayor Kenney: ‘If Donald Trump Ever Has To Go Back Where He Came From, He’s Going To Have To Go To Hell’

Westlake Legal Group muMCbO14fVuhdLl-PjR28sinJ_zfnscMpL3tIh_f_bk Mayor Kenney: ‘If Donald Trump Ever Has To Go Back Where He Came From, He’s Going To Have To Go To Hell’ r/politics

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Jesse Watters: Here’s why Trump probably hasn’t been told anything about Area 51

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d

Ahead of a Facebook-advertised “storming” of Area 51, Jesse Watters considered whether President Trump has been told about what goes on at the secretive military installation.

If Trump is privy to top-secret information about the base, which has long been a point of discussion for conspiracy theorists who believe the facility holds government secrets about aliens and UFOs, it is surprising he hasn’t told the public, Watters said on “The Five.”

“I am surprised Trump has not slipped up about Area 51 yet,” he joked.

“The man cannot keep a secret. I don’t even think they told him about Area 51.”

‘STORM AREA 51’ SOCIAL MEDIA MOVEMENT IS ‘GETTING SOMEWHAT OUT OF HAND,’ SAYS UFO EXPERT

The “Watters’ World” host added Trump is often unusually open at campaign events — to a greater extent than past presidents.

“He’ll just let it go at a rally,” he said. “But if he has kept that secret, I am very proud.”

On Facebook, a page advertising the purported event went viral over the past week, as more than 1 million users responded they would go to the top-secret military installation on Sept. 20 at 3 a.m., with the creator writing “they can’t stop all of us.”

While it isn’t exactly known what the base is currently used for, Air Force spokeswoman Laura McAndrews told The Washington Post that Area 51 is where, “we train American armed forces” and “is an open training range for the U.S. Air Force.”

TRUMP’S’ OPINION ON UFOS: NOPE — BUT YOU NEVER KNOW

4 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE TOP-SECRET SITE, AREA 51

“The U.S. Air Force always stands ready to protect America and its assets,” McAndrews added. She discouraged civilians from visiting the area.

Regarding the base’s publicly-known history, Area 51 is a government facility in the Nevada desert near Groom Lake, a salt flat located about 120 miles north of Las Vegas. The site was chosen in the 1950s to secretly test the Air Force’s U-2 aircraft and train pilots, according to the CIA.

The area had earlier been used during World War II as an aerial gunnery range for Army pilots.

Employees take small, unmarked passenger planes from the Las Vegas airport to get to the remote area, according to Business Insider.

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President Dwight Eisenhower approved the facility’s development in the 1950s, according to the CIA. The site was used by the Air Force to test the U-2 spy plane during the Cold War.

In 2013, the CIA acknowledged its existence, releasing its location and how it had been used to test military aircraft, including the F-117A, A-12 and TACIT BLUE, according to Business Insider.

Fox News’ Stephen Sorace contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d

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Moderate Dem slams ‘squad’ for threatening to primary him: ‘They’re not Democrats … they’re socialists’

Westlake Legal Group Squad-Cuellar_AP-FOX Moderate Dem slams 'squad' for threatening to primary him: 'They're not Democrats ... they're socialists' Nick Givas fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6af62057-fac7-5270-8248-e701e555ea50

Rep. Henry Cuellar D-Texas, responded to the threat of a primary from the four female progressive House members known as “the squad” on Tuesday and accused them of being socialists in disguise.

“I mean it’s this group called the Justice Democrats. I think they’re not Democrats quite honestly,” he said on “Your World with Neil Cavuto.”

“They’re socialists and they want to impose their vision to Texas and we certainly know that in Texas our vision is very different from … what I call these Justice Democrats, which are really socialists. They’re not really Democrats.”

LISA BOOTHE: TRUMP’S SPAT WITH ‘THE SQUAD’ MAY BENEFIT HIM, DOES LITTLE TO MOVE NEEDLE ON IMPEACHMENT

Cuellar was referring to the four House members who took on President Trump in a Monday press conference, after engaging in a Twitter spat with the commander-in-chief. They are Reps. Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Rashida Tlaib D-Mich., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.

Cuellar said he isn’t the only Democrat to fall into the squad’s crosshairs and claimed some members are being targeted for their support of Israel. He also predicted most Americans wouldn’t side with the squad because their values don’t line up with most Americans.

“I do know that they are going after different folks, for example, they’re going after Juan Vargas… and the reason they’re going after him is because he has a very strong pro-Israel voting record,” he said.

