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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 98)

Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your day …

Dershowitz: ‘Obama personally asked the FBI to investigate somebody on behalf of George Soros’
As President Trump faces ongoing criticism for allegedly interfering in the Roger Stone case — and Attorney General William Barr confronts more calls for his resignation for his handling of the case — Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz says he has proof that former President Obama “personally asked” the FBI to investigate someone “on behalf of George Soros,” the liberal billionaire megadonor.

“There was a lot of White House control of the Justice Department during the Kennedy administration and I don’t think we saw very many liberal professors arguing against that,” Dershowitz said in an interview with Breitbart News that aired Sunday on SiriusXM. “I have some information as well about the Obama administration – which will be disclosed in a lawsuit at some point, but I’m not prepared to disclose it now – about how President Obama personally asked the FBI to investigate somebody on behalf of George Soros, who was a close ally of his.”

Dershowitz did not say specifically who the target might have been. His claim comes as Barr, who has maintained that Trump never personally intervened in a criminal matter, has been hit by a letter reportedly signed by more than 2,000 former DOJ officials organized by a leftwing group demanding his resignation. In recent days, Barr has openly asked President Trump to stop tweeting about ongoing Justice Department matters, saying it made it “impossible” to do his job.

In an interview on “Hannity” Monday, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., slammed Barr’s critics, saying they have a political agenda separate from upholding the rule of law. Click here for more on our top story.

Westlake Legal Group BSA021820 Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a2e5322-e5d5-5e78-b6b9-e284137b0d43

In this Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, photo, a statue stands outside the Boys Scouts of America headquarters in Irving, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy after sex abuse lawsuits
The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy early on Tuesday after decades of sexual abuse claims within one of the country’s largest youth organizations.

The move filed in Delaware bankruptcy court halts the hundreds of lawsuits the BSA is facing that allege sexual misconduct by people within the 110-year-old organization over the years.

Sexual abuse settlements had reportedly strained the Boy Scouts’ finances, with states passing laws last year so victims from long-ago abuse can sue for damages. Click here for more.

Westlake Legal Group 341b726e-Daytona-3 Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a2e5322-e5d5-5e78-b6b9-e284137b0d43

Ryan Newman, top center, goes airborne as he is hit by Corey LaJoie (32) on the final lap of the NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race at Daytona International Speedway, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020, in Daytona Beach, Fla. Sunday’s race was postponed because of rain. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)

Denny Hamlin wins third Daytona 500; Ryan Newman hospitalized after fiery wreck at finish
Denny Hamlin emerged victorious at the Daytona 500 on Monday night, winning the iconic NASCAR race for a third time, but it was overshadowed by a string of frightening crashes — including a fiery wreck that sent Ryan Newman to the hospital.

Westlake Legal Group d17091e6-Daytona-4 Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a2e5322-e5d5-5e78-b6b9-e284137b0d43

Denny Hamlin (11) celebrates in front of the grandstands after winning the NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race at Daytona International Speedway, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

Newman flipped several times; his car ultimately crossed the finish line engulfed in flames. Fortunately, his injuries were not life-threatening, according to NASCAR Executive Vice President Steve O’Donnell, who read a statement from Roush Fenway Racing Monday night. Click here for more. 
 
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TODAY’S MUST-READS
China says 80 percent of coronavirus cases have been mild, as death toll rises again.
ICYMI: Trump fires back after Obama claims credit for economic boom: ‘Con job.’
Pelosi’s GOP challenger describes being threatened by alleged ‘Antifa bully.’
Democracy 2020 Digest: Bloomberg camp confirms he will debate in Nevada – if he qualifies.
ICYMI: New book reveals explosive details about Loretta Lynch-Bill Clinton tarmac meeting.

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
Coronavirus hits Apple, company to miss revenue target
HSBC sets new cost-cutting, earnings targets after profit falls 33 percent
Americans have $21B in unused gift cards and store credits.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Laura Ingraham says Michael Bloomberg’s recent comments about farmers reveals who he really is and shows the Democratic Party is a party of snobs.

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.
 
Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Wednesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group ObamaSoros021820 Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a2e5322-e5d5-5e78-b6b9-e284137b0d43   Westlake Legal Group ObamaSoros021820 Dershowitz: Obama asked FBI to investigate someone on behalf of Soros; Boys Scouts file for bankruptcy fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a2e5322-e5d5-5e78-b6b9-e284137b0d43

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Janice Dean: Why I love the weather

Growing up, my dad always used to tell me: “Janice Anne, find what you most love to do in life, and it will never feel like work.”

I remembered him saying this at a very young age, and I am happy and proud to say, I am living my father’s advice.

