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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 74)

Saudi Arabia ‘will be involved in taking care’ of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says

Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4

The leaders of Saudi Arabia are devastated by the deadly attack at the Pensacola naval base in Florida and intend to “help out” the families of those murdered, President Trump announced Saturday.

“The king will be involved in taking care of families and loved ones,” Trump said after speaking to Saudi Arabia’s King Salman by phone. “He feels very strongly. He’s very, very devastated by what happened and what took place. Likewise the Crown Prince (Mohammed bin Salman).”

The suspected shooter is a Saudi Air Force aviation officer who was training at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola.

SAUDI STUDENT WATCHED MASS SHOOTING VIDEOS DURING DINNER PARTY BEFORE FLORIDA NAVAL BASE ATTACK: REPORT

Trump said the Saudi leaders “are devastated by what took place in Pensacola. I think they are going to help out the families very greatly.”

The announcement of potential assistance comes after Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Saudi Arabia owed a debt to the families.

“Obviously, the government … needs to make things better for these victims. I think they’re going to owe a debt here, given that this was one of their individuals,” DeSantis said at a news conference Friday.

The attack unfolded Friday morning at the waterfront base when the shooter opened fire with a handgun in a training classroom. The attack prompted a massive law enforcement response and put the base on lockdown.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper confirmed to Fox News that three of the victims were Americans. Family members identified one of them as Joshua Watson, a 23-year-old recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who is credited with taking life-saving actions in his final moments of life after being shot five times by the Saudi national.

HERO NAVAL ACADEMY GRAD SHOT 5 TIMES AT NAVAL AIR STATION RELAYED CRUCIAL INFORMATION BEFORE SUCCUMBING TO INJURIES

Both Esper and Trump have declined to call the attack an act of terror.

“I can’t say it’s terrorism at this time,” Esper told Fox News’ Bret Baier on Saturday, saying that the FBI and investigators must do their work.

The suspected shooter, who was killed by a sheriff’s deputy, was in the United States for military training. The U.S. has a long-standing program to teach foreign nationals how to operate American-made military equipment purchased by their governments.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump said the U.S. would “immediately” conduct a review of the training procedures and pledged to “get to the bottom” of what happened.

He signaled that investigators are trying to determine whether the shooter acted alone or planned the attack with others.

“We are finding out what took place,” Trump said, “whether it’s one person or a number of people.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4   Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4

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Bernie Sanders’ sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a ‘basic human right’

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'

“The internet in this country costs too damn much,” according to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who released a plan on Friday to spend $150 billion on high-speed universal internet service.

Sanders’ sweeping plan dubs high-speed internet service a “basic human right” that should be handled like the New Deal treated electricity at the beginning of the 20th Century.

“High-speed internet service must be treated as the new electricity — a public utility that everyone deserves as a basic human right,” according to the 2020 candidate’s plan. “And getting online at home, at school, or at work shouldn’t involve long waits, frustrating phone calls, and complex contracts and fees meant to trap and trick consumers.”

Similar to his campaign rhetoric, Sanders’ plan blasts telecom companies for their alleged “greed” and calls for breaking up “internet service provider and cable monopolies.” His plan would also block service providers from providing content.

SANDERS, AOC UNVEIL ‘GREEN NEW DEAL FOR PUBLIC HOUSING’ TO FUND SOLAR PANELS, ‘COMMUNITY GARDENS’

“With no incentive to innovate or invest, these conglomerates charge sky-high internet prices to reap profits from consumers, and they collect government subsidies to provide service to rural households while still leaving millions of Americans unconnected,” his plan reads.

Other major reforms include eliminating data caps and throttling, instructing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to force companies to provide affordable rates, working with Congress to codify net neutrality, and requiring that internet service providers offer a minimum standard of broadband speed.

Friday’s proposal was just the latest large-scale guarantee that Sanders promised through sweeping government action. Since announcing his candidacy, Sanders has pledged to provide universal health care, jobs, college tuition, housing and cancellation of medical debt.

