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Share of Americans With Health Insurance Declined in 2018

Westlake Legal Group 10INCOME2-facebookJumbo Share of Americans With Health Insurance Declined in 2018 United States Economy Trump, Donald J Poverty Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) Income Inequality Income Health Insurance and Managed Care census bureau

Fewer Americans are living in poverty but, for the first time in years, more of them lack health insurance.

About 27.5 million people, or 8.5 percent of the population, lacked health insurance for all of 2018, up from 7.9 percent the year before, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday. It was the first increase since the Affordable Care Act took full effect in 2014, and experts said it was at least partly the result of the Trump administration’s efforts to undermine that law.

The growth in the ranks of the uninsured was particularly striking because the economy was doing well. The same report showed the share of Americans living in poverty fell to 11.8 percent, the lowest level since 2001. Median household income was $63,200, essentially unchanged from a year earlier after adjusting for inflation, but significantly above where it was during the Great Recession.

“In a period of continued economic growth, continued job growth, you would certainly hope that you wouldn’t be going backwards when it comes to insurance coverage,” said Sharon Parrott, senior vice president at the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

But there was good news in the Census Bureau report for the White House. The decade-long recovery is at last delivering income gains to middle-class and low-income families. After decades of rising inequality, recent wage gains have been strongest for people at the bottom of the earnings ladder, said Michael R. Strain, an economist at the conservative American Enterprise Institute.

“You’re seeing improvements in employment outcomes for people with disabilities. You’re seeing improvements in employment outcomes for the formerly incarcerated,” Mr. Strain said. “These workers who are potentially more vulnerable, you’re seeing the recovery reach them.”

Democrats, however, are likely to highlight evidence that income gains have slowed since President Barack Obama’s final years in office. Median income grew 5.1 percent in 2015 and 3.1 percent in 2016.

And while Tuesday’s report showed the benefits of what now ranks as the longest economic expansion on record, it also showed the limitations of that growth. Median household income is only modestly higher now than when the recession began in late 2007 and is essentially unchanged since the dot-com bubble burst in 2000.

Democrats and Republicans alike have tapped into the sense among many voters that the economy is not working for them.

“It’s two solid economic cycles of struggling to either stay in place or get back out of a hole,” said Arloc Sherman, a senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. “You can see why people would be impatient for real progress.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why.

The presidential candidates at the CNN climate forum on Wednesday repeatedly emphasized how climate change is hurting low-income communities and people of color, reflecting a growing awareness among Democrats that many of the problems they seek to address are inextricably tied to racism, poverty and other forms of discrimination and inequality.

Nine of the 10 participating candidates — all except former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — named or clearly alluded to environmental justice, a framework that calls for environmental policies to explicitly address racial and economic disparities exacerbated by a warming planet.

It was an acknowledgment, as several candidates put it, that decades of racist and classist policies have concentrated people of color and poor people in the most polluted communities, and that those most immediately and severely affected by climate change are often those with the fewest resources to respond.

The environmental justice movement “embraces the principle that all communities and all people have a right to equal protection of our environmental laws,” said Robert Bullard, a professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University who pioneered the movement. “It’s equal access to the good things that make communities healthy, but also making sure that no community is overburdened because of their income or because of their race or their geographic location.”

That overburdening is plain to see. When a storm like Hurricane Dorian makes landfall, the people in its path are generally the ones who couldn’t afford to evacuate or who had nowhere to go. Poor people — a disproportionate percentage of whom are people of color — cannot afford to rebuild the way wealthier people can, and their infrastructure is often less resilient and more prone to damage in the first place. Afterward, communities of color often get less attention and federal aid.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160205064_d6e1f65f-8882-45d9-a961-c8876e0b45fa-articleLarge Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

CNN hosted a climate forum on Wednesday.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

Just consider the response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas, or to Hurricane Irma in Florida. Then look at Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Climate change is not the only problem. Because of decades of housing discrimination — including redlining, as Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., specifically noted — people of color are much more likely than white people to live in polluted neighborhoods. Their water is more likely to be contaminated, as in Flint, Mich., and Newark. They are more likely to have asthma and other health problems caused or aggravated by dirty air.

Environmental justice involves “connecting the dots of the day-to-day challenges and the decisions we made,” and identifying “the opportunities that we have to make some different decisions so that we can have more equitable outcomes,” said S. Atyia Martin, a distinguished senior fellow at Northeastern University’s Global Resilience Institute and the founder of All Aces Inc.

Leading candidates like Senators Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts did not mince words in Wednesday’s forum. Climate policies, Ms. Warren said, must be designed to help “people who have been displaced, workers who have been displaced, people in communities of color who have for generations now been the ones where the toxic dumps got sited next to their homes.”

Several candidates proposed a variety of policies related to environmental justice.

  • Mr. Buttigieg promoted his “Douglass Plan” to combat systemic racism, including in housing and health care, and to provide funding for environmentally vulnerable communities.

  • Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, said he wanted to increase funding for the National Flood Insurance Program to help low-income Americans recover from natural disasters.

  • Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota highlighted her carbon pricing proposal, revenue from which would be used to “make sure that people are basically held harmless” when climate change damages their homes or livelihoods, she said.

  • Former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas said he would use revenue from his proposed cap-and-trade system to help people in polluted neighborhoods and flood-prone coastal areas.

  • Andrew Yang, the tech entrepreneur, promoted his $1,000-a-month universal basic income proposal. “That would help citizens of this country protect themselves in a natural disaster, because we all know when Hurricane Dorian or Hurricane Harvey hits, who suffers?” he said. “Poor people, people of color, people who don’t have a car they can get into and just drive to some relative’s house.”

Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California have gone further, making environmental justice a central theme of their overall climate plans. Earlier in her career, Ms. Harris created an environmental justice unit within the San Francisco district attorney’s office, a point she noted on Wednesday. She and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York also introduced legislation in July that would require the government to evaluate environmental policies based on their effects on low-income communities.

The very presence of environmental justice as a topic of discussion in a major presidential forum was noteworthy and reflects broader shifts in the Democratic Party. In many policy areas, from climate change to abortion, candidates have begun to explicitly emphasize socioeconomic disparities — and, in particular, the impact of generations of systemic racism.

But Dr. Bullard said much more was needed.

“The climate proposals that candidates have pushed out are aspirational, and I commend them for doing that,” he said. But, he added: “Breathing clean air should not be aspirational. It should be experiential. Clean drinking water in Flint or Newark — that’s something that should not be aspirational. We should be able to drink clean water right now, not 20 years from now.”

Dr. Martin said that while she was very glad the discussion was happening, it had been oversimplified and, at times, reinforced stereotypes of powerlessness surrounding poor people and communities of color. Environmental justice plans should not only benefit marginalized communities, she said, but also bring them into the policymaking process.

“We have an opportunity to have a more sophisticated and nuanced conversation,” she said.

More on the 2020 Democrats and Climate Change
Biden Fund-Raiser Draws Climate Change Protesters

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160256148_23335768-5867-46eb-8acc-fc361c47cdc4-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
‘I Have Sued Exxon Mobil,’ Kamala Harris Said. Not Quite.

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160199802_dbdf3935-b667-4dc7-9862-68cfa2c5a5fd-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
5 Takeaways From the Democrats’ Climate Town Hall

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 04-live-climate-takeaways-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
Climate Town Hall: Several Democratic Candidates Embrace a Carbon Tax

Sept. 4, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 03dems-climate-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why.

The presidential candidates at the CNN climate forum on Wednesday repeatedly emphasized how climate change is hurting low-income communities and people of color, reflecting a growing awareness among Democrats that many of the problems they seek to address are inextricably tied to racism, poverty and other forms of discrimination and inequality.

Nine of the 10 participating candidates — all except former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — named or clearly alluded to environmental justice, a framework that calls for environmental policies to explicitly address racial and economic disparities exacerbated by a warming planet.

It was an acknowledgment, as several candidates put it, that decades of racist and classist policies have concentrated people of color and poor people in the most polluted communities, and that those most immediately and severely affected by climate change are often those with the fewest resources to respond.

The environmental justice movement “embraces the principle that all communities and all people have a right to equal protection of our environmental laws,” said Robert Bullard, a professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University who pioneered the movement. “It’s equal access to the good things that make communities healthy, but also making sure that no community is overburdened because of their income or because of their race or their geographic location.”

That overburdening is plain to see. When a storm like Hurricane Dorian makes landfall, the people in its path are generally the ones who couldn’t afford to evacuate or who had nowhere to go. Poor people — a disproportionate percentage of whom are people of color — cannot afford to rebuild the way wealthier people can, and their infrastructure is often less resilient and more prone to damage in the first place. Afterward, communities of color often get less attention and federal aid.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160205064_d6e1f65f-8882-45d9-a961-c8876e0b45fa-articleLarge Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

CNN hosted a climate forum on Wednesday.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

Just consider the response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas, or to Hurricane Irma in Florida. Then look at Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Climate change is not the only problem. Because of decades of housing discrimination — including redlining, as Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., specifically noted — people of color are much more likely than white people to live in polluted neighborhoods. Their water is more likely to be contaminated, as in Flint, Mich., and Newark. They are more likely to have asthma and other health problems caused or aggravated by dirty air.

Environmental justice involves “connecting the dots of the day-to-day challenges and the decisions we made,” and identifying “the opportunities that we have to make some different decisions so that we can have more equitable outcomes,” said S. Atyia Martin, a distinguished senior fellow at Northeastern University’s Global Resilience Institute and the founder of All Aces Inc.

Leading candidates like Senators Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts did not mince words in Wednesday’s forum. Climate policies, Ms. Warren said, must be designed to help “people who have been displaced, workers who have been displaced, people in communities of color who have for generations now been the ones where the toxic dumps got sited next to their homes.”

Several candidates proposed a variety of policies related to environmental justice.

  • Mr. Buttigieg promoted his “Douglass Plan” to combat systemic racism, including in housing and health care, and to provide funding for environmentally vulnerable communities.

  • Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, said he wanted to increase funding for the National Flood Insurance Program to help low-income Americans recover from natural disasters.

  • Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota highlighted her carbon pricing proposal, revenue from which would be used to “make sure that people are basically held harmless” when climate change damages their homes or livelihoods, she said.

  • Former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas said he would use revenue from his proposed cap-and-trade system to help people in polluted neighborhoods and flood-prone coastal areas.

  • Andrew Yang, the tech entrepreneur, promoted his $1,000-a-month universal basic income proposal. “That would help citizens of this country protect themselves in a natural disaster, because we all know when Hurricane Dorian or Hurricane Harvey hits, who suffers?” he said. “Poor people, people of color, people who don’t have a car they can get into and just drive to some relative’s house.”

Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California have gone further, making environmental justice a central theme of their overall climate plans. Earlier in her career, Ms. Harris created an environmental justice unit within the San Francisco district attorney’s office, a point she noted on Wednesday. She and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York also introduced legislation in July that would require the government to evaluate environmental policies based on their effects on low-income communities.

The very presence of environmental justice as a topic of discussion in a major presidential forum was noteworthy and reflects broader shifts in the Democratic Party. In many policy areas, from climate change to abortion, candidates have begun to explicitly emphasize socioeconomic disparities — and, in particular, the impact of generations of systemic racism.

But Dr. Bullard said much more was needed.

“The climate proposals that candidates have pushed out are aspirational, and I commend them for doing that,” he said. But, he added: “Breathing clean air should not be aspirational. It should be experiential. Clean drinking water in Flint or Newark — that’s something that should not be aspirational. We should be able to drink clean water right now, not 20 years from now.”

Dr. Martin said that while she was very glad the discussion was happening, it had been oversimplified and, at times, reinforced stereotypes of powerlessness surrounding poor people and communities of color. Environmental justice plans should not only benefit marginalized communities, she said, but also bring them into the policymaking process.

“We have an opportunity to have a more sophisticated and nuanced conversation,” she said.

More on the 2020 Democrats and Climate Change
Biden Fund-Raiser Draws Climate Change Protesters

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160256148_23335768-5867-46eb-8acc-fc361c47cdc4-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
‘I Have Sued Exxon Mobil,’ Kamala Harris Said. Not Quite.

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160199802_dbdf3935-b667-4dc7-9862-68cfa2c5a5fd-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
5 Takeaways From the Democrats’ Climate Town Hall

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 04-live-climate-takeaways-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
Climate Town Hall: Several Democratic Candidates Embrace a Carbon Tax

Sept. 4, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 03dems-climate-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s Why. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means.

The presidential candidates at the CNN climate forum on Wednesday repeatedly emphasized how climate change is hurting low-income communities and people of color, reflecting a growing awareness among Democrats that many of the problems they seek to address are inextricably tied to racism, poverty and other forms of discrimination and inequality.

Nine of the 10 participating candidates — all except former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — named or clearly alluded to environmental justice, a framework that calls for environmental policies to explicitly address racial and economic disparities exacerbated by a warming planet.

It was an acknowledgment, as several candidates put it, that decades of racist and classist policies have concentrated people of color and poor people in the most polluted communities, and that those most immediately and severely affected by climate change are often those with the fewest resources to respond.

The environmental justice movement “embraces the principle that all communities and all people have a right to equal protection of our environmental laws,” said Robert Bullard, a professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University who pioneered the movement. “It’s equal access to the good things that make communities healthy, but also making sure that no community is overburdened because of their income or because of their race or their geographic location.”

That overburdening is plain to see. When a storm like Hurricane Dorian makes landfall, the people in its path are generally the ones who couldn’t afford to evacuate or who had nowhere to go. Poor people — a disproportionate percentage of whom are people of color — cannot afford to rebuild the way wealthier people can, and their infrastructure is often less resilient and more prone to damage in the first place. Afterward, communities of color often get less attention and federal aid.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160205064_d6e1f65f-8882-45d9-a961-c8876e0b45fa-articleLarge Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

CNN hosted a climate forum on Wednesday.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

Just consider the response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas, or to Hurricane Irma in Florida. Then look at Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Climate change is not the only problem. Because of decades of housing discrimination — including redlining, as Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., specifically noted — people of color are much more likely than white people to live in polluted neighborhoods. Their water is more likely to be contaminated, as in Flint, Mich., and Newark. They are more likely to have asthma and other health problems caused or aggravated by dirty air.

Environmental justice involves “connecting the dots of the day-to-day challenges and the decisions we made,” and identifying “the opportunities that we have to make some different decisions so that we can have more equitable outcomes,” said S. Atyia Martin, a distinguished senior fellow at Northeastern University’s Global Resilience Institute and the founder of All Aces Inc.

Leading candidates like Senators Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts did not mince words in Wednesday’s forum. Climate policies, Ms. Warren said, must be designed to help “people who have been displaced, workers who have been displaced, people in communities of color who have for generations now been the ones where the toxic dumps got sited next to their homes.”

Several candidates proposed a variety of policies related to environmental justice.

  • Mr. Buttigieg promoted his “Douglass Plan” to combat systemic racism, including in housing and health care, and to provide funding for environmentally vulnerable communities.

  • Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, said he wanted to increase funding for the National Flood Insurance Program to help low-income Americans recover from natural disasters.

  • Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota highlighted her carbon pricing proposal, revenue from which would be used to “make sure that people are basically held harmless” when climate change damages their homes or livelihoods, she said.

  • Former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas said he would use revenue from his proposed cap-and-trade system to help people in polluted neighborhoods and flood-prone coastal areas.

  • Andrew Yang, the tech entrepreneur, promoted his $1,000-a-month universal basic income proposal. “That would help citizens of this country protect themselves in a natural disaster, because we all know when Hurricane Dorian or Hurricane Harvey hits, who suffers?” he said. “Poor people, people of color, people who don’t have a car they can get into and just drive to some relative’s house.”

Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California have gone further, making environmental justice a central theme of their overall climate plans. Earlier in her career, Ms. Harris created an environmental justice unit within the San Francisco district attorney’s office, a point she noted on Wednesday. She and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York also introduced legislation in July that would require the government to evaluate environmental policies based on their effects on low-income communities.

The very presence of environmental justice as a topic of discussion in a major presidential forum was noteworthy and reflects broader shifts in the Democratic Party. In many policy areas, from climate change to abortion, candidates have begun to explicitly emphasize socioeconomic disparities — and, in particular, the impact of generations of systemic racism.

But Dr. Bullard said much more was needed.

“The climate proposals that candidates have pushed out are aspirational, and I commend them for doing that,” he said. But, he added: “Breathing clean air should not be aspirational. It should be experiential. Clean drinking water in Flint or Newark — that’s something that should not be aspirational. We should be able to drink clean water right now, not 20 years from now.”

Dr. Martin said that while she was very glad the discussion was happening, it had been oversimplified and, at times, reinforced stereotypes of powerlessness surrounding poor people and communities of color. Environmental justice plans should not only benefit marginalized communities, she said, but also bring them into the policymaking process.