Becoming a meteorologist wasn’t always on the horizon when it came to following my career path.  But, every job I did do early on I believe has led me to where I am today.

SNOW DAY SPURS MISSOURI FATHER TO MAKE PLEA: ‘KIDS HOME SEND HELP’

It started where I grew up. Living in Ottawa, Canada I was reminded that I was living in one of the world’s coldest winter capitals.

The fondest memories I have as a kid did not always happen in the summer months. I have more pictures of me in my snowsuit, making snowmen or skating on the ice than I do of me at the beach building sandcastles.

Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-childhood-in-snow Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

The author in an undated childhood photo.

And every single year, God willing, if I live to be 100 years old, I’ll always create a snow angel following the first snowfall of the season!

Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-snow-angel Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

When I visit children in classrooms around the country and tell them about my job, I bring pictures to show them the house I grew up in with snow piled up to the roof.

When I am asked about what my favorite season is or what kind of weather I like to cover the most, I say all of it.

We also had memorable ice storms – one particular historic year ice piled up on the roads, sidewalks and power lines. The National Guard had to come in and help get our city cleaned up and the power restored after weeks of being in the dark (and the cold!).

I remember seeing the weather forecasters during these big events and being fascinated by how they could forecast these sometimes life-changing storms. I would wonder how they knew when these big weather events were going to strike.

JANICE DEAN OPENS UP ABOUT HER DECADE-LONG BATTLE WITH MS

When I first graduated from college, I had my mind all set on a broadcasting career. For several years I worked at a classic rock station and it was during this period in my early 20’s a news director told me he thought I should some television reporting.  He asked if I had ever done the weather (back then you didn’t need the meteorology background to be an on-camera presenter).

Eager to try new things, I said yes and sat for days learning how to create weather graphics and figure out a five-day forecast.

I never imagined someday I would be doing it fulltime but I enjoyed the excitement of television, being outside, and looking at clues to see what the next day’s weather would bring.

When I was hired at Fox News over a decade later as their daytime forecaster, I went back to school to make it official.  It took me several years to become a broadcast meteorologist and in 2009 I was awarded the American Meteorological Society (AMS) seal of approval.

Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-weather-map Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

When I talk with kids who are trying to figure out their career path, I always tell them to do everything you can to broaden out your job opportunities.

When I was in school, I LOVED math and science – the subjects you need to excel at when you study weather — and my years doing radio and reporting have also given me the building blocks to what I do every morning on “Fox & Friends.”

Weather is all around us. It can start up conversations with strangers and is a good way to think about life.

Someone recently asked me if my years as a radio D.J. has helped me in my job today. And the answer is absolutely. 

People are shocked to find out that meteorologists don’t read scripts from a TelePrompter. It’s all ad-lib, and my days in radio certainly have helped my presentation.

The fact that I went back to school in my thirties to study meteorology is a lesson that there should never be a time limit to learning something new.

And because I love talking and teaching kids about weather, that inspired my other love – writing about it. 

More from Opinion

The idea for my “Freddy the Frogcaster” series came from friends and family members who were looking for recommendations for children’s weather books.  After doing some research, I felt like there was a need for more of them, so I “leaped forward” and began to create my own.

I had read somewhere that frogs somehow innately know when the weather is changing, and have been known to “croak loader” when a storm is coming.  I’m not sure if this is scientifically proven, but when I read it, I thought wow – frogs are natural weather forecasters.

I’ve written five books in the “Freddy the Frogcaster” series including his adventures covering thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, snowstorms and flash floods.

Westlake Legal Group 5b8f9d35-Janice-Dean-w-Freddy-in-background-in-Fox-Square Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

Janice Dean with Freddy the Frogcaster in Fox Square in New York City. (FNC)

I’m also proud that Freddy the Frogcaster is an ambassador for NOAA’s Weather Ready Nation program. (He’s got his own seal of approval!)

CLICK HERE TO GET OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Now that I’ve written these books and have spoken to thousands of kids about weather, I think this is one of the most important things I’ve ever done. And, just like I was as a kid, the children I go out and talk with are excited to tell you everything they’ve been through. Even the tough stuff.

Over the years covering extreme weather events, I am always struck by how communities come together and help each other. We can help save lives by talking about what to do and how to prepare in advance.

Parents have told me that after they read the “Freddy” books, many times it’s their children who are the ones who take the initiative to get an emergency preparedness kit together.

When I am asked about what my favorite season is or what kind of weather I like to cover the most, I say all of it.