“And that’s just you know, just amazing that they’re targeting him. They’re going after Jim Costa also. They’re going after Lacy Clay. They’re going after other folks. But again, their vision is not the vision of most Americans.”

TRUMP FIRES BACK AT SQUAD, CHALLENGES HOUSE TO ‘REBUKE’ THEM FOR ‘FILTHY AND HATE LACED’ LANGUAGE

Cuellar also praised the $4.6 billion bipartisan immigration package passed by Congress last month, which Ocasio-Cortez and Omar voted against. He said part of the funding will go to non-profits and churches, trying to help ease the crisis at the southern border.

“I was able to get that $30 million reimbursement for the nonprofits and the churches that are doing so much at the border. They’re putting money out of their pocket. So we were working with them. We got a lot of the language there,” he said.

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“So when the bill came out I looked at it and that bill had a lot of things that we had looked at. When they say that there’s no protocols or no rules — that we gave the president a blank check — that is not correct because there are protocols that Homeland has.

“There are protocols that ICE has … there’s language that I have added there to make sure that we have transparency and protection for the migrant kids. And in … the Senate bill that came over, there’s even additional language there for protection. So there was no blank checks, a blank check written to anybody. And that’s why I supported that particular bill”

Westlake Legal Group Squad-Cuellar_AP-FOX Moderate Dem slams 'squad' for threatening to primary him: 'They're not Democrats ... they're socialists' Nick Givas fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6af62057-fac7-5270-8248-e701e555ea50   Westlake Legal Group Squad-Cuellar_AP-FOX Moderate Dem slams 'squad' for threatening to primary him: 'They're not Democrats ... they're socialists' Nick Givas fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6af62057-fac7-5270-8248-e701e555ea50

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House Condemns Trump’s Attack on Four Congresswomen as Racist

WASHINGTON — The House voted on Tuesday to condemn as racist President Trump’s attacks against four congresswomen of color, but only after the debate over the president’s language devolved into a bitterly partisan brawl that showcased deep rifts over race, ethnicity and political ideology in the age of Trump.

The measure passed nearly along party lines, 240-187, following one of the most polarizing exchanges on the House floor in recent memory. Only four Republicans and the House’s lone independent, Representative Justin Amash of Michigan, voted with all Democrats to condemn Mr. Trump.

“I know racism when I see it, I know racism when I feel it, and at the highest level of government, there’s no room for racism,” thundered Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, an icon of the civil rights movement who was nearly beaten to death in Alabama in 1965.

Some Republicans were just as adamant in their defense of Mr. Trump: “What has really happened here is that the president and his supporters have been forced to endure months of allegations of racism,” said Representative Dan Meuser, Republican of Pennsylvania. “This ridiculous slander does a disservice to our nation.”

[Read the text of the resolution.]

Republicans ground the proceedings to a halt shortly before the House was preparing to vote on the nonbinding resolution, which calls Mr. Trump’s tweets and verbal volleys “racist comments that have legitimized increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” Republicans voted en masse against the measure, which was the Democrats’ response to Mr. Trump’s attacks on Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, who he said should “go back” to their countries, a well-worn racist trope that he has continued to employ in the days since.

“There’s no excuse for any response to those words but a swift and strong, unified condemnation,” Ms. Pelosi said as the House debated the resolution. “Every single member of this institution, Democratic and Republican, should join us in condemning the president’s racist tweets.”

As Republicans rose to protest, Ms. Pelosi turned toward them on the House floor and picked up her speech, her voice rising as she added, “To do anything less would be a shocking rejection of our values and a shameful abdication of our oath of office to protect the American people.”

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, made a formal objection to the remarks, charging that they had violated the rules of decorum in the House, which call for lawmakers to avoid impugning the motives of their colleagues or the president. It was a stunning turn for a resolution that was drafted in response to Mr. Trump’s own incendiary language.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158029704_159d542f-4529-4b92-92c7-04af3259cb9a-articleLarge House Condemns Trump’s Attack on Four Congresswomen as Racist Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Race and Ethnicity Omar, Ilhan Ocasio-Cortez, Alexandria Malinowski, Tom Immigration and Emigration discrimination

President Trump held up a sheet of paper showing a photograph of Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, during a cabinet meeting on Tuesday at the White House.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Mr. Trump on Tuesday denied that his tweets were racist and implored House Republicans to reject the measure. The president raged on Twitter, calling the House resolution a “con game” as he renewed his harsh criticism of the congresswomen.

“Those Tweets were NOT Racist,” Mr. Trump wrote. “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body! The so-called vote to be taken is a Democrat con game. Republicans should not show ‘weakness’ and fall into their trap.”

