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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 85)

Rapper Juice WRLD Dies At 21

Westlake Legal Group 5ded18ba240000e0035a2a66 Rapper Juice WRLD Dies At 21

Chicago rapper Juice WRLD, 21, died Sunday, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed to HuffPost.

A spokeswoman said an autopsy has not been performed at this time and declined to comment further.

Juice WRLD, whose real name is Jarad Anthony Higgins, suffered a seizure in Chicago Midway International Airport after a flight from California early Sunday morning, TMZ first reported. Higgins died after being rushed to the hospital, according to the outlet.

Perhaps best known for his song “Lucid Dreams” ― a dreary love ballad interpolating Sting’s “Shape of My Heart” ― Juice WRLD was among a burgeoning class of popular rappers whose lyrical content focused heavily on his haunting experiences with mental illness and the self-injurious ways he coped with it. His style, which deployed his gravelly whine over dark-sounding instrumentals, was classified by some as “emo rap.”

Juice WRLD’s debut album, “Goodbye & Good Riddance,” was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in 2018 and peaked at No. 6 on Billboard’s most popular albums for that year. His list of collaborations spanned genres, as he worked with artists including Future and Panic at the Disco.

An Instagram post on Juice WRLD’s account said the artist was celebrating his birthday last week. 

Hayley Miller contributed to this report.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Southwest Airlines passenger says flight attendant complained about ‘Muslim woman’ for ‘making people uncomfortable’

Westlake Legal Group Southwest-airlines Southwest Airlines passenger says flight attendant complained about 'Muslim woman' for 'making people uncomfortable' Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc d72b242d-2750-54fb-810f-dc5e9658d688 article

A man traveling on Southwest Airlines says his wife was called out by a flight attendant for making other passengers “uncomfortable.”

Journalist Mehdi Hasan shared his story on Twitter, where he says a flight attendant confronted his wife after she asked to switch seats with another passenger so she could sit with her family. According to Hasan, the flight attendant “complained about the Muslim woman” to ground staff.

The flight, which occurred over the Thanksgiving holiday, was operating on an “open-seating policy,” which meant that passengers didn’t have assigned locations and seats were picked as passengers boarded on a first-come, first-served basis, The Sun reports.

On his Twitter account, Hasan posted, “Hey Southwest Air: not a good look for your flight attendant on SW5539 to DC last night to loudly tell a brown woman in a headscarf she’ll be ‘escorted off the plane’ for making people feel ‘uncomfortable’ — because she wanted to sit with her husband & kids!”

Hasan continued his story, explaining how the flight attendant seemingly escalated the situation. “The flight attendant called ground staff onto the plane,” he continued, “complained about the Muslim woman — my wife! — to them, & escalated rather than de-escalated the situation — simply because my wife politely asked a guy if he’d give up his seat for our family (which he was fine with!).”

DELTA FLIGHT ATTENDANT, 79, MAKING $250K A YEAR ALLEGEDLY FIRED FOR STEALING MILK CARTON

The Twitter thread also explained that other passengers and airline employees wondered why the flight attendant “wouldn’t shut up and let things go so we could take off.”

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Later on, Hasan posted an update saying that Southwest Airlines had apologized to him “privately,” but refused to do so publicly.

In a statement obtained by The Sun, a spokesperson for Southwest Airlines said, “From our initial discussions, we understand that some Passengers on Flight 5539 were involved in a disagreement over seat selection near the end of boarding. The Family was able to sit together and the flight arrived safely in Washington, D.C. on Sunday night. We remain in communication with the customer who sent the tweet and are working to address his concerns directly.”

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The company later replied to the original Twitter thread, where it posted, “I can only empathize with the depths of you and your family’s feelings on this matter, and I’m sorry that we don’t have another resolution to offer. You have my assurances that the events as you have described them were carefully documented.”

Fox News reached out to Southwest Airlines for comment, but they did not immediately reply.

Westlake Legal Group Southwest-airlines Southwest Airlines passenger says flight attendant complained about 'Muslim woman' for 'making people uncomfortable' Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc d72b242d-2750-54fb-810f-dc5e9658d688 article   Westlake Legal Group Southwest-airlines Southwest Airlines passenger says flight attendant complained about 'Muslim woman' for 'making people uncomfortable' Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc d72b242d-2750-54fb-810f-dc5e9658d688 article

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Paul Batura: This is one shortage Americans may not want to face

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6074404853001_6074407656001-vs Paul Batura: This is one shortage Americans may not want to face Paul Batura fox-news/opinion fox-news/food-drink/food fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 20d69651-cd58-58d4-9c6d-06c9c7da05b4

From wartime rationing of aluminum and electricity in the 1940s to long gas lines during the energy crisis of the 1970s, America has faced its share of serious and consequential shortages over the years.