I feel incredibly responsible when it comes to forecasting severe weather or hurricanes.  Meteorologists are sometimes the first ones to alert communities of the possibility of a dangerous weather event.  All of us want to make sure we’re giving the most up to date information so that families and communities can make their best plans.

Our forecasting tools area getting better at predicting when bad weather could strike more accurately. We’re the last ones that want to get the forecast wrong, but sometimes it happens and we hear about it. But, I always say I’d rather see people be over-prepared for a weather situation that doesn’t happen than that they are underprepared and caught off guard.

In terms of fun, though, I have to go back to my days as a kid. I love that moment when the first snowfall arrives and maybe there’s a day off from school to get bundled up and make snowmen, snow forts and snow angels.

Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-snow Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

(Courtesy of the author)

Rosy cheeks and fresh air remind you it’s a great day to be outside.  And then there’s the warm up inside with hot cocoa and marshmallows to discuss all of the snow that came down in just a few hours.

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Every morning when I’m outside on Fox Square bringing you the nation’s weather I’m always reminded that weather is the one thing that we all experience together on this planet. Those cold, sunny days when you can see your breath and quite literally they remind you that you’re alive.

Weather is all around us. It can start up conversations with strangers and is a good way to think about life: After every storm, the sun comes out, and the winds sometimes will clear a path to a new destination, a different path or just a brand new day to begin again.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM JANICE DEAN

Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-headshot-new Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb   Westlake Legal Group Janice-Dean-headshot-new Janice Dean: Why I love the weather Janice Dean fox-news/weather fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9a4fe104-113f-50d7-b1fb-057257fa15bb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

HSBC Plans to Cut 35,000 Jobs as Challenges Mount in Asia

Westlake Legal Group 18hsbc-facebookJumbo HSBC Plans to Cut 35,000 Jobs as Challenges Mount in Asia Layoffs and Job Reductions HSBC Holdings PLC. Hong Kong Economic Conditions and Trends Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

HONG KONG — HSBC plans to cut 35,000 jobs over the next three years as the global bank struggles to revive a business that has come to depend increasingly on China for growth.

The London-based bank said on Tuesday that it aimed to cut $4.5 billion in costs as it faces headwinds that include the coronavirus outbreak in China and months of political strife in Hong Kong, one of its most important bases.

The coronavirus is causing economic disruptions in Hong Kong and mainland China that could have a negative impact on performance this year, the bank warned. The bank lowered expectations for growth across Asia for this year but added that it expected to see some improvement once the virus was contained. Nearly half of the bank’s revenue comes from Asia.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

HSBC shares trading in Hong Kong slumped by more than 3 percent.

It is the latest company to shed light on the impact of a fast-moving virus that has gripped China over recent weeks and led to a near nationwide economic standstill. While parts of the country are getting back to work, the reopening of business operations for many companies has been slow.

On Monday, Apple cut its sales expectations for the quarter and warned of the impact on the global supply chain.

“Parts of our business are not delivering acceptable returns,” said Noel Quinn, HSBC’s chief executive.

The bank reported a 33 percent fall in profit before taxes last year compared with the previous year, in part due to a so-called goodwill impairment of $7.3 billion. Mr. Quinn took the helm after the surprise resignation of the former chief executive, John Flint, in August.

The bank has already begun an overhaul that involves cutting back operations in the United States and Europe, Mr. Quinn said.

Months of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong “weighed on the local economy and caused significant disruption,” Mr. Quinn said. The protests have pushed Hong Kong’s economy into recession as businesses that once thrived from mainland tourism have taken a hit.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy after sex abuse lawsuits

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection early on Tuesday after decades of sexual abuse claims within one of the country’s largest youth organizations.

The move filed in Delaware bankruptcy court halts the hundreds of lawsuits the BSA is facing that allege sexual misconduct by people within the 110-year-old organization over the years.

Sexual abuse settlements had reportedly strained the Boy Scouts’ finances, with states passing laws last year so victims from long-ago abuse can sue for damages.

ANTHONY WEINER HAS PARENTS UPSET AS HE SEEKS MORE ACCESS AT SON’S SCHOOL: REPORT

Westlake Legal Group AP19304529013812 Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy after sex abuse lawsuits fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro baa20c0e-b876-57a4-b340-7d1297b91b65 article

FILE- In this June 25, 2016, file photo, Cub Scouts watch a race during the Second Annual World Championship Pinewood Derby in New York’s Times Square. In January 2020, the Boy Scouts of America will increase its annual youth membership fee by more than 80% as it faces a potentially ruinous wave of new sex-abuse lawsuits. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Mike Pfau, an attorney whose firm was representing 300 victims in New York as of last April said the bankruptcy would be “bigger in scale than any other sex abuse bankruptcy.”

