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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 8)

Dead man tied to 11-year-old girl’s cold case murder in Texas through DNA

The cold case rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl has been solved after 36 years but her accused killer isn’t around to be brought to justice, a Texas TV station reported Friday.

The victim was Julie Fuller, who was found slain in Fort Worth in 1983 after her abduction from an Arlington motel.

Fort Worth police now believe the killer was James Francis McNichols thanks to genealogical testing of DNA from the crime scene, Fox 4 Dallas reported.

Westlake Legal Group Julie-Fuller-James-Francis-McNichols Dead man tied to 11-year-old girl's cold case murder in Texas through DNA Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 596ca3ed-d937-5cb3-8392-26ea34b47408

Julie Fuller was 11 when she was killed in Texas after being abducted from a motel. Fort Worth police said Friday her killer was James Francis McNichols based on genealogical testing of crime scene DNA, Fox 4 Dallas reported. McNichols died in 2004. (Fort Worth Police Department/Fox4 Dallas)

The DNA testing tying McNichols to the crime came 15 years after his death, the station reported.

Detective Thomas O’Brien told the station he would have preferred that McNichols was around so that he could be held responsible.

“I mean you’re talking about an 11-year-old girl who was raped and murdered. That’s not something we want to have on our books that’s not solved.”

— Fort Worth Detective Thomas O’Brien

The Arlington motel was where Julie and her family were staying after moving to North Texas from England, the station reported.

Julie disappeared as she was taking out the garbage. Her body was found the next day.

DNA CLEARS NORTH CAROLINA WOMAN IN SISTER’S COLD CASE MURDER–AFTER SHE TOLD DR. PHIL SHE DIDN’T DO IT

“I always kind of would beat myself up that maybe I should have been paying more attention and maybe not so into myself,” Julie’s older brother Lee Fuller told the station via a phone interview. “The fact that I allowed my little sister to just wander off like that… I mean, she was just taking out the trash.”

Fuller, who was 13 when his sister was killed, said he was glad McNichols was dead.

CALIFORNIA MAN ARRESTED AFTER DNA FROM BASKIN-ROBBINS SPOON LINKS HIM TO SEXUAL ASSAULTS FROM 22 YEARS AGO

“Just the thought of him and my parents, especially having for them to go through that of facing the guy, I think would just be horrific,” he said.

O’Brien said McNichols was living in the Fort Worth area around the time of Julie’s murder.

He had a criminal record but was never on the FBI’s radar and his DNA was never in a database, the station reported.

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“I feel very certain this case would never have been solved,” without genetic genealogy, O’Brien told the station. “Especially with him being dead, there would have been no other way to have solved this case.”

.

Westlake Legal Group Julie-Fuller-James-Francis-McNichols Dead man tied to 11-year-old girl's cold case murder in Texas through DNA Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 596ca3ed-d937-5cb3-8392-26ea34b47408   Westlake Legal Group Julie-Fuller-James-Francis-McNichols Dead man tied to 11-year-old girl's cold case murder in Texas through DNA Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 596ca3ed-d937-5cb3-8392-26ea34b47408

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Christmas photo of dog suffering ‘existential crisis’ goes viral on Twitter

Westlake Legal Group dog Christmas photo of dog suffering 'existential crisis' goes viral on Twitter Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a6ec805f-b9d8-58bc-98c0-0eddfa11b3cd /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

The holiday season can be overwhelming for both humans and pets, as evidenced by a small dog who was recently pictured suffering an “existential crisis” during a wintery photo shoot.

Last week, dog-mom Lauren Carter tweeted a hilarious image of her two pets from a professional portrait session, and the post has since gone wildly viral with over 757,000 likes and more than 175,000 shares.

In the photo, her pups are flanked by evergreens as faux snow falls around them. Her more chipper dog, Opiee, seemingly smiles at the camera while wearing a string of lights. But her other dog, Mika, is desperately staring into the distance with an empty-looking gaze, apparently unimpressed by her jaunty hat and jingle bell collar.

