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Westlake Legal Group > News (Page 63)

Luxe hotels you can afford to stay in

Just because you’re not a member of the 1% doesn’t mean you can’t travel like you are. Below, we’ve handpicked 10 hotels around the globe that boast five star-worthy amenities — think infinity pools, Instagrammable views, plush beds and exceptional service — and are surprisingly affordable.

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As predicted, Theresa May survives to fight another day

Westlake Legal Group TheresaMay As predicted, Theresa May survives to fight another day vote Theresa May The Blog Prime Minister Parliament no confidence Great Britain Brexit

Following the landslide defeat of British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal, Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party quickly moved to call for a vote of no confidence in the full House of Commons, as Ed discussed yesterday morning. There seemed to be some confusion on social media yesterday over how they could do this when May had just survived such a vote and was supposedly insulated against another for one year. The explanation is that the previous no-confidence vote was only among the Conservative Party and their internal rules forbid repeating such a challenge for twelve months. This was a vote of the entire House of Commons.

Roughly a week ago, when it became obvious that the Brexit deal wasn’t going to be approved, I predicted that May would most likely beat back such a challenge. The Tories may not like the deal May negotiated with the EU Parliament, but they like the idea of teaming up with and potentially handing over power to Labour even less. Sure enough, Corbyn’s vote was called and the Prime Minister slipped the noose by a thin margin. (NY Post)

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government has survived a no-confidence vote called after May’s Brexit deal was overwhelmingly rejected by lawmakers.

The House of Commons expressed confidence in the government by 325 votes to 306, meaning May can remain in office.

Had the government lost, Britain would have faced an election within weeks while preparing to leave the European Union on March 29.

The Prime Minister is still in power and she supposedly has until Monday to come up with a new Brexit deal proposal to offer her nation. How anyone thinks that’s going to happen in a successful fashion is a mystery. They’ve been working on some sort of deal for years now and are no closer to a nationally acceptable package that the EU would sign off on than when they began.

The reason I wanted to bring this up again is that much of this debate ignores the underlying reality that British politicians don’t seem to want to say aloud. During the initial referendum, the British people voted (narrowly) to leave the European Union, but they were voting on an idea, not an actual plan. They held the referendum and tallied the votes without having even a hint of how the objective would be achieved. And now that lack of foresight is coming back to haunt them.

The reality is that the goals of Great Britain and the EU are completely at odds, but both sides need to agree on a deal or the Brits will be forced to leave the union without any deal in place. It doesn’t matter whether you’re talking about Ireland and its borders, the trade and transfer of goods across the channel or travel restrictions between the islands and the continent. The EU doesn’t want anyone to leave and will seek to punish defectors with a harsh deal at the negotiating table. The Brits want a better deal that makes future dealings with other European nations go more smoothly.

The point is, there was never going to be a deal that the British Parliament was going to like. That put the Prime Minister in an untenable position. In the end, it was either going to be her deal, a No Deal Brexit, or Article 50 would have to be pushed back or canceled entirely, leading to a second referendum.

And this explains, once again, what is probably the biggest reason that Theresa May is still residing at 10 Downing Street. If they get rid of her, somebody else would be stuck with the job. And under the current conditions, nobody really wants it.

The post As predicted, Theresa May survives to fight another day appeared first on Hot Air.

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Great news from Rudy: “I never said there was no collusion”

Westlake Legal Group cuomo-giuliani Great news from Rudy: “I never said there was no collusion” The Blog Russia Investigation Rudy Giuliani Robert Mueller Paul Manacourt Natalia Veselnitskaya Jared Kushner donald trump jr donald trump collusion Chris Cuomo

Don’t worry about Donald Trump’s defense — he has top men working on it. Top. Men. For instance, here’s Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s lead attorney, on CNN last night with Chris Cuomo apparently admitting that some “collusion” might well have taken place. “I never said there was no collusion,” Giuliani tells Chris Cuomo, only that it didn’t involve Trump personally:

President Trump’s legal spokesman Rudy Giuliani on Wednesday night appeared to grant the possibility that members of Trump’s campaign did, in fact, collude with the Russians during the 2016 campaign.

And in the process, he contradicted dozens of previous denials that both the Trump team (and Trump himself) have offered.

“I never said there was no collusion between the campaign or between people in the campaign,” Giuliani told CNN’s Chris Cuomo, before getting cut off.

“Yes, you have,” Cuomo said.

Giuliani shot back: “I have not. I said ‘the president of the United States.’”

The CNN clip picks up in the middle of the argument over “collusion,” by which Cuomo apparently means “contact” as the argument unfolds. Rather than initially pointing out the difference, Giuliani initially agrees to the definition and then blurts out the eye-popping line. Later in the interview Giuliani does make the distinction by explaining that the “collusion” charge has to do with whether any crime was committed — in this case, participation in or encouragement of the hack on the DNC. By that time, though, the damage is done, and the rest of the ten-minute clip goes in and out of various rabbit holes, such as whether Giuliani is demanding the right to rewrite Robert Mueller’s report (no, just to see it before its release).

Was there contact between members of the campaign and Russians? Of course there was, and not just involving Manafort. Family members Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner (along with Paul Manafort) made the incredibly stupid decision to meet personally with Russian attorney Natalia Veselnitskaya in their father’s building, for Pete’s sake, for the purpose of getting dirt on Hillary Clinton. Veselnitskaya turned out to have some interesting connections within the Putin regime, too. However, that meeting took place well after the DNC hack, and there’s no indication that anything of substance occurred in the meeting other than the idiotic decision to meet with her in the first place.

The recent revelations about Manafort that have Cuomo so exercised seem a lot less exciting than he makes them out to be, too. Internal polling isn’t really much of a secret, and Cuomo’s suggestion that the campaign shared them with Russia for the purpose of targeting their fake-news campaign doesn’t make much sense. By the time Manafort offered to share that data, the Russian disinformation campaign was well under way, and there was plenty of public polling data to use for such targeting. (In fact, they could have simply used one of their shell companies to contract with commercial data firms that produce much better targeting data.) Don’t forget that the Trump campaign’s internal polling wasn’t all that sophisticated in the first place; they were way behind on data and didn’t take that kind of research seriously until after the convention, when Manafort was already out. Manafort’s offer to share that data likely has much more to do with his debts to Russian oligarchs than “collusion” with a disinformation campaign, and has even less to do with the DNC hack.

But now, of course, the headlines will all be that Rudy Giuliani tacitly admits that “collusion” took place, thanks to his strange impulse to get on television and have these arguments. What exactly was Giuliani hoping to do, and why? The Mueller investigation is almost over, so perhaps he’s pre-spinning what Giuliani and his legal team think Mueller might reveal. If that’s the case, then the Mueller report may not be the nothingburger that some have predicted. But if this is just Rudy being Rudy on TV, then perhaps Trump might want to consider benching his Top Man before he gets buried by him.

The post Great news from Rudy: “I never said there was no collusion” appeared first on Hot Air.

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