“You’re talking about thousands of perpetrators,” Seattle-based lawyer Michael Pfau, who has represented over 300 Boy Scout victims in 34 states, told the New York Daily News. “You’re talking about tens of thousands of victims. This will be the largest bankruptcy the country has ever seen, and likely one of the largest corporate bankruptcies.”

The national organization said they made the move to fairly compensate victims harmed during their time in scouting and to keep the 100-year-old nonprofit running for years to come.

A Victims Compensation Trust will reportedly be set up during the bankruptcy process, which the organization says will provide “equitable compensation to victims.”

COUNTRY SINGER DANIEL LEE MARTIN DEAD BY SUICIDE AMID CHILD SEX ABUSE CHARGES

“The BSA cares deeply about all victims of abuse and sincerely apologizes to anyone who was harmed during their time in Scouting. We are outraged that there have been times when individuals took advantage of our programs to harm innocent children,” said Roger Mosby, president and chief executive officer of the BSA.

“While we know nothing can undo the tragic abuse that victims suffered, we believe the Chapter 11 process – with the proposed Trust structure – will provide equitable compensation to all victims while maintaining the BSA’s important mission,” he added.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The bankruptcy petition reportedly listed the Boy Scouts’ assets as between $1 billion and $10 billion, and its liabilities at $500 million to $1 billion.

The Associated Press contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group AP19304529013812 Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy after sex abuse lawsuits fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro baa20c0e-b876-57a4-b340-7d1297b91b65 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19304529013812 Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy after sex abuse lawsuits fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro baa20c0e-b876-57a4-b340-7d1297b91b65 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

Westlake Legal Group 5e4b8d912600007a02b5ebe9 ‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Kellye Nakahara Wallett, a film and television actress best known for playing Lt. Nurse Kellye Yamato on “M*A*S*H,” has died at age 72.

Son William Wallett told The Associated Press that Wallett died Sunday after a brief battle with cancer. She was at her home in Pasadena, California, surrounded by family and friends.

A native of O’ahu, Hawaii who was listed as Kellye Nakahara while in “M-A-S-H,” Wallett also appeared in the film “Clue” and in John Hughes’ “She’s Having a Baby.” More recently, she worked as a watercolor artist and was involved in the local arts community. She is survived by her husband, David Wallett; two children and four grandchildren.

“M*A*S*H,” the acclaimed sitcom set during the Korean War, ran from 1972-83. Nurse Kellye carries a secret crush on the show’s major character, the womanizing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce, played by Alan Alda. In a memorable scene, Kellye reveals her feelings, scolding Hawkeye for having his “eyes … on every nurse” except her.

Fans who learned of her death left tributes on social media:

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Director of Wuhan Hospital Dies From Virus

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group 18china-briefing-doctor1-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Director of Wuhan Hospital Dies From Virus Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

A makeshift memorial for Dr. Li Wenliang, who died in early February, at Wuhan City Central Hospital. Another prominent doctor in Wuhan, the director of Wuchang Hospital, died on TuesdayCredit…Chris Buckley/The New York Times

The director of a hospital in Wuhan, the Chinese city at the center of the epidemic, died on Tuesday after contracting the new coronavirus, the latest in a series of medical professionals to be killed in the outbreak.

Liu Zhiming, a neurosurgeon and the director of the Wuchang Hospital in Wuhan, died shortly before 11 a.m. on Tuesday, the Wuhan health commission said.

“From the start of the outbreak, Comrade Liu Zhiming, without regard to his personal safety, led the medical staff of Wuchang Hospital at the front lines of the fight against the epidemic,” the commission said. Dr. Liu “made significant contributions to our city’s fight to prevent and control the novel coronavirus,” it added.

Last week the Chinese government said that more than 1,700 medical workers had contracted the virus, and six had died.

Chinese medical workers at the forefront of the fight against the coronavirus epidemic are often becoming its victims, partly because of government missteps and logistical hurdles. After the virus emerged in Wuhan late last year, city leaders played down its risks, and doctors did not take the strongest precautions.

The death nearly two weeks ago of Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist who was initially reprimanded for warning medical school classmates about the virus, stirred an outpouring of grief and anger. Dr. Li, 34, has emerged as a symbol of how the authorities controlled information and have moved to stifle online criticism and aggressive reporting on the outbreak.

An analysis of 44,672 coronavirus patients in China whose diagnoses were confirmed by laboratory testing has found that 1,023 had died by Feb. 11. That’s a fatality rate of 2.3 percent. Figures released on a daily basis suggest the rate has further increased in recent days.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

That is far higher than the mortality rate of the seasonal flu, with which the new coronavirus has sometimes been compared.