CAT MEOWING WITH ‘THICK SOUTHERN ACCENT’ GOES VIRAL ON INSTAGRAM

“Took my dogs to take their yearly Christmas photos. It’s really hard when you have one super photogenic dog and one dog having an existential crisis,” Carter wrote.

In reply, jokesters seized the opportunity to speculate about what Mika could be thinking behind her grave gaze.

“What does it even mean to be ‘good’?” one user imagined the pooch pondering.

“How I look on the outside vs. how I feel on the inside,” another offered, in a post juxtaposing the two dogs.

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Carter later admitted that her pets frequently mirror each other’s moods.

“Sometimes she rubs off on him,” she explained, sharing a somber-looking image of the pups in reindeer hoods.

“Sometimes he rubs off on her,” she added, posting a sweet photo of Opiee nuzzling Mika’s face, as they sported Santa Claus and elf outfits, respectively.

As for Mika’s one-of-a-kind personality, Carter said that she doesn’t take Mika’s somewhat dimmer disposition too seriously.

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“I’m telling y’all she has a very classic ‘Oh god… did I leave the stove on?’ type of face 24/7,” she joked.

Westlake Legal Group dog Christmas photo of dog suffering 'existential crisis' goes viral on Twitter Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a6ec805f-b9d8-58bc-98c0-0eddfa11b3cd /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group dog Christmas photo of dog suffering 'existential crisis' goes viral on Twitter Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a6ec805f-b9d8-58bc-98c0-0eddfa11b3cd /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

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U.S. and China Reach Initial Trade Deal

Westlake Legal Group 13dc-uschina-facebookJumbo U.S. and China Reach Initial Trade Deal United States International Relations United States Economy Trump, Donald J International Trade and World Market Customs (Tariff)

BEIJING — The United States and China have agreed to an initial trade deal that will result in a reduction of tariffs and purchases of American farm goods, marking a significant de-escalation in the 19-month battle that has rattled the world economy.

“We have agreed to a very large Phase One Deal with China,” President Trump said in a tweet. “They have agreed to many structural changes and massive purchases of Agricultural Product, Energy, and Manufactured Goods, plus much more.”

Mr. Trump said the United States would reduce its overall tariff rate on Chinese goods to 7.5 percent, down from the current rate of 25 percent and that a round of tariffs scheduled for Sunday would be cancelled.

Wang Shouwen, China’s vice commerce minister, said at a news conference in Beijing that the two sides had made “significant progress” and that the agreement would result in the United States removing some of the tariffs it has placed on $360 billion worth of Chinese goods. Those tariffs would come off “phase by phase” and the United States would agree to exempt more Chinese products from being taxed, he said.

“This will create better conditions for China and the United States to strengthen cooperation,” Mr. Wang said.

The agreement includes a commitment by Beijing to buy more American agriculture products and to strengthen laws protecting foreign companies operating in China, as well as beefing up intellectual property rules and providing more transparency around currency movements. Mr. Wang said both sides have agreed to complete legal reviews as quickly as possible and that an official signing was still being worked out.

Some advisers to the White House said China had agreed to buy $50 billion worth of American farm products next year but China has so far not confirmed that figure and the United States trade representative did not provide an official figure in its statement.

“The Phase One agreement also includes a commitment by China that it will make substantial additional purchases of U.S. goods and services in the coming years,” U.S.T.R. said on Friday.

Chinese officials on Friday said that imports of American agriculture products would increase by a “considerable margin” to meet China’s needs for goods like soybean and pork.

The deal came as a relief of investors, who have been haunted by the steady drumbeat of tariffs that have depressed business sentiment and stirred economic uncertainty. The S&P 500 was up slightly in early-morning trading.

An agreement will also give Mr. Trump another trade win that he can tout heading into his re-election campaign and as Congress forges ahead with his impeachment. The agreement came on the same week that the administration agreed with House Democrats to revise the terms of a trade pact with Canada and Mexico.