But now french fries?

Cold and wet weather across the heartland has resulted in a depressed potato crop this year, a fact that threatens and complicates restauranteurs’ ability to serve America’s favorite side dish of sliced and fried strips of potato.

FRENCH FRIES SHORTAGE POSSIBLY LOOMING AFTER POTATO CROPS DAMAGED BY WEATHER

Say it ain’t so!

According to the U.S. Agriculture Department, the average person eats over 115 pounds of potatoes a year — and more than two-thirds of them in the form of a processed potato product, with fries leading the way.

Potato shortages can be no laughing matter, of course. Ireland’s “Great Potato Famine” between 1845 and 1849 not only caused over one million deaths but also forever changed the country’s demography and culture — and the world’s, for that matter.

More from Opinion

If you think about it, millions of us who enjoy an Irish heritage can trace our very existence and American citizenship back to the shortage of potatoes. Faced with a bleak future on “The Emerald Isle,” my mother’s great grandmother emigrated to New York in the 1860s. Over a half-million joined her.

The upside of misfortune — the silver lining of a dark cloud — is almost never appreciated in the midst of the turmoil. It’s only after the fact when we’re able to connect the dots, that we’re able to see how good things often come from bad.

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I feel bad for America’s farmers who are struggling, not just over a bad spud crop this season, but who are constantly battling the elements and weathering the storms in order that we may enjoy fine and affordable food.

It’s fair to say that we take our nation’s agricultural workers for granted. Often working long hours, and in very challenging weather, they’re heroes in my book. Techniques and traditions have changed, but President Dwight Eisenhower, who hailed from Kansas, was right when he said, “Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you’re a thousand miles from the cornfield.”

Our nation’s love affair with the french fry goes back to our founding. Historians will tell you that Thomas Jefferson’s White House table included “potatoes served in the French manner.” But it wasn’t until the explosion of fast-food restaurants in the middle of the 20th century that fries became an accompanying staple with such favorites as hamburgers, chicken and hot dogs.

Our nation’s love affair with the french fry goes back to our founding. Historians will tell you that Thomas Jefferson’s White House table included “potatoes served in the French manner.”

Growing up, french fries were hands down my favorite vegetable. My first memory of them dates back to being 4 or 5 years old. Nunley’s was a classic old amusement park located just a block away from our house in Baldwin on Long Island. Opened in 1940, the centerpiece of the park was an ornate carousel, a magnificent ride that first operated on Brooklyn’s waterfront.

But it was the snack bar beside the high-dome ceilinged room that drew my greatest attention and affection. Behind a long counter stood two or three burly men in white outfits who were hunched over sizzling, stainless steel fry cookers. They used to serve fries in white paper sacks and the hot grease always threatened to break through the bottom of the bag.

If you’re a fan of the french fry, you likely have your favorite cut — thin or thick, waffle or curly, seasoned or plain. I prefer thin and extra crispy. Just before my mom died, we stopped at Sonic one day and introduced her to tater tots. She said she couldn’t believe she had survived almost 80 years without them.

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Because this is the 21st century and smart people solve all kinds of problems far more complex than too few American potatoes, I’m sure none of us will go for want of french fries this coming year.

But even if we did, like those of us who enjoy American citizenship because of a previous potato shortage, we’d probably be better off in the long run

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM PAUL BATURA

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6074404853001_6074407656001-vs Paul Batura: This is one shortage Americans may not want to face Paul Batura fox-news/opinion fox-news/food-drink/food fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 20d69651-cd58-58d4-9c6d-06c9c7da05b4   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6074404853001_6074407656001-vs Paul Batura: This is one shortage Americans may not want to face Paul Batura fox-news/opinion fox-news/food-drink/food fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 20d69651-cd58-58d4-9c6d-06c9c7da05b4

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California man choked, battered ex-landlord before crashing car in attempt to get away, sheriff says

A man in California was arrested Friday after assaulting his former landlord and then crashing his car when attempting to flee from deputies, according to officials.