In the United States, flu fatality rates hover around 0.1 percent.

The new analysis was posted online by researchers at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over all, about 81 percent of patients with confirmed diagnoses experienced mild illness, the researchers found. Nearly 14 percent had severe cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, and about 5 percent had critical illnesses.

Thirty percent of those who died were in their 60s, 30 percent were in their 70s and 20 percent were age 80 or older. Though men and women were roughly equally represented among the confirmed cases, men made up nearly 64 percent of the deaths. Patients with underlying medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, died at higher rates.

The fatality rate among patients in Hubei Province, the center of China’s outbreak, was more than seven times higher than that of other provinces.

China on Tuesday announced new figures for the outbreak. The number of cases was put at 72,436 — up 1,888 from 70,548 the day before — and the death toll now stands at 1,868, up 98 from 1,770, the authorities said.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v31 Coronavirus Live Updates: Director of Wuhan Hospital Dies From Virus Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has infected more than 73,200 people in China and 25 other countries.

Video

transcript

Americans Heading From Cruise Ship to Quarantine

More than 300 Americans were evacuated from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan. Fourteen of them tested positive for the coronavirus and will be placed in isolation in the United States.

Oh OK, this is a little strange. All right careful, nice and slow. This is really good. Be careful everyone as you come up the stairway. Well, we’re exhausted, but we’re on the plane and that’s a good feeling. Pretty miserable wearing these masks though.

Westlake Legal Group 17JAPAN-SHIP12-promo-videoSixteenByNine3000-v8 Coronavirus Live Updates: Director of Wuhan Hospital Dies From Virus Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

More than 300 Americans were evacuated from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan. Fourteen of them tested positive for the coronavirus and will be placed in isolation in the United States.CreditCredit…Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

A day before 328 Americans were to be whisked away from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo told passengers that no one infected with the new coronavirus would be allowed to board charter flights to the United States.

But those plans were hastily changed after the test results for 14 passengers came back positive — just as they were being loaded onto buses and dispatched to the airport, where two reconfigured cargo jets were waiting to fly them to military bases in California and Texas.

After consultations with health experts, the U.S. government decided to let the infected evacuees, who were not yet exhibiting symptoms, board the flights.

The reversal was the latest chaotic turn in a two-week quarantine of the ship, the Diamond Princess, that has become an epidemiological nightmare.

Weeks after airlines cut flights to China over the coronavirus outbreak, airlines in Asia are cutting flights elsewhere.

Singapore Airlines on Tuesday said it would temporarily cut flights between the city-state and major destinations like New York, Paris, London, Tokyo, Seoul and Sydney. It cited weak demand as fears over the outbreak keep more travelers at home.

The announcement follows a similar notice two weeks ago by Cathay Pacific, the Hong Kong carrier. In announcing the cancellation of nearly all its flights to mainland China, it also said it would reduce service elsewhere over the next two months depending on how the market fares. Over all, it said, the cuts represent nearly one-third of the airline’s capacity.

Containment efforts have sidelined Chinese tourists, a powerful economic force responsible for $277 billion in spending a year, according to the U.N. World Tourism Organization. But the spreading coronavirus has unnerved tourists from elsewhere, especially when it comes to flying back and forth from Asia. As of Tuesday, Japan had reported 66 cases, not counting 454 aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship off Yokohama. Singapore reported 66 cases, Hong Kong had 60 cases and South Korea reported 31 cases.

When Cambodia’s prime minister greeted passengers on a cruise ship amid a coronavirus scare on Valentine’s Day, embraces were the order of the day. Protective masks were not.

Not only did Prime Minister Hun Sen not wear one, assured that the ship was virus-free, his bodyguards ordered people who had donned masks to take them off. The next day, the American ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy, who brought his own family to greet the passengers streaming off the ship, also went without a mask.

“We are very, very grateful that Cambodia has opened literally its ports and doors to people in need,” Mr. Murphy said. Five other ports had said no.

But after hundreds of passengers had disembarked, one later tested positive for the coronavirus.

Now, health officials worry that what Cambodia opened its doors to was the outbreak, and that the world may pay a price as passengers from the cruse ship Westerdam stream home.

Officials are testing those passengers still on the ship, but health authorities may be hard put to trace all those who have headed back to their homes.

Apple said on Monday that it was cutting its sales forecast because of the coronavirus, in a sign of how the outbreak is taking a toll on manufacturing, even at one of the world’s most valuable companies.

The announcement came hours before China announced new figures for the outbreak.

In a statement, the iPhone maker, which is heavily dependent on factories in China, said its supply of smartphones would be hurt because production was slowed by the outbreak.

None of the factories that make iPhones are in Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak, but travel restrictions have hindered other parts of the country as well. Production was taking longer than hoped to get back on track after the facilities reopened following the Lunar New Year holiday, the company said.

Apple said it was also cutting its sales forecast because demand for its products was being hurt in China. China has been one of the Silicon Valley company’s fastest-growing and largest markets.

Apple’s warning is significant because it is a bellwether of global demand and supply of products. The company said it was “fundamentally strong, and this disruption to our business is only temporary.”

Reporting and research was contributed by Austin Ramzy, Hannah Beech, Roni Caryn Rabin, Richard C. Paddock, Motoko Rich and Daisuke Wakabayashi.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

Westlake Legal Group 5e4b8d912600007a02b5ebe9 ‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Kellye Nakahara Wallett, a film and television actress best known for playing Lt. Nurse Kellye Yamato on “M*A*S*H,” has died at age 72.

Son William Wallett told The Associated Press that Wallett died Sunday after a brief battle with cancer. She was at her home in Pasadena, California, surrounded by family and friends.

A native of O’ahu, Hawaii who was listed as Kellye Nakahara while in “M-A-S-H,” Wallett also appeared in the film “Clue” and in John Hughes’ “She’s Having a Baby.” More recently, she worked as a watercolor artist and was involved in the local arts community. She is survived by her husband, David Wallett; two children and four grandchildren.

“M*A*S*H,” the acclaimed sitcom set during the Korean War, ran from 1972-83. Nurse Kellye carries a secret crush on the show’s major character, the womanizing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce, played by Alan Alda. In a memorable scene, Kellye reveals her feelings, scolding Hawkeye for having his “eyes … on every nurse” except her.

Fans who learned of her death left tributes on social media:

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Struggle to Mend America’s Rural Roads

Wearing bright safety vests, the county highway workers followed the scalding, red tar kettle as it pumped out liquid rubber bandages, thick as melted butter, to cover the pavement’s worst gashes. From above, it looked like the flip side of skywriting — as if yellow cursors on the ground were carefully spelling out a message for unseen readers in the clouds.

The farmers, truckers and others who traverse these rural roads, though, could quickly tell you what the hieroglyphics mean: Help.

Like hundreds of other small agricultural counties and towns around the country, Trempealeau County in central-west Wisconsin is overwhelmed with aging, damaged roads and not enough money to fix them.

“Our road hasn’t been paved since the ’60s,” said Kellen Nelson, whose family owns Triple Brook Farms on County Road O outside Osseo. “Patching and seal coating is all they’ve ever done.”

Westlake Legal Group 00roads1-articleLarge The Struggle to Mend America’s Rural Roads Wisconsin Rural Areas Roads and Traffic Local government Infrastructure (Public Works) Budgets and Budgeting Bridges and Tunnels Agriculture and Farming
Kellen Nelson, a Wisconsin farmer, says patching, not repaving, is all his road has gotten for half a century.Credit…Tim Gruber for The New York Times

The roads look like losers in a barroom brawl. Thick, jagged cracks run down the asphalt like scars, interrupted at points by bruised bumps. In some places, guardrails are tilted off their moorings like a pair of glasses knocked askew.

“It is not real stable — the shoulders are eroding in many places,” Mr. Nelson said. “When you’re going through with an 80,000-pound load of soybeans and meeting cars, that’s dangerous.”

Throughout much of the Midwest and South, the rural transportation system is crumbling. Two-thirds of the nation’s freight emanates from rural areas. Traffic volume has increased. And over the years, tractor-trailers and farm equipment have been supersized, ballooning in length, breadth and weight.

A legally loaded semi-trailer truck can produce 5,000 to 10,000 times the road damage of one car according to some estimates, said Benjamin J. Jordan, director of the Wisconsin Transportation Information Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Roads and bridges have not kept up.

Although just 19 percent of the country’s population lives in rural areas, those regions have 68 percent of the total lane and road miles, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

“We have less resources to maintain and rehabilitate the road system and it’s deteriorating more quickly,” Mr. Jordan said.

The state’s gas tax, which is dedicated to transportation needs, has been unchanged since 2006. A proposal last year from Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat, for an 8-cent increase was voted down by the Republican-led Legislature, which instead raised vehicle title and registration fees.

“In the last budget, the Legislature and governor did come up with some additional funding,” said Daniel J. Fedderly, executive director of the Wisconsin County Highway Association. “But the problem is it’s one-time funding and it’s not ongoing and it’s not sustainable.”