This is a developing story. It will be updated.

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Brexit’s Advance Is Latest Blow to Postwar Trade Order

Westlake Legal Group 13uktrade-hung-01-facebookJumbo Brexit’s Advance Is Latest Blow to Postwar Trade Order United States Protectionism (Trade) International Trade and World Market Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain European Union elections Customs (Tariff)

LONDON — For more than seven decades, the global powers that be operated on the assumption that greater economic integration amounts to historical progress. But that era is over, as Britain’s voters have now made clear.

The decisive majority secured by Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his Conservative Party all but ensures that the country will proceed with its abandonment of the European Union.

Another complex phase of the tangled divorce proceedings lies ahead — negotiations over the terms of Britain’s future economic relationship with the Continent. But in one form or another, “getting Brexit done,” the mantra that Mr. Johnson promised and can now deliver, marks a profound change in the world trading system.

In the aftermath of World War II, the victorious Allies forged an international order built on the understanding that when countries swap goods they become less inclined to trade artillery volleys.

Britain’s departure from Europe is the clearest manifestation that this principle no longer holds decisive sway. Yet it is far from the only sign that the world trading system is devolving into a state in which national interests have primacy over collective concerns.

The United States and China are locked in a trade war that is heightening concerns about a global economic slowdown.

Tensions appeared to ease on Thursday, as the United States was reported to have settled on the outlines of a deal that could significantly reduce tariffs on $360 billion in Chinese goods in exchange for China’s promise to buy goods from American farmers. The deal was expected to halt American tariffs scheduled to hit another $160 billion worth of Chinese imports this weekend.

But even if such a deal takes hold, the United States and China have descended into such an adversarial state that they are likely to continue seeking alternatives to exchanging goods and investment. Companies that make goods in China will face pressure to explore other countries, posing disruption to the global supply chain.

The traditional arbiter of international trade disputes, the World Trade Organization, is listing toward irrelevance as countries bypass its channels to impose tariffs.

“The sense that policy moves in one direction, toward more liberalization and more integration, has been replaced by recognition that policy can go backward as well as forwards,” said Brad Setser, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

The fraying of international trading arrangements has been driven by intensifying public anger in many countries over widening economic inequality, and the perception that trade has been bountiful for the executive class while leaving ordinary people behind.

In Britain, struggling communities used the June 2016 referendum that unleashed Brexit as a protest vote against the bankers in London who had engineered a catastrophic financial crisis, and then forced regular people to absorb the costs through wrenching fiscal austerity.

In the United States, President Trump’s political base has rallied to his trade war, inclined to view it as a necessary corrective to the destruction of the industrial economy by Chinese factories.

From Italy to France to Germany, furious popular movements have fixed on trade as a threat to workers’ livelihoods, while embracing nationalist and nativist responses that promise to halt globalization.

“The era of freewheeling markets and liberalism is ending,” said Meredith Crowley, an international trade expert at the University of Cambridge in England. “People are dissatisfied with the complexity of policy, and this feeling that those who have the levers of policy are somehow out of their reach.”

Economists see perils in this unfolding era, like impediments to trade as governments champion national industries at the expense of competition. They point to history for portents — especially the Great Depression, which was deepened by a wave of tit-for-tat trade protectionism kicked off by the United States through the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930.

The law sharply raised tariffs on a vast range of agricultural and factory goods, prompting American trading partners to respond in kind. As world trade disintegrated, nationalist rage spread, culminating in the brutalities of World War II.

The British election, and the splintering of the European trading bloc, amounts to the most consequential upsurge of economic nationalism in generations.

“Since Smoot-Hawley, I don’t think we have seen something as dramatic as this,” said Swati Dhingra, an economist at the London School of Economics.

As the rupture in Europe plays out, the world’s two largest economies — the United States and China — remain ensnared in conflict.