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department said in a news release that officials received a call around 4:11 a.m. to a home in Norco, located about 50 miles east of downtown Los Angeles.

When deputies arrived they found the 83-year-old victim, who reported being choked and battered by a former tenant who broke into his home to retrieve his own car.

FIRST PERSON CHARGED UNDER FLORIDA ‘RED FLAG’ LAW FOUND GUILTY

Officials said the suspect, identified as 27-year-old Paul Stephen Otto, then left the scene in his older model Volvo sedan, which was registered to himself.

Later that day, Otto was seen driving by the police station in Norvo, where an attempt was made by deputies to detain him.

Westlake Legal Group Paul-Stephen-Otto-Riverside-County-Sheriffs-Dept California man choked, battered ex-landlord before crashing car in attempt to get away, sheriff says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 5ec17df4-8960-5487-a62d-385e196a727d

Paul Stephen Otto, 27, was arrested on Friday after allegedly assaulting his former landlord, according to officials. (Riverside County Sheriff’s Department)

The 27-year-old then fled “at a high rate of speed” in the Volvo before eventually getting into an accident at an intersection while trying to evade deputies. As a result of the collision, police said the 27-year-old totaled his vehicle and was able to be taken into custody.

MISSING SAUDI SERVICEMEN LINKED TO NAS PENSACOLA SHOOTING SOUGHT; GUNMAN MADE PRIOR REPORTED TRIP TO NYC

“Neither party involved in the traffic collision sustained any injuries” police said.

Otto was transported to a hospital for medical clearance before he was taken to the  Robert Presley Detention Center, where he is being held on $300,000 bail. Officials said that Otto was charged with assault causing great bodily injury and elder abuse.

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Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact Deputy Lycopolus at (951) 270-5673.

Westlake Legal Group Paul-Stephen-Otto-Riverside-County-Sheriffs-Dept California man choked, battered ex-landlord before crashing car in attempt to get away, sheriff says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 5ec17df4-8960-5487-a62d-385e196a727d   Westlake Legal Group Paul-Stephen-Otto-Riverside-County-Sheriffs-Dept California man choked, battered ex-landlord before crashing car in attempt to get away, sheriff says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 5ec17df4-8960-5487-a62d-385e196a727d

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Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Lena Dunham is doing her best to recover from a broken heart. 

For her, that process has involved a major move: The “Girls” actor is living in Wales while filming a new project, an experience that she has found very healing. 

The actor and author joked during an appearance on the “The Jonathan Ross Show” on Saturday night that the Welsh countryside made her feel like she was an English novelist. 

“It was so cozy, there were sheep all around us. I’m from New York City. I’ve never even been above 14th street. Suddenly I’m in Wales sitting in a turret in a little castle like I’m freaking Charlotte Brontë,” Dunham said to laughs from the audience. “The whole thing was so romantic. I was recovering from a broken heart. So that’s where you go.” 

The “Not That Kind of Girl” writer split from her longtime boyfriend, musician Jack Antonoff, in December 2017 after five years of dating. Since their split, Antonoff has been linked to model and photographer Carlotta Kohl.

Westlake Legal Group 5dea687821000053ef34f3b0 Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Scott Dudelson via Getty Images Lena Dunham and Jack Antonoff attend the 2017 pre-Grammy Gala on Feb. 11, 2017, in Beverly Hills.

Dunham said in her interview with Ross that she’s tried dating during her stay in the U.K., but that being sober has brought some challenges.

“Here’s the thing that I’m finding about dating here. I love England, love the culture, love the people. I’m sober, it’s a choice, and I would say sober dating in the U.K. is a roughie,” she said.

“I mean ― it was easy to find guys when I would drink ’cause I would drink a lot, go over to their house, throw up and then they would have to let me stay. But in Wales when I was being a polite woman of dignity and grace, much more challenging.”

Last year, Dunham revealed on Dax Shepard’s podcast, “Armchair Expert,” that she misused pills for three years and was now sober.

Westlake Legal Group 5dea83ed2400004e005a2900 Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Vince Bucci via Getty Images Dunham attends the Friendly House 30th Annual Awards Luncheon on Oct. 26 in Los Angeles. 

“My particular passion was Klonopin,” she said. “There were a solid three years where I was ― to put it lightly ― misusing benzos, even though it was all, quote unquote, doctor prescribed.”

“Nobody I know who is prescribed these medications is told, ‘By the way, when you try and get off this, it’s going to be like the most hellacious acid trip you’ve ever had where you’re fucking clutching the walls and the hair is blowing off your head and you can’t believe you found yourself in this situation,’” she said.