In Trempealeau, decades of underfunding have left the county of 29,000 people with roughly $60 million to $80 million worth of road repairs. Generally, there is no state or federal assistance to help cover the costs.

“The last time we received money to help with road projects was 2008,” said Al Rinka, commissioner of the county’s Highway Department.

The normal life span of an asphalt road is 30 years. The county’s 292 miles of roads are now averaging 74 years.

Emergency closings and weight limits are as common as a sunrise. Farmers can’t easily move equipment from one field to another. Truckers must make long detours to deliver feed and fertilizers. Drivers end up with broken axles, wrecked suspension systems or busted tires.

Last March, when the snow melted, inadequate drainage around County Road K near Galesville was so severe that several homes were flooded.

In November, a school bus slid off a county road outside Arcadia as it navigated a turn and tipped over into a ditch. No one was seriously injured.

“I get people calling me and screaming at me all the time,” Mr. Rinka said. “In 10 years, we’re going to start turning roads back into gravel” if nothing changes.

This week, temperatures remained below freezing. But when the spring thaw comes, the melting will create soft spots that are easily damaged by traffic.

The county also has the worst bridges in the state, with the highest proportion — 6 percent — given a D rating, requiring tonnage restrictions.

The repair backlog is long. Mr. Nelson of Triple Brook Farms waited three years before a small bridge near his property was fixed. That meant he had to to drive eight miles to get to fields that were just half a mile away because the crossing couldn’t handle the weight of a combine or a tractor. And an emergency weight limit on a bridge on County Road O caused a 12-mile detour each time he sent crops to the grain elevator or river barges.

Still damaged is a 15-ton bridge east of the farm on County Road OO that requires him and his neighbors to reroute their combines and semi-trucks.

“There are things that we can accept that are beyond our control, like viruses and trade deals,” Mr. Nelson said, referring to the effects that soybean farmers felt from the coronavirus outbreak and the tariff war with China. “But when it comes to infrastructure, that’s crucial for everyone, not just farmers. All the businesses that are out here rely on quality roads.”

Quality roads are expensive. Reconstructing a mile costs $300,000, Mr. Rinka said. Chip sealing, a kind of short-term patching, costs $17,000 a mile.

In November, the Trempealeau County Board of Commissioners approved the largest increase ever in the road budget — $5 million — paid for through debt.

With luck, the added funding will cover 15 miles of reconstruction, nearly four times what would be possible with the department’s typical annual budget of $1.2 million to $1.5 million. County Road JJ, where the school bus accident occurred, will get new blacktop. (A new culvert was added to County Road K over the summer.)

Workers installed a culvert on County Road K last summer to improve drainage.Credit…Tim Gruber for The New York Times
Rebar being cut for bridge work. Trempealeau County has Wisconsin’s worst bridges.Credit…Tim Gruber for The New York Times

What’s really needed, Mr. Rinka said, is a “culture change” in residents and business owners who want good roads but don’t want to pay for them.

Someone will beg to have a road repaired, Mr. Rinka said. “I’ll say, ‘O.K., I’ll fix your road, and you’re going to see an increase in your property tax.’

“‘Oh, no, no,’ they say, ‘I don’t want that.’”

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Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

Westlake Legal Group 5e4b8d912600007a02b5ebe9 ‘M*A*S*H’ Star Kellye Nakahara Wallett Dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Kellye Nakahara Wallett, a film and television actress best known for playing Lt. Nurse Kellye Yamato on “M*A*S*H,” has died at age 72.

Son William Wallett told The Associated Press that Wallett died Sunday after a brief battle with cancer. She was at her home in Pasadena, California, surrounded by family and friends.

A native of O’ahu, Hawaii who was listed as Kellye Nakahara while in “M-A-S-H,” Wallett also appeared in the film “Clue” and in John Hughes’ “She’s Having a Baby.” More recently, she worked as a watercolor artist and was involved in the local arts community. She is survived by her husband, David Wallett; two children and four grandchildren.

“M*A*S*H,” the acclaimed sitcom set during the Korean War, ran from 1972-83. Nurse Kellye carries a secret crush on the show’s major character, the womanizing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce, played by Alan Alda. In a memorable scene, Kellye reveals her feelings, scolding Hawkeye for having his “eyes … on every nurse” except her.

Fans who learned of her death left tributes on social media:

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Disease Is Roughly 20 Times Deadlier Than Seasonal Flu

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_169038867_94d4d55f-2e1c-41e3-b2e8-16a5f2b94c50-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Disease Is Roughly 20 Times Deadlier Than Seasonal Flu Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

The isolation ward of the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan, China, on Sunday.Credit…Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

An analysis of 44,672 coronavirus patients in China whose diagnoses were confirmed by laboratory testing has found that 1,023 had died by Feb. 11. That’s a fatality rate of 2.3 percent. Figures released on a daily basis suggest the rate has further increased in recent days.