Critics have pointed out the large price tags for these plans. Conservatives, in particular, compare Sanders’ government intervention to socialist countries.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Sanders’ plan, however, vows to “dramatically lower costs.”

“The internet was invented in America,” his plan reads. “We should be the world leader in providing fast, affordable service. We must also invest in digital adoption and literacy, ensuring when affordable service is provided, all can fully utilize the benefits.”

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'   Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'

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Trump Says Giuliani Will Deliver Report on Ukraine and Biden Dirt to Attorney General and Congress | Like a serial killer returning to the scene of a crime, Rudy Giuliani has been in Ukraine recently

Westlake Legal Group c5kh0Ns7MG9EYDNnmsJxE2AB3dYSRB5DkegWxQC-rbs Trump Says Giuliani Will Deliver Report on Ukraine and Biden Dirt to Attorney General and Congress | Like a serial killer returning to the scene of a crime, Rudy Giuliani has been in Ukraine recently r/politics

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‘E.T.’ star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police

Henry Thomas, known for his role in “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” tried to fake out the police after he was arrested for DUI in Oregon, according to a report.

The “The Haunting of Hill House” actor allegedly tried to use toilet water instead of a urine sample in the hopes of passing his blood-alcohol test.

According to the Tualatin Police Department report obtained by TMZ, he refused to complete his breathalyzer and field sobriety tests when pulled over in October, so he was taken to the station.

‘E.T.’ STAR HENRY THOMAS UNDER DUI ARREST IN OREGON

The 48-year-old was put in a holding cell and asked for a urine sample. Thomas requested to use the toilet, police say, and then attempted to swap the water for urine when the officer turned his back.

The report described the sample as “not warm, clear and filled to the brim,” and said Thomas denied tampering with the sample.

Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

This image provided by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office shows booking photos of actor Henry Thomas. Authorities say Thomas, the actor who starred as a child in “E.T. the Extra Terrestrial,” was arrested for driving under the influence in Oregon. The 48-year-old was booked into the Washington County Jail and faces the misdemeanor charge after police said they found him Monday in a stationary car.  (Washington County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

In late October, the Tualatin Police Department in Oregon confirmed to Fox News that officers received a 911 call about a suspicious vehicle parked in a lane for travel. When police arrived at the scene, they found Thomas passed out behind the wheel of the motionless vehicle.

‘E.T.’ STAR HENRY THOMAS ADDRESSES REBOOT RUMORS, REVEALS LIFE AFTER ICONIC FILM

The officers reportedly had to wake him up. They quickly noticed signs of intoxication and promptly took him to Washington County Jail, where he was charged with a misdemeanor DUI, according to the department’s public information officer, Jennifer Massey.

Westlake Legal Group Getty_HenryThomasElliott 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

Henry Thomas, who starred in 1982’s “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” attended a special screening of Netflix’s “The Haunting of Hill House” at The Welsh Chapel on October 2, 2018 in London, England. (Getty)

In November, he reportedly accepted a plea deal that will allow him to avoid jail time following his DUI arrest.

Thomas pleaded no contest to driving under the influence and reckless driving after he was arrested in Oregon on Oct. 21. Rather than serve any time, though, the star accepted a rather plea deal with some strings attached.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

TMZ reported at the time that Thomas will enter a diversion program for one year in addition to paying a $500 fine. He’ll also have to attend a one-time victim impact panel, as well as have his vehicle outfitted with an ignition interlock device to prevent further incidents of driving under the influence.

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177   Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

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Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies

A baby giraffe that became unlikely best friends with a dog after being abandoned in the wild has died, the “heartbroken” South African animal orphanage announced Friday on Facebook.

Jazz collapsed on Thursday at the Rhino Orphanage from hyphema coupled with brain hemorrhaging due to either a genetic defect or an under-developed value system, the orphanage said.

“He couldn’t regulate blood pressure to his brain and therefore bleeding between the ventricles occurred,” the orphanage wrote. “All our efforts were in vain.”