Need help with substance abuse or mental health issues? In the U.S., call 800-662-HELP (4357) for the SAMHSA National Helpline.

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Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Lena Dunham is doing her best to recover from a broken heart. 

For her, that process has involved a major move: The “Girls” actor is living in Wales while filming a new project, an experience that she has found very healing. 

The actor and author joked during an appearance on the “The Jonathan Ross Show” on Saturday night that the Welsh countryside made her feel like she was an English novelist. 

“It was so cozy, there were sheep all around us. I’m from New York City. I’ve never even been above 14th street. Suddenly I’m in Wales sitting in a turret in a little castle like I’m freaking Charlotte Brontë,” Dunham said to laughs from the audience. “The whole thing was so romantic. I was recovering from a broken heart. So that’s where you go.” 

The “Not That Kind of Girl” writer split from her longtime boyfriend, musician Jack Antonoff, in December 2017 after five years of dating. Since their split, Antonoff has been linked to model and photographer Carlotta Kohl.

Westlake Legal Group 5dea687821000053ef34f3b0 Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Scott Dudelson via Getty Images Lena Dunham and Jack Antonoff attend the 2017 pre-Grammy Gala on Feb. 11, 2017, in Beverly Hills.

Dunham said in her interview with Ross that she’s tried dating during her stay in the U.K., but that being sober has brought some challenges.

“Here’s the thing that I’m finding about dating here. I love England, love the culture, love the people. I’m sober, it’s a choice, and I would say sober dating in the U.K. is a roughie,” she said.

“I mean ― it was easy to find guys when I would drink ’cause I would drink a lot, go over to their house, throw up and then they would have to let me stay. But in Wales when I was being a polite woman of dignity and grace, much more challenging.”

Last year, Dunham revealed on Dax Shepard’s podcast, “Armchair Expert,” that she misused pills for three years and was now sober.

Westlake Legal Group 5dea83ed2400004e005a2900 Lena Dunham Says Moving To Wales Helped Her Heal ‘A Broken Heart’

Vince Bucci via Getty Images Dunham attends the Friendly House 30th Annual Awards Luncheon on Oct. 26 in Los Angeles. 

“My particular passion was Klonopin,” she said. “There were a solid three years where I was ― to put it lightly ― misusing benzos, even though it was all, quote unquote, doctor prescribed.”

“Nobody I know who is prescribed these medications is told, ‘By the way, when you try and get off this, it’s going to be like the most hellacious acid trip you’ve ever had where you’re fucking clutching the walls and the hair is blowing off your head and you can’t believe you found yourself in this situation,’” she said.

Need help with substance abuse or mental health issues? In the U.S., call 800-662-HELP (4357) for the SAMHSA National Helpline.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in ‘three minutes flat’

Westlake Legal Group e5Bucwd9Pz5WoIlTr0z_6d-398IUqdJ9flblTdVrZE0 Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in 'three minutes flat' r/politics

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What Does This Country Demand of Black Women in Politics?

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165011958_da739378-20bc-42fc-948f-a0df7fc16c5e-facebookJumbo What Does This Country Demand of Black Women in Politics? Women and Girls United States Politics and Government Race and Ethnicity Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Moseley Braun, Carol Harris, Kamala D Elections, Mayors Chisholm, Shirley Breed, London Blacks

WASHINGTON — The first black woman to be elected mayor of San Francisco, London Breed, considers Senator Kamala Harris something of a political soul mate. When Ms. Harris announced her White House bid in Oakland, Calif., in January, Ms. Breed was one of the 20,000 supporters there loudly celebrating, and she endorsed the campaign from the beginning.

But in the days since Ms. Harris dropped out of the race last week, Ms. Breed has been reflecting on the moments that were less celebratory, like the questions that continually dogged Ms. Harris about whether a black woman could win.

They are questions Ms. Breed has heard herself. When she first considered making her first bid for elected office at age 37, with a run for the San Francisco board of supervisors in 2012, several people urged her to go for a lower position or move to another district, one with a larger African-American population.

The message then — and now — was clear to her: Limit your sights. There’s only so much a black woman in politics can do.

“I keep going back to a lot of people telling me there’s no way I can win in my district, they thought I could never get elected to my seat,” she said. “Why is it more natural for a white man to be electable than an African-American woman?”