That is far higher than the mortality rate of the seasonal flu, with which the new coronavirus has sometimes been compared.

In the United States, flu fatality rates hover around 0.1 percent.

The new analysis was posted online by researchers at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over all, about 81 percent of patients with confirmed diagnoses experienced mild illness, the researchers found. Nearly 14 percent had severe cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, and about 5 percent had critical illness.

Thirty percent of those who died were in their 60s, 30 percent were in their 70s and 20 percent were age 80 or older. Though men and women were roughly equally represented among the confirmed cases, men made up nearly 64 percent of the deaths. Patients with underlying medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, died at higher rates.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

The fatality rate among patients in Hubei Province, the center of China’s outbreak, was more than seven times higher than that of other provinces.

China on Tuesday announced new figures for the outbreak. The number of cases was put at 72,436 — up from 70,548 the day before — and the death toll now stands at 1,868, up from 1,770, the authorities said.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v31 Coronavirus Live Updates: Disease Is Roughly 20 Times Deadlier Than Seasonal Flu Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has infected more than 73,200 people in China and 25 other countries.

Video

transcript

Americans Heading From Cruise Ship to Quarantine

More than 300 Americans were evacuated from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan. Fourteen of them tested positive for the coronavirus and will be placed in isolation in the United States.

Oh OK, this is a little strange. All right careful, nice and slow. This is really good. Be careful everyone as you come up the stairway. Well, we’re exhausted, but we’re on the plane and that’s a good feeling. Pretty miserable wearing these masks though.

Westlake Legal Group 17JAPAN-SHIP12-promo-videoSixteenByNine3000-v8 Coronavirus Live Updates: Disease Is Roughly 20 Times Deadlier Than Seasonal Flu Japan Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Cruises Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

More than 300 Americans were evacuated from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan. Fourteen of them tested positive for the coronavirus and will be placed in isolation in the United States.CreditCredit…Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

A day before 328 Americans were to be whisked away from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo told passengers that no one infected with the new coronavirus would be allowed to board charter flights to the United States.

But those plans were hastily changed after the test results for 14 passengers came back positive — just as they were being loaded onto buses and dispatched to the airport, where two reconfigured cargo jets were waiting to fly them to military bases in California and Texas.

After consultations with health experts, the U.S. government decided to let the infected evacuees, who were not yet exhibiting symptoms, board the flights.

The reversal was the latest chaotic turn in a two-week quarantine of the ship, the Diamond Princess, that has become an epidemiological nightmare.

When Cambodia’s prime minister greeted passengers on a cruise ship amid a coronavirus scare on Valentine’s Day, embraces were the order of the day. Protective masks were not.

Not only did Prime Minister Hun Sen not wear one, assured that the ship was virus-free, his bodyguards ordered people who had donned masks to take them off. The next day, the American ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy, who brought his own family to greet the passengers streaming off the ship, also went maskless.

“We are very, very grateful that Cambodia has opened literally its ports and doors to people in need,” Mr. Murphy said. Five other ports had said no.

But after hundreds of passengers had disembarked, one later tested positive for the coronavirus.

Now, health officials worry that what Cambodia opened its doors to was the outbreak, and that the world may pay a price as passengers from the cruse ship Westerdam stream home.

Officials are testing those passengers still on the ship, but health authorities may be hard put to trace all the those who have headed back to their home.

Apple said on Monday that it was cutting its sales forecast because of the coronavirus, in a sign of how the outbreak is taking a toll on manufacturing, even at one of the world’s most valuable companies.

The announcement came hours before China announced new figures for the outbreak.

In a statement, the iPhone maker, which is heavily dependent on factories in China, said its supply of smartphones would be hurt because production was slowed by the outbreak.

None of the factories that make iPhones are in Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak, but travel restrictions have hindered other parts of the country as well. Production was taking longer than hoped to get back on track after the facilities reopened following the Lunar New Year holiday, the company said.

Apple said it was also cutting its sales forecast because demand for its products was being hurt in China. China has been one of the Silicon Valley company’s fastest-growing and largest markets.

Apple’s warning is significant because it is a bellwether of global demand and supply of products. The company said it was “fundamentally strong, and this disruption to our business is only temporary.”

Reporting and research was contributed by Hannah Beech, Richard C. Paddock, Motoko Rich and Daisuke Wakabayashi.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com