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Westlake Legal Group > Sex Crimes

With Weinstein Conviction, Jury Delivers a Verdict on #MeToo

Westlake Legal Group 00assessweinsteinconvict-facebookJumbo With Weinstein Conviction, Jury Delivers a Verdict on #MeToo Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes Decisions and Verdicts #MeToo Movement

The criminal case against Harvey Weinstein was a long shot.

Many of his accusers were bracing for an acquittal. Fellow prosecutors across the country were quietly questioning whether the New York district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., had made a mistake by bringing charges.

But by pushing the boundaries of sex-crimes prosecutions, the Manhattan prosecutors delivered what many people declared a victory for the global movement against sexual misconduct that Mr. Weinstein’s actions had helped ignite.

“It’s a perfect test case of what happens when a culture begins to shift,” said Deborah Tuerkheimer, a law professor at Northwestern.

Along the way, one accuser had to be dropped from the case amid allegations of police misconduct. The central victims acknowledged having had consensual sex with the Hollywood producer after being attacked by him, and one had an intimate relationship with him that stretched for several years. Prosecutors almost never try cases in those circumstances, deeming them too messy to win convictions. At every turn, Mr. Weinstein’s lawyers argued he was a victim of the #MeToo movement gone too far.

The jury’s verdict was ultimately mixed. Mr. Weinstein was acquitted of two counts of predatory sexual assault, the most serious charges against him. The jury had suggested on Friday that it was deadlocked on those counts.

[Follow our live coverage and updates of the Weinstein trial verdict.]

“This wasn’t ‘Believe all women,’ and certainly not ‘Believe everything women are saying,’” said Isabelle Kirshner, a former Manhattan prosecutor turned criminal defense lawyer, who has represented men accused of sexual assault. “ It looks like they were fairly careful on what they decided.”

But prosecutors persuaded the jury to convict on two felony sexual assault charges — which could send him to prison for up to 29 years — suggesting that accountability stretches from the court of public opinion to the court of criminal law.

On Monday, some of Mr. Weinstein’s more than 90 accusers, and others around the world, reacted to the verdict with relief, tears and gratitude that the law had spoken for them.

“For so long these women believed that he was untouchable and could never be held responsible, but now the criminal justice system has found him guilty,” said Tarana Burke, the founder of the #MeToo movement. “That sends a powerful message.”

[Ashley Judd and other Weinstein accusers spoke to The Times about the verdict.]

The #MeToo movement helped propel the prosecution. Mr. Vance, the district attorney had drawn criticism for failing to prosecute Mr. Weinstein in 2015 after an Italian model complained to the police that the producer had grabbed her breasts and tried to force his hand up her skirt. And some of Mr. Weinstein’s accusers who had not previously gone to the police were then willing to participate in the criminal justice process if it meant supporting and protecting other women.

“I just wanted to add my voice in support, and share my experience with the hopes of helping anyone else who was” victimized, Miriam Haley, a former production assistant, said on the witness stand.

“I did it for all of us,” Dawn Dunning, who served as a supporting witness in the trial, said in an interview on Monday. “I did it for the women who couldn’t testify. I couldn’t not do it.”

Joan Illuzzi, the lead prosecutor, did not have much by way of forensic evidence or direct witnesses to prove wrongdoing. Instead, her team strove to establish a pattern of predation, putting four additional women on the stand who told similar stories of rape or abuse by Mr. Weinstein. Those types of supporting witnesses had proved crucial in the successful prosecution of Bill Cosby in 2018. In the Weinstein trial, they provided testimony that was much larger than the sum of its parts, reflecting the collective power of women’s voices at the core of #MeToo.

For decades Mr. Weinstein used high-priced lawyers and secret settlements to silence women with allegations of sexual misconduct against him. But during the trial, which began in early January, he was the one who could not speak. On the advice of his lawyers, he did not take the stand. Instead, he listened as six women testified about what they said he had done to them.

Many of the women described being humiliated by the producer. As they spoke, Mr. Weinstein often appeared humiliated. At one point, as one accuser, Jessica Mann, described his genitals, Mr. Weinstein hung his head.

To counter the allegations, Mr. Weinstein and his legal team drummed home the message that #MeToo had spun out of control.

On the day of his arrest, he walked into a TriBeCa precinct house carrying a biography of Elia Kazan, the Hollywood director who became a victim of McCarthyism. He switched counsel several times, finally setting on Donna Rotunno, a Chicago lawyer who framed much of her defense as a broader attack on #MeToo. She argued that Mr. Weinstein’s sexual encounters were consensual, that his accusers were lying to achieve celebrity status, that women weren’t taking responsibility for their safety, and that men were the true victims and the movement had robbed them of their fundamental rights.

In an interview with “The Daily,” Ms. Rotunno asserted that she had never been a victim of sexual assault because she had never put herself “in that position.”

In her closing argument, she criticized what she said was “a universe that strips adult women of common sense, autonomy and responsibility.”

But the jury appears to have rejected those arguments. The Weinstein verdict could prove a symbolic turning point, legal experts said, showing that sex crimes don’t necessarily follow neat scripts and reshaping public beliefs about which victims deserve their day in court.

The verdict provides hope that we can “have a criminal justice system that reflects the reality of sexual violence,” said Fatima Goss Graves, the president of the National Women’s Law Center.

Mr. Weinstein’s legal team has already said it will appeal the convictions, of rape and criminal sexual act. The producer also faces a separate criminal prosecution in Los Angeles, where he has been charged with raping one woman and sexually assaulting another.

Jane Manning, a former Queens prosecutor and founder of the Women’s Equal Justice Project, said she hoped the Weinstein case would inspire other prosecutors around the country to pursue similarly challenging cases.

“That’s how to cultivate the skill set to try them successfully,” she said. “We need prosecutors to show courage.”

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Harvey Weinstein Is Gone, but Hollywood Is Still a Man’s World

Westlake Legal Group 24weinstein-hollywood-1-facebookJumbo Harvey Weinstein Is Gone, but Hollywood Is Still a Man’s World Workplace Environment Women and Girls Weinstein, Harvey Time's Up Shaw, Nina L (1954- ) sexual harassment Sex Crimes Salke, Jennifer SAG-AFTRA Rosenberg, Melissa (1962- ) Jacobson, Nina (1965- ) DuVernay, Ava discrimination #MeToo Movement

LOS ANGELES — In Hollywood, director jobs are no longer automatically filled by white men. Television writers’ room have made diversity and inclusion top priorities. Human resources departments at major media corporations are more responsive when complaints are filed. Intimacy coordinators, who introduce physical consent considerations into the artistic process, are now normal on productions featuring sexual content.

It has been nearly two and a half years since the sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein burst into public view, and much is different in Hollywood.

But the entertainment industry has been doing things a certain way for decades, and not every aspect of it has been quick to change. Even as Mr. Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, Hollywood largely remains a man’s world.

Take the Oscars, moviedom’s ultimate show of power and prestige. For the ninth time in 10 years, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences did not nominate a woman for best director in 2020. Only one of the 20 acting nominations went to a person of color. And with the exception of “Parasite” and “Little Women,” the majority of the films honored by the Academy — “The Irishman,” “Ford v Ferrari,” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” and “Joker” — were portraits of white men directed by prominent white auteurs.

“I hear people saying a lot of things they hadn’t said before: that inclusion matters, that they understand the need for representation, that they believe in diverse people and perspectives being centered,” the writer and director Ava DuVernay said. “But saying it and doing it aren’t parallel tracks.”

One group of high-powered women in town maintains a running list of the white men who keep rising up the executive ladder while the women stay at least one step below. Jennifer Salke, for instance, became the head of Amazon Studios in 2018 after her predecessor, Roy Price, was accused of sexual harassment. But the former Sony executive Mike Hopkins was brought in last month to oversee Amazon’s video entertainment business. Ms. Salke reports to him and he reports to Jeff Bezos, the Amazon founder.

It is unlikely that accused harassers like Brett Ratner, James Toback, Charlie Rose and Matt Lauer will return to the public eye anytime soon. (Those men, and Mr. Weinstein, have denied any allegations of nonconsensual sex.)

But many in town remain frustrated by those who were accused of improprieties — or who worked closely with those who were — and have been allowed to return to work. Case in point: John Lasseter, who was removed from his position as the creative chief of Pixar after acknowledging misbehavior in 2018, landed a top job at Skydance Animation last year. The former Weinstein Company partners David Glasser and Bob Weinstein, Harvey’s brother, have each formed new production companies. Mr. Glasser raised some $300 million in financing from partners such as Ron Burkle, and has become a fixture on the festival circuit.

“No matter how much things are shifting in the right direction, when you get to the top of these media companies, you will usually find a white dude,” said Nina Jacobson, a veteran producer and the former president of Disney’s Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group. “The power behind the power is still white and male, and in terms of truly passing the torch in corporate life, the torch has not yet been passed.”

On the whole, Hollywood has become a more inclusive place. It has been helped by the rise of streaming services, which have a seemingly insatiable need for more content that appeals to new and diverse audiences. Women and people of color have been finding their voices through organizations like Time’s Up and ReFrame, which have transformed the issues of gender and racial equality from tired buzzwords into vital, concrete paths to addressing the imbalanced power structures that some blame for allowing abusers like Mr. Weinstein to flourish.

“I think that the very small group of people that are waiting for things to even out and go back to the status quo need to realize that’s never going to happen,” said Nina Shaw, an entertainment lawyer and a co-founder of Time’s Up. “But we also need to figure out a way forward.”

Last summer, as the showrunner Melissa Rosenberg began developing a pilot for HBO Max based on the prequel to the 1998 film “Practical Magic,” she noticed stark changes in corporate attitudes.

Mr. Weinstein’s brother, Bob, has formed a new production company.Credit…David Walter Banks for The New York Times So has David Glasser, a former Weinstein Company partner.Credit…David Walter Banks for The New York Times

“There were very specific intentions from the studio and the network to have diverse voices in the room,” said Ms. Rosenberg, who created the Netflix show “Jessica Jones” and was an executive producer for “Dexter.” She added that she had been told, “You will not have a room without people of color and diversity of gender and sexual orientation.”

“That was a big change,” Ms. Rosenberg said. “When I was coming up it would be sufficient to have one woman in the room — to represent the female voice — and she was often the lowest-paid writer, too.”

Today’s issue in television is one of supply. Rarely are episodic series staffed with an all-male director slate, unless the show’s creator opts to direct each episode. More frequently, women are landing directing gigs.

With so many shows being produced, there aren’t enough women to fill the demand. “The problem now is a pipeline problem,” Ms. Shaw said.

Mark Gill, who was president of Miramax Los Angeles when Harvey Weinstein ran the company, was the only man to speak out in the New York Times article in 2017 that first chronicled Mr. Weinstein’s abuse. He said then that the company “was a mess” but that Mr. Weinstein’s treatment of women “was the biggest mess of all,” a quote that drew the ire of his male colleagues when it was published.

“I got a ton of blowback,” Mr. Gill said in a recent interview. “It was sort of a violation of the code. Several people actually said to me, ‘You’ve just blown your career.’”

Mr. Gill has since started a production company with $400 million in financing and a staff that is divided equally between genders. “Of course, it turned out to be the exact opposite,” he said of the warnings he received. “It turned out to be a recruiting advantage.”

Hollywood has marked its intention to adapt with the formation of support organizations. These include Time’s Up, the celebrity-fueled group that in addition to condemning sexual harassment has formed a legal-defense fund to help connect women of various industries to lawyers, and ReFrame, an organization run by Women in Film and the Sundance Institute with the goal of achieving gender parity in the entertainment industry. Women in Film also started an independent help line for anyone who has been harassed or abused to call to be connected with pro bono lawyers or therapists.

“Women have less trepidation about helping each other, networking with each other, being vulnerable with each other,” said the producer Amy Baer, the board president of Women in Film. “I think this is a direct result of #MeToo and women realizing that there’s strength in numbers and in having each other’s backs, much the way the boys’ network has worked for decades.”

The SAG-AFTRA actors’ union has turned the job of intimacy coordinator, a profession that began on theater stages, into a cottage industry inside Hollywood. And it has developed a set of guidelines and protocols for how the coordinators are integrated into sets.

“It’s been an interesting process,” said the actress Gabrielle Carteris, who is president of the union. She worked closely with actors, directors, writers and the coordinators over the past two years to determine the protocol that was released in January.

“When you think about the Harvey period from a few years ago, people felt like they had no control,” Ms. Carteris said. “There was no structure. Now people are saying: ‘I can do this work. This is amazing.’ I think this moment is a step towards cultural change.”

Still, systemic transformation is slow. According to a 2019 study from the University of Southern California’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, only 17 percent of executive positions in major media companies were held by women, with only four of the women coming from underrepresented groups. Producing stats are equally dismal, with just 18 percent of producers on films between 2016 and 2018 being women. (Only 11 percent of all producers came from underrepresented racial or ethnic groups.) While “Captain Marvel,” “Harley Quinn,” “Wonder Woman” and other female-centered blockbusters have come to the screen with female directors at the helm, most theatrical blockbusters based on well-worn intellectual property — the bread and butter of today’s movie business — still belong to the men.

“Inside, deep inside, I’m not seeing wheels turn beyond surface statements,” Ms. DuVernay said. “I think Time’s Up is effective and still pushing hard. But without a real threat or adverse impact, systems don’t change overnight. As I’m experiencing it now, I’d say it’s at 4 on a scale of 1 to 10. Which is significant, seeing it was at a negative 20 before.”

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‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict

Harvey Weinstein was once lauded as one of Hollywood’s most dynamic film producers. Now, after a Manhattan jury convicted him of two felony sex crimes, he faces the prospect of years in prison.

While the New York case was narrowly focused — the criminal charges centered largely on just two women — its symbolism was sweeping. More than 90 women have accused Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct, and the allegations against him set off the global #MeToo movement.

Mr. Weinstein is the first high-profile man to be ousted from a position of power during the movement and then criminally prosecuted. (He has denied all allegations of nonconsensual sex.)

Moments after the jury announced its decision on Monday, The New York Times asked some of Mr. Weinstein’s accusers, other stakeholders in the #MeToo movement and legal experts to interpret the verdict’s meaning.

Their responses have been edited and condensed.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_143958450_0a3ee367-7a8e-46bb-94ca-529767a4f456-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

This is what he has created for himself, prison, lack of remorse, lack of accountability.

Ashley Judd

Ashley Judd was the first actress to publicly accuse Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct.

The story of #MeToo, of what the movement is about, is that men no longer have tacit permission to use their power or prestige to sexually access girls’ and women’s bodies. Their power and position cannot be used in secret or in the open to exploit asymmetry of power. There will be consequences in the courtroom, in employment and in society.

This is the way it’s supposed to be. This is the way it’s supposed to be.

And I think that Harvey’s guilty verdict demonstrates how overwhelmingly guilty he was. A perpetrator has to be overwhelmingly guilty for justice to be served at this time.

I would love for Harvey to have a restorative justice process in which he could come emotionally to terms with his wrongs. The criminal justice system is a distant second to a more humane kind of process. This is what he has created for himself: prison, lack of remorse, lack of accountability. The man is going to prison for sex crimes.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167853321_a2284026-a278-491e-aa17-3aded8edafaa-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

It was definitely the most stressful thing I’ve done in my life.

Dawn Dunning

Dawn Dunning is a former actress who served as one of several supporting witnesses at Mr. Weinstein’s trial, testifying about what prosecutors said was a pattern of predation by the producer.

It was very nerve-racking to testify. I knew I’d have to see him and talk about what happened to me.

I did it for all of us. I did it for the women who couldn’t testify. I couldn’t not do it.

My biggest fear was him being found not guilty. I’m very relieved. But he wasn’t found guilty on all of the counts, so I feel like it was a victory, but not a complete victory. This verdict made it real for people watching from afar that you will be held accountable for your actions. You can’t take advantage of people just because you have power and money.

Either way, regardless of the verdict, it didn’t change how hard it was to be face to face with him in the courtroom, and testifying in a room full of press. The cross-examination was really difficult.

It was definitely the most stressful thing I’ve done in my life.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_145212849_6c2d845e-087e-4205-a596-5bd91dba97b2-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Heather Sten for The New York Times

He will forever be guilty.

Tarana Burke

Tarana Burke is the activist who started the original #MeToo movement more than a decade ago.

Most of us will never see the inside of the courtroom, but these women got to take the stand, look him in the eye, and ‘You did this to me.’

He will forever be guilty. That’s a thing we have.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_169076019_5f526fff-e92f-4dfa-9016-9e2517f46501-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Rachel Woolf for The New York Times

Hinging the future of women’s rights on a criminal conviction is a little troubling to me.

Aya Gruber

Aya Gruber is a former defense lawyer and a law professor at the University of Colorado.

I have mixed reactions about the whole case. On the one hand, I am myself a sexual assault survivor and I believe that the #MeToo movement is good. On the other hand, as a former defense attorney, hinging the future of women’s rights on a criminal conviction is a little troubling to me.

The thought that one case could be representative of the entire world of victims and defendants is just wrong. But that’s what happened in this case. It became symbolic of not just the entire universe of sexual assault cases, but the entire women’s movement.

When we bend rules to favor prosecutors, it’s not always the Harvey Weinsteins. When you look at the majority of sex offenders, especially as we’re broadening the definition of what counts as a sex offense, a lot of them are juveniles. People who are figuring out their sexuality. A lot of them are people of color and from marginalized neighborhoods. And they’re going to be caught up in a system that is extremely harsh, and possibly branded for life.

What is the fallout from a #MeToo movement that insists on incarceration as part of its justice goals?

Harvey Weinstein needed to be held accountable. But sex offenders have a horrible time in jail. It is going to be terrible, state-imposed suffering and torture. I have a hard time feeling happy about that. If accountability can only come through decades in horrific conditions in jail, I don’t love that. Not for anyone.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_156375450_7de37ab4-8380-46b5-9fb5-e1713ac7eda9-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Sean Smith for The New York Times

This moment we are in is an opportunity to disrupt the story of a typical survivor.

Fatima Goss Graves

Fatima Goss Graves is the president of the National Women’s Law Center.

What defense attorneys do is create a narrative that only one type of person could experience sexual violence, and that there is only one type of response. They discount behaviors that are actually really typical in an effort to blame victims. This moment we are in is an opportunity to disrupt the story of a typical survivor, and to disrupt the story of a typical response.

When I think about the last two years, we’ve seen important examples of individual accountability. I have great hope that individuals in this case have a measure of justice around them. But the last two years have been bigger than one individual. They’ve been about systems changing, creating new norms and laws that will propel us further in the future. I’m hopeful about the future.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_32002780_f2f3d58e-a432-487c-be70-7aa36e4da750-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Barbara P. Fernandez for The New York Times

It looks like they were fairly careful on what they decided.

Isabelle Kirshner

Isabelle Kirshner is a former Manhattan prosecutor turned criminal defense lawyer who has represented men accused of sexual assault.

This wasn’t “Believe all women,” and certainly not “Believe everything women are saying.”

Had they believed all women, and what all the women said, he would have been convicted on all charges. It looks like they were fairly careful on what they decided.


Westlake Legal Group 00weinstein-reaction-manning-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Kirsten Luce for The New York Times

The conviction of Harvey Weinstein is a stunning victory for every single woman who refused to remain silent any longer.

Jane Manning

Jane Manning is a former Queens prosecutor who is director of the Women’s Equal Justice Project.

It’s a historic day. A predator who was once untouchable has finally been held accountable. All of the women who spoke out about Harvey Weinstein are heroes: the ones who received a guilty verdict, and the many who didn’t.

Annabella Sciorra’s case stretches farther back in time than the others; perhaps that was a challenge for the jury. But there’s no doubt in my mind that her testimony mattered. It helped establish a pattern; it supported the accounts of Miriam Haleyi and Jessica Mann. She deserves admiration and gratitude for her courage; all the prosecution witnesses do.

The conviction of Harvey Weinstein is a stunning victory for every single woman who refused to remain silent any longer.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_161012739_835aac3d-f774-4ac8-90cb-0b95e37724c0-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Jason Henry for The New York Times

Every day that I live and enjoy my life is a victory over Harvey.

Rowena Chiu

Rowena Chiu is a former assistant at Miramax, the production company founded by Harvey Weinstein and his brother, Bob. She accused Mr. Weinstein of assaulting her on the job in 1998.

I had said in an interview a few days ago, that this isn’t just a story of one man. Even in the light of a conviction, it isn’t just one person. Obviously it is a really important victory for the #MeToo movement. But the #MeToo movement is much, much bigger than what happens to Harvey. This is certainly a moment of great encouragement and a milestone for me personally and the movement as a whole.

In some ways, I feel that the life I’ve built today, every day that I live and enjoy my life is a victory over Harvey. That is much more meaningful than going for a legal victory. Because we all know the legal system is flawed.

Many of us are doing incredible work that stems from surviving trauma. I think that is very much something I want to put out there. Many of us are doing these incredible things. The very fact that I’m with my kids in a sand pit, is a victory over Harvey, whether he ends up in jail or not.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_144413697_f45b4d46-6f2d-4b95-8dde-6b8d6339f2cd-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Erin Schaff for The New York Times

I felt some measure of justice had been done. He is now a convicted rapist.

Debra Katz

Debra Katz, a civil rights and employment lawyer, has represented several people who have spoken out about Mr. Weinstein.

There was a great deal of tension in the courtroom this morning, waiting for the jury. When we got to the first count of guilty, there was a feeling of extraordinary relief.

I felt some measure of justice had been done. He is now a convicted rapist. It was an extraordinary moment of social reckoning. It’s no longer OK to say that this was transactional, that these women knew exactly what they were getting. It’s no longer acceptable to blame women for the fact that they were targeted by a sexual predator. This was a true repudiation of the arguments that Donna Rotunno, his lawyer, made, that these women used Weinstein and that he was an unwitting victim.

When Rotunno exited the courthouse today, her response was extremely telling. She said Harvey Weinstein was completely shocked. For a man who has taken this kind of advantage and abused women for decades and taken this as his prerogative, I would say he is shocked.


Westlake Legal Group merlin_169037865_c4f6dffa-0c57-4a7e-820a-0b466d6d8e1f-jumbo ‘Finally’: Ashley Judd and Other Weinstein Accusers Respond to Verdict Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes #MeToo Movement   Credit…Lexey Swall for The New York Times

Hopefully this gives more women the strength to come forward.

Lucia Evans

Lucia Evans’s accusation of sexual assault against Mr. Weinstein was originally included, and then dropped, from the New York case.

I am so impressed by the women who participated in the criminal case up through the verdict. Witnessing firsthand many of the obstacles that stood in their way only deepens my appreciation of their courage. I truly wish I was given the opportunity to stand next to them, to see my case through to the end.

Hopefully this gives more women the strength to come forward.

It really took a village of women to do this.


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Harvey Weinstein Is Found Guilty of Sex Crimes in #MeToo Watershed

Westlake Legal Group HFO-00weinstein-verdict-ledeall01-facebookJumbo-v2 Harvey Weinstein Is Found Guilty of Sex Crimes in #MeToo Watershed Young, Lauren Wulff, Tarale Weinstein, Harvey Vance, Cyrus R Jr sexual harassment Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Rotunno, Donna Perez, Rosie Mann, Jessica (Actor) Illuzzi-Orbon, Joan Haleyi, Mimi Haley, Miriam Dunning, Dawn Decisions and Verdicts Burke, James M #MeToo Movement

Harvey Weinstein, the powerhouse film producer whose downfall over sexual misconduct ignited a global movement, was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial in which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.

The jury found Mr. Weinstein guilty of rape and criminal sexual act but acquitted him of three other counts, including the two most serious charges against him — that he is a sexual predator.

Mr. Weinstein sat motionless and displayed little emotion as the verdict was read. “But, I’m innocent,” the producer repeated three times to his lawyers. Minutes later, he appeared stunned as he was handcuffed and led out of court, limping between two court officers on his way to jail to await sentencing. He faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years.

Complaints about Mr. Weinstein, an Oscar-winning producer of films including “Shakespeare in Love,” had opened the floodgates in late 2017, as hundreds of thousands of women aired their own stories of harassment. Mr. Weinstein quickly became a symbol not just of the casting couch culture in Hollywood, but of the abuse women had endured for hundreds of years.

And for many, the trial was a watershed moment for the #MeToo movement and a crucial test in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual harassment in the workplace.

The criminal charges brought in Manhattan against Mr. Weinstein, 67, rested narrowly on the complaints of two women: Miriam Haley, a production assistant who said he had forced oral sex on her in 2006, and Jessica Mann, a former actress who alleged he had raped her at a hotel in 2013.

Jurors also had to consider the testimony of the actress Annabella Sciorra, who said Mr. Weinstein had raped her in the early 1990s, in deciding whether he was a sexual predator. Three other women were allowed give their accounts of alleged assaults to establish a pattern of behavior, but Mr. Weinstein was not charged in those incidents.

But the jury found him not guilty on two counts of predatory sexual assault, suggesting they had doubts about Ms. Sciorra’s allegation.

After the jury foreman delivered the verdict, Justice James M. Burke thanked the jurors for their “care and concentration” before they left the courtroom. As they filed out, Juror No. 6 stared at Mr. Weinstein. Justice Burke immediately sent Mr. Weinstein to jail to await sentencing on March 11, denying his request to be sent home for medical reasons.

The case, heard in State Supreme Court, was an unusually risky one for Manhattan prosecutors, who had little or no physical or forensic evidence to support the women’s allegations. The trial turned into a battle over the women’s credibility.

Donna Rotunno, the lead defense lawyer, tried to put the #MeToo movement on trial, arguing that public outrage over Mr. Weinstein’s behavior had stripped him of a career and branded him as a rapist without due process. He was, she said, “a target of a cause and of a movement.”

Prosecutors portrayed Mr. Weinstein as a calculated predator who kept his victims close after his attacks to control them, using his power over their futures in the film industry to silence them.

“The power imbalance he deviously exploited was not just physical, it was also professional and profoundly psychological,” one of the prosecutors, Meghan Hast, said in her opening statement.

But defense lawyers said the women had sex with Mr. Weinstein willingly to further their careers. Only years later, they said, after he had been accused of sexual harassment in The New York Times and The New Yorker, did the women say their encounters with him were not consensual.

The defense presented evidence that Ms. Haley and Ms. Mann not only had friendly communications with Mr. Weinstein after the alleged attacks, but also had consensual sex with him.

But after deliberating for five days the jury of seven men and five women determined that Mr. Weinstein had broken the law.

The verdict was a victory for the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., whose legacy turned on the outcome of the case. He had come under heavy political pressure to bring charges against Mr. Weinstein after he had declined to prosecute him in 2015, after allegations the producer had groped an Italian model during a business meeting.

That decision came back to haunt Mr. Vance in late 2017 when dozens of women came forward to accuse Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct; some of the allegations dated back decades. Once considered an ally by feminists, Mr. Vance became the target of protests, even as jurors began to hear testimony against Mr. Weinstein last month.

With his legacy as district attorney and his political future in the balance, Mr. Vance sat in on the trial most days. After the verdict, he said in the hallway outside the courtroom that the women who had testified against Mr. Weinstein had “changed the course of history in the fight against sexual violence.”

“Harvey Weinstein is a vicious sexual predator” who has “used his power to trick, assault and humiliate his victims,” Mr. Vance said. “To the survivors of Harvey Weinstein, I owe, and we all owe, an immense debt to you.”

From the start, much about the story of Mr. Weinstein’s mistreatment of women had been outsize, from the number of women who accused him — at least 90 — to the range of the alleged misconduct: everything from lewd propositions and unwanted touching to forced oral sex and rape.

But the authorities in New York faced hurdles in putting together a case, law enforcement officials said. Many of the alleged crimes happened outside the state. Others were too old to prosecute under the statute of limitations. Some of the women were not willing to testify.

The criminal case Mr. Vance’s office brought in May 2018 was challenging for prosecutors to prove, in part because two of the three accusers had continued to see Mr. Weinstein after the alleged assaults.

Then, charges related to the third woman were thrown out because, prosecutors said, the lead detective on the case had withheld evidence from them that could have been used to discredit the woman’s account.

To bolster the weakened case, prosecutors won permission last summer from Justice James M. Burke, the judge overseeing the trial, to include a rape allegation from Ms. Sciorra, the actress known for her work on “The Sopranos.”

Though the incident had happened too long ago to be the basis of a separate rape charge, prosecutors sought to use it to support charges of predatory sexual assault, which carry a penalty of life in prison. Those charges require the state to prove that Mr. Weinstein committed a serious sex crime against at least two women.

Ms Sciorra, 59, testified Mr. Weinstein had pushed his way into her apartment in the early 1990s, after he gave her a ride home from a dinner party, and violently raped her even as she kicked and punched him.

The actress Rosie Perez backed up her testimony, recounting how Ms. Sciorra had told her at the time, “I think I was raped,” and had later identified Mr. Weinstein as her attacker.

Justice Burke also allowed prosecutors to call three women — Tarale Wulff, Dawn Dunning and Lauren Young — who said Mr. Weinstein lured them into private meetings, either at hotels or at his apartment, under the pretense of discussing job opportunities, then sexually assaulted them. At the time, they were aspiring actresses trying to get film parts.

One of those incidents happened in Los Angeles, and two were barred by New York State’s statute of limitations. Still, the judge allowed the women, who had all been working as waitresses or models, to testify to establish a pattern of abuse — the legal strategy led to a conviction in the sexual assault trial of the comedian Bill Cosby in Pennsylvania.

The defense called friends of Ms. Mann’s and Ms. Sciorra’s, who said the women had never described their experiences with Mr. Weinstein as rape. Ms. Sciorra, the defense suggested during cross-examination, had misremembered what happened, noting that she could not recall the date of the assault, nor explain how Mr. Weinstein got past a doorman and to her apartment.

Defense lawyers also introduced scores of friendly and sometimes flirtatious emails showing that Ms. Mann and Ms. Haley maintained relationships with Mr. Weinstein for years after the alleged attacks.

In one message to a friend, for instance, Ms. Mann described Mr. Weinstein as “a pseudo father” who had given her “all the validation” she needed. In another, she bragged about performing oral sex on a “super rich producer” who could ruin careers.

Ms. Mann, 34, acknowledged under three days of grueling questioning that her romantic relationship with Mr. Weinstein was “complicated and different.” At one point, she became inconsolable when it came out in court she had been sexually abused when she was young. She said that she last had sex with Mr. Weinstein in 2016, after he asked her to console him because his mother had died.

“It does not change the fact that he raped me,” she said.

Ms. Haley, 42, who changed her legal name from Mimi Haleyi, said that Mr. Weinstein asked her for a massage at their first professional meeting, but that she rejected his advances at subsequent meetings. He eventually helped get her a job as a production assistant on the television show “Project Runway,” she said.

Then, on July 11, 2006, Ms. Haley accepted an invitation to visit Mr. Weinstein at his apartment in Lower Manhattan. She said he pushed her onto a bed, even as she protested, held her down and forced oral sex on her. “I’m being raped,” she recalled thinking.

The defense elicited testimony from Ms. Haley that she continued to see Mr. Weinstein after the alleged attack, having consensual sex with him two weeks later at a hotel. She also told her friends about her friendship with him, pitched him ideas for projects, and accepted tickets to movie premieres and for a flight to London.

Mr. Weinstein’s lawyers also asked why none of the six women reported the incidents to the police.

Prosecutors told jurors that the women feared Mr. Weinstein would ruin their careers if they reported the encounters to law enforcement. Prosecutors also called an expert on the psychology of sexual assault victims, Dr. Barbara Ziv, who said victims often do not report such crimes to the authorities and sometimes maintain relationships with their attackers.

Ms. Rotunno had said the prosecutors invented a world where women have no free will and are not responsible for their own decisions, suggesting Mr. Weinstein’s accusers now regretted having had consensual sex with him at the time when they stood to benefit.

But Joan Illuzzi, the lead prosecutor, countered that it was Mr. Weinstein who had created a world in which women with less than him, and more to lose, had no choice but to subjected to his unwanted advances and abuse, until now.

“He was the master of his universe, and the witnesses here were merely ants that he could step on without consequences,” Ms. Illuzzi said. “The fact they wanted to get into his universe was all he needed to turn around and say — they don’t get to complain when they are stepped on, spit on, demoralized, and yes, raped and abused by the defendant.”

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Weinstein Found Guilty: Live Updates and Verdict Reaction

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group HFO-00weinstein-verdict-ledeall01-articleLarge Weinstein Found Guilty: Live Updates and Verdict Reaction Young, Lauren Wulff, Tarale Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Rotunno, Donna Mann, Jessica (Actor) Manhattan (NYC) Haley, Miriam Dunning, Dawn #MeToo Movement

Harvey Weinstein arriving on Monday at State Supreme Court in Manhattan for his rape trial.Credit…Anna Watts for The New York Times

Harvey Weinstein, who long reigned as one of the most influential producers in Hollywood, was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes after a Manhattan trial that became a watershed moment for the #MeToo movement.

But the jury acquitted Mr. Weinstein of the two most serious charges against him, predatory sexual assault.

The verdict offered a measure of justice to the dozens of women who have come forward with similar allegations against Mr. Weinstein. For many, the trial was a crucial test in the effort to hold powerful men accountable for sexual harassment in the workplace.

The jury found Mr. Weinstein guilty of two counts, criminal sexual assault in the first degree and rape in the third degree. On the two counts of predatory sexual assault, the not guilty verdicts suggested that one or some jurors did not believe the testimony of Annabella Sciorra, an actress best known for her work in “The Sopranos.”

He faces a sentence of five to 25 years on the top count.

Video

Westlake Legal Group HFO-00weinstein-verdict-ledeall01-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600-v2 Weinstein Found Guilty: Live Updates and Verdict Reaction Young, Lauren Wulff, Tarale Weinstein, Harvey sexual harassment Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Rotunno, Donna Mann, Jessica (Actor) Manhattan (NYC) Haley, Miriam Dunning, Dawn #MeToo Movement

Jurors at Harvey Weinstein’s trial found him guilty of criminal sexual act in the first degree and rape in the third degree.CreditCredit…Anna Watts for The New York Times

As the jury walked into the courtroom to announce that it had reached a verdict, Mr. Weinstein sat between his lawyers, staring straight ahead, as four court officers stood behind him.

Mr. Weinstein appeared unmoved as the verdict was read. Cyrus R. Vance Jr., the Manhattan district attorney, was nearby, in the front row.

After the verdict was read, Justice James M. Burke thanked the jurors for their “care and concentration” before they left the courtroom. As they filed out, Juror No. 6 stared at Mr. Weinstein.

The judge then announced that Mr. Weinstein would immediately be sent to jail to await his sentencing. But as court officers approached him, the producer seemed stunned and refused to move.

Moments later, he was handcuffed and removed from the room, limping with two officers standing by his side.

Mr. Vance, the district attorney, said at a news conference immediately after Mr. Weinstein was remanded that the women who testified against him had “changed the course of history in the fight against sexual violence.”

“Harvey Weinstein is a vicious sexual predator” who has “used his power to trick, assault and humiliate his victims,” Mr. Vance said. “To the survivors of Harvey Weinstein, I owe, and we all owe, an immense debt to you.”

He added: “These survivors weren’t just brave, they were heroic. Words can’t describe the sacrifices they made.”

In 2015, Mr. Vance declined to prosecute Mr. Weinstein after an Italian model alleged he had groped her breasts during a business meeting at his office in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood.

At the time, the prosecutor said the evidence did not support charging Mr. Weinstein with forcible touching, a misdemeanor.

Six women testified at trial that he had sexually assaulted them, though Mr. Weinstein had faced criminal charges in connection with only two of them. The others were allowed to testify to establish a pattern of behavior.

The indictment rested on the accusations of Miriam Haley, a former television production assistant who testified that Mr. Weinstein forced oral sex on her at his Manhattan apartment in 2006; and Jessica Mann, a former aspiring actress, who says he raped her in a Midtown Manhattan hotel room in 2013.

Ms. Mann and Ms. Haley both acknowledged that they continued to see Mr. Weinstein after the alleged assaults and later had consensual sex with him, testimony that complicated the prosecution’s case.

Justice Burke allowed the prosecution to call four women as witnesses to corroborate the five charges stemming from Ms. Mann’s and Ms. Haley’s claims against Mr. Weinstein.

One of those witnesses was Ms. Sciorra, who says she was raped by Mr. Weinstein nearly 30 years ago in her Manhattan apartment. She was called to support the charges of predatory sexual assault, which require proving that a defendant attacked at least two victims. The jury ultimately did not convict Mr. Weinstein on those counts.

The three other women were permitted to testify to bolster the prosecution’s contention that Mr. Weinstein engaged over time in a pattern of sexually abusive behavior.

None of the four women’s accounts could be formally charged as crimes on their own because the alleged attacks were too old to prosecute under New York’s statute of limitations.

Prosecutors had described Mr. Weinstein as a clever predator who kept his victims close to control them, using his power over their careers in the film industry as leverage.

But defense lawyers had said the women had willingly had sex with Mr. Weinstein to further their careers and only years later, after he had been accused in news reports of sexual harassment, began to remember their encounters with him as nonconsensual.

Accusations of sexual misconduct and assault against Mr. Weinstein have swirled for decades in New York and Los Angeles. The trial in Manhattan was only the latest step in a lengthy saga.

Mr. Weinstein had avoided prosecution in connection with an alleged groping incident in 2015, and was indicted in New York in 2018 only after scores of women came forward to accuse him in the media.

Here is a timeline of events, from March 2015 to February 2020, of Mr. Weinstein’s journey toward a verdict.

Regardless of the verdict in New York, Mr. Weinstein still faces charges in a separate case in Los Angeles. In a highly unusual move, California prosecutors announced their indictment on the first day of Mr. Weinstein’s trial in Manhattan.

The Los Angeles case is based on the accounts of two unidentified women, who have accused him of attacking them — just a day apart — in February 2013.

One of the women, an Italian model and actress, has told prosecutors that Mr. Weinstein raped her in the bathroom of a Beverly Hills hotel after she met him at a film festival.

The next day, the other woman has said, Mr. Weinstein invited her and another woman to his room in a West Los Angeles hotel after meeting them in the restaurant downstairs. There, prosecutors said, Mr. Weinstein trapped his victim in a bathroom, grabbed her breasts and masturbated.

One actress accused Mr. Weinstein of raping her in the early 1990s. A second woman said he forced oral sex on her in 2006. A third accused him of raping her in 2013.

In all, six women testified against Mr. Weinstein at his trial:

Annabella Sciorra testified that after a dinner party in the winter of either 1993 or 1994, Mr. Weinstein barged in to her Manhattan apartment and raped her. The alleged attack was too old to be prosecuted separately as rape under New York law.

Miriam Haley told jurors that in 2006 the producer forced oral sex on her at his apartment in Lower Manhattan, despite her protests. Mr. Weinstein was charged with one count of criminal sexual act and predatory sexual assault involving Ms. Haley, who previously went by the name Mimi Haleyi.

Jessica Mann testified that Mr. Weinstein injected his genitals with an erection medication and raped her in a hotel room in Midtown Manhattan. He was charged with first- and third-degree rape, and predatory sexual assault involving her allegations.

Dawn Dunning accused Mr. Weinstein of touching her genitals in a hotel room in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood.

Tarale Wulff testified that Mr. Weinstein pulled her into a secluded stairwell in a lounge in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood and masturbated.

Lauren Young told jurors that the producer pulled down her dress, groped her breasts, masturbated and ejaculated onto the floor in a hotel room in Los Angeles.

Ms. Young’s account, like those of Ms. Dunning’s and Ms. Wulff’s, were allowed in an effort to show the producer’s history of abuse, prosecutors said.

Reporting was contributed by Jan Ransom, Alan Feuer, Liam Stack, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey.

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A Timeline of the Weinstein Case

Westlake Legal Group 00WEINSTEINTIMELINE1-facebookJumbo A Timeline of the Weinstein Case Weinstein, Harvey Vance, Cyrus R Jr sexual harassment Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Rotunno, Donna Police Department (NYC) Mann, Jessica (Actor) Manhattan (NYC) Illuzzi-Orbon, Joan Haley, Miriam Evans, Lucia Cuomo, Andrew M Brafman, Benjamin Battilana, Ambra #MeToo Movement

Accusations of sexual misconduct had swirled around the film producer Harvey Weinstein in New York and Los Angeles long before he was on trial in Manhattan.

Here is a timeline of events in Mr. Weinstein’s journey toward a verdict.

March 27, 2015

Ambra Battilana, an Italian model, told the New York City police that Mr. Weinstein groped her breasts during a business meeting at his office in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood. The next day, working with investigators, Ms. Battilana visited Mr. Weinstein at the TriBeCa Grand Hotel and secretly recorded him apologizing for the encounter.

But after a two-week investigation by sex-crimes prosecutors, the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., announced that the evidence did not support charging Mr. Weinstein with forcible touching, a misdemeanor.

August 2017

As reports began to circulate that journalists were looking into allegations that Mr. Weinstein mistreated scores of women over decades, the producer hired a private intelligence firm, Black Cube, to investigate what he described as “red flags” — or people who he suspected were talking about him to reporters.

Among those people was Annabella Sciorra, an actress known for her work on “The Sopranos,” who claims that Mr. Weinstein raped her at her apartment in Manhattan’s Gramercy Park neighborhood in 1993 or 1994.

Oct. 5, 2017

The New York Times published an investigation detailing the accounts of several women who claimed that Mr. Weinstein abused or harassed them in incidents as early as 1990s.

Five days later, The New Yorker published an article about more women who were accusing Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct; it included Ms. Sciorra’s account.

March 19, 2018

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo ordered New York State prosecutors to investigate why Mr. Vance declined to charge Mr. Weinstein in Ms. Battilana’s 2015 case. It had recently become clear that Mr. Vance had taken campaign donations from some of Mr. Weinstein’s lawyers.

The investigation placed Mr. Vance’s decision-making in the spotlight.

April 25, 2018

Mr. Vance replaced the veteran sex-crimes prosecutor initially assigned to investigate Mr. Weinