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Cities Prepare for the Worst as Trump’s Food Stamp Cuts Near

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-foodstamps-1-facebookJumbo Cities Prepare for the Worst as Trump’s Food Stamp Cuts Near Welfare (US) United States Politics and Government Unemployment Trump, Donald J Poverty Ohio Labor and Jobs food stamps Food Banks and Pantries Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Cleveland (Ohio)

CLEVELAND — Next month, Cuyahoga County, Ohio’s second largest, will begin sending letters and fliers, making phone calls and hosting information fairs to alert struggling citizens of a change about to befall them: Come April, able-bodied adults without children may lose their food stamps if they do not find work fast.

A Trump administration rule change, long in the making, is about to become real, and by the administration’s own estimates, nearly 700,000 people across the country — 20,000 of them in Ohio, 3,000 alone in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County — will be dropped from the food-stamp rolls.

“That’s a fairly big hit for the county, for our population,” said Kevin Gowan, the administrator of Cuyahoga Job and Family Services, which oversees the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly (and still popularly) known as food stamps. “We’re not happy to do it. It is our job and we will fulfill our job.”

To the Trump administration, record low unemployment and steady economic growth mean there is no time like the present to nudge people off federal assistance. Around 40 million people access the food-stamp program each year, nearly 3 million of them able-bodied, without children. Of those 3 million, around 2 million do not work.

“Millions and millions of people don’t need food stamps anymore,” President Trump declared this week at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “They have jobs. They’re doing really well.”

For Carl Thomas, a 48-year-old with a high school degree, it is not that simple. He spends most of his time holed up at a public library, making use of its internet access to apply for all of the jobs he can find.

Before 2016, when his mother died at age 84 of sepsis, he had spent most of his life caring for her. He has been job hunting ever since her death. Some employers want to see a lengthy work history and a college degree. Some are far away, and he does not have a car.

On the sixth day of every month, Mr. Thomas plans out how he is going to make his $194 in food assistance stretch. Coupons in hand, he walks or takes the bus to Walmart, Giant Eagle, and Dave’s Market to find the lowest prices on meat, vegetables and produce. He is ecstatic when seeded red grapes go on sale.

That lifeline could soon disappear. Able-bodied adults with no children lose their food assistance if they fail to work 80 hours a month for three months in a three-year period unless they live in a state with a waiver. Under the looming changes, waivers from this work requirement, once common, will be much harder to come by.

Fourteen states, New York City and the District of Columbia have sued the Trump administration to block the new rules from going into effect in April, accusing the administration of doing an illegal end run around Congress.

Cuyahoga County and its urban heart, Cleveland, are preparing for the worst. They will start by conducting two information fairs every month starting in February. They will also call and send mail to people, which “will explicitly tell them the ramifications of noncompliance,” Mr. Gowan said, while stressing that it is time to “achieve self-sufficiency.”

By some accounts, Ohio has yet to recover from the recessions of the early and late 2000s. A healthier job market has not led to significantly higher wages. In 2018, five of Greater Cleveland’s 10 most common jobs — retail sales, food preparation and service, cashiers, waiting tables and janitorial and cleaning work — did not pay enough for people to afford food without assistance, according to Policy Matters Ohio, a liberal research organization.

But even for struggling areas like Cuyahoga County, where the majority of food assistance recipients in Ohio live, the bar will soon be too high for waivers from Washington’s work requirement. Such waivers will only go to “labor market areas” defined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and an area’s unemployment rate will have to be both 20 percent above the national unemployment rate over a two-year period and at least 6 percent.

For Cleveland’s poor, such economic thresholds and measurements may feel remote, but in April, their responsibilities under the new system will become very real. People seeking food assistance will have to track their work hours each week and report them by mail, phone or in person.

County officials say they will look for individual exemptions based on physical or mental limitations. Already, applicants for food assistance take part in an initial phone screening, and then an in-person assessment test to determine if they are exempt from work requirements. But Mr. Gowan said only 20 percent of those eligible actually make it in for the assessment.

“In general, people don’t want the government involved in their personal lives,” he said.

Local anti-poverty advocates worry that people who should be exempt from the work requirements will be kicked off the food-stamp rolls anyway. Notifying people of the rule change will be challenging because food-stamp recipients often lack a permanent home address or reliable phone service. Even if they do know of the rule, the paperwork may be confusing, said Rachel Cahill, a Cleveland-based consultant for Cuyahoga Job and Family Services.

People may not work because they lack educational qualifications and transportation to surrounding towns with more employment. They may also face discrimination in the hiring process because of the color of their skin or their gender, Ms. Cahill said.

And struggling people tend to have complications in their lives that would challenge anyone. Mr. Thomas’s late mother left behind $25,000 in medical debt, and her house, where he lives, may be seized to pay it off. He said he will likely end up homeless.

Zhavahna Thompson, 22, has been on and off food stamps for years. Finding a job in Cleveland is difficult, she said. So are food stamps.

“Sometimes I honestly wish I just would have never ever applied for food stamps, because it is very complicated,” she said.

Ms. Thompson has worked multiple low-wage jobs, including seasonal work at the Cleveland baseball stadium, where her hours were determined by how long the games went, at a Dollar General, at a Subway, and for Amazon, before getting injured lifting a box and then getting laid off.

Ms. Thompson said she is saddened by the new food stamp rule. “That’s how people eat,” she said.

The Greater Cleveland Food Bank worries that the rule will move people out of the grocery store and into the food pantry line.

“We know SNAP is the largest defense against hunger,” said Tiffany Scruggs, the director of outreach at the food bank. “We know with cuts like these, we can’t supplement and make up for the shortfalls.”

Feeding America, which the Greater Cleveland Food Bank is part of, estimates that for every meal provided by a food bank, the food-stamps program provides nine. The program kept more than three million people out of poverty in 2018.

And April’s rule change may be just the beginning. Two other rules to trim the food-stamp rolls are pending. More than 100,000 more Ohioans could lose benefits under one rule change, according to Mathematica Policy Research in Cambridge, Mass. And 41 percent of Ohio households would see a decrease in their benefits under the other, $45 a month on average, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a liberal think tank in Washington.

Mr. Thomas spends 24 hours a month answering phones and handling incoming packages at University Settlement, a food pantry in Cleveland that he also relies on when his food assistance run out. He hopes to find a full-time job soon.

“Not everybody wants to be on government assistance,” Mr. Thomas said. “There are people who want to be self-reliant. Sometimes you just need some help, just a little bit to get back on their feet.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Former Speaker Boehner Contradicts Fox’s Napolitano, Says GOP Did Not Change Impeachment Rules in 2015

Westlake Legal Group HouseGOPimpeachmentpresser-620x317 Former Speaker Boehner Contradicts Fox’s Napolitano, Says GOP Did Not Change Impeachment Rules in 2015 washington D.C. Social Media republicans Politics Ohio North Carolina Newsweek Media Matters Media journalism John Boehner Impeachment of President Trump impeachment Front Page Stories Front Page fox news Fox and Friends Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress Brit Hume Andrew Napolitano Allow Media Exception

House Republicans gather for a news conference after Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper arrived for a closed door meeting to testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Newsweek gleefully reported yesterday about comments Fox News senior judicial analyst Andrew Napolitano made on Fox and Friends Thursday morning in the aftermath of the storming that took place on Wednesday by dozens of frustrated House GOP members into House Intel Chief Adam Schiff’s secret hearings.

During the segment, Napolitano told the hosts that the GOP had no one to blame themselves for how the current impeachment inquiry was being conducted. Why? According to him, the impeachment inquiry rules were written in 2015 by the GOP and signed by then-House Speaker John Boehner:

“As frustrating as it may be to have these hearings going on behind closed doors…they are consistent with the rules,” Napolitano, who previously served as a New Jersey Superior Court judge, explained during a segment of the Fox News morning show Fox & Friends.

“When were the rules written last?” the legal expert asked. “In January of 2015. And who signed them? John Boehner [the Republican speaker of the House]. And who enacted them? A Republican majority,” he asserted.

A video of the clip was tweeted out by Media Matters’ Bobby Lewis, who apparently is their designated monitor for Fox and Friends. The clip went viral, and as of this writing has over 29,000 retweets and nearly 80,000 likes:

In the next tweet, Lewis asserted – without evidence – that Napolitano “demolishe[d] Fox’s talking point that Dems need transparency.” Similarly, the Daily Beast ran a piece on the Judge’s comments, and uncritically passed them off as factual. “Napolitano … effectively dismantl[ed] the primary talking point of both Fox News and the Trump White House,” senior writer Matt Wilstein stated.

There’s just one problem: Boehner himself called BS on Judge Napolitano’s comments, as Brit Hume noted in a couple of tweets responding to the reports:

Boehner later confirmed that that’s what he said:

I assume Judge Nap is talking about a rule that was/is supposedly in the House Rules and Manual, an updated one of which is distributed every two years to the new Congress. Here’s how the process works:

Printed as a “House Document,” the Manual is usually authorized by House resolution at the end of a Congress for printing at the beginning of the following Congress. As such, the House document number reflects the Congress that authorized the printing although the cover page identifies the applicable Congress for the contents.

Let’s assume for grins and giggles that Napolitano is correct here. Even if he was, the book changes for each new Congress. 2015 was when the 114th Congress convened. We’re now in the 116th Congress. And as Rep. Dan Crenshaw (TX) pointed out Wednesday, the rulebook for this Congress clearly states on page 568 all House members should have access to the documents/transcripts, etc that Schiff is keeping under wraps:

Is Napolitano not aware of this?

As far as depositions being held in the public view goes, Byron York made this great point this morning:

Indeed. Too bad our intellectual betters in the mainstream media aren’t interested in finding out why that’s the case.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 16+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Former Speaker Boehner Contradicts Fox’s Napolitano, Says GOP Did Not Change Impeachment Rules in 2015 appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group HouseGOPimpeachmentpresser-300x153 Former Speaker Boehner Contradicts Fox’s Napolitano, Says GOP Did Not Change Impeachment Rules in 2015 washington D.C. Social Media republicans Politics Ohio North Carolina Newsweek Media Matters Media journalism John Boehner Impeachment of President Trump impeachment Front Page Stories Front Page fox news Fox and Friends Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress Brit Hume Andrew Napolitano Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Video: Mayor Pete Suplexes Beto After Failed Senate Candidate Questioned His Courage

Westlake Legal Group MayorPeteDemDebateAPimage-620x317 Video: Mayor Pete Suplexes Beto After Failed Senate Candidate Questioned His Courage Texas Politics Pete Buttigieg Ohio North Carolina Indiana Guns gun rights gun control Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats Democratic Debate Culture Campaigns Beto O'Rourke beto Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020

Democratic presidential candidate South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by CNN/New York Times at Otterbein University, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019, in Westerville, Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

About the only thing I looked forward to seeing Tuesday night at the fourth Democratic debate was the scrap between Beto O’Rourke and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Beto and Mayor Pete have been needling each other for weeks on the issue of gun control, and specifically O’Rourke’s mandatory gun confiscation plan. Mayor Pete has referred to Beto’s plan as an unattainable “shiny object.” Because of that, O’Rourke has countered that the Mayor, who served in Afghanistan, was “afraid of doing the right thing right now” because he was supposedly more interested in focus groups, consultants, and polls than saving lives.

CNN’s Anderson Cooper, one of last night’s debate moderators, teed up the tense exchange between the two by first asking Beto about how he planned on implementing his plan. After Beto gave a non-committal answer as to what he would do, Cooper then turned to Mayor Pete for his thoughts:

COOPER: Thank you. Mayor Buttigieg, just yesterday, you referred to mandatory buybacks as confiscation and said that Congressman O’Rourke has been picking a fight to try to stay relevant. Your response on guns?

BUTTIGIEG: Look, Congressman, you just made it clear that you don’t know how this is actually going to take weapons off the streets. If you can develop the plan further, I think we can have a debate about it. But we can’t wait. People are dying in the streets right now.

Beto responded by emphatically stating that we can’t wait on gun confiscation, the time is now, and we need to do the right thing, etc. etc. He also added the below comments, which was another swipe at Buttigieg’s courage regarding taking what Democrats would characterize as bold action on gun control:

O’ROURKE: No, let’s decide what we are going to believe in, what we’re going to achieve. And then let’s bring this country together in order to do that. Listening to my fellow Americans, to those moms who demand action, to those students who march for our lives, who, in fact, came up with this extraordinary bold peace plan… that calls for mandatory buybacks, let’s follow their inspiration and lead and not be limited by the polls and the consultants and the focus groups. Let’s do what’s right…”

Buttigieg at long last let him have it:

BUTTIGIEG: The problem isn’t the polls. The problems is the policy. And I don’t need lessons from you on courage, political or personal. Everyone on this stage is determined to get something done. Everyone on this stage recognizes, or at least I thought we did, that the problem is not other Democrats who don’t agree with your particular idea of how to handle this.

Watch:

I’ve said before that I’d be content with them both destroying each other at future campaign stops and debates because they are both pompous, sanctimonious hypocrites on a number of fronts, but Beto really did have that coming to him.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Video: Mayor Pete Suplexes Beto After Failed Senate Candidate Questioned His Courage appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group MayorPeteDemDebateAPimage-300x153 Video: Mayor Pete Suplexes Beto After Failed Senate Candidate Questioned His Courage Texas Politics Pete Buttigieg Ohio North Carolina Indiana Guns gun rights gun control Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats Democratic Debate Culture Campaigns Beto O'Rourke beto Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Warren Draws Fire From All Sides, Reflecting a Shift in Fortunes in Race

Westlake Legal Group 15debate-ledeall1-facebookJumbo-v2 Warren Draws Fire From All Sides, Reflecting a Shift in Fortunes in Race Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Polls and Public Opinion Ohio Klobuchar, Amy Health Insurance and Managed Care Harris, Kamala D Democratic Party Debates (Political) Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Booker, Cory A Biden, Joseph R Jr

WESTERVILLE, OHIO — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts faced a sustained barrage of criticism from her Democratic rivals at a presidential debate in Ohio on Tuesday, tangling with a group of underdog moderates who assailed her liberal economic proposals, while former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. appeared to fade from the fray after parrying President Trump’s attacks on his family.

The debate confirmed that the primary race had entered a new phase, defined by Ms. Warren’s apparent strength and the increasing willingness of other Democrats to challenge her. She has risen toward the top of the polls while confronting limited resistance from her opponents, and in past debates she attracted a fraction of the hostility that Democrats trained on Mr. Biden.

That changed in a dramatic fashion on Tuesday, when a group of her rivals voiced sharp skepticism of Ms. Warren’s agenda or accused her of taking impractical stances on issues like health care and taxation. Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., insistently charged Ms. Warren with evading a “yes-or-no” question on how she would pay for a “Medicare for all” health care system, while Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota cast parts of Ms. Warren’s platform as a “pipe dream.” Former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas branded Ms. Warren’s worldview as overly “punitive.”

Ms. Warren sought at every turn to dispense with her critics by casting them as lacking ambition or political grit. When she addressed criticism of her proposal to tax vast private fortunes, for instance, Ms. Warren suggested her opponents believed it was “more important to protect billionaires than it is to invest in an entire generation” but did not single out her rivals.

The debate unfolded in a drastically altered political landscape, with Mr. Trump facing impeachment and Mr. Biden in the center of a firestorm over his son’s financial overseas financial dealings. The candidates were prompted to cover a wide range of issues, including a number that had featured little or not at all in past debates, such as the impeachment of Mr. Trump, the Turkish invasion of Syria and the details of gun control policy and the taxation of great wealth.

The moderators began with a series of questions about impeachment to each of the 12 candidates — the largest field ever for a primary debate — affording them an opportunity to denounce Mr. Trump. And Mr. Biden was quickly asked about his son Hunter Biden’s overseas financial work, delivering a narrow, repetitive answer in which he said neither he nor his son had done anything wrong.

Foreign policy played a greater role on Tuesday evening than in any other debate, pushed to the political foreground by the renewed outbreak of war and humanitarian catastrophe in Syria. The Democrats chiefly trained their attention on Mr. Trump’s role in instigating the crisis there: For instance, Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, condemned Mr. Trump for “caging kids on the border and letting ISIS prisoners run free” in Syria.

With Mr. Biden a diminished force, Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Klobuchar appeared determined to present themselves as strong alternatives for voters in the middle. Both emphasized their Midwestern credentials, and Mr. Buttigieg invoked his experience as a military veteran in several wide-ranging answers on foreign policy.

Their new aggressiveness represented a shorter-term calculation about halting Ms. Warren’s increasing strength in Iowa. With Ms. Warren gaining there, Ms. Klobuchar and Ms. Buttigieg plainly decided to target her in an effort to appeal to the state’s moderate voters, who so far have lined up with Mr. Biden.

With a powerfully funded campaign and an expanding field operation in Iowa, Mr. Buttigieg may be uniquely well positioned to cut into Mr. Biden’s blocs of support in the leadoff caucus state.

In an intense argument that reflected their changing fortunes in the race, Mr. Biden briefly went on the offensive against Ms. Warren toward the end of the debate, describing her health care plans as “vague” and demanding in a raised voice that she give him some credit for her signature accomplishment, the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau after the 2008 financial crisis. Ms. Warren expressed gratitude for the help she had received — not from Mr. Biden but from former President Barack Obama.

But Ms. Warren was on the defensive for much of the evening and most of all on the issue of single-payer health care, when she again declined to specify precisely how she would fund a sweeping system of government-backed insurance. Unlike Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Ms. Warren has not acknowledged in plain terms that a “Medicare for all” plan would quite likely have to substitute broad-based taxes for private insurance premiums and other costs.

“I will not sign a bill into law that does not lower costs for middle-class families,” Ms. Warren said, declining to elaborate.

Ms. Klobuchar, in her most assertive debate performance yet, chided Ms. Warren for not explaining to voters “where we’re going to send the invoice” for single-payer care.

“At least Bernie’s being honest here,” Ms. Klobuchar said.

Ms. Warren was squeezed, at times, from the left as well: While Mr. Sanders never broke their informal nonaggression pact, he agreed with several of the moderates that it was “appropriate” to enumerate the financial trade-offs involved in single-payer health care, including taxes on Americans that would be “substantially less than what they were paying for premiums and out-of-pocket expenses.”

And while Mr. Sanders, who had a heart attack this month, was forced to address new concerns about his health, his campaign aides confirmed during the debate that he had secured an endorsement from Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York that could inject new energy into his candidacy.

But there were also the germs of a broader debate about the role of the United States in the Middle East: In an intense exchange between the two military veterans onstage, Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii said that it was not only Mr. Trump who had “the blood of the Kurds on his hands,” but also politicians in both parties and news media organizations that had cheered for “regime change war.”

Her remarks drew forceful pushback from Mr. Buttigieg, who said Ms. Gabbard was “dead wrong,” arguing that “the slaughter going on in Syria is not a consequence of American presence — it a consequence of a withdrawal and a betrayal by this president of American allies and American values.”

While Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren did not clash directly over foreign policy, they diverged in a stark fashion over the situation in Syria. Mr. Biden said he would want to keep American troops there and convey to the Turkish government that it would pay a “heavy price” for its invasion. Ms. Warren said she opposed Mr. Trump’s handling of the situation but believed the United States should “get out of the Middle East.”

Throughout the evening, Mr. Biden played a far less central role than he did in past debates, stepping to the foreground for exchanges over foreign policy but otherwise taking a more passive approach. His most important moment of the night may have come early on, when he was pressed by a moderator to explain why his son had not crossed any ethical lines by doing business in Ukraine while his father was overseeing diplomacy there for the Obama administration.

Mr. Biden said several times that he and his son had done “nothing wrong,” and alluded repeatedly to an interview Hunter Biden gave to ABC News, in which he said it had been an error in judgment to sit on the board of a Ukrainian gas company while the elder Mr. Biden was vice president. Mr. Trump has accused the Bidens of corruption, often in false or exaggerated terms, and his efforts to enlist the government of Ukraine in tarring Mr. Biden instigated an impeachment inquiry.