CALIFORNIA WOMAN PUNCHES MOUNTAIN LION IN ATTEMPT TO SAVE HER DOG

Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

In this Friday Nov 22, 2019 file photo, Hunter, a young Belgian Malinois, keeps an eye on Jazz, a nine-day-old giraffe at the Rhino orphanage in the Limpopo province of South Africa. Jazz, who was brought in after being abandoned by his mother at birth, died of brain hemorrhaging and hyphema it was announced Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

When he arrived at the orphanage at just 3 days old, Jazz befriended Hunter, a Belgian Malinois, who started looking after the newcomer.

A video posted on Nov. 22 showed Jazz licking the fur of Hunter before the pair are wrapped in their own adorable animal embraces.

“Just when we thought it couldn’t get any cuter, sweeter and more heart-warming, this happened,” the video caption read. “The bond and understanding between Jazz the giraffe and Hunter our […] Belgian Malinois is astonishing.”

As Jazz’s health began to deteriorate, the animal orphanage said Hunter knew something was wrong.

“[Hunter] suddenly stayed by the giraffe’s side again not going outside,” they said on Facebook. “Jazz took his last breath with Hunter and all his human mommies by his side.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19340480358440 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

Janie Van Heerden fed Jazz, a 9-day-old giraffe at the Rhino orphanage in the Limpopo province of South Africa. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

The pup reportedly sat in front of the empty room for hours before going to its caretakers “for comfort.”

Over the past couple of weeks, the orphanage had continued to give progress udpates on Jazz, who arrived weak and dehydrated after being found in the wild.

A final photo after Jazz’s passing showed Hunter in front of the closed door of the room where they used to play.

MASSIVE ANIMALS IN AUSTRALIA DIED FROM HUMANS AND CLIMATE CHANGE, STUDY SAYS

It received thousands of views and hundreds of comments expressing sadness for the giraffe’s passing and concern for how Hunter would handle the loss of his friend.

In its post, the orphanage paid tribute to Hunter’s loyalty.

“He stayed till the end and said his goodbyes,” it said. “Such a good boy,” adding that Hunter was doing well and would continue training to be a tracking dog.

In its farewell to the giraffe, the orphanage said: “You have taught us so much in the last three weeks and we will remember you fondly.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Jazz was buried close to the orphanage, said Arrie van Deventer, the orphanage’s founder.

The Associated Press contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a   Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

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Judiciary Committee Report Offers Legal Rationale for Impeaching Trump

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165426090_7426432b-f78c-47c7-b864-c9785d03b3c2-facebookJumbo Judiciary Committee Report Offers Legal Rationale for Impeaching Trump Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Nixon, Richard Milhous impeachment House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary

WASHINGTON — House Democrats released a report on Saturday intended to lay out the legal and historical underpinnings of their case for impeaching President Trump while also countering Republican accusations that the investigation of the president’s conduct in office has been unfair and illegitimate.

Democrats have accused the president of abusing his power by trying to pressure the Ukrainian government to announce investigations into his political rivals. They also claim that Mr. Trump obstructed the congressional inquiry by blocking witnesses from testifying and refusing to provide documents.

The 52-page report by the Democratic staff of the House Judiciary Committee argues that the framers of the Constitution intentionally provided a way to remove the occupant of the Oval Office for just such misconduct.

“A president who perverts his role as chief diplomat to serve private rather than public ends has unquestionably engaged in ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’— especially if he invited, rather than opposed, foreign interference in our politics,” concludes the report, titled “Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment.”

On Monday, the committee will formally receive the evidence against Mr. Trump in a public hearing. Democratic and Republican lawyers for the House Intelligence Committee, which spent two months investigating the president’s actions, will testify and answer questions, the committee announced on Saturday.

Lawyers for the Judiciary Committee will also testify at the hearing as the panel’s 41 members begin a weeklong debate on whether to approve articles of impeachment. An official working on the inquiry, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss it publicly, said the presentations by the lawyers on each side, Barry H. Berke for the Democrats and Steve Castor for the Republicans, will serve as the “opening arguments.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the committee, has made no pretense about how he expects the debate to conclude.