Ms. Breed is far from alone in wondering what Ms. Harris’s aborted run means for the political standing of black women in Democratic politics. The California senator’s decision to exit the race before the first round of voting has sparked an emotional reckoning, as the small sorority of prominent elected black female officials, strategists and candidates find themselves grappling with how Ms. Harris fell from a top contender to near the bottom of the pack, why she failed to attract black supporters and wondering what it will take for one of them to not only run, but also win, the White House.

For the first time in their political lives, many saw their own identity reflected in Ms. Harris’s bid, in the photos of her as a young girl in braids, her membership in the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, her stories of being bused into a white school district and her drum line dance moves.

They also saw in her effort a Democratic Party establishment unwilling to fully back its candidacies, even as black women remain the party’s most loyal supporters. And they saw confirmation of how much more difficult it can be for a black woman to raise money from people who like her but just aren’t convinced she should be — or could be elected — president.

Representative Barbara Lee, who represents Oakland, said the possibility of an all-white slate of top-tier candidates — and the likelihood of an entirely white roster at this month’s presidential debate — after Ms. Harris’s exit from the race demonstrates a lack of respect for black women at the highest levels.

“The issues that will be brought up will not be brought up from a black woman’s perspective,” said Ms. Lee, who was one of Ms. Harris’ campaign co-chairs. “We’ve elected everyone to office, so why shouldn’t we be the commander in chief?”

While Ms. Harris’s bid wasn’t a historic first, her candidacy was groundbreaking for how seriously her effort was taken by the political establishment. The third black woman to run for the White House, she cast her campaign in the direct shadow of the first, opening her effort with a red-and-yellow logo that was a nod to Shirley Chisholm’s bid.

“She broke a glass ceiling for women of color,” said Representative Karen Bass, a Democrat from California and the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus. “There will be more African-American women running in the next presidential race. Maybe it will even be Kamala herself.”

Supporters acknowledge that many of the problems faced by Ms. Harris’s presidential campaign were self-inflicted, having little do to with her race or gender. They list failings like strategic miscalculations that had her ignoring Iowa and New Hampshire for the first months of the race, a lack of leadership within her operation and an inability to articulate a consistent rationale for her candidacy. Her critics argue that those missteps suggested to voters that Ms. Harris was unprepared for the presidency, lending credence to arguments questioning her electability.

But her supporters note that she faced a level of scrutiny that unsuccessful white male candidates, like former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas, seemed to escape.

“There was a particular focus on her, which just speaks to the double standard that all women candidates and candidates of color face,” said Adrianne Shropshire, the executive director of BlackPAC, a super PAC focused on African-American Democrats, who is unaffiliated in the race. “That scrutinizing of missteps in the campaign isn’t applied equally.”

While record-breaking numbers of black women were elected to Congress last year, they have struggled to break into higher positions. A black woman has never served as governor, and only two have served in the Senate, Ms. Harris and Carol Moseley Braun, of Illinois.

Last year, Stacey Abrams, of Georgia, became the first black woman to win her party’s nomination for governor in United States history.

Within the limited academic research detailing the barriers black women face, there is a broad consensus that there are additional obstacles. Their efforts can become a circle of self-defeat: Political strategists, party leaders and donors doubt whether they can win majority-white areas, so they don’t support their bid. Because they don’t have early support, it creates more skepticism of their candidacy from the political establishment.

Aides who worked on Ms. Abrams’s campaign said they waged a “concurrent campaign of belief.” They needed to win voters the way any candidate would, by meeting people and putting forward appealing policies. And they needed to convince skeptics that just because a black woman had never won in a Southern state, that didn’t mean she couldn’t.

Those problems were supersized for Ms. Harris, who ran in a campaign cycle in which Democratic voters are intensely focused on their ideas of who can defeat President Trump.

“This whole electability conversation I think is super tone deaf,” said Representative Lauren Underwood, who became the first woman and first person of color to represent her majority-white Illinois district last year. “We can win, and we do all across the country.”

Ms. Harris tried to tackle that concern directly, bringing up what she called the “donkey in the room” at town hall meetings and rallies. When she addressed her race and gender, she cast her candidacy in aspirational terms, urging voters to “believe in what can be unburdened by what has been.”

She also argued that the path to winning back the Midwest could run through black voters in places like Detroit as easily as the white suburbs. Yet risk-averse older black voters worried that Ms. Harris’s race would be a difficult sell to white voters in key swing states.