Later at the White House, the president did not back away from his original comment, saying of the quartet, “they can leave.”

“They should love our country. They shouldn’t hate our country,” he continued.

The vote on Tuesday evening marked a show of unity for Democrats who had been squabbling for weeks — and a test of Republican principles. But as the debate played out, the scene devolved into a spectacle. Republicans sought to turn the tables and condemn Ms. Pelosi for her remarks about Mr. Trump — which many Democrats had echoed in their own speeches before her — touching off tumult as officials scrambled to review House rules and determine how to proceed.

At one point, Representative Emanuel Cleaver II, Democrat of Missouri, who was presiding in the House when Republicans challenged Ms. Pelosi’s words, banged the gavel, rose from the marble dais, and stormed off the House floor. “We aren’t ever, ever going to pass up, it seems, an opportunity to escalate, and that’s what this is,” Mr. Cleaver said, his voice rising in frustration. “We want to just fight.”

For their part, Republicans took to the floor not to defend the president’s remarks but to condemn Democrats for what they called a breach of decorum for calling Mr. Trump out.

Ultimately, it was left to Representative Steny H. Hoyer, the majority leader, to recite the official ruling that Ms. Pelosi had, in fact, violated a House rule against characterizing an action as “racist.” The move by Republicans to have her words stricken from the record then failed along party lines, and Ms. Pelosi was unrepentant.

“I stand by my statement,” she said as she strode through the Capitol. “I’m proud of the attention being called to it, because what the president said was completely inappropriate.”

The scene underscored the intensity of feeling sparked by Mr. Trump’s latest comments. Republicans spent the day not so much defending the president’s tweets as arguing that Democrats, particularly Ms. Ocasio-Cortez’s “Squad,” were no better.

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said, “The president is not a racist.”CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

“In those tweets, I see nothing that references anybody’s race — not a thing — I don’t see anyone’s name being referenced in the tweets, but the president’s referring to people, congresswomen, who are anti-American,” said Representative Sean P. Duffy, Republican of Wisconsin. “And lo and behold, everybody in this chamber knows who he’s talking about.”

His comments prompted an angry response from Representative Pramila Jayapal, Democrat of Washington, who sought to register an official objection. She said the use of the word “anti-American” was “completely inappropriate” but was not allowed to formally ask to have the words stricken.

At a closed-door meeting of House Democrats on Tuesday morning, Ms. Pelosi set the stage for the debate, calling the four freshman congresswomen “our sisters,” and saying the insults to which Mr. Trump had subjected them echo hurtful and offensive remarks he makes every day.

“So this is a resolution based in who we are as a people, as well as a recognition of the unacceptability of what his goals were,” Ms. Pelosi told Democrats, according to an aide present for the private meeting who described her remarks on condition of anonymity. “This is, I hope, one where we will get Republican support. If they can’t support condemning the words of the president, well, that’s a message in and of itself.”

A smattering of Republicans have denounced the president’s performance, including Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker. Mr. Trump’s comments “were shameful, they were racist,” he told WBUR in Boston, “and they bring a tremendous amount of, sort of, disgrace to public policy and public life and I condemn them all.”

But Republican leaders refrained from criticizing Mr. Trump, at least directly, and top House Republicans were pressing their colleagues to oppose the resolution.

Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the House Republican leader and a close ally of the president’s, said he would oppose the measure, and when asked whether Mr. Trump’s tweets were racist, replied flatly, “No.”

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, did say that politicians from all ends of the ideological spectrum should dial back their rhetoric, saying, “everybody ought to tone it down,”

but he did not take issue with the president, telling reporters who asked whether his tweets were racist, “The president’s not a racist.”

Video

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-trump-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000 House Condemns Trump’s Attack on Four Congresswomen as Racist Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Race and Ethnicity Omar, Ilhan Ocasio-Cortez, Alexandria Malinowski, Tom Immigration and Emigration discrimination

On Monday, hours after President Trump defended his Twitter attacks on Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna S. Pressley, the four Democratic congresswomen of color held a news conference to respond to his remarks.CreditCreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Earlier, Mr. Trump attempted to shift the focus to what he called “HORRIBLE” things said by the four liberal freshmen congresswomen, who have been among the most outspoken in their party in their criticisms of him, including at a news conference on Monday where they described Mr. Trump as racist, xenophobic, misogynistic and criminal.

“This should be a vote on the filthy language, statements and lies told by the Democrat Congresswomen, who I truly believe, based on their actions, hate our Country,” Mr. Trump wrote.

While some Democrats had pressed for a stronger resolution of censure, House leaders opted instead for a narrower measure based on Mr. Trump’s latest remarks, in an effort to generate a unanimous vote in their party.

During the meeting on Tuesday morning, Representative Jim McGovern, Democrat of Massachusetts and the chairman of the Rules Committee, warned members to take care with their language during the debate, including checking with the official in charge of enforcing floor procedures to make sure their speeches would not violate House rules against making personal references to the president on the floor.

Ms. Pelosi advised Democrats to focus on how Mr. Trump’s “words were racist,” which would keep them in compliance with the rules. Later, after Mr. Collins objected to her speech, Ms. Pelosi shot back that she had cleared them in advance to ensure they were within bounds.

While the vote is symbolic and nonbinding, the debate dramatized the conflict between Democrats and a president who has organized his agenda and his re-election campaign around stoking racial controversy, and casting the group of progressive stars as dangerous extremists to be feared.

Among other things, the resolution declares that the House “believes that immigrants and their descendants have made America stronger,” that “those who take the oath of citizenship are every bit as American as those whose families have lived in the United States for many generations,” and that the House “is committed to keeping America open to those lawfully seeking refuge and asylum from violence and oppression, and those who are willing to work hard to live the American Dream, no matter their race, ethnicity, faith, or country of origin.”

One after another, Republicans rose to reject the criticism of Mr. Trump, arguing that it was Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and her colleagues, who have sometimes used coarse language to describe the president and his policies, who should be rebuked and punished for their words and conduct.

“When we consider the power of this chamber to legislate for the common good, I wonder why my colleagues have become so eager to attack the president they are willing to sacrifice the rules, precedent and the integrity of the people’s house for an unprecedented vote that undercuts its very democratic processes,” Mr. Collins said.

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Ocasio-Cortez turns attention to Mitch McConnell amid ongoing feud with Trump over controversial comments

Westlake Legal Group AOC-Mitch-AP Ocasio-Cortez turns attention to Mitch McConnell amid ongoing feud with Trump over controversial comments Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6164c0ae-865a-5808-a68c-54ccf2ad062f

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., turned her attention to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., amid her ongoing feud with President Trump over his recent controversial comments.

In the broadside, the freshman Democrat said McConnell is “complicit in advancing racism” in the wake of the president’s remarks about four Democratic congresswomen — including Ocasio-Cortez — needing to “go back” where they came from. Three of the four women were born in America.

“The majority leader is complicit in advancing racism in America if he doesn’t even have the backbone to speak out,” Ocasio-Cortez told ABC on Tuesday.

Her comments followed days of controversy surrounding Trump’s tweets, provoking responses from politicians in both chambers of Congress. McConnell, on Tuesday, called on “everybody” to “tone down their rhetoric.”

PELOSI’S COMMENTS ON TRUMP’S ‘RACIST’ TWEETS RULED OUT OF ORDER, AFTER FLOOR FIGHT ERUPTS

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., similarly dismissed Ocasio-Cortez’s and others’ outrage surrounding Trump’s tweets as “all about politics.”

But according to Ocasio-Cortez, Trump’s words constituted a “classic line of white supremacy.” Trump’s comments appeared to unify, at least temporarily, Democrats and prompted House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to adamantly condemn Trump’s comments on the House floor.

Before her comments, Trump attempted to tie the Speaker to Ocasio-Cortez and other freshmen in an apparent attempt to make the party seem more left-leaning before the 2020 elections.

BRET BAIER: CENSURE VOTE AGAINST TRUMP A ‘CAMPAIGN COMMERCIAL IN THE MAKING’ FOR HOUSE DEMOCRATS

Ocasio-Cortez similarly predicted the controversy could bode well for her party in the upcoming elections. “Honestly, if these members go on the record condoning the president telling women of color to go back to their own country, I invite them to because we will win the 2020 election and we will take this country back.”

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Not everyone Republican refrained from condemning Trump’s remarks. Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, both denounced Trump’s comments on Monday.

“There is no excuse for the president’s spiteful comments –they were absolutely unacceptable and this needs to stop,” Murkowski tweeted.

Westlake Legal Group AOC-Mitch-AP Ocasio-Cortez turns attention to Mitch McConnell amid ongoing feud with Trump over controversial comments Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6164c0ae-865a-5808-a68c-54ccf2ad062f   Westlake Legal Group AOC-Mitch-AP Ocasio-Cortez turns attention to Mitch McConnell amid ongoing feud with Trump over controversial comments Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6164c0ae-865a-5808-a68c-54ccf2ad062f

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