The Trump administration began imposing tariffs in response to what it portrays as a decades-long Chinese effort to destroy American jobs by subsidizing key industries. But among hard-liners, the trade war is increasingly a means of weaponizing the enormous American marketplace — threatening China’s access to American consumers — to contain a supposed strategic and security threat.

China’s leaders have come to construe trade hostilities as part of an American bullying campaign engineered to suppress their national aspirations and deny the country its rightful place as a superpower.

Nationalist sentiments and security concerns combined with trade policy do not make for a conducive climate for a meaningful deal that can comprehensively end trade hostilities.

“If anything, the positions are hardening,” Ms. Crowley said.

On another front, Mr. Trump has threated to impose tariffs on imported automobiles, a step that would be especially disruptive in Germany, Europe’s largest economy. Germany sells far more goods to the United States than it imports, drawing the ire of the American president.

Mr. Trump has openly threatened to cite a national security threat as justification for auto tariffs. Trade experts have derided that approach as an affront to the norms of the international trading system.

Last month, Mr. Trump allowed a self-imposed deadline to lapse without imposing auto tariffs. But he has left a major international industry guessing about what happens next.

The World Trade Organization’s appellate body, which adjudicates disputes, has been rendered inoperative by the Trump administration’s blocking of new judges. The panel needs at least three judges to render verdicts, but now has only one.

One major variable has gained clarity: Congressional Democrats and the Trump administration this week hailed an agreement that clears passage of the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the sprawling deal that has allowed some $1.2 trillion worth of goods a year to be exchanged freely across the United States, Canada and Mexico.

But the results of Britain’s election raise the likelihood that commerce in one large swath of the globe is likely to be impeded.

Britain sends nearly half of its exports to the European Union, a flow of goods potentially imperiled by Brexit. Its departure from the European single market — which allows trade to be conducted seamlessly from Greece to Ireland, as if the territory were one vast country — risks undermining Britain’s appeal as a headquarters for multinational companies.

Since Britain shocked the world with its vote to abandon the European Union, its political institutions have tangled themselves in knots trying to decide what to do with their nebulous mandate to leave. Businesses have deferred hiring and investments, awaiting clarity on future trading terms.

The uncertainty has already exacted significant costs, and far beyond Europe, according to a new paper by Tarek Hassan, an economist at Boston University, and three European accounting experts, Stephan Hollander, Laurence van Lent and Ahmed Tahoun.

Every year since the referendum, the average company in Ireland — which trades heavily with Britain — has seen its growth in investment reduced by 15 percent, and hiring is 4.2 percent less than it otherwise would have been because of uncertainty, the paper concludes. Yet even across the Atlantic, the average American company has seen investment growth limited by 0.5 percent a year and hiring slowed by 1.7 percent.

“There is already a significant drop in employment as a result of the risks of Brexit,” Mr. Hassan said.

Though Thursday’s election provided clarity on Brexit, substantial variables remain. Assuming Mr. Johnson’s Brexit plan now sails through Parliament, Britain must negotiate trade terms with Europe before the end of a transition period running through the end of next year — a monumental task.

Mr. Johnson has ruled out extending that deadline, renewing the prospect that Britain could again flirt with crashing out of the European bloc without a deal. That threat could force businesses to again stockpile goods and implement complicated contingency plans.

Some analysts suggested that the election enhanced the possibility that Mr. Johnson would pursue a softer form of Brexit that keeps Britain closer to the European market. His majority is so comfortable that he need not worry about alienating the hard-liners in his party who favor a clean break with Europe.

But some alteration is clearly ahead. If Brexit uncertainty has been damaging, what replaces it is the near-certainty of weaker economic growth and diminished living standards. Britain’s political mandate to “take back control” carries costs.

“It’s going to have massive implications,” Mr. Hassan said.