Still others argue that Ms. Harris’s bid shows that the real risk is not leaning enough into identity, something future candidates will have to do to succeed.

“The advice for black women who are running is to lean into the fact that fellow black women are the most powerful Democrats, we have a unique position and strength,” said Aimee Allison, the founder of She the People, a group focused on increasing political power among women of color

Yet perhaps the most significant challenge facing black female candidates, according to strategists, is one that eventually undid Ms. Harris’s effort: money.

As her campaign dropped in the polls, aides to Ms. Harris frequently pointed to former Senator John Kerry’s primary campaign as an example of how a candidacy can rebound. During his 2003 primary effort, Mr. Kerry fell in the polls throughout the fall before rebounding to win the Iowa caucuses. At the lowest point, Mr. Kerry lent his effort $6.4 million of his family fortune to keep his campaign afloat, a financial infusion Ms. Harris was unable to supply or raise from donors.

“There’s a huge racial wealth gap, so you don’t have a level playing field,” Ms. Lee said, pointing to Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s ability to raise money from wealthy gay donors. “You look at the wealth gap and you look at the donor base and you look at who has the money and who doesn’t have the money, these are some very deep questions that we should be talking about.”

Now with clear evidence on how much this limits politicians at even the highest levels, Ms. Lee said, donors and politicians have to confront it directly.

Ms. Bass said that when she raises money for her re-election in Los Angeles, she often faces skepticism. She imagines that Ms. Harris faced similar difficulties.

“People question why I need money, but they don’t bat an eye when a white man from a very similar district” makes a similar request, Ms. Bass said. “Typically there’s just an assumption that a man needs the money. Usually if I point that out they immediately recognize the discrepancy, but that doesn’t mean I always get the check.”

Many saw clear challenges in Ms. Harris’s run, but they also remain hopeful. The third black woman to run for the White House will not be the last, they say confidently.

There are clear signs of progress in recruitment and the public discussion about diverse leadership, for example. Others see different signs of advancement.

As Ms. Moseley Braun, the second black woman to run for president, watched Ms. Harris campaign, she couldn’t help thinking how much less uncomfortable, at least physically, the whole ordeal seemed.

When Ms. Moseley Braun ran, candidates sat on stools at campaign events that were so tall that they left her legs dangling off the side, she recalled. And then there was the practice of the candidates locking hands and raising them over their heads at the end of each debate, like a human chain of rivals.

“As the only girl in the race at that time, it made my boobs look crooked on television,” recalled Ms. Braun, who is backing former Vice President Joseph R. Biden in the primary race. “It seems there has been progress.”

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Esper: Delay of Ukraine aid did not have ‘any impact on U.S. national security’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114031306001_6114032178001-vs Esper: Delay of Ukraine aid did not have 'any impact on U.S. national security' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article a95a04ce-d67c-52dc-8b7c-e7b3b74e0597

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper was reluctant to discuss details behind the withholding and release of military aid to Ukraine, but he did reject the notion that the delay had any negative effect on national security.

Over the course of the House impeachment inquiry of President Trump, Democrats have been accusing the president of using the aid and a White House visit with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky as leverage to get them to investigate his political opponents. Democrats claim that by putting political interests ahead of national interest, Trump put national security at risk. Esper was quick to deny such a claim.

MIKE PENCE: NOT A ‘FOREGONE CONCLUSION’ DEMS WILL SECURE IMPEACHMENT VOTES

“At the end of the day, the bottom line is most of that aid got out on time and at no time did it have any impact on United States national security,” Esper said.

Esper said there were three factors that were considered regarding the aid.

“When I came onto the scene, the three things we were looking at were this: one, was the aid necessary and vital to the Ukrainians in terms of defending against Russia; No. 2, had the Ukrainians addressed corruption, and that was a congressional concern; and No. 3, were other countries in the region, other allies and partners assisting them. And given those three things we decided to support the provision of Ukrainian aid.”

Esper would not address whether there were any political factors involved in the delay of the aid’s delivery, citing the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

“I’ll leave that process unto itself,” he said.

Esper also discussed a number of other issues related to national security. He addressed the shooting at the naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., where Americans were killed before the suspect, a Saudi Air Force officer, was shot and killed. The defense secretary would not definitively state whether the incident should be classified as terrorism.

“I don’t know yet. I think that’s why it’s important to allow the investigation to proceed, to understand exactly what he was doing and why.”