“The Framers worst nightmare is what we are facing in this very moment,” he said on Twitter on Saturday as the report was released. “President Trump abused his power, betrayed our national security, and corrupted our elections, all for personal gain. The Constitution details only one remedy for this misconduct: impeachment.”

The report — which echoes a well-regarded 1974 document created by the same committee during the debate about whether to impeach President Richard M. Nixon — is an attempt to provide Democratic lawmakers with the constitutional rationale to support impeaching a president for only the third time in American history.

Both the 1974 report and the new one trace the origins of impeachment from monarchical England, where it was developed to hold the king’s ministers to account, to colonial America, where the framers of the Constitution believed it was a necessary remedy to ensure that the leaders of the new republic did not corrupt it for their personal benefit.

Both reports primarily focus on how to define “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors,” the offenses enumerated by the Constitution for impeachment.

But the current document is clearly meant to be a road map for Democrats, tracking closely with the allegations they have already made about Mr. Trump’s conduct. It lays out several offenses that could form the basis for articles of impeachment, including bribery, which is specifically cited in the Constitution.

“Impeachable bribery occurs when the president offers, solicits, or accepts something of personal value to influence his own official actions,” the report states. “By rendering such bribery impeachable, the framers sought to ensure that the nation could expel a leader who would sell out the interests of ‘We the People’ for his own personal gain.”

The report also makes the case for impeaching a president who abuses the power of his office through actions that are legal but not motivated by the national interests — a not-so-subtle nod to allegations that Mr. Trump’s decision to hold up Ukraine’s military aid was intended to help him personally

“At minimum, that duty requires presidents ‘to exercise their power only when it is motivated in the public interest rather than in their private self-interest,’” the report argues. “A president can thus be removed for exercising power with a corrupt purpose, even if his action would otherwise be permissible.”

Saturday’s report is also a legal rebuttal to the repeated attacks on the impeachment inquiry by Mr. Trump and his Republican allies in Congress. They have accused Democrats of orchestrating a “sham” impeachment that ignored historical traditions and did not provide the president with the right to defend himself.

The report’s authors say the inquiry followed rules similar to previous impeachments and note that if he is impeached, Mr. Trump will face a Senate trial, “where he may be afforded an opportunity to present an evidentiary defense and test the strength of the House’s case.”

The report also rejects the Republican argument that some evidence in the case should be ignored because it came from secondhand witnesses. “At this fact-finding stage, no technical ‘rules of evidence’ apply,” the report says. And it dismisses the argument by Mr. Trump and his aides that he did nothing wrong because Ukraine never delivered the investigations he wanted.

“The nation is not required to cross its fingers and hope White House staff will persist in ignoring or sidelining a president who orders them to execute ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’” the report says. “Nor can a President escape impeachment just because his corrupt plan to abuse power or manipulate elections was discovered and abandoned.”

Ross H. Garber, a lawyer who has defended several governors facing impeachment, criticized the report, saying it presented a “highhanded, extreme view” of the power of House Democrats to push forward with impeachment against Mr. Trump.

“While it is unquestionable that the Constitution accords the House ‘sole’ power to impeach, it does not follow that this power may be exercised effectively without recognizing its practical and political limits,” Mr. Garber said.

He added that the report “does not seem intended to educate or persuade, and is virtually guaranteed to do neither.”

Saturday’s report comes three days after the committee convened a panel of four constitutional scholars to discuss how to apply the history and legal grounding of impeachment to the evidence collected by the House.

Three of the scholars, all of whom were invited by Democrats, argued that Mr. Trump’s conduct toward Ukraine as presented by the inquiry clearly rose to the level of impeachable bribery or abuse of power and that his efforts to conceal it from Congress could also be construed as an impeachable offense.

A fourth scholar, called by Republicans, said the allegations could be impeachable but argued that Democrats had not sufficiently made that case in a rush to complete the process.

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Trump Can’t Resist Campaigning for Governors. But They Can Resist Him.