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Megathread: U.S. House Judiciary Committee approves articles of Impeachment against President Trump, full House vote on Wednesday

Westlake Legal Group bGlBm_FG_7O_nFWw5LelQiK7IaFGLt_iqZ470RisWJE Megathread: U.S. House Judiciary Committee approves articles of Impeachment against President Trump, full House vote on Wednesday r/politics

The House Judiciary Committee has approved the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Both votes were approved along party lines 23-17. The articles now go to the House floor for a full vote next week.


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British woman survives 6-hour cardiac arrest after getting caught in Spain snowstorm

MADRID – A British woman was revived after her heart stopped for six hours in what doctors in Spain called an “exceptional case on a global scale.”

Audrey Marsh, 34, who works as an English teacher in Barcelona, was lost with her husband in a snowstorm in the Spanish Pyrenees mountains last month.

She suffered severe hypothermia and fell unconscious before entering into a cardiac arrest.

HEART FROM DEAD DONAR REVIVED, TRANSPLANTED INTO VETERAN IN US FIRST

When she was rescued by emergency teams, her body temperature had fallen to 60F and she showed little signs of life. The normal body temperature is 98.6F.

Westlake Legal Group Marsh-Health-Spain British woman survives 6-hour cardiac arrest after getting caught in Spain snowstorm Graham Keeley fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc e3aa1c28-1db2-5b2a-80c9-f5e15fc416d7 article

Audrey Marsh, 34, was revived after suffering a 6-hour cardiac arrest while hiking in a snowstorm with her husband in Spain. (Vall’d’Hebron Hospital)

Doctors in Barcelona said Marsh’s case was one of the longest cardiac arrests ever recorded in the world.

“When I woke up in hospital I was very confused. I don’t remember the weekend at all, ” Marsh told Fox News last week. “Then I realized how serious it was. There was a sense of relief and horror. My husband watched me take my last breath. I died and then came back from death.”

She added: “Other people might have given up hope but the doctors brought me back from the most extreme situation.”

APPLE WATCH CATCHES GRANDMOTHER’S HEART CONDITION, POSSIBLY SAVING HER LIFE

The couple went missing in a snowstorm after spending a weekend with friends on November 3.

Rescuers located Marsh in time after her husband sent friends photographs of their location.

She was flown by air ambulance to the Vall’d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona, where she was connected to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation machine.

The machine stands in for the heart and lungs, pumping blood through the arteries and heating it, which raises the body temperature. Doctors believed she could survive if they treated the hypothermia.

“This is an exceptional case on a global scale,” Eduard Argudo, a doctor from the Vall d’Hebron hospital told a press conference. “There are practically no cases of people being revived after their heart has stopped for so long.”

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When she arrived at the hospital, Mash’s heart was showing no electrical activity and her kidneys and lungs were not functioning, doctors said.

Argudo said the sharp fall in her body temperature may have saved her as the cold preserved her organs.

Six hours after entering cardio-respiratory arrest, Marsh’s heart began to beat naturally again.

Marsh, who spent 11 days in hospital recovering, has not suffered any long-term brain damage but has trouble moving her hands which were affected by the cold.

“When I went home I had damage to my hands. I could not do up my buttons on trousers or put in my earrings. These are small things which are going to get better,” she said.

Mash’s husband, Rohan Schoeman, 36, who is South African and works as a teacher, said the couple had spent the weekend with friends but left early morning without them.

“At one point the snowfall became very heavy. We found a rock and tried to use it for shelter to avoid adverse weather conditions. Once visibility improved, I could see that our friends had tried to contact us,” he said. “Audrey was losing consciousness so I tried to send some photos to our friends of where we were.”

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Marsh admitted the couple should have taken more precautions in the snowstorm.

“I didn’t realize how changeable the weather was at the time,” she said. “Perhaps we weren’t as prepared as we should have been, we were careless.”

Despite her ordeal, Marsh said she wanted to return for walks in the mountain within a year but said they should be better prepared this time.