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Esper did say he called on officials to “begin review of what our screening procedures are with regard to foreign nationals coming into the United States.” At the same time, he emphasized the need to maintain programs where foreign individuals come to train with U.S. forces.

“The ability to bring foreign students here to train with us, to understand American culture, is very important to us in building those long-term relationships that keep us safer.”

Esper also addressed how the U.S. was prepared to respond to potential “bad behavior” on the part of Iran.

“We’ve reached a point, I think, that we’ve deterred Iranian bad behavior,” Esper said, pointing to an end in recent Iranian aggression that included attacks against ships in the Strait of Hormuz and shooting down of a U.S. drone.

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But when asked about Iran’s latest military efforts, including shipping missiles to other countries in the region and the testing of a ballistic missile that has the capability of delivering a nuclear weapon, Esper said that the U.S. is ready to act, if need be.

“We are prepared to respond, depending on what Iran does,” he said. “And they need to understand that our restraint should not be interpreted as weakness.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114031306001_6114032178001-vs Esper: Delay of Ukraine aid did not have 'any impact on U.S. national security' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article a95a04ce-d67c-52dc-8b7c-e7b3b74e0597   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114031306001_6114032178001-vs Esper: Delay of Ukraine aid did not have 'any impact on U.S. national security' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article a95a04ce-d67c-52dc-8b7c-e7b3b74e0597

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Iconic Connecticut news legend Denise D’Ascenzo dies suddenly

Denise D’Ascenzo, the award-winning WFSB-TV news anchor died suddenly in her Connecticut home late on Saturday, the television station announced. She was 61.

“It was sudden and unexpected,” the station’s statement said. “The grief we are all feeling is immeasurable. We are devastated for her husband and daughter, who were her whole life.”

She came to WFSB-TV in 1986 and “through the years has been a steady and reassuring presence on the anchor desk, covering all the major local and national news stories of the day,” the statement added.

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Westlake Legal Group Denise-DAscenzo-WFSB Iconic Connecticut news legend Denise D'Ascenzo dies suddenly fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro c099cd63-a45b-5e21-bba9-374252a96948 article

Denise D’Ascenzo, the WFSB-TV Connecticut news anchor died suddenly in her home late Saturday, the television station announced late on Saturday. She was 61. (WFSB)

Tributes came from throughout the state on Saturday, as word of her death spread through the local community. Many were shocked.

“I am stunned, I am dumbfounded, and I have no adequate words right now to say how much I thought of Denise,” colleague Gerry Brooks said on Facebook. “I will say this: she is everything you thought she was. And she took good care of herself. Which reminds me how random the lottery of life is. As my mother used to say, ‘It goes by so fast.’ Rest easy, Denise. You will be badly and sadly missed.”

Dennis House was her co-anchor at WFSB for 25 years. He appeared teary-eyed while announcing the news of her death.

“She was a sister I never had,” he said. “I was her brother that she never had. She was my TV wife and we were best friends and I will miss her dearly.”

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Gov. Ned Lamont also tweeted a tribute of D’Ascenzo — who was the longest-serving news anchor at a single television station in the state — calling her “a Connecticut news legend.”

“The news of @DeniseDAscenzo’s passing is incredibly saddening,” he wrote. “She was a trusted name in journalism, and her work most certainly made an impact. My deepest condolences go to her family, friends, and colleagues at @WFSB. She is undoubtedly a CT news legend.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal wrote that she “epitomized competence, class and integrity.”

“For more than 30 years, she guided Connecticut through tragedy and triumph,” he said. “We will miss her huge heart, her boundless generosity and her tireless grace. Connecticut has lost a television legend, invaluable voice, and a dear friend.”

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Throughout her dedicated journalism career, D’Ascenzo won 11 Emmys, including one for Best Anchor, two Edward R. Murrow awards, seven Associated Press awards, and a national Gabriel Award. She was the first woman to be inducted in the Connecticut Broadcasters Association Hall of Fame, according to WFSB.

Westlake Legal Group Denise-DAscenzo-WFSB Iconic Connecticut news legend Denise D'Ascenzo dies suddenly fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro c099cd63-a45b-5e21-bba9-374252a96948 article   Westlake Legal Group Denise-DAscenzo-WFSB Iconic Connecticut news legend Denise D'Ascenzo dies suddenly fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro c099cd63-a45b-5e21-bba9-374252a96948 article

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