Westlake Legal Group 00govs-memo1-facebookJumbo Trump Can’t Resist Campaigning for Governors. But They Can Resist Him. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Midterm Elections (2018) Louisiana Loeffler, Kelly L Kentucky Kemp, Brian P Governors (US) Georgia Florida Elections, Governors DeSantis, Ron Bevin, Matthew

His grip on Republican senators has held in the lead-up to a historic impeachment trial. Members of the House have faced the prospect of retiring before going against him. And he frequently boasts about his strong approval ratings among Republican voters.

Yet for a party leader who inspires fear in Washington, President Trump has been bedeviled by governor’s races time and again, even after his aggressive campaigning has helped Republican candidates win.

Unable to modulate his excitement for other people’s political battles — and, according to advisers, not understanding the distinct incentives for governors who run their own states and senators who have to work with him in Washington — Mr. Trump has plunged headfirst into contests that have done little but expose his own political vulnerabilities.

In the last month, two Republican candidates the president supported lost their off-year races for governor, puncturing his self-proclaimed role as kingmaker. But even his successes in the 2018 governor’s races have left him disappointed: The winners he championed, once in office, have defied his wishes and cast aside his allies, as recently as this past week.

“Fundamentally, unlike members of the House and the Senate, there’s no element of dependency that goes with being in Washington” for governors, said Mark Sanford, a former governor of South Carolina who recently ended his quixotic bid to challenge Mr. Trump for the Republican nomination.

“There’s a degree of political autonomy” that governors have, he added.

Mike DuHaime, a Republican strategist who advised former Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, put it more bluntly: “Many members of Congress are scared of the president’s ability to take them out in a primary — governors are less so.”

The examples have piled up over the last 18 months, as some of Mr. Trump’s aides have winced at how aggressively he wanted to participate in particular campaigns despite their urging him to stay out of those races.

For those candidates who won their governor’s races, their own political needs have since overshadowed those of Mr. Trump, and they have less incentive to fear him once elected.

In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election. Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp.

Once that happened, Mr. Trump’s aides sought to make the best of it, trying to net victories in the states with an eye toward having allies there in 2020.

But since his election, Mr. DeSantis — once a congressman who frequently jabbed at Mr. Trump’s critics during the investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III — has seemed fine bucking the president.

He has steered clear of public defenses of Mr. Trump, preferring not to spend his political capital by wading into national issues. He has indicated to reporters that he will be too busy to put much time toward helping Mr. Trump in his re-election battle.

And in a move that jolted Florida politics, the president’s campaign complied with a demand by Mr. DeSantis that Mr. Trump fire his own re-election campaign’s top Florida adviser, Susie Wiles, who has been credited with helping elect not only Mr. Trump in 2016 but also Mr. DeSantis in 2018.

Mr. DeSantis, who is seen as a possible Republican presidential candidate in 2024, viewed her as insufficiently loyal to him — and too close to another potential presidential candidate, former Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, whom she also helped elect, according to four people briefed on the events.

Her dismissal, in September, was agreed to by Mr. Trump and Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, but the move infuriated a number of Trump advisers, who believe Ms. Wiles was an asset and who think the campaign should not have bent to a demand from a governor whom Mr. Trump assisted.

More recently, Mr. Trump was ignored by Mr. Kemp as the president pressed for an ally to fill the seat of Senator Johnny Isakson of Georgia, who is retiring at the end of the year. Mr. Trump favored Representative Doug Collins, an appointment that would have given him an additional loyalist in the Senate as an impeachment trial looms in that chamber.

But Mr. Kemp on Wednesday chose Kelly Loeffler, a business executive who he believes will not turn off the suburban women whose support he needs.

Mr. Kemp took Ms. Loeffler to meet Mr. Trump at the White House at a secret gathering two weeks ago, trying to reassure him. Mr. Trump did not budge — but neither did Mr. Kemp.