Westlake Legal Group Marsh-Health-Spain British woman survives 6-hour cardiac arrest after getting caught in Spain snowstorm Graham Keeley fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc e3aa1c28-1db2-5b2a-80c9-f5e15fc416d7 article   Westlake Legal Group Marsh-Health-Spain British woman survives 6-hour cardiac arrest after getting caught in Spain snowstorm Graham Keeley fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc e3aa1c28-1db2-5b2a-80c9-f5e15fc416d7 article

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Panel Approves Impeachment Articles and Sends Charges for a House Vote

WASHINGTON — A fiercely divided House Judiciary Committee pushed President Trump to the brink of impeachment on Friday, voting along party lines to approve charges that he abused the power of his office and obstructed Congress.

After a fractious two-day debate steeped in the Constitution and shaped by the realities of a hyperpartisan era in American politics, the Democratic-controlled committee recommended that the House ratify two articles of impeachment against the 45th president. In back-to-back morning votes, they adopted each charge against Mr. Trump by a margin of 23 to 17 over howls of Republican protest.

The partisan result and the contentious debate that preceded it were harbingers of a historic proceeding and vote on the House floor, expected next week, to impeach Mr. Trump, whose nearly three-year tenure has exacerbated the nation’s political divisions. Mr. Trump, who insists he did nothing wrong, is now only the fourth American president in history to face impeachment by the House of Representatives for “high crimes and misdemeanors” and possible conviction and removal from office by the Senate.

The charges ratified on Friday arise from a House Intelligence Committee investigation that concluded this fall that the president has manipulated his administration to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., his political rival, and a theory that Democrats conspired with Ukraine to interfere in the 2016 election. He did so, Democrats allege, using as leverage nearly $400 million in security assistance for Ukraine’s fight against Russia and a coveted White House meeting for its president.

Westlake Legal Group trump-impeachment-house-vote-whip-count-promo-1576184833145-articleLarge-v8 Panel Approves Impeachment Articles and Sends Charges for a House Vote Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

‘No Choice’ or ‘a Sham’: Where Every House Member Stands on the Articles of Impeachment

See what House members have said about the articles of impeachment against the president.

Mr. Trump then sought to conceal the scheme from Congress, the committee charged, ordering unprecedented, across-the-board stonewalling of its investigation unlike any “in the history of the Republic.” It amounted to an effort by the president to undermine the separation of powers and limit his accountability, they said.

The vote took place in the Ways and Means Committee room the morning after a contentious 14-hour session in the Judiciary Committee that stretched past 11 p.m. on Thursday as Democrats turned back a number of Republican efforts to gut or weaken the charges and members of both parties feuded over impeaching the president. Republicans argued not so much that Mr. Trump’s conduct was not impeachable, but that his actions were justified and explained by more innocent intentions.

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, abruptly paused the session late Thursday night before bringing the articles to a final vote, saying he wanted members to take the time to “search their consciences” before the historic roll-call. After Republicans had dragged out the debate for hours, Democrats said they did not want such a consequential vote to occur in the dark of night, when the American public was unlikely to be watching.

Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998 were both impeached on largely partisan votes, but were later acquitted by the Senate. Richard M. Nixon resigned in 1974 after the Judiciary Committee had approved charges against him, and just before the House could take a final vote to impeach him.

Talk of impeaching Mr. Trump began among some liberals as early as his Inauguration Day in 2017, and intensified this year when Democrats reclaimed control of the House amid a swirl of speculation about whether a special counsel investigation would conclude that Mr. Trump’s campaign had conspired with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election.

But in the end, the impeachment of Mr. Trump has unfolded rapidly and on grounds that emerged only a few months ago. The Judiciary Committee votes came almost exactly four months after an anonymous C.I.A. whistle-blower submitted a complaint alleging a systematic campaign by the president to solicit Ukraine’s help in the 2020 election. The House opened its inquiry in late September.

On Friday, the Judiciary Committee endorsed the charge that Mr. Trump abused the powers of his office by pressuring Ukraine to announce investigations of his political rivals, using official acts as leverage as he sought advantage for his 2020 re-election campaign.