“This is about Trump’s corruption,” Mr. Biden said. “That’s what we should be focusing on.”

None of Mr. Biden’s Democratic rivals chose to press the subject, reflecting both the political sensitivity of issues touching on Mr. Biden’s family and also a calculation, by his most immediate rivals, that Mr. Biden is likely to continue sinking in the race without a further onslaught from fellow Democrats. While a number of candidates are hoping to peel away moderate voters from Mr. Biden, they tried to do so on Tuesday by challenging the left rather than by blasting the leading candidate of the center.

Defending his political stature, Mr. Biden at one point described himself as “the only one on this stage who has gotten anything really big done,” and cited his work on the Violence Against Women Act and the Obama administration’s health care law.

That argument drew a fierce response from Mr. Sanders, who said Mr. Biden had also achieved far less laudable feats, like the passage of the NAFTA trade deal and a law tightening the federal bankruptcy code. “You got the disastrous war in Iraq done,” Mr. Sanders said.

And Ms. Warren, too, took issue with Mr. Biden’s claim, pointing to her role as the architect of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — an agency, she said, that represented “structural change in our economy.” In a moment of crackling tension, Mr. Biden raised his voice and urged Ms. Warren to give him credit, too, for the birth of the agency.

“I went onto the floor and got you votes,” he said.

Ms. Warren retorted by saying she was “deeply grateful for President Obama, who fought so hard to make sure that agency was passed into law,” as well as for others in the administration who did the same.

Just as striking as the offensives by Ms. Klobuchar and Mr. Buttigieg were the more passive showings by Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris — both of whom were counting on a strong outing.

Mr. Booker repeatedly said the focus of the debate should be on Mr. Trump. He denounced the moderators’ questions about Mr. Biden’s son. “The only person sitting at home enjoying that was Donald Trump,” Mr. Booker said.

And he even defended the fitness of the septuagenarian candidates onstage — Mr. Biden, Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren — by noting that Mr. Trump would be the least healthy candidate running in 2020. Ms. Harris also mostly trained her fire on the president, at one point using her new catch line: “Dude gotta go.”

The only moment when Ms. Harris showed any appetite for tangling with the other candidates was when she demanded to know why Ms. Warren would not join her in urging Twitter to remove the president’s account.

Ms. Harris seemed more focus on trying to build support with women, as she spoke most forcefully about the importance of defending abortion rights. “It is her body, it is her right, it is her decision,” she said.

After presenting her message at the previous three debates with only intermittent challenges from her rivals, Ms. Warren was met with cutting criticism of her signature populist flourishes.

“I want to give a reality check to Elizabeth,” said Ms. Klobuchar, before alluding to another candidate onstage, the hedge fund executive Tom Steyer. “No one on this stage wants to protect billionaires. Not even the billionaire wants to protect billionaires. We just have different approaches.”

Mr. Buttigieg was just as pointed, repeatedly casting Ms. Warren as a “Washington politician,” but he and Ms. Klobuchar were not alone. Even lagging candidates such as former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas and Andrew Yang, a former tech entrepreneur, took on Ms. Warren, all but confirming her front-runner status.

Mr. Sanders was not as ubiquitous a presence as he had been at past debates, but he drew applause by pre-empting a question about his health. “I’m healthy, I’m feeling great,” he said before vowing “a vigorous campaign.”

That, Mr. Sanders said, “is how I think I can reassure the American people.”

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Warren Comes Under Fire on Funding for Health Care Plan

WESTERVILLE, Ohio — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, an emerging front-runner in the Democratic presidential race, battled sustained criticism from her Democratic rivals over her position on health care in a debate on Tuesday night, squeezed by a combination of moderate and progressive opponents who pressed her to describe in plain terms how she would fund a “Medicare for all”-style system.

Ms. Warren, who has endorsed a proposal by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont for single-payer care, has consistently refused to say that she would embrace middle-class tax increases to finance the plan. She maintained that practiced position on the stage in Ohio, vowing that she would lower health care costs for all but the wealthy yet repeatedly sidestepping the question of whether she would enact a broad-based tax increase.

“I will not sign a bill into law that does not lower costs for middle-class families,” Ms. Warren said, declining to go into detail. But the answer failed to keep her foes at bay, and for the first time in the race Ms. Warren found herself assailed from multiple sides over an extended period in the debate. Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., accused her of evading “a yes-or-no question,” while Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota called the single-payer proposal backed by Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders a “pipe dream.”

Ms. Klobuchar reserved her sharpest words, however, for only one of those two progressives. “At least Bernie’s being honest here,” Ms. Klobuchar said, challenging Ms. Warren to tell voters “where we’re going to send the invoice” for single-payer care.

Ms. Warren was not alone in facing scrutiny early in the debate: Joseph R. Biden Jr. was quickly pressed on the issue of his son Hunter and his work for a Ukrainian gas company while his father was vice president. Mr. Biden responded to a question about his son’s overseas work in narrow and repetitive terms, saying several times that he and his son had done “nothing wrong.”

The drawn-out argument over health care captured one of the defining themes in the Democratic race: the ideological divide over the best way to provide universal coverage, and over the proper scale and cost of government-backed social programs. Up to this point, the Democrats’ policy debate has largely been defined by Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders, with their promises to restructure huge parts of the American economy. The debate in Ohio represented the most assertive effort so far by candidates skeptical of their policies to put up resistance to those ideas.

The fierce exchange also signaled that the race had entered a new phase, defined by Ms. Warren’s apparent status as a leader of the Democratic pack and a new mood of urgency among other candidates eager to challenge that status.

Mr. Sanders, who has observed a kind of informal nonaggression pact with Ms. Warren so far, did not exactly break from that approach on Tuesday night. But he called it “appropriate” for candidates to explain the fiscal trade-offs involved in a “Medicare for all” system: Mr. Sanders said that voters would see their taxes go up, but that they would save money overall because of the way health care would be restructured.

“Premiums are gone, co-payments are gone, deductibles are gone, all out-of-pocket expenses are gone,” Mr. Sanders said, adding, “The tax increase they pay will be substantially less, substantially less than what they were paying for premiums and out-of-pocket expenses.”

But Mr. Sanders more forcefully scolded the candidates onstage who opposed single-payer care and whom he described as “defending a system which is dysfunctional, which is cruel.”

The Democratic field appeared far more eager to attack Ms. Warren for her health care policies than to critique Mr. Biden who remains a top candidate in the race, for the family business entanglements that have defined a weekslong clash between Mr. Biden and President Trump.

Mr. Biden has tried to put to rest criticism of his son’s financial dealings in Ukraine and China. Over the weekend, he said he would not allow members of his family to do business overseas during a potential Biden presidency, and Hunter Biden stepped down from his role at an investment fund linked to China.