Even with Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp walking a careful line with the president, Mr. Trump has seemed to relish playing kingmaker after getting a taste of it in 2018. So this year, he jumped into other races that offered him little benefit in his own re-election fight next year, or in Congress.

In Kentucky and Louisiana, where the Republican nominees for governor lost this year, the races were decided by a number of local factors, including negative perceptions of the incumbent Republican in Kentucky, Matt Bevin, and the moderate style of the incumbent Democrat in Louisiana, John Bel Edwards.

Still, Mr. Trump made heavily promoted visits to the states and touted the candidates on Twitter, personalizing the races almost every time he talked about them.

A loss would be damaging, Mr. Trump told the crowd at a rally in Kentucky the night before the election. “You can’t let that happen to me!” he implored.

Some of Mr. Trump’s advisers say they see fund-raising benefits in the president’s traveling to those states, even with the losses. And they believe that even if he had stayed out of the races, political reporters would have described them as losses for Mr. Trump.

But senior Republicans acknowledge that Mr. Trump still doesn’t understand the nuances between the types of races run by governors, who have to tend to voters back home, and senators and representatives, who must survive in Washington and have a different political balancing act.

Former Gov. Pat McCrory of North Carolina, a Republican, said that Mr. Trump shared something in common with his predecessor, Barack Obama, in that neither one had significant coattails in off-year elections. The two men developed a “personal relationship” with voters who turned out only for their presidential elections and could not be cajoled into supporting other candidates, he said.

Some Trump advisers have questioned why his aides have not pushed back more forcefully against his desire to inject himself into contests in solid-red states like Kentucky and Louisiana where there is no electoral benefit to him in 2020.

“The curse of Donald Trump is that he can’t help himself, and he always makes it about him,” Mr. Sanford said.

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Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony

A somber ceremony was held Saturday at the Pearl Harbor Visitors Center to mark the 78th anniversary of the surprise Japanese attack on the Hawaii naval base.

The event was attended by more than 2,000 people, including about a dozen men in their 90s who survived the Dec. 7, 1941, attack that led to the entry of the U.S. into World War II.

“It makes you think of all the servicemen who have passed ahead of me,” said Herb Elfring, 97, of Jackson, Mich. He’s the last of his old regiment who is still alive.

Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-1 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

Marine Cpl. Zachariah Jeavons, 22, of Binghamton, N.Y., meets Pearl Harbor survivor Lou Conter, 98, who was aboard the USS Arizona when the Japanese attacked in 1941, Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019 at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the 78th anniversary of the attack. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

Elfring was in the Army, assigned to the 251st Coast Artillery, part of the California National Guard. The unit’s job was to protect airfields, but they weren’t expecting an attack that morning.

NAVY VET’S ASHES DESTINED FOR SUNKEN PEARL HARBOR BATTLESHIP

Elfring was standing at the edge of his barracks at Camp Malakole a few miles down the coast from Pearl Harbor, reading a bulletin board when Japanese Zero planes flew over.

“I could hear it coming but didn’t pay attention to it until the strafing bullets were hitting the pavement about 15 feet away from me,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-2 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

Herb Elfring, 97, of Jackson, Mich. attends the ceremonies at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019. Elfring survived the attack on Pearl Harbor as a soldier in the California National Guard’s 251st Coast Artillery. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)

The ceremony featured a moment of silence at 7:55 a.m. — the same minute of the beginning of the attack.

The silence was broken by a flyover of U.S. Air Force fighter jets in missing man formation.

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More than 2,300 members of the U.S. military were killed in the attack. Nearly half — or 1,177 — were Marines and sailors serving on the USS Arizona, a battleship moored in the harbor. The vessel sank within 9 minutes of being hit, taking most of its crew down with it.

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FILE – In this Dec. 7, 1941, file photo, smoke rises from the battleship USS Arizona as it sinks during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (AP Photo, File)

Three USS Arizona survivors are still alive, and Lou Conter, 98, was the only one who attended Saturday’s ceremony.

Conter was sick last year and couldn’t come. He said he likes to attend to remember those who lost their lives.

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“It’s always good to come back and pay respect to them and give them the top honors that they deserve,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Florida Shooting Updates: Gunman Showed Videos of Mass Shootings at Party

Video

transcript

‘You Just Don’t Expect This,’ Sheriff Says of Pensacola Shooting

A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.

“Walking through the crime scene was like being on the set of a movie. And as the mayor eloquently put, you just don’t expect this to happen at home. This doesn’t happen in Escambia County, it doesn’t happen in Pensacola. It doesn’t happen to our friends and neighbors who are members of the United States Navy. But it did. And it has. And so for now, we’re here to pick up the pieces.” “This is a tragic day for the city of Pensacola. NAS (Naval Air Station) is incredibly an important part of our community — for 200 years this has been a part of the city of Pensacola — and we’re a military town. Our hearts and prayers are connected to all those that serve us every day, and certainly the expectation that this would happen here at home was unexpected.”

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A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.CreditCredit…WEAR-TV, via Associated Press

Here’s what you need to know:

The Saudi trainee who carried out the attack on a Florida naval base showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party the night before he carried out the shooting, according to a person briefed on the investigation but not authorized to speak publicly.

The gunman, who killed three people and injured eight others, did not have any apparent ties to international terrorist groups, according to a senior American official who was also not authorized to speak.

The gunman, identified as Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was killed by a sheriff’s deputy who responded to the attack. Lieutenant Alshamrani initially entered the United States in 2018, according to initial assessments by intelligence and counterterrorism officials. But at some point Lieutenant Alshamrani returned to Saudi Arabia and then re-entered the United States in February 2019.

The lieutenant reported for his training program at the naval air station about three days before the shooting, according to the officials. It was unclear what Lieutenant Alshamrani was doing in the United States between February and when he reported for training, but he was apparently living in the Pensacola area for much of that period.

Six other Saudi nationals were detained for questioning near the scene of the shooting, which took place over two floors in a classroom on the base. Three of the Saudis who were detained had been seen filming the entire incident, according to another person briefed on the investigation.

It was not known whether the six Saudis detained were students in the classroom building, and there was no immediate indication that those filming the incident were connected to the gunman, the person said.

The authorities have said that there is no credible threat to the Pensacola community, and one of the senior officials said that all Saudi trainees on base had been accounted for.

On Facebook, family members identified Joshua Kaleb Watson as one of the victims. Adam Watson wrote in a post that his youngest brother “saved countless lives today with his own.”

“After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable,” he wrote. “He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled.”

Mr. Watson’s father, Benjamin Watson, told The Pensacola News Journal that his 23-year-old son was shot five times. A rifle team captain, he had reported to the base two weeks earlier for flight training, his father told the newspaper.

Capt. Timothy F. Kinsella Jr., the base’s commanding officer, said the victims were “part of the Navy family.”

The authorities have not officially released the victims’ names. Sheriff Morgan said two of the eight were deputies responding to the scene. One was shot in the arm and one in the knee, but both are expected to recover and one was released from the hospital on Saturday, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Office said.

At a vigil for the victims on Saturday, Chip W. Simmons, the chief deputy of the Escambia County Sheriff’s office, said the injured deputy in the hospital was in good spirits.

Investigators were trying to determine what motivated the gunman.

Senator Rick Scott, Republican of Florida, and Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican whose district includes Pensacola, both described the shooting as an act of terrorism. But federal law enforcement officials said it was too early to establish the gunman’s motive.

The SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors jihadist activity, cited a Twitter account with a name matching the gunman that had posted a “will” calling the United States a “nation of evil” and criticizing its support for Israel.

SITE said the account had also quoted Osama bin Laden, the former Qaeda leader, and was critical of United States foreign policy.

“I’m not against you for just being American,” the posts said. “I don’t hate you because your freedoms, I hate you because every day you supporting, funding and committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

The account could not be independently verified, and law enforcement officials did not confirm that it was connected to the gunman.

The lieutenant was a trainee with the Saudi Air Force. Saudi pilots have trained at the Pensacola base since 1995.

The gunman used a locally purchased Glock 45 9-millimeter handgun with an extended magazine and had four to six other magazines in his possession, according to one of the people briefed on the investigation.

At a vigil for the victims on Saturday, Mayor Grover C. Robinson IV of Pensacola said that as far as he knew, the Pensacola Police had never had any interactions with the gunman.

Captain Kinsella said that about 200 international students were training at the base. They are from countries like Italy and Norway, in addition to Saudi Arabia, and are trained to fly helicopters or F-15s, according to a Navy pilot familiar with the program. Americans and Saudis go through initial training together before embarking on separate programs.

Mr. Robinson said the Naval Air Station had deep roots in northwest Florida, with a military history that went beyond its status as a state. It was a key fort for the Spanish, he said, and for “as long as we’ve been flying planes, 100 years, they have been flying planes out of that base.”

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Saturday that he had directed the Pentagon to look at vetting procedures for foreign nationals who came to the United States to study and train with the American military.

Mr. Esper, speaking at the Reagan Defense Forum in Simi Valley, insisted that the shooting would not affect military-to-military relations between the Saudi Arabia and the United States.

The announcement followed criticism from officials like Mr. Scott and Mr. Gaetz, who blamed the shooting, in part, on what they called insufficient federal vetting standards. The senator said he wanted a “full review” of military programs that train foreign nationals in the United States.

“Whether this individual was motivated by radical Islam or was simply mentally unstable, this was an act of terrorism,” Mr. Scott said in a statement on Friday. “There is no reason we should be providing state-of-the-art military training to people who wish us harm.”

Mr. Robinson acknowledged that the incident raised serious questions about vetting, but said he would leave issues of national security to the federal authorities. “We depend on allies,” he said. “This is the first time this has happened and NAS has been doing this for decades. We train a number of people to help fight against these adversaries.”

King Salman of Saudi Arabia called President Trump to offer his condolences and to condemn the actions of the gunman, who he said did not represent the Saudi people, according to Mr. Trump.

“The King said that the Saudi people are greatly angered by the barbaric actions of the shooter,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter.

The shooting happened early on Friday morning across two floors of a classroom building at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, where foreign military trainees have studied for decades.

Law enforcement officials said they began receiving emergency calls at about 6:50 a.m., and the base was put on lockdown. It was the second shooting at a Navy base this week.

Chief Simmons, of the Escambia County Sheriff’s office, recounted the shock of hearing words law enforcement officials have come to dread come over the police radio: “active shooter” and “officer down.”

The building was covered in broken glass, shell casings and signs of horror, Chief Simmons said, and the police used every possible person available to search every room in the multistory building.

“It isn’t till everything settles down that you realize what you’ve seen,” Chief Simmons said. “What you are experiencing is what you have seen on TV. What you are experiencing is loss of life.”

Patricia Mazzei, Adam Goldman, Helene Cooper, Kalyn Wolfe and Liam Stack contributed reporting.

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Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations

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President Trump named U.S. Secret Service Deputy Assistant Director Anthony Ornato as his new Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations on Saturday.

“I have worked with Tony for 3 years – he will do a fantastic job!,” the president tweeted. “Thank you to Dan Walsh for his great service, and congratulations to Tony!”

While serving as Special Agent in Charge, Ornato accompanied the president to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in North Korea to meet with the country’s leader Kim Jong Un in June. False reports had circulated that Trump walked into North Korea without Secret Service protection.

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The White House said last month that Walsh would leave the office of operations, which plans foreign trips for the Trump administration and allocates resources for White House aides.

The role is one of three White House Deputy Chief of Staff positions and serves just under the White House Chief of Staff. The other two positions are Principal Deputy Chief of Staff, a role filled by Emma Doyle, and Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Coordination, currently Chris Liddell.

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Walsh was one of the few current White House officials who had served the Trump administration since its inception; he had been a government employee for nearly three decades. Walsh has now accepted a job in the private sector, according to The Washington Post.

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article   Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article

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