Though Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic leaders have explicitly connected the Ukraine matter to Mr. Trump’s embrace of Russian election assistance during the 2016 campaign, accusing the president of a broad and dangerous pattern of conduct, they elected not to include additional charges outside of it.

Democratic leaders have indicated the full House will debate and vote on the articles next week, with final approval likely falling on Wednesday, just before Congress recesses for Christmas and the New Year’s holiday. They were lining up two more consequential votes to help soften the political liability for moderate Democrats in swing districts, including approval of Mr. Trump’s new trade deal with Canada and Mexico.

Impeachment votes by the House Judiciary Committee have brought past presidents to their knees. Nixon resigned days afterward. Mr. Clinton promptly apologized for his actions and offered to accept a censure resolution by the House in lieu of impeachment.

Mr. Trump has remained defiant, insisting he had done “NOTHING wrong” and lambasting Democrats Friday morning as “the Party of lies and deception!” Firing off a series of tweets hours before the vote, Mr. Trump praised Republicans for their defense of him and declared “Republicans are the Party of the American Dream!”

“It always helps to have a much better case, in fact the Dems have no case at all, but the unity & sheer brilliance of these Republican warriors, all of them, was a beautiful sight to see. Dems had no answers and wanted out!” he wrote.

Over the last two weeks, the president declined to send his lawyers to participate in the hearings or offer a White House defense before the House, breaking with the approach of Nixon and Mr. Clinton. He did not want to lend the proceedings legitimacy and argued he would get a fairer trial in the Senate.

Republican leaders in the upper chamber indicated on Thursday, in the run-up to the vote, that they wanted a speedy trial and would work hand-in-glove with Mr. Trump’s defense team — an announcement that quickly drew a rebuke from Democrats who pointed out that senators take an oath to “do impartial justice” in an impeachment trial.

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, predicted there was “no chance” 67 senators — the two-thirds majority needed for a conviction — would vote to remove Mr. Trump in an election year.

Unlike during Watergate, when the public came to broadly support removal, or in 1998, when a clear majority opposed it, public polling in recent weeks suggests that Americans are as divided as their elected lawmakers with little signs of change. Some polls show a slight majority of the public supports impeachment and removal, roughly the same fraction who voted against Mr. Trump three years ago.

Still, the echoes of history were hard to miss. The charges against Mr. Trump paralleled some of the articles drawn up against Nixon. And Thursday’s vote fell almost exactly 21 years after the Judiciary panel voted to recommend the impeachment of Mr. Clinton, on charges of perjury, obstruction of justice and abuse of power.

The Intelligence Committee’s conclusions were reached based on documents and testimony from more than a dozen senior American diplomats and White House officials who said that over the spring and fall, Mr. Trump empowered his personal attorney, Rudolph W. Giuliani, and a group of allies inside the government to toss out official American policy toward Ukraine and supplant it with his personal interests.

However, the House never heard from some of those closest to Mr. Trump, who could have shed further light on the scheme and the president’s thinking, based on the White House’s orders not to comply. During the debate this week, Republicans accused Democrats of rushing to conclusions without all the facts.

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House Judiciary Committee Votes To Impeach Donald Trump

Westlake Legal Group 5df26d29240000890a5a31a5 House Judiciary Committee Votes To Impeach Donald Trump

The House floor vote would come before lawmakers adjourn for the holidays this month, setting up a Senate trial in January.

Friday’s party-line committee vote, 23-17, had been postponed from Thursday, when committee members debated late into the night on the second day of markup hearings. Republicans dragged out the hearing with the introduction of long-shot amendments to the two articles of impeachment, unveiled by House Democrats Tuesday.

In them, lawmakers said Trump abused his power when he pressured Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, and obstructed the congressional investigation into the matter by directing White House officials not to testify and withhold relevant documents.

Chiefly, they concluded that his July 25 phone call with Zelensky represented “stark evidence of misconduct; a demonstration of the President’s prioritization of his personal political benefit over the national interest.”

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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House Judiciary Committee Approves Two Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

Westlake Legal Group ap_19346839128696_wide-83cec51b82c2f8765a2a35b066770361dbfbd79e-s1100-c15 House Judiciary Committee Approves Two Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had adjourned Thursday without a vote on the articles of impeachment. Ranking member Doug Collins (in background) likened the move to a “kangaroo court.” J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Westlake Legal Group  House Judiciary Committee Approves Two Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had adjourned Thursday without a vote on the articles of impeachment. Ranking member Doug Collins (in background) likened the move to a “kangaroo court.”

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Updated at 10:13 a.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, making him the 4th president in American history to face impeachment by the House.

In contrast to Thursday’s contentious back and forth between the two parties, Friday’s session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after gaveling the session to order, Judiciary Committee chairman, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were approved on party line votes, 23-17.

The committee’s approval moves the articles to the full House, which would then decide whether to impeach President Trump. A vote is expected next Wednesday.

The formal debate over whether Trump should be impeached for abuse of power and for obstruction of Congress culminated in a dramatic and abrupt ending.

The committee was expected to approve the articles Thursday evening, but shortly after 11 p.m. ET, House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., punted the vote to the next morning.

“It is now very late at night,” he said, adjourning the hearing. “I want the members on both sides of the aisle to think about what has happened over these last two days and to search their consciences before we cast our final votes.”

Nadler’s decision led to vocal objection from Republicans on the committee, including ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga.

“You’ve just blown up schedules for everyone,” Collins said. “This is the kangaroo court that we’re talking about.”

Throughout the day, and for several hours on Wednesday, committee members delivered partisan talking points in support of or opposition to Trump’s impeachment. Republicans offered several amendments that were rejected.

House Democratic leaders are planning to hold the full House vote on articles of impeachment against President Trump next Wednesday, December 18, according to two Democratic leadership aides.

If the full House votes to impeach the president, the Senate would then begin a trial to determine whether to remove Trump from office or, much more likely in the Republican-led chamber, acquit him.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

House Judiciary Committee Approves 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

Westlake Legal Group ap_19346839128696_wide-83cec51b82c2f8765a2a35b066770361dbfbd79e-s1100-c15 House Judiciary Committee Approves 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had adjourned Thursday without a vote on the articles of impeachment. Ranking member Doug Collins (in background) likened the move to a “kangaroo court.” J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Westlake Legal Group  House Judiciary Committee Approves 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had adjourned Thursday without a vote on the articles of impeachment. Ranking member Doug Collins (in background) likened the move to a “kangaroo court.”

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Updated at 10:13 a.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee on Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump, making him the fourth president in American history to face impeachment.

In contrast to Thursday’s contentious back-and-forth between the two parties, Friday’s session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after gaveling the session to order, Judiciary Committee chairman, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were approved on party-line votes, 23-17.

House Democratic leaders are planning to hold the full House vote on articles of impeachment next Wednesday, Dec. 18, according to two Democratic leadership aides.

The formal debate over whether Trump should be impeached for abuse of power and for obstruction of Congress had culminated in a dramatic and abrupt ending.

The committee had been expected to approve the articles Thursday evening, but shortly after 11 p.m. ET, Nadler punted the vote to the next morning.

“It is now very late at night,” he said, adjourning the hearing. “I want the members on both sides of the aisle to think about what has happened over these last two days and to search their consciences before we cast our final votes.”

Nadler’s decision led to vocal objection from Republicans on the committee, including ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga.

“You’ve just blown up schedules for everyone,” Collins said. “This is the kangaroo court that we’re talking about.”

Throughout the day on Thursday, and for several hours on Wednesday, committee members delivered partisan talking points in support of or opposition to Trump’s impeachment. Republicans offered several amendments that were rejected.

If the full House votes to impeach the president, the Senate would then begin a trial to determine whether to remove Trump from office or, much more likely in the Republican-led chamber, acquit him.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com