Prompted by a moderator to explain why his family had not observed similar restrictions while he was vice president, Mr. Biden avoided answering directly and repeatedly defended his son. He pointed to an interview Hunter Biden gave to ABC News, in which he described his decision to work in Ukraine as an error of judgment but said he had not done anything wrong ethically.

“I carried out the policy of the United States government in rooting out corruption in Ukraine,” Mr. Biden said, adding, “My son’s statement speaks for itself.”

The other Democrats onstage did not appear eager to press the issue, in part because they believe there is no appetite among primary voters for criticism of Mr. Biden’s family. There is also a feeling among some Democrats that Mr. Biden is on the downswing in the race and that it makes little sense to attack him in ways that might antagonize his supporters. Neither Ms. Warren nor Mr. Sanders, Mr. Biden’s two most formidable rivals, took up the line of attack on Ukraine.

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, who in previous debates took on Mr. Biden in pointed terms, instead scolded the moderators for even asking Mr. Biden about his son’s work in Ukraine.

“The only person sitting at home enjoying that was Donald Trump,” said Mr. Booker, lamenting what he called ‘‘elevating a lie and attacking a statesman.”

With a dozen candidates onstage and impeachment in the air, it was unclear heading into Tuesday’s debate whether it would prove to be a turning point in the race. With Mr. Trump’s struggle to stabilize his presidency dominating the news, along with a national security and humanitarian crisis unfolding in Syria, the trading of rhetorical blows on a stage in suburban Ohio may or may not captivate the attention of primary voters across the country this week.

Still, the debate promised to test Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren’s competing claims to the status of Democratic front-runner: The two candidates have been closely matched in recent polling, nationally and in the early primary states, with Ms. Warren assembling an increasingly formidable coalition on the left and Mr. Biden remaining the favorite among more moderate Democrats. In recent weeks, the former vice president has been increasingly critical of Ms. Warren’s vows to overhaul the American economy, and he has spoken dismissively about the idea of electing a “planner” to the presidency — an allusion to Ms. Warren’s swollen sheaf of policy proposals.

They entered the debate battling different vulnerabilities. Mr. Biden has been mired in a nearly monthlong battle with Mr. Trump over the work Mr. Biden’s son Hunter did in foreign countries while Mr. Biden was vice president. Mr. Trump’s attacks have veered into personal smears and even potentially impeachable behavior, with entreaties to Ukraine and China to investigate the Bidens, but they have left Mr. Biden off balance at a perilous moment in his candidacy.

Video

Westlake Legal Group opt01_UPDATE_00012-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Warren Comes Under Fire on Funding for Health Care Plan Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Polls and Public Opinion Ohio Klobuchar, Amy Health Insurance and Managed Care Harris, Kamala D Democratic Party Debates (Political) Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Booker, Cory A Biden, Joseph R Jr

Over the years, televised debates have yielded turning points for presidential contenders. We look at some pivotal moments from past debates and explain how they shaped the race.

Even before Mr. Trump’s onslaught, Mr. Biden was struggling to excite the Democratic base. While some in his party are content with what they see as a play-it-safe candidacy, others want him to offer a message beyond nostalgic tributes to the Obama years and vows to restore comity in Washington. As Ms. Warren now threatens to overtake him as the clear leader in the race, Mr. Biden’s allies believe he must both dispense forcefully with the criticism of his family and also articulate more clearly what he would aim to achieve as president.

At the same time, Ms. Warren has been confronting a new level of criticism from her Democratic rivals as she has risen in the polls. And before she can cement a commanding position in the race, Ms. Warren may have to put to rest a few persistent questions about her candidacy — how she would appeal to moderate voters in the general election, for instance, and black voters, and how she would make good on her proposal to create a system of single-payer health insurance.

It is on that last front that her rivals have been most comfortable criticizing her, and it was quick to rise to the forefront Tuesday night, Ms. Warren was pressed on how she would fund a “Medicare for all”-style health insurance system, goading her to say in plain language whether she would raise taxes on the middle class.

Up to this point, Ms. Warren has been careful not to allow any daylight to emerge on the health care issue between her and Mr. Sanders, her most formidable populist rival, who has made “Medicare for all” the defining cause of his campaign. But there may now be more pressure on Ms. Warren to revise her stance in a way that might reassure voters on the center-left than there is on her to protect her left flank from Mr. Sanders, who has been fading in the polls and grappling with the aftermath of a heart attack.

Mr. Sanders has been off the campaign trail for nearly all of October, since he was hospitalized in Las Vegas and had two stents placed in an artery. He has been recovering at his home in Burlington, Vt., and announced plans for a comeback tour starting in New York this weekend. But with his advanced age in the spotlight and his poll numbers slowly declining, Mr. Sanders may face a steep climb to overtake either Mr. Biden or Ms. Warren, with whom he has had something of a nonaggression pact.

At least for a moment, Mr. Sanders showed an unaccustomed willingness to highlight his differences with Ms. Warren last weekend, explaining in a television interview that a crucial distinction between them was that Ms. Warren is a “capitalist through her bones” and he is not.

More eager for conflict might be the candidates in the middle and the back of the Democratic pack — figures like Mr. Buttigieg, Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. Booker, former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas and Senator Kamala Harris of California. Mr. Buttigieg, whose campaign is stocked with cash but struggling to move up in the polls, has been taking a notably sharper tone with his Democratic opponents. He has chided Ms. Warren for certain aspects of her agenda and more bluntly criticized Mr. O’Rourke for his left-wing proposals to examine the tax-exempt status of religious institutions and to require gun owners to surrender some types of firearms.

Some of Mr. Buttigieg’s rivals have responded in kind, with Mr. O’Rourke branding him as a carefully poll-tested candidate and Ms. Harris suggesting on Twitter that Mr. Buttigieg’s gun policies amounted to little more than a “Band-Aid” on a serious problem.

Lending a fresh layer of unpredictability to the evening were Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, an idiosyncratic lawmaker who is running as a peace candidate, and Tom Steyer, a billionaire former hedge fund investor who has spent lavishly from his personal fortune to buy himself a place on the debate stage. Ms. Gabbard has lashed out in surprising directions in the past, delivering a searing attack on Ms. Harris in a July debate, while Mr. Steyer, appearing in a debate for the first time, has tried to strike a combative pose as a populist critic of Washington.

Several candidates were fighting not only for attention but also for survival, as they strain to meet the stricter qualification standards for the next debate in November. Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, was in that cluster, along with Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. O’Rourke and Ms. Gabbard. Together, they make up an ideologically varied group joined by a common challenge: winning sustained interest from voters in a race dominated by a few exceedingly well-known candidates who have topped the polls for months.

One Democrat not at risk of being sidelined was Andrew Yang, the former technology entrepreneur who has built a powerful niche following with his stern warnings about the automation of work and his proposal to give every American a $12,000-a-year stipend paid from government funds. He raised more money than all but a few candidates in the last quarter, and in the polls he is now even with or leading a number of candidates with far more extensive qualifications for the presidency.

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Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States

Westlake Legal Group Fauxcahontas-300x200 Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States white house washington D.C. warren Social Media progressives President Trump Ohio Oct 15th News Media kamala harris Front Page Stories Feminism Featured Story elections Democratice Debate Cory Booker Conservatives CBS News biden Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020 2019

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Now that we are almost halfway through October, these polls are going to start to matter a lil bit more and the knives should start to come out here beginning Tuesday at the next debate.

A poll released by CBS News now gives a clear picture of who is starting to gain ground just a bit over 3 months until the Iowa caucuses.

From CBS News

Early-state Democratic voters say President Trump’s allegations against Joe Biden have not affected their views of Biden and largely think they aren’t true. Even so, it’s Elizabeth Warren who continues to draw support from Democrats. She has extended the aggregate lead she had in this poll last month across the 18 early primary and caucus states.

As for individual states, she has increased her lead over the pack in New Hampshire and pulled even with Biden in Iowa. And Warren leads in our delegate model over Biden, too, demonstrating that she’s competitive in many regions.

Now, for some reason, I’m not exactly buying that people are not worried about Joe Biden and the pounding that Trump has laid on him and his son Hunter. If this were not a concern, then Hunter doesn’t resign from his cushy board position like he did yesterday [READ] WHERE’S HUNTER? He Just Quit His Sweet Gig On The Board Of A Chinese Company. Of course, it doesn’t help that Biden has an appearance once every two weeks and seems a bit lethargic. He seems bored with this and like he is only running because he wants to get out of the house for a spell.

Even though Bernie had an impressive 3rd quarter in fundraising, his campaign is in its final spin. The heart attack is a serious thing and that will play in the back of everyone’s mind, even if they say it does not.

The only place where Biden still has any sort of lead is in South Carolina where he leads 43% to Warren’s 18%. This is the state to watch over the next 4 weeks to see if Warren starts to gain on him. If she does and if she doesn’t get derailed, then it will look like she will be able to secure the nomination sooner rather than later. This is what the DNC has been hoping for all along — someone to break out of the pack and take it early.

One last thing.

The poll says that most of the Democrats surveyed DID NOT think that impeachment was one of the top things to worry about. With all of the wall-to-wall coverage on this, I find that amazing. I would have thought that it would at LEAST make the top 3 things but evidently not.

Once again, back to CBS…

And an important backdrop to all this: for Democrats deciding how to vote in these states, a candidate’s position on impeachment is not the most important issue. In fact, it ranks far behind issues like health care, climate change, income inequality and guns. This echoes something Democratic voters have voiced since the summer: they have long told us they would rather hear candidates talk about beating Donald Trump in 2020 than about impeaching him.

Who would have thunk it?

So according to this, I predict that Elizabeth Warren will be the one this Tuesday with the BIG TARGET on her back. Let’s see how she handles it.

Check out my other posts here on Red State and my podcast Bourbon On The Rocks plus like Bourbon On The Rocks on Facebook and follow me on the twitters at IRISHDUKE2 

The post Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Fauxcahontas-300x200 Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States white house washington D.C. warren Social Media progressives President Trump Ohio Oct 15th News Media kamala harris Front Page Stories Feminism Featured Story elections Democratice Debate Cory Booker Conservatives CBS News biden Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020 2019   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States

Westlake Legal Group Fauxcahontas-300x200 Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States white house washington D.C. warren Social Media progressives President Trump Ohio Oct 15th News Media kamala harris Front Page Stories Feminism Featured Story elections Democratice Debate Cory Booker Conservatives CBS News biden Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020 2019

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Now that we are almost halfway through October, these polls are going to start to matter a lil bit more and the knives should start to come out here beginning Tuesday at the next debate.

A poll released by CBS News now gives a clear picture of who is starting to gain ground just a bit over 3 months until the Iowa caucuses.

From CBS News

Early-state Democratic voters say President Trump’s allegations against Joe Biden have not affected their views of Biden and largely think they aren’t true. Even so, it’s Elizabeth Warren who continues to draw support from Democrats. She has extended the aggregate lead she had in this poll last month across the 18 early primary and caucus states.

As for individual states, she has increased her lead over the pack in New Hampshire and pulled even with Biden in Iowa. And Warren leads in our delegate model over Biden, too, demonstrating that she’s competitive in many regions.

Now, for some reason, I’m not exactly buying that people are not worried about Joe Biden and the pounding that Trump has laid on him and his son Hunter. If this were not a concern, then Hunter doesn’t resign from his cushy board position like he did yesterday [READ] WHERE’S HUNTER? He Just Quit His Sweet Gig On The Board Of A Chinese Company. Of course, it doesn’t help that Biden has an appearance once every two weeks and seems a bit lethargic. He seems bored with this and like he is only running because he wants to get out of the house for a spell.

Even though Bernie had an impressive 3rd quarter in fundraising, his campaign is in its final spin. The heart attack is a serious thing and that will play in the back of everyone’s mind, even if they say it does not.

The only place where Biden still has any sort of lead is in South Carolina where he leads 43% to Warren’s 18%. This is the state to watch over the next 4 weeks to see if Warren starts to gain on him. If she does and if she doesn’t get derailed, then it will look like she will be able to secure the nomination sooner rather than later. This is what the DNC has been hoping for all along — someone to break out of the pack and take it early.

One last thing.

The poll says that most of the Democrats surveyed DID NOT think that impeachment was one of the top things to worry about. With all of the wall-to-wall coverage on this, I find that amazing. I would have thought that it would at LEAST make the top 3 things but evidently not.

Once again, back to CBS…

And an important backdrop to all this: for Democrats deciding how to vote in these states, a candidate’s position on impeachment is not the most important issue. In fact, it ranks far behind issues like health care, climate change, income inequality and guns. This echoes something Democratic voters have voiced since the summer: they have long told us they would rather hear candidates talk about beating Donald Trump in 2020 than about impeaching him.

Who would have thunk it?

So according to this, I predict that Elizabeth Warren will be the one this Tuesday with the BIG TARGET on her back. Let’s see how she handles it.

Check out my other posts here on Red State and my podcast Bourbon On The Rocks plus like Bourbon On The Rocks on Facebook and follow me on the twitters at IRISHDUKE2 

The post Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Fauxcahontas-300x200 Elizabeth Warren Starts to Pull Away From Biden in Early States white house washington D.C. warren Social Media progressives President Trump Ohio Oct 15th News Media kamala harris Front Page Stories Feminism Featured Story elections Democratice Debate Cory Booker Conservatives CBS News biden Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020 2019   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Rep. Jim Jordan to the MSM: Why Won’t You Ask Democrats These Important Impeachment Questions?

Westlake Legal Group JimJordanAPPhoto-620x317 Rep. Jim Jordan to the MSM: Why Won’t You Ask Democrats These Important Impeachment Questions? washington D.C. Social Media republicans Politics Ohio North Carolina Nancy Pelosi Media journalism Jim Jordan Impeachment of President Trump impeachment Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress California Allow Media Exception adam schiff

Ranking Member Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, asks questions to Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, during a hearing of the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) has been one of the leading Republican voices speaking out against the deceptive tactics House Intel Chair Adam Schiff and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have been using to conduct the secretive “impeachment inquiry” currently underway in Washington, D.C.

Just last week, Jordan wrote an op/ed that was published in the USA Today slamming Democrats for their use of impeachment as a tool to oust someone from office over political disagreements. He also condemned what he called the “secrecy” of their process.

Here’s some of what he wrote:

Democrats put the nation through three years of the “Russia collusion” hoax, only for those allegations to completely unravel. Democrats have spent the past 10 months embarking on a series of partisan fishing expeditions, all in a concerted effort to take down a duly elected president. Now Democrats are accusing President Trump of orchestrating a quid pro quo to pressure the Ukrainian government.
[…]
When we began to interview people with firsthand knowledge, the Democrats’ narrative fell apart. Ambassador Kurt Volker, the U.S. special envoy to Ukraine, was very clear in his testimony last week: He was aware of no quid pro quo, and the Ukrainian government never raised concerns about a quid pro quo. He testified that the U.S. officials were working at all times in the best interests of the United States and for the success and security of Ukraine.
[…]
President Trump displayed unprecedented transparency by releasing a transcript of his call with a foreign leader. However, the Democrats’ impeachment push is shrouded in secrecy. Americans deserve more. Americans deserve to know exactly how Democrats are misusing their authority to undo the results of the 2016 election.

Jordan, who is the ranking member on the House Oversight and Reform Committee, has continued to bang this drum, and over the weekend he tweeted out a number of questions directed towards Pelosi and Schiff. At the end of his rant, he asked the media why they weren’t asking them these same questions.

Indeed. Why won’t they?

Jordan asked a total of 18 questions. You can read them all in sequence by clicking here.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Rep. Jim Jordan to the MSM: Why Won’t You Ask Democrats These Important Impeachment Questions? appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group JimJordanAPimage-300x153 Rep. Jim Jordan to the MSM: Why Won’t You Ask Democrats These Important Impeachment Questions? washington D.C. Social Media republicans Politics Ohio North Carolina Nancy Pelosi Media journalism Jim Jordan Impeachment of President Trump impeachment Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress California Allow Media Exception adam schiff   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Siblings Outraged by Their Brother’s Fatal Shooting Dismiss the Fact That He was an Armed Robber – ‘Oh Well!”

 

Westlake Legal Group tone-rochelle-rappley-crime-color-corrected-SCREENSHOT-620x353 Siblings Outraged by Their Brother’s Fatal Shooting Dismiss the Fact That He was an Armed Robber – ‘Oh Well!” Uncategorized tone rappley roosevelt rappley rochelle rappley Ohio Not Today Internet Guns Front Page Stories Featured Story dollar general dayton Culture crime Allow Media Exception

 

 

 

Two siblings are outraged at the shooting death of their brother.

An employee at a Dayton Dollar General gunned him down.

Tragically, 23-year-old Roosevelt Rappley was fired upon inside the store along the 2200 block of North Gettysburg Avenue Wednesday night.

Siblings Rochelle and Tone Rappley are furious.

Rochelle told local Channel 7 the worker had no business having a gun onsite to start with, let alone fatally targeting her brother.

Horribly, Roosevelt’s the pair’s second of ten siblings to perish from gun violence.

“[W]rong is wrong. That was wrong for that clerk to shoot my brother in the chest…”

Tone’s in complete shock:

“I still don’t believe it. … [A]t the end of the day, I don’t believe my brother’s dead. … [I]t ain’t kicked in yet.”

Police have confirmed that the employee — who was legally allowed to possess a firearm — was indeed the gunman.

However, even given the shock of his shooting, Rochelle does grant Roosevelt partial responsibility:

“He’s got some responsibility, but not all!”

Reporter Molly Koweek summed it up:

“The pair acknowledges that [it] was wrong for Roosevelt Rappley to try and rob the Dollar General…but they say the clerk shouldn’t have had a gun at work.”

The worker wasn’t the only one packing heat:

“Police say…Roosevelt…showed a gun and demanded cash Wednesday.”

From WHIOTV:

In a 911 call, a man told dispatchers that a man with a gun attempted to rob him at the store.

“He pointed a gun at me,” the caller said. “I had a firearm on me. I pulled my firearm and I shot him in self defense.”

The caller also said that the suspect “shot back,” but it is not clear how many shots were fired during the incident.

[Lt. Jason Hall] told dispatchers that there [were] other staff in the store at the time and that the suspect pointed a gun at them as well.

Rochelle appears to believe the store employee was being reprehensibly petty:

“Yes, he’s robbin’ y’all — oh WELL.”

She thinks a little bit of decorum was in order:

“Call the police. That’s what y’all are supposed to do.”

Cops say Roosevelt might’ve been involved in other robberies, too.

But Rochelle is indignant:

“Y’all are not supposed to take matters into y’all’s own hands. If that’s the case, I’ll take matters into my own hands.”

We’re living in dangerous times, and care must always be taken. Roosevelt Rappley fell victim to a serial malady in this brutal world: He was victimized by the deadly threat of a loaded gun — while he was trying to do the same to others instead, as he robbed the snot out of them.

-ALEX

 

See 3 more pieces from me:

Man Attempts Armed Robbery, Accidentally Gives His Victim The Gun (Video)

You’ve Gotta See It: Unlike Everyone Else In The Heavily-Armed Robbery, A Fearless Man Stays, Lights A Cigarette (VIDEO)

Louisiana Man Reports Being Shot At, Directs Cops To The Scene. But He Fails To Consider One Extremely Important Detail

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

The post Siblings Outraged by Their Brother’s Fatal Shooting Dismiss the Fact That He was an Armed Robber – ‘Oh Well!” appeared first on RedState.

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The Democratic Debate Is Coming to Ohio, Where a Party Battle Is Already Underway

Westlake Legal Group 13ohioprimary-01-facebookJumbo The Democratic Debate Is Coming to Ohio, Where a Party Battle Is Already Underway Ohio morgan harper Justice Democrats joyce beatty House of Representatives Democratic Party COLUMBUS, Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As Morgan Harper campaigned at the Prestige Cuts & Styles barbershop here, Joe Copeland, a retired school principal, said he had never heard of the young woman mounting an insurgent primary challenge of a Democratic member of Congress. But he thought of a comparison.

“Is this the same type of situation as with A.O.C.?” he asked.

Indeed, there are similarities between Ms. Harper, 36, and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, whose felling of a powerful House incumbent in 2018 was a shock alert to national Democrats of a populist wave.

Ms. Harper announced this past week that in just three months as a first-time candidate, she had raised an impressive $323,000, riding the endorsement of Justice Democrats, the same anti-establishment progressive group that backed Ms. Ocasio-Cortez.

Ms. Harper is running against Representative Joyce Beatty, 69, who is in her fourth term representing Ohio’s Third District. Campaigning for a guaranteed income, reparations for African-Americans and other policies designed to end “economic segregation,” Ms. Harper, a former senior adviser at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, sees no need to spend years ascending the rungs of local politics. “The world is on fire and we need a lot to get done,” she told Mr. Copeland in the barbershop.

The dynamic in this Ohio congressional race — which is being echoed in House races across the country where grass-roots progressives have declared civil war on establishment Democrats — will be on display in the party’s 2020 presidential debate on Tuesday night, which will take place in a Columbus suburb partly in Ms. Beatty’s district.

Ask Our Reporters

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As Democrats wrestle over who would be their best nominee to defeat President Trump, the energy and momentum is with the progressive populism of Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont. But there will be several longtime Democratic officeholders onstage who are also committed to liberal policy goals like expanding health care, strengthening gun control laws and raising taxes on Wall Street and the wealthy.

Like Ms. Harper and Ms. Beatty, the Democratic presidential candidates and others in the party are now debating just how much progressive change to push for, and what’s possible to achieve.

“I think it’s hard when someone who has been registered for seven or eight months in the district says they know what the people want,” Ms. Beatty said in a jab at Ms. Harper, a Columbus native who moved back to the city in December after a career in New York and Washington.

Ms. Harper is campaigning by attending as many community events as possible, and by old-fashioned neighborhood canvassing. There are some signs her strategy is working. She said she had raised money from nearly every ZIP code in her district. (Ms. Beatty, who hasn’t reported third-quarter fund-raising, had $1.3 million cash on hand as of July.)

Ms. Harper has focused on residents left out of the recent growth of Columbus — now Ohio’s most dynamic city, surpassing Cleveland — and the gentrification that has followed.

A wave of new apartment blocks, craft breweries and espresso shops radiating from downtown has pushed out poor residents, many of them black. Ms. Harper’s website calls Columbus the second most economically segregated city in the country.

In the barbershop, Mr. Copeland, the retired principal, said he was a personal friend of Ms. Beatty from “way back,” but that wouldn’t cement his vote.

“We’re in a bad state of affairs,” he said, referring to local and national events. “When we’re looking at elections and who we’re going to be sending to Congress and that sort of thing, we’re probably in a position where good friends and all that kind of stuff is going to go by the wayside.”

Aaron Pickrell, a Democratic strategist in Columbus, predicted Ms. Beatty would take Ms. Harper seriously, but added that he did not see her as a vulnerable incumbent who had lost touch with voters.

“She’s exactly what you’d want from a member of Congress,” said Mr. Pickrell, who ran Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign in Ohio. “She’s in her district every weekend. She has a progressive record. She advocates for people of color and low-income families and the immigrant community.”

At a job fair for people with disabilities on Wednesday, Ms. Beatty worked the room as if it were a block party. She spotted Nina Miller, a job-seeker in a wheelchair, and gushed. The two had met before. Ms. Miller, 51, was looking for work at the table of a customer call center. “Let me vouch for her,” the congresswoman told the employer. “I want to be a reference.”

To Larry Cunningham, a middle-aged man who had just been hired by McDonald’s, Ms. Beatty offered a week’s worth of bus tokens from a stash in her district office. “First impressions are so important,” she told Mr. Cunningham. “On your first day, you want to get that earlier bus because everybody’s looking for the new man.”

Ms. Beatty has not faced a primary challenge since winning her seat in 2012. Before that, she was an official at Ohio State University and spent 10 years in the State House of Representatives, eventually becoming the first woman to serve as its Democratic leader.

In an interview, she took off the gloves when it came to Ms. Harper, whose résumé includes jobs at the C.F.P.B. and the corporate law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore — but no community service or organizing in Columbus.

“I know there is no volunteer record of being in the community with health care, or children with diabetes or fighting for public education,” Ms. Beatty said of Ms. Harper. “Has she ever gone over and provided Christmas toys for children who are homeless and then worked hours feeding them?”

Ms. Beatty accused Ms. Harper of raising “false hope” by backing programs like “Medicare for all” and the Green New Deal without a plan to pay for them, and she described Ms. Harper’s platform as an off-the-shelf template developed by national groups, one built by “trust-fund babies and million-dollar folk that work on the East Coast.”

Ms. Harper strongly rejected the notion that she was a Columbus outsider with outside ideas.

“My name is Morgan Harper,” she said in an interview at her campaign office. “I was born here in Columbus, Ohio, at The Ohio State University Hospital. I was given up for adoption. I lived in a foster home for nine months in this district.”

She continued to lay out her biography, a powerful part of her candidacy: Raised by a single mother, she won a scholarship to a local prep school, then attended Tufts University. She earned a master’s degree from Princeton and a law degree from Stanford.

“My policy is 100 percent informed by the people that are living here,” she said.

Later, in an email, Ms. Harper said Ms. Beatty was the one who was out of touch, calling her “a politician who has been around since 1999, whose campaigns are funded by corporations, is not from Central Ohio, is worth over $4 million” and “lives in Blacklick,” an affluent neighborhood.

She “tells her constituents (who live in the second-most economically segregated region in the country) that she’s fighting for them,” Ms. Harper said. “To me, that’s false hope.”

The intensely personal attacks from both candidates may do more harm to Ms. Harper, who is little known and still undefined to Columbus voters compared with Ms. Beatty.

“Joyce Beatty, one of the things you know about her is she does touch people,” Michael Sexton, the chairman of the Franklin County Democratic Party, said. “I would say she’s out there fighting for our district every day.”

Ms. Harper spends her days talking to residents about her platform, which also includes guaranteed jobs and national rent stabilization. “A lot of people, as soon as I start talking about these issues, they’re like, ‘Thank you, because I’ve been waiting for somebody to actually talk to me,’” she said.

On Thursday, she visited the Hilltop neighborhood on the city’s West Side, walking along an avenue of houses in disrepair, tattoo parlors and Family Dollar stores. Stopping for a soft-serve cone, she introduced herself to two young men at a table.

“I’m backing a thing called the Green New Deal,” Ms. Harper told them animatedly. “Have you ever heard about that?” The men shook their heads.

Farther along the avenue, she ran into Esther Flores, a community activist she knew. Ms. Flores was on her way to a drop-in center she runs that offers meals and clothing to sex workers and victims of human trafficking.

“You need to come and talk to the girls,” Ms. Flores told Ms. Harper. “We’ve got some girls that are voters.”

Ms. Harper promised to do that.

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