“We have an opportunity to have a more sophisticated and nuanced conversation,” she said.

More on the 2020 Democrats and Climate Change
Biden Fund-Raiser Draws Climate Change Protesters

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160256148_23335768-5867-46eb-8acc-fc361c47cdc4-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
‘I Have Sued Exxon Mobil,’ Kamala Harris Said. Not Quite.

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160199802_dbdf3935-b667-4dc7-9862-68cfa2c5a5fd-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
5 Takeaways From the Democrats’ Climate Town Hall

Sept. 5, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 04-live-climate-takeaways-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D
Climate Town Hall: Several Democratic Candidates Embrace a Carbon Tax

Sept. 4, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 03dems-climate-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Environmental Justice Was a Climate Forum Theme. Here’s What It Means. Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Income Inequality Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Global Warming environment discrimination Democratic Party Bullard, Robert D

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pow! Ted Cruz Mercilessly Lays Out Bernie Sanders Over His Pro-China Comments

Westlake Legal Group music-black-and-white-white-sport-photography-ring-846233-pxhere.com_-620x413 Pow! Ted Cruz Mercilessly Lays Out Bernie Sanders Over His Pro-China Comments Uncategorized Ted Cruz socialism Poverty Front Page Stories Featured Story Congress communism China Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020

 

 

Speaking to Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball Wednesday, 2020 hopeful and everyone’s favorite multimillionaire socialist uncle — Bernie Sanders — heaped praise upon progressive China:

“But what we have to say about China, in fairness to China and it’s leadership, is — if I’m not mistaken — they have made more progress in addressing extreme poverty than any country in the history of civilization. Okay? So they’ve done a lot of things for their people.”

Ted Cruz, apparently, found the comment curious.

Therefore, he decided to Crush Uncle Bernie mercilessly:

“Sure, the Chinese Communists have wrongfully imprisoned & tortured millions, and they have murdered over 65 million people, but Bernie may have a point: when you’re dead, your poverty’s solved, right? #AbsurdLeftistPropaganda.”



via GIPHY

 

Perhaps Bernie’s just a good-timin’ fella who likes to look on the non-murderous bright side.

Still, Ted cruised in and wrecked ol’ Bern with that blazer.

Uncle Bernie’s a revolutionary, and — unfortunately — many of his supporters seem wholly aware of what he’s selling. Despite signs and comments by millennials to the contrary, socialism isn’t simply a system in which everyone’s taken care of. It’s a design which prohibits individuals from owning their own businesses, as the government possesses all products and means of production. Which China has in the past somewhat employed: Under Chairman Mao, every factory and farm in the gargantuan nation was owned by the Communist Party.

Is that what the youngsters really want? The inability to open their own vape store?

Presumably, Bernie’s a fan.

Thankfully, many who know the definition of words aren’t.

That includes Ted, who’s no stranger to correcting Mr. Sanders.

Take a short trip back in time and watch Ted absolutely shred your uncle below. Like China, Ted’s intense:



-ALEX

 

See 3 more pieces from me:

Bern Out: Right After He Condemns Trump’s Baltimore Slam, Uncle Bernie’s Seen Doing The Same Thing

Folks In DC Are Asked About Trump’s ‘Racist’ Baltimore Remarks – Then Told They Were Actually Bernie’s (Video)

Actor Gary Sinise Celebrates A 25-Year Partnership Honoring America’s Disabled Veterans

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

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The post Pow! Ted Cruz Mercilessly Lays Out Bernie Sanders Over His Pro-China Comments appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group music-black-and-white-white-sport-photography-ring-846233-pxhere.com_-300x200 Pow! Ted Cruz Mercilessly Lays Out Bernie Sanders Over His Pro-China Comments Uncategorized Ted Cruz socialism Poverty Front Page Stories Featured Story Congress communism China Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception 2020   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bernie Sanders Thinks He’s Praising Communism During Interview, but Is Actually Applauding Capitalism

Westlake Legal Group gs-bernie-sanders2-620x413 Bernie Sanders Thinks He’s Praising Communism During Interview, but Is Actually Applauding Capitalism socialism Poverty poor Politics Front Page Stories Featured Story Economy democrats communism China Capitalism Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception

Bernie Sanders by Gage Skidmore, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0/Original

China is rife with problems. Be it religious persecution, an Orwellian way of treating its citizens,  and its penchant for communism, it’s not exactly the model country.

While 2020 candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, acknowledges that China has its problems, but seems to believe that the communist country has done more for its poor than any other country in the history of the world.

“China is a country that is moving unfortunately in a more authoritarian way in a number of directions,” Sanders told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball. “But what we have to say about China in fairness to China and it’s leadership is if I’m not mistaken they have made more progress in addressing extreme poverty than any country in the history of civilization, so they’ve done a lot of things for their people.”

As Ryan Saavedra of the Daily Wire points out, Sanders misunderstands how China helped its poor. It was never communism that helped the poverty levels, it created them. It was China’s turn to capitalism that helped the poor out of its rut, and Saavedra points to a Forbes article that describes how it happened:

…never before in history have so many people escaped poverty in such a short time as in the past decades in China. According to official World Bank figures, the percentage of extremely poor people in China in 1981 stood at 88.3%. By 2015 only 0.7% of the Chinese population was living in extreme poverty. In this period, the number of poor people in China fell from 878 million to less than ten million…

…China’s success provides clear evidence of the power of capitalism. Under Mao, the state had an omnipotent grip over China’s economy. What has happened over the past few decades can be summed up in a few sentences: China has progressively embraced the tenets of free-market economics, introduced private ownership, and gradually reduced the influence of the once all-powerful state over the Chinese economy. That the state still plays a major role today is simply because China is in the midst of a transformation process that began with complete state dominance of the economy.

In fact, it appears Sanders is a lot more careful about what he left out about China than what he praised, as pointed out by Paul Crookston of The Washington Free Beacon:

He did not address how China’s communist government has oppressed religious people and minorities, putting at least one million Uighur Muslims in concentration camps while instituting one of the most comprehensive surveillance states in history. In China, the Communist Party requires all religions to pledge ultimate loyalty to President Xi Jinping, who is atop a one-party system that does not allow political opposition.

China’s poor may have been helped out by China embracing capitalism more than it used to, but the falling poverty levels is a testament to capitalism, not the power of a communist government. The power of communism, which Sanders is dangerously close to applauding, results in every other problem you just read.

Sanders has a habit of skirting around the facts about the economic and governmental systems he heaps praise on. Every question thrown at him usually results him uttering the same few phrases that help him dodge the question. “Big corporations,” and “the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer,” etc, etc.

I get the feeling Sanders knows his governmental system has massive flaws, but at this point, backing off from it would mean losing support, and more importantly for Sanders, money.

The post Bernie Sanders Thinks He’s Praising Communism During Interview, but Is Actually Applauding Capitalism appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group bernie-sanders-flickr-cc-300x169 Bernie Sanders Thinks He’s Praising Communism During Interview, but Is Actually Applauding Capitalism socialism Poverty poor Politics Front Page Stories Featured Story Economy democrats communism China Capitalism Bernie Sanders Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

As the Left Focuses on Faux Cries of Racism, Baltimore Blows By 2018 Murder Rate and Real People Are Suffering

Westlake Legal Group DonaldTrumpAPphoto-620x317 As the Left Focuses on Faux Cries of Racism, Baltimore Blows By 2018 Murder Rate and Real People Are Suffering war zone racism Poverty Politics murder rate Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Faux Outrage elijah cummings donald trump Disgusting democrats CBP border patrol baltimore Al Sharpton 3rd world

President Donald Trump speaks during a Made in America showcase event on the South Lawn of the White House, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Let me show you the stupidity of modern politics. We’ll start with a recap.

Elijah Cummings makes a dishonest, disgusting rant against the acting DHS Secretary, accusing him of abusing children and not caring about humanity. Nothing he said was provably true and it was a slander the CBP didn’t deserve. Trump responded by pointing out, rightly, that Cummings own district is a dumpster fire of crime and poverty and that he shouldn’t be attacking CBP, who are doing the best they can.

To a normal, logical person, the response should be “you know, it is concerning that Baltimore has a murder rate higher than almost every 3rd world country on earth and perhaps we should focus on that.”

But nope, we don’t live in sane times. So instead we got crying on CNN and countless media hits about how Trump’s comments were racist, despite having no racial connotation whatsoever. Heck, we even got Democrats rushing to defend noted anti-Semite and race hustler Al Sharpton because nothing has to make sense anymore as long as you are opposing Trump.

What really happened here is that Trump broke the rules, as he’s apt to do. The rules say that Republicans simply aren’t allowed to point out the failures of Democrats in the major cities and if you do so, you will be labeled racist because the inner cities are mostly made up of minorities. Until Trump, most Republicans dutifully followed the script.

Trump is not most Republicans.

Meanwhile, as the left rages about tweets that were objectively not racist, real people continue to suffer and die in Baltimore, a city none of them were thinking twice about until it became a way to respond angrily at Donald Trump.

Here’s some eye popping stats for you.

Those numbers are high enough that if Baltimore were a country, it’d be the 4th most dangerous country on the planet. Baltimore leads every U.S. city in murder rate and it’s really not even close at this point. Even if you broaden it to just violent crime (including minor assaults, etc.), Baltimore still clocks in at #2, just behind Detroit.

But the high median income and college graduate rates!

Well yeah. Cummings’ district looks like a child threw up because it’s been so gerrymandered (for the record I’m not against gerrymandering and to the victor go the spoils). That means that he has western and northern suburbs that curve around and connect to his part of the city. In those suburbs are mostly rich white people who moved out of the city long ago because it is such a disaster.

Median income numbers do absolutely nothing to tell the story of poverty within west Baltimore, which is the area being referenced throughout this entire ordeal.

Baltimore is objectively in awful shape. The violent crime numbers are mind-glowingly bad. Residents live in fear and squalor that’s more fit for Afghanistan. Instead of actually addressing Trump’s comments though, we’ve gotten nonsensical #IamBaltimore hashtags and virtue signaling. Because that’s all our current political and media class are good for.

By next week, none of those same people will be thinking about Baltimore. They won’t help the people there. They won’t hold the officials helping to destroy the city accountable. As usual, this was all about politics and “orange man bad.” Better to cry racism for partisan gain than to actually help people who are literally dying in a ware zone in one of America’s oldest cities.

The post As the Left Focuses on Faux Cries of Racism, Baltimore Blows By 2018 Murder Rate and Real People Are Suffering appeared first on RedState.

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NYC’s Uber restrictions found to adversely impact poorest New Yorkers

Westlake Legal Group UberLyft NYC’s Uber restrictions found to adversely impact poorest New Yorkers uber The Blog Poverty New York City lyft gig economy

The municipal government in New York City has made no secret of the war they’ve been waging against gig economy companies like Uber and Lyft for the past several years. They’ve passed one bill after another designed to support their traditional donors in the taxi industry and their unions, making it increasingly difficult for ride-sharing drivers to make a living. But what impact is that having on the community? Uber has been looking into it and found (to nobody’s surprise) that it’s the poorest New Yorkers, particularly in minority communities who are paying the price. (NY Post)

The San Francisco company says city and state regulations reining in ride-hailing services like Uber are only making life difficult for lower income neighborhoods — while having zero impact on more affluent New York City riders.

“The data suggests that the TLC’s regulations may be impacting low-income New Yorkers, especially in communities that are poorly served by yellow taxis,” Chad Dobbs, Uber’s head of rides in the city, told The Post.

Dobb’s statement comes ahead of a hearing before the Taxi Limousine Commission Tuesday to consider more regulations, including extending the current NYC freeze on for-hire vehicles.

Wage requirements and other regulations have driven up the minimum cost of taking an Uber or Lyft in the city considerably. On top of that, the government passed a freeze on the addition of any new for-hire vehicles. As drivers drop out, this leads to fewer cars being available, so surge pricing often goes into effect, driving up costs further. The result is that affluent riders probably don’t notice it all that much, but low income, economically disadvantaged residents are being priced out of the system.

As a result, Uber says that the number of rides being requested in lower-income neighborhoods has grown only three percent in the past year while affluent regions have seen growth of 50% or more.

It’s not as if getting a ride in some of the city’s rougher neighborhoods was easy to begin with. There are areas with higher crime levels where the yellow cabs simply refuse to go for pickup or drop off of passengers. Ride-hailing drivers are more likely to venture into those neighborhoods because they’re not be randomly flagged down by unknown individuals who may be waiting to rob them. Riders have to have a registered account on their phone, so they are less likely to commit a crime in the car with their name on the system’s record of ride requests.

The result of all this is that too many people have a hard time getting a ride. And if you can’t predictably find transportation to get back and forth, it’s kind of hard to hold down a job, adding to the economic woes many of these communities already suffer under.

So who exactly is benefitting from this dogpile of new regulations being hurled at Uber and Lyft? It’s not the city’s poorest residents. It’s the cab companies, their unions and their lobbyists who have the ear of the Mayor and the City Council. And they pay richly for that access. It might be nice if someone pointed all of this out during next year’s elections in the Big Apple.

The post NYC’s Uber restrictions found to adversely impact poorest New Yorkers appeared first on Hot Air.

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Robert Halfon: Skills, social justice, standards, and support for teachers. A four-part manifesto for the new Prime Minister.

Robert Halfon is MP for Harlow, Chair of the Education Select Committee and President of Conservative Workers and Trade Unionists.

Whether it is Boris Johnson’s £4.6 billion earmarked for schools, or his pledge to boost funding for apprenticeships, education has received vital oxygen during this leadership contest.

The Education Select Committee’s upcoming report on school funding, which we will publish later this week, supports the logic of these pledges – in particular, the need to support further education, which has for too long been considered the Cinderella sector.

But we must look beyond this. Education policy is an enormous montage of different worlds. In the months and years ahead, the new Prime Minister should collect these into one ambitious strategy. He can do this by focusing on the following four “S”s: skills, social justice, standards, and support for the profession.

First, skills.

Around nine million working aged adults in England have low literacy and/or numeracy skills. Many end up in low-skill, low-paid jobs – their life prospects dragged into the quicksand. And a third of England’s 16-19-year-olds have low basic skills.

We must urgently address this by building on the fine work of Damian Hinds and Anne Milton.

In particular, the new Conservative Government should build a world-class apprenticeship offer. It is vital to better understand what is driving the dramatic decline in Level 2 and Level 3 apprenticeships, and increasing FE funding is a necessity. We would be in a remarkable position if we were able to offer an apprenticeship to every single young person in our country who wanted one.

In terms of lifelong learning, we should build an adult community learning centre in every town, restructure existing employer tax reliefs so that they receive more generous relief when investing in low-skilled employees, and introduce a social justice tax credit, which would expand the number of employers who benefit from tax breaks when they invest in training for low-skilled workers in areas of skills needs.

The curriculum also needs reappraising to make sure our country is ready for the march of the robots. 28 per cent of jobs taken by 16-24-year-olds could be at risk of automation by the 2030s; many low-skilled jobs are at risk and even higher skilled jobs are not immune. Policy makers must consider what it means to develop the skills of the future, and how best to do this. There should be a Royal Commission, with the finest scientists, economists and academics in the land, looking at the effect that AI, automation, and robots will have on society, the economy and our education system, as well as how we should respond to these challenges.

Degree apprenticeships, the crown jewel in higher education, should be at the heart of our higher education offering. The Government must aim to have at least 50 per cent of students doing degree apprenticeships. They allow students to get good quality jobs and earn whilst they learn without a lead weight of £50,000 dragging from their feet.

It is time to reflect on what we consider to be an ‘elite university’. Do they just have good research rankings or are they institutions that deliver high graduate employment outcomes, meet our skills needs and address social disadvantage? We must better recognise the unsung heroes of higher education, like Portsmouth University which came top of The Economist’s “value-added” university rankings (this compares graduates’ wages with what they would have been expected to earn if they had not gone to that university), or Nottingham Trent which has exceptionally high numbers of disadvantaged students and incredibly high destination outcomes.

Second, social justice.

Currently, social injustice inhabits every part of our education system. Almost half of children eligible for free school meals are not ready for primary school. Disadvantaged children are 19 months behind by the time they do their GCSEs. Just 33 per cent of pupils on free school meals get five good GCSEs. And the most disadvantaged students are almost four times less likely to go to university than the most advantaged students.

Good schools are not just bastions of learning but also places of community. And yet schools in many deprived areas struggle to attract experienced teachers and leaders, who are so instrumental in driving up quality. Teachers in disadvantaged areas are also less likely to teach subjects in which they are qualified, and access to good initial teacher training varies by geography.

So how to dismantle these obstacles to learning? Social justice must be the beating heart of our education policy. A bold, assertive agenda that has compassion and aspiration right at its core.

The DfE should incentivise elite initial teacher training providers to set up shop in disadvantaged areas and support the subsequent development of local teachers. This might involve new funding, but they could also consider making use of existing funds – for example, we spend £72 million on opportunity areas, although we don’t really know exactly what impact they are having.

Disadvantaged pupils should also enjoy the benefits associated with our best private schools, including extensive social capital. I attended a private school and am a huge fan of their transformative potential. But, given the extensive charitable benefits that private schools get, they must do more to open their gates to acutely disadvantaged pupils. This could be done by better incentivising schools through the tax system.

Third, standards.

There is no doubt that education has improved in recent years. I have a great deal of admiration for the work the Government – and in particular, Nick Gibb – has done to improve standards.

The evidence is clear. The Government has furnished our children’s education with more rigour. The proportion of six year olds passing the phonics check increased from 58 per cent in 2012 to 82 per cent in 2018. We are stripping out qualifications that hold no real currency. Our Free Schools Programme continues to produce such gems as King’s College London Mathematics School. Since 2010, 1.8 million more pupils are in good or outstanding schools. And we have some of the finest universities in the world.

It is important to build on this and export rigour to every part of our education system and that includes technical education. The Government is starting to do this in its post-16 Skills Plan, which will produce a smaller number of T-Level qualifications that employers recognise and value. The next step is to make sure these new qualifications land safely.

The Free Schools Programme must emphasise community and not get subsumed into larger academies’ broader programmes. And we must apply the logic of high standards to non-mainstream alternative provision, where 1.1 per cent of pupils achieve five good GCSE passes and the supply of good schools is highly variable.

Finally, support for the profession.

It is vital that we support our teachers. We can build the best facilities in the world, but without their most precious element, they are just empty shells.

The education sector needs to continue to attract the brightest individuals. And the Government should support their professional development. We can learn lessons from countries that have a strong record in this area, such as Singapore, which gives classroom teachers more flexibility to hone their trade; places an unusually strong emphasis on peer support (around four fifths are either mentored or a mentor); and has a clearly defined ladder of career progression.

It is also important to make teachers’ lives easier. According to the OECD’s latest international survey, our teachers work more than they used to, and their working week is higher than average. Teachers also spend less time teaching than they did five years ago. Our next Prime Minister must free teachers from unnecessary bureaucracy, and give them more time to do what they do best: teach.

So to sum up.

Skills, social justice, standards, and support for the profession. These should be the four, interlocking foundations of the next Prime Minister’s education programme. Together, they allow those who cannot even see the ladder of opportunity to find it, and they give us all the chance to climb high and build prosperity.

Some of this can only be delivered with wisely targeted resources, but funding alone is not the answer. These four foundations are as much about ingenuity, creativity and resourcefulness, as they are about hard cash.

We have a unique chance to address the broad restlessness that exists in society. By extending the ladder of opportunity to those who currently lack it, and by nurturing our raw talents more generally, we can ensure the next generation climbs that ladder and gets the jobs, security, and prosperity that they, and our country, need. It is well within our ability to make sure this happens.

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Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — A widening income gap and sagging social mobility have left dents in the American dream. But the belief that anyone with enough gumption and grit can clamber to the top remains central to the nation’s self-image.

And that could complicate Democratic efforts to frame the 2020 presidential election as a referendum on a broken economic system.

Americans, who tend to link rewards to individual effort, routinely overestimate the ease of moving up the income ranks, while Europeans — citing an unfair system, inherited wealth and sticky social classes — consistently underestimate it, surveys have found.

For moving from the bottom of the income ladder to the top, the South offers the worst odds in the United States. But it’s also the region where people are most optimistic about the prospects.

“Fifteen to 20 percent?” guessed Vicki Winters, a retired contract specialist at the Defense Department who lives with her husband, George, in a predominantly white Huntsville suburb.

The actual chances of making that climb in Alabama are a shade above 5 percent. Nationwide, they are less than 8 percent. And in Madison County, where the Winterses live, the odds that a child will escape poverty are among the lowest in the nation.

The county’s dismal ranking is in some ways surprising given Huntsville’s reputation as a dynamic and growing technology hub centered on NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Army Aviation and Missile Command. It has an unemployment rate below 3 percent, is close to a string of colleges and universities and has a business-friendly profile.

“There are a lot of jobs in Huntsville,” said Gregory G. Parker, who presides over the front desk at the Optimist Recreation Center, named for the service club that helped create it. On a recent morning, he was checking in the regular pickleball players. “People just have to have the drive to strive.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156809799_8748183c-9e9b-4607-9d76-9903b9f0c2ba-articleLarge Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

“There are a lot of jobs in Huntsville,” said Gregory G. Parker, who works at the Optimist Recreation Center. “People just have to have the drive to strive.”CreditAndrea Morales for The New York Times

Huntsville was one of the first racially integrated cities in the South as a result of civil rights sit-in campaigns in the early 1960s. But the legacy of Jim Crow and redlining persists in the city as it does elsewhere in the region, with concentrated pockets of poverty.

One of those can be found at the city’s office for social services and food stamps, a low-slung, blocklong building flanked by a pawnshop and a Salvation Army thrift store. On a steamy weekday, public-assistance recipients and applicants waited for a bus under a shady tree.

“You’ve got to work hard, but it can happen,” said Edward Stokes, adding that he had often found himself one paycheck away from homelessness. He had just come from signing up for a program at the city’s career center.

Why inequity and disadvantage produce such hopefulness is not as unusual as it might initially seem. In the most economically stricken areas, residents understand that “nobody is going to help you,” said Roland Bénabou, an economics and public affairs professor at Princeton University.

So the only way to retain hope and motivate your children is to “think that if you just work hard or study hard, you will make it,” he said. “Otherwise there is no hope and no incentive to work, and then for sure you’ll remain poor.”

Mr. Bénabou also noted that whether you believe people get what they deserve in terms of rewards and punishments often varies widely by country.

Westlake Legal Group make-your-own-mobility-animation-1521838318116-articleLarge-v6 Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

Income Mobility Charts for Girls, Asian-Americans and Other Groups. Or Make Your Own.

Watch men and women of any race grow up in the United States.

Americans are strong believers in what psychologists call a “just world,” one where people get what they deserve and deserve what they get, he said. “If you’re poor, you must have not worked hard or are lazy, and if you are rich, it must be due to your own merits, efforts and talents,” he said. “Europeans think it’s much more due to luck.”

Those perceptions were confirmed by Harvard University researchers after conducting broad surveys in Europe and the United States, published last year. They asked people in five countries to estimate a child’s chances of moving from the bottom fifth of the income distribution to the top fifth.

Economic Mobility: Reality and Perception

Recent research by a Harvard University team found a disparity between the perceived and actual odds that a child born into the bottom fifth of the income ladder in the United States could move to the top fifth. Optimism about mobility is highest in states that, in reality, offer some of the worst prospects.

Westlake Legal Group 0627-biz-web-MOBILITY-Artboard_2 Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

Actual intergenerational mobility

Percentage of children in each state who were born into families in the lowest fifth of the income ranks but moved into the top fifth by adulthood.*

Perceived intergenerational mobility

Estimation among those surveyed, by state, of the percentage of Americans born into the bottom fifth of the income ranks who will reach the top fifth in adulthood.

Westlake Legal Group 0627-biz-web-MOBILITY-Artboard_3 Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

Actual intergenerational mobility

Percentage of children in each state who were born into families in the lowest fifth of the income ranks but moved into the top fifth by adulthood.*

Perceived intergenerational mobility

Estimation among those surveyed, by state, of the percentage of Americans born into the bottom fifth of the income ranks who will reach the top fifth in adulthood.

Westlake Legal Group 0627-biz-web-MOBILITY-Artboard_4 Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

Perceived intergenerational mobility

Actual intergenerational mobility

Estimation among those surveyed, by state, of the percentage of Americans born into the bottom fifth of the income ranks who will reach the top fifth in adulthood.

Percentage of children in each state who were born into families in the lowest fifth of the income ranks but moved into the top fifth by adulthood.*

Westlake Legal Group 0627-biz-web-MOBILITY-Artboard_5 Southerners, Facing Big Odds, Believe in a Path Out of Poverty Southern States (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Poverty Polls and Public Opinion Income Inequality HUNTSVILLE, Ala. Economic Conditions and Trends Democratic Party

Actual intergenerational mobility

Percentage of children in each state who were born into families in the lowest fifth of the income ranks but moved into the top fifth by adulthood.*

Perceived intergenerational mobility

Estimation among those surveyed, by state, of the percentage of Americans born into the bottom fifth of the income ranks who will reach the top fifth in adulthood.

*The numbers for each state show the share of those born from 1980 to 1985 whose families were in the bottom fifth in pretax household income in 1996-2000, but who as adults were in the top fifth in 2011-12.

By The New York Times | Source: Harvard University

The kind of audacious hope they uncovered could hinder the Democratic case that fundamental changes are needed to enhance economic opportunity.

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts announced her presidential campaign with an indictment of a “rigged system that props up the rich and powerful and kicks dirt on everyone else.” Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has rallied crowds with attacks on the “rigged economy.” And former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has talked of the “rigged labor market.”

They, and other Democratic contenders, have proposed ambitious programs for easing the upward trek confronting children from poor families, like free college, universal health care and childhood savings accounts or bonds.

Yet views about the government’s ability to even the playing field are tangled up with attitudes about the system’s fundamental fairness.

“If people think opportunity is equal, they will tolerate more unequal outcomes,” said Stefanie Stantcheva, an economics professor at Harvard who was part of the university’s research team.

Oddly, segregation does not dampen America’s unique brand of optimism, but augments it. “We find that perceptions are more optimistic when there is more racial segregation,” the Harvard researchers said.

George Winters, a retired public relations specialist, at a meeting for job seekers. Mr. Winters, a lifelong Democrat, said that the odds of poor people working their way up were slim, and that he considered that a sign the government needed to do more.CreditAndrea Morales for The New York Times

Whether people think opportunity is equally available, though, often depends on their political viewpoint.

Liberals are generally more pessimistic than conservatives about the ability of poorer Americans to hoist themselves up economically, and they are more inclined to support government programs meant to ease the route. Tell them that social mobility from one generation to the next is less than they thought, and their support for public assistance increases.

For conservatives, none of that is true. Learning that they have overestimated the odds does not increase their support for government intervention, but causes it to drop even further.

“We didn’t expect this very stark polarization,” Ms. Stantcheva said. It is not that conservatives do not consider flagging social mobility to be a serious issue, but rather that they think government will make the problem worse.

The political split may also help explain the South’s particular optimism. The region has leaned conservative for decades. Alabama, like most of its neighbors, has not voted for a Democrat in a presidential election since 1976.

Ms. Winters is one of those dedicated Republicans. Her husband described himself as a lifelong Democrat.

Mr. Winters figured the odds that poor people could work their way up were slim. For him, that is evidence that the government needs to do more.

For Ms. Winters, hearing that the odds of moving up the income ladder are actually much lower than she had guessed did not change her opinion that government assistance was wasteful.

“There are too many handouts to collect from the government,” Ms. Winters said, “instead of going out there and trying to work, and putting your money in a savings account.”

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