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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 72)

Texas deli owner transforms store into ‘Santa Mail Delivery Service’ for kids to leave letters to Santa

Santa has a very special helper in San Antonio, Texas.

CHRISTMAS TRADITION: WHY SOME PEOPLE HANG A PICKLE ON THE TREE

Aleem Chaudhry, owner of Gino’s Stop-N-Buy, has transformed the deli into “Gino’s Santa Mail Delivery Service” for the holidays – all because of a Christmas mailbox he purchased last year as a holiday decoration.

“Last year, we had 60 letters by December 15 or so,” Chaudhry told CBS News. “We have more than that already.”

Westlake Legal Group ginos-stop-n-buy Texas deli owner transforms store into 'Santa Mail Delivery Service' for kids to leave letters to Santa fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/food-drink fnc d7c5aa6b-9886-532b-8f62-0da722135a50 article Alexandra Deabler

Aleem Chaudhry, owner of Gino’s Stop-N-Buy, has transformed the deli into “Gino’s Santa Mail Delivery Service” for the holidays – all because of a Christmas mailbox he purchased last year as a holiday decoration. (Google Maps)

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The man told the outlet he had purchased the mailbox for the store as a Christmas decoration, but soon after he put it up, children began filling it with letters to Santa.

Throughout the 2018 holiday season, he reportedly received 400 letters to Santa – all of which he read and responded to, and plans to do the same this year.

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Chaudhry began advertising the free service on the deli’s Facebook and other social media.

“Have your Little one write a letter to Santa and drop it in the special mailbox located at the register at Gino’s Deli. Santa will reply with a personalized letter sent through the mail,” a post read.

Chaudhry has even encouraged more people to write notes to Santa by supplying crayons next to the mailbox.

Not all of the Christmas letters are wish lists, however. The deli owner said some are questions like “how can reindeer fly” and, from one curious little girl, why Santa doesn’t “use the front door?”

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The challenging task of responding to every letter is not for the faint of heart – but spreading the Christmas cheer is well worth the effort.

Westlake Legal Group ginos-stop-n-buy Texas deli owner transforms store into 'Santa Mail Delivery Service' for kids to leave letters to Santa fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/food-drink fnc d7c5aa6b-9886-532b-8f62-0da722135a50 article Alexandra Deabler   Westlake Legal Group ginos-stop-n-buy Texas deli owner transforms store into 'Santa Mail Delivery Service' for kids to leave letters to Santa fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/food-drink fnc d7c5aa6b-9886-532b-8f62-0da722135a50 article Alexandra Deabler

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Axe Body Spray prank gets school bus evacuated; 15 treated for ‘mild respiratory irritation’

This probably isn’t what the commercials meant when they boast of “the Axe effect.”

A school bus carrying 30 children from Florida’s Manatee County School District was evacuated on Monday after an “excessive amount of body spray” was released aboard the vehicle. Authorities are investigating the incident, and believe that it was meant to be a prank.

Westlake Legal Group ManateeCountyFire Axe Body Spray prank gets school bus evacuated; 15 treated for 'mild respiratory irritation' Michael Hollan fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9effcf26-9925-57b7-97d1-91035757f4f4

Local authorities believe that an excessive amount of body spray was released on the bus as a prank. (Parrish Fire District)

At least 15 students were treated for “mild respiratory irritation” after the spray was discharged on the school bus, which was in Parrish, Fla., at the time, Fox 5 reports. Authorities are reviewing cameras on the bus to determine who released the spray, which has been identified as Axe Body Spray by ABC Action News.

CALIFORNIA BRIDE TRIED SCAMMING WEDDING WEBSITE THE KNOT OUT OF $10G TWICE, INSURANCE DEPARTMENT FINDS

Fortunately for the students, no serious injuries were reported. A second, Axe-body-spray-free bus was called to the scene to transport the students to a nearby high school, where their parents could pick them up.

Westlake Legal Group axe-body-spray Axe Body Spray prank gets school bus evacuated; 15 treated for 'mild respiratory irritation' Michael Hollan fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9effcf26-9925-57b7-97d1-91035757f4f4

According to local authorities, 15 students were treated for “mild respiratory irritation.” (Gordon Chibroski/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

The Parrish County Fire Department released a statement about the incident on their Facebook page that said: “Early this evening, our District along with MCEMS responded to a reported hazardous materials incident onboard a Manatee County School Bus. Crews arrived on the scene to find fifteen students with mild respiratory irritation. All students were triaged and prioritized according to their initial complaint.”

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The statement continues: “It was a unified command decision to call out secondary bus to be dispatched to pick up the stranded students and remotely transport to the local High School for a limited access lot to provide security and accountability for parents to pick up students. Manatee Co. School Board reps along with the Sheriff’s Office set up a coordinated pick-up area.”

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Authorities are treating incident as a “prank” and “an active on-going investigation in which bus cameras will be reviewed and further interviews conducted. All 30 students on the bus were accounted for and treated and released with refusals to be transported by EMS.”

Westlake Legal Group ManateeCountyFire Axe Body Spray prank gets school bus evacuated; 15 treated for 'mild respiratory irritation' Michael Hollan fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9effcf26-9925-57b7-97d1-91035757f4f4   Westlake Legal Group ManateeCountyFire Axe Body Spray prank gets school bus evacuated; 15 treated for 'mild respiratory irritation' Michael Hollan fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9effcf26-9925-57b7-97d1-91035757f4f4

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chicago toddler unhurt as father and another man die in gunfire exchange

Westlake Legal Group Police-Line Chicago toddler unhurt as father and another man die in gunfire exchange Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 855155fc-1092-5daf-8aa3-7247e33b48ac

An 18-month-old toddler escaped injury after his father and another man both died after exchanging gunfire on a Chicago street.

It happened Monday morning on the city’s South Side, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

“They came in three waves,” Arturo Rodriguez said of the gunshots. He told the paper he heard them from his bedroom.

“All I heard was ‘boom, boom, boom,’ and then a woman screaming and a kid crying,” he said.

CHICAGO POLICE PRAISED FOR SEIZING MORE THAN 10,000 ILLEGAL GUNS DESPITE LACK OF MANPOWER

CHICAGO POLICE EMPLOYEES ALLEGEDLY HELPED EDDIE JOHNSON COVER UP SLEEPING INCIDENT, REPORT SAYS

Police said Rayshawn Finley, 24, had targeted the boy’s father, Alton Ellis, 31, for “unknown reasons,” the paper reported.

Ellis was walking his son to school when Finley approached them and shot him three times in the chest and torso, the paper reported.

Police said Ellis returned fire, hitting Finley twice.

Responding officers found Finley in a car with wounds to both his thighs, according to the paper.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Doctors pronounced the two men dead at the hospital.

Westlake Legal Group Police-Line Chicago toddler unhurt as father and another man die in gunfire exchange Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 855155fc-1092-5daf-8aa3-7247e33b48ac   Westlake Legal Group Police-Line Chicago toddler unhurt as father and another man die in gunfire exchange Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 855155fc-1092-5daf-8aa3-7247e33b48ac

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A judge has handed ExxonMobil a victory in only the second climate change lawsuit to reach trial in the United States. The decision was a blow for New York’s Attorney General’s Office, which brought the case.

Justice Barry Ostrager of the New York State Supreme Court said that the Attorney General failed to decisively prove that the oil giant broke the law.

“Nothing in this opinion is intended to absolve ExxonMobil from responsibility for contributing to climate change through the emission of greenhouse gasses in the production of its fossil fuel products,” Ostranger wrote. But, he added, “this is a securities fraud case, not a climate change case.”

In a three week trial, New York state prosecutors argued that the oil company had downplayed the financial risks it faces from possible climate regulation. Attorney General Letitia James claimed this made Exxon’s assets appear more secure than they really were, which in turn affected its share price and defrauded investors.

Ostrager concluded that James’ office “failed to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that ExxonMobil made any material misrepresentations that ‘would have been viewed by a reasonable investor as having significantly altered the ‘total mix’ of information made available.'”

James released a statement following the verdict, saying that the case had compelled Exxon “to answer publicly for their internal decisions that misled investors.”

“Throughout this case, we laid out how Exxon made materially false, misleading, and confusing representations to the American people about the company’s response to climate change regulations,” James said.

“Exxon’s inability to tell the truth, further underscores the lies that have been sold to the American public for decades,” she said. “Despite this decision, we will continue to fight to ensure companies are held responsible for actions that undermine and jeopardize the financial health and safety of Americans across our country, and we will continue to fight to end climate change.”

Exxon said the ruling “affirms the position ExxonMobil has held throughout the New York Attorney General’s baseless investigation. We provided our investors with accurate information on the risks of climate change. The court agreed that the Attorney General failed to make a case, even with the extremely low threshold of the Martin Act in its favor.”

“Lawsuits that waste millions of dollars of taxpayer money do nothing to advance meaningful actions that reduce the risks of climate change,” the company said.

There were signs of weakness in the state’s case. On the last day of the trial, the attorney general’s office withdrew two counts of fraud from its lawsuit. Exxon asked the judge to rule on those counts anyway, saying the state had tarnished the company’s reputation in making its case on them.

The state went forward with two counts based on the Martin Act, a New York statute that grants the state’s attorney general the authority to pursue investigations and actions against those it suspects of securities fraud.

The Martin Act has a lower burden of proof: prosecutors must show that a company made misrepresentations to investors, and that there were consequences.

Ostrager minced no words in describing how he thought the trial had gone: “The testimony of the expert witnesses called by the Office of the Attorney General was eviscerated on cross-examination and by ExxonMobil’s expert witnesses.”

Ostrager said his ruling found Exxon not liable on any of the counts.

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The highest profile witness in the landmark case was former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s CEO from 2006 to 2017.

Exxon used two different ways to estimate the impact of potential climate-change regulations on its future business. Tillerson testified that one assessment was used to estimate the effect of future climate change regulation — such as a carbon tax — on the global energy system. But for specific projects, such as the Alberta oil sands, the company would use a different way of calculating a “greenhouse gas cost.”

Tillerson insisted this was appropriate, and that Exxon had no incentive to underestimate carbon costs internally, since “we’d be misinforming ourselves.”

Exxon battled for years to prevent this case and others from reaching trial, but there are now numerous pending lawsuits against Exxon and other oil companies, including a similar case that was recently brought in Massachusetts.

In Massachusetts, Attorney General Maura Healey accuses Exxon Mobil of systematically misleading investors about climate change’s impact on the economy and its own business, and of deceiving consumers about fossil fuel’s environmental impact.

Elsewhere, many city and state governments are using “public nuisance” arguments to try and hold energy companies accountable for their role in climate change. The idea is to force them to help pay for the mounting climate impacts communities now struggle to address.

Fossil fuel companies often attempt to get the cases moved to federal courts, which they believe will be more sympathetic to their side.

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‘Botched’ patient with 2 implants in each breast shocks Dubrow, Nassif: ‘It’s forbidden’

A patient who sought the help of Drs. Paul Nassif and Terry Dubrow of E!’s hit show “Botched” said she was “super nervous” to tell the pair that she actually had two implants stacked in each breast.

“It kind of feels like telling my mom that I did something wrong when I was younger,” the patient, identified as Brittany, said on Monday’s episode of the show.

‘BOTCHED’ DOCTORS PAUL NASSIF AND TERRY DUBROW TALK BRAZILIAN BUTT LIFTS AND THE DANGERS OF INSTAGRAM

Brittany explained to the doctors that the first time she went for breast implants, she sought 600cc implants, which were placed under the muscle.

“Immediately after, my implant was actually poking out of my right breast,” Brittany said. “My doctor said he wouldn’t touch it, and it wouldn’t be worth fixing, so I started to seek out other doctors and do consults. At this point, I knew right away I wanted to go bigger.”

Brittany said a lot of doctors turned her away when she mentioned wanting 1300cc silicone implants.

Dubrow then explained that silicone implants come at a maximum of 800cc, and anything larger puts the tissue under too much tension and can cause thinning of the skin, atrophy of the breast tissue or other complications.

MODEL DIES HOURS AFTER LIPOSUCTION, NOSE JOB AT MEXICO CLINIC, REPORTS SAY

Brittany then explained that she found a doctor who offered to stack two silicone implants, placing one above the muscle, and one under the muscle, which shocked both Dubrow and Nassif.

Westlake Legal Group Brittany_Botched 'Botched' patient with 2 implants in each breast shocks Dubrow, Nassif: 'It's forbidden' fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 9c3827ee-f16e-57d4-a3fd-27daf5bd50b0

The patient, identified as Brittany, said she was nervous to tell the doctors about having four implants in her breasts.  (E! Entertainment)

“You go to the implant company inserts it specifically says, ‘Do not stack implants,’” Dubrow told Brittany. “It’s forbidden.”

Dubrow was able to remove the four implants for Brittany and replace them with one 800cc implant, while also avoiding too much scaring on her skin.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I look a million times better and I can definitely tell that [the implants are] actually where they’re supposed to sit,” she said, 10 weeks post-op. “They look wonderful now.”

Westlake Legal Group Brittany_Botched 'Botched' patient with 2 implants in each breast shocks Dubrow, Nassif: 'It's forbidden' fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 9c3827ee-f16e-57d4-a3fd-27daf5bd50b0   Westlake Legal Group Brittany_Botched 'Botched' patient with 2 implants in each breast shocks Dubrow, Nassif: 'It's forbidden' fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 9c3827ee-f16e-57d4-a3fd-27daf5bd50b0

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Michael Bloomberg is widely unpopular following campaign launch, poll finds

Westlake Legal Group 2EGUorFoDO1ubvQWfwBKNicQpatPwHMzY_TWNfVyDjE Michael Bloomberg is widely unpopular following campaign launch, poll finds r/politics

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Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177566089-f84da33d4bb2b5f9aea339b11b999f6e76e098bb-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A judge has handed ExxonMobil a victory in only the second climate change lawsuit to reach trial in the United States. The decision was a blow for New York’s Attorney General’s Office, which brought the case.

Justice Barry Ostrager of the New York State Supreme Court said that the attorney general failed to prove that the oil giant broke the law.

“Nothing in this opinion is intended to absolve ExxonMobil from responsibility for contributing to climate change through the emission of greenhouse gasses in the production of its fossil fuel products,” Ostranger wrote. But, he added, “this is a securities fraud case, not a climate change case.”

In a three week trial, New York state prosecutors argued that the oil company had downplayed the financial risks it faces from possible climate regulation. Attorney General Letitia James claimed this made Exxon’s assets appear more secure than they really were, which in turn affected its share price and defrauded investors.

Ostrager concluded that James’ office “failed to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that ExxonMobil made any material misrepresentations that ‘would have been viewed by a reasonable investor as having significantly altered the ‘total mix’ of information made available.'”

James released a statement following the verdict, saying that the case had compelled Exxon “to answer publicly for their internal decisions that misled investors.”

“Throughout this case, we laid out how Exxon made materially false, misleading, and confusing representations to the American people about the company’s response to climate change regulations,” James said.

“Exxon’s inability to tell the truth, further underscores the lies that have been sold to the American public for decades,” she said. “Despite this decision, we will continue to fight to ensure companies are held responsible for actions that undermine and jeopardize the financial health and safety of Americans across our country, and we will continue to fight to end climate change.”

Exxon said the ruling “affirms the position ExxonMobil has held throughout the New York Attorney General’s baseless investigation. We provided our investors with accurate information on the risks of climate change. The court agreed that the Attorney General failed to make a case, even with the extremely low threshold of the Martin Act in its favor.”

“Lawsuits that waste millions of dollars of taxpayer money do nothing to advance meaningful actions that reduce the risks of climate change,” the company said.

There were signs of weakness in the state’s case. On the last day of the trial, the attorney general’s office withdrew two counts of fraud from its lawsuit. Exxon asked the judge to rule on those counts anyway, saying the state had tarnished the company’s reputation in making its case on them.

The state went forward with two counts based on the Martin Act, a New York statute that grants the state’s attorney general the authority to pursue investigations and actions against those it suspects of securities fraud.

The Martin Act has a lower burden of proof: prosecutors must show that a company made misrepresentations to investors, and that there were consequences.

Ostrager minced no words in describing how he thought the trial had gone: “The testimony of the expert witnesses called by the Office of the Attorney General was eviscerated on cross-examination and by ExxonMobil’s expert witnesses.”

Ostrager said his ruling found Exxon not liable on any of the counts.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1179042853-a8ae9a3ce914f9298e61548366b313d4b43cf8fa-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The highest profile witness in the landmark case was former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s CEO from 2006 to 2017.

Exxon used two different ways to estimate the impact of potential climate-change regulations on its future business. Tillerson testified that one assessment was used to estimate the effect of future climate change regulation — such as a carbon tax — on the global energy system. But for specific projects, such as the Alberta oil sands, the company would use a different way of calculating a “greenhouse gas cost.”

Tillerson insisted this was appropriate, and that Exxon had no incentive to underestimate carbon costs internally, since “we’d be misinforming ourselves.”

Exxon battled for years to prevent this case and others from reaching trial, but there are now numerous pending lawsuits against Exxon and other oil companies, including a similar case that was recently brought in Massachusetts.

In Massachusetts, Attorney General Maura Healey accuses Exxon Mobil of systematically misleading investors about climate change’s impact on the economy and its own business, and of deceiving consumers about fossil fuel’s environmental impact.

Elsewhere, many city and state governments are using “public nuisance” arguments to try and hold energy companies accountable for their role in climate change. The idea is to force them to help pay for the mounting climate impacts communities now struggle to address.

Fossil fuel companies often attempt to get the cases moved to federal courts, which they believe will be more sympathetic to their side.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177566089-f84da33d4bb2b5f9aea339b11b999f6e76e098bb-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A judge has handed ExxonMobil a victory in only the second climate change lawsuit to reach trial in the United States. The decision was a blow for New York’s Attorney General’s Office, which brought the case.

Justice Barry Ostrager of the New York State Supreme Court said that the Attorney General failed to decisively prove that the oil giant broke the law.

“Nothing in this opinion is intended to absolve ExxonMobil from responsibility for contributing to climate change through the emission of greenhouse gasses in the production of its fossil fuel products,” Ostranger wrote. But, he added, “this is a securities fraud case, not a climate change case.”

In a three week trial, New York state prosecutors argued that the oil company had downplayed the financial risks it faces from possible climate regulation. Attorney General Letitia James claimed this made Exxon’s assets appear more secure than they really were, which in turn affected its share price and defrauded investors.

Ostrager concluded that James’ office “failed to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that ExxonMobil made any material misrepresentations that ‘would have been viewed by a reasonable investor as having significantly altered the ‘total mix’ of information made available.'”

James released a statement following the verdict, saying that the case had compelled Exxon “to answer publicly for their internal decisions that misled investors.”

“Throughout this case, we laid out how Exxon made materially false, misleading, and confusing representations to the American people about the company’s response to climate change regulations,” James said.

“Exxon’s inability to tell the truth, further underscores the lies that have been sold to the American public for decades,” she said. “Despite this decision, we will continue to fight to ensure companies are held responsible for actions that undermine and jeopardize the financial health and safety of Americans across our country, and we will continue to fight to end climate change.”

Exxon said the ruling “affirms the position ExxonMobil has held throughout the New York Attorney General’s baseless investigation. We provided our investors with accurate information on the risks of climate change. The court agreed that the Attorney General failed to make a case, even with the extremely low threshold of the Martin Act in its favor.”

“Lawsuits that waste millions of dollars of taxpayer money do nothing to advance meaningful actions that reduce the risks of climate change,” the company said.

There were signs of weakness in the state’s case. On the last day of the trial, the attorney general’s office withdrew two counts of fraud from its lawsuit. Exxon asked the judge to rule on those counts anyway, saying the state had tarnished the company’s reputation in making its case on them.

The state went forward with two counts based on the Martin Act, a New York statute that grants the state’s attorney general the authority to pursue investigations and actions against those it suspects of securities fraud.

The Martin Act has a lower burden of proof: prosecutors must show that a company made misrepresentations to investors, and that there were consequences.

Ostrager minced no words in describing how he thought the trial had gone: “The testimony of the expert witnesses called by the Office of the Attorney General was eviscerated on cross-examination and by ExxonMobil’s expert witnesses.”

Ostrager said his ruling found Exxon not liable on any of the counts.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1179042853-a8ae9a3ce914f9298e61548366b313d4b43cf8fa-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The highest profile witness in the landmark case was former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s CEO from 2006 to 2017.

Exxon used two different ways to estimate the impact of potential climate-change regulations on its future business. Tillerson testified that one assessment was used to estimate the effect of future climate change regulation — such as a carbon tax — on the global energy system. But for specific projects, such as the Alberta oil sands, the company would use a different way of calculating a “greenhouse gas cost.”

Tillerson insisted this was appropriate, and that Exxon had no incentive to underestimate carbon costs internally, since “we’d be misinforming ourselves.”

Exxon battled for years to prevent this case and others from reaching trial, but there are now numerous pending lawsuits against Exxon and other oil companies, including a similar case that was recently brought in Massachusetts.

In Massachusetts, Attorney General Maura Healey accuses Exxon Mobil of systematically misleading investors about climate change’s impact on the economy and its own business, and of deceiving consumers about fossil fuel’s environmental impact.

Elsewhere, many city and state governments are using “public nuisance” arguments to try and hold energy companies accountable for their role in climate change. The idea is to force them to help pay for the mounting climate impacts communities now struggle to address.

Fossil fuel companies often attempt to get the cases moved to federal courts, which they believe will be more sympathetic to their side.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lenticular cloud hovers in Colorado sky over mountain like a ‘flying saucer’

A mysterious sight in the skies over Colorado last week wasn’t a plane or UFO, but actually a particular type of cloud that tends to form near mountains.

The National Weather Service shared a video on Twitter of what’s known as a lenticular cloud hovering near the David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder, a research facility for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory.

The weather service said the cloud hovered over the area for between 60 to 70 minutes.

NEW ZEALAND VOLCANO RESCUER SAYS ISLAND LOOKED LIKE SCENE OUT OF ‘CHERNOBYL’ AS ISLAND ‘BLANKETED IN ASH’

In the time-lapse video released by the NWS, the cloud simply hovers and reforms as higher clouds move past it.

According to the NWS’ Albuquerque forecast office, lenticular clouds are associated with waves in the atmosphere that develop when relatively stable, fast-moving air is forced up and over a topographic barrier that is oriented perpendicular to the direction from which the upper-level wind is blowing, such as mountains.

“This deflection creates a gravity wave downwind of the topographic barrier not unlike a wave you might generate by throwing a pebble into a pond,” the agency states.

Westlake Legal Group lenticular-cloud Lenticular cloud hovers in Colorado sky over mountain like a 'flying saucer' Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox news fnc/us fnc c792ce71-1c7c-5ced-8df8-f107539704aa article

The lenticular cloud hovered over the area for 60 to 70 minutes, according to forecasters. (NWS Boulder)

When there is sufficient moisture present above the top level of the mountain, the clouds develop within the crest of the mountain waves where the air is rising.

“ACSL clouds are continually developing and dissipating in the vicinity of the wave’s crest and immediately downwind of the crest, respectively,” according to the NWS. “That is why they appear to remain stationary (hence the name) even though winds are swiftly (sometimes very swiftly) moving through the entire cloud.”

75-FOOT WAVE RECORDED OFF CALIFORNIA DURING LAST MONTH’S ‘BOMB CYCLONE’

Forecasters say the clouds are most often seen in the winter or spring, when winds aloft are typically the strongest.

“When aircraft encounter a mountain wave, severe turbulence is often the result,” the NWS states.

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“They look a lot like the traditional shape of flying saucers in science fiction, and real lenticular clouds are believed to be one of the most common explanations for UFO sightings across the world,” U.K.’s Met Office explains.

Westlake Legal Group lenticular-cloud Lenticular cloud hovers in Colorado sky over mountain like a 'flying saucer' Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox news fnc/us fnc c792ce71-1c7c-5ced-8df8-f107539704aa article   Westlake Legal Group lenticular-cloud Lenticular cloud hovers in Colorado sky over mountain like a 'flying saucer' Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox news fnc/us fnc c792ce71-1c7c-5ced-8df8-f107539704aa article

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Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177566089-f84da33d4bb2b5f9aea339b11b999f6e76e098bb-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A judge has handed ExxonMobil a victory in only the second climate change lawsuit to reach trial in the United States. The decision was a blow for New York’s Attorney General’s Office, which brought the case.

Justice Barry Ostrager of the New York State Supreme Court said that the attorney general failed to prove that the oil giant broke the law.

“Nothing in this opinion is intended to absolve ExxonMobil from responsibility for contributing to climate change through the emission of greenhouse gasses in the production of its fossil fuel products,” Ostranger wrote. But, he added, “this is a securities fraud case, not a climate change case.”

In a three week trial, New York state prosecutors argued that the oil company had downplayed the financial risks it faces from possible climate regulation. Attorney General Letitia James claimed this made Exxon’s assets appear more secure than they really were, which in turn affected its share price and defrauded investors.

Ostrager concluded that James’ office “failed to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that ExxonMobil made any material misrepresentations that ‘would have been viewed by a reasonable investor as having significantly altered the ‘total mix’ of information made available.'”

James released a statement following the verdict, saying that the case had compelled Exxon “to answer publicly for their internal decisions that misled investors.”

“Throughout this case, we laid out how Exxon made materially false, misleading, and confusing representations to the American people about the company’s response to climate change regulations,” James said.

“Exxon’s inability to tell the truth, further underscores the lies that have been sold to the American public for decades,” she said. “Despite this decision, we will continue to fight to ensure companies are held responsible for actions that undermine and jeopardize the financial health and safety of Americans across our country, and we will continue to fight to end climate change.”

Exxon said the ruling “affirms the position ExxonMobil has held throughout the New York Attorney General’s baseless investigation. We provided our investors with accurate information on the risks of climate change. The court agreed that the Attorney General failed to make a case, even with the extremely low threshold of the Martin Act in its favor.”

“Lawsuits that waste millions of dollars of taxpayer money do nothing to advance meaningful actions that reduce the risks of climate change,” the company said.

There were signs of weakness in the state’s case. On the last day of the trial, the attorney general’s office withdrew two counts of fraud from its lawsuit. Exxon asked the judge to rule on those counts anyway, saying the state had tarnished the company’s reputation in making its case on them.

The state went forward with two counts based on the Martin Act, a New York statute that grants the state’s attorney general the authority to pursue investigations and actions against those it suspects of securities fraud.

The Martin Act has a lower burden of proof: prosecutors must show that a company made misrepresentations to investors, and that there were consequences.

Ostrager minced no words in describing how he thought the trial had gone: “The testimony of the expert witnesses called by the Office of the Attorney General was eviscerated on cross-examination and by ExxonMobil’s expert witnesses.”

Ostrager said his ruling found Exxon not liable on any of the counts.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1179042853-a8ae9a3ce914f9298e61548366b313d4b43cf8fa-s1100-c15 Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

Former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson testified that the company used different carbon accounting methods appropriately.

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The highest profile witness in the landmark case was former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s CEO from 2006 to 2017.

Exxon used two different ways to estimate the impact of potential climate-change regulations on its future business. Tillerson testified that one assessment was used to estimate the effect of future climate change regulation — such as a carbon tax — on the global energy system. But for specific projects, such as the Alberta oil sands, the company would use a different way of calculating a “greenhouse gas cost.”

Tillerson insisted this was appropriate, and that Exxon had no incentive to underestimate carbon costs internally, since “we’d be misinforming ourselves.”

Exxon battled for years to prevent this case and others from reaching trial, but there are now numerous pending lawsuits against Exxon and other oil companies, including a similar case that was recently brought in Massachusetts.

In Massachusetts, Attorney General Maura Healey accuses Exxon Mobil of systematically misleading investors about climate change’s impact on the economy and its own business, and of deceiving consumers about fossil fuel’s environmental impact.

Elsewhere, many city and state governments are using “public nuisance” arguments to try and hold energy companies accountable for their role in climate change. The idea is to force them to help pay for the mounting climate impacts communities now struggle to address.

Fossil fuel companies often attempt to get the cases moved to federal courts, which they believe will be more sympathetic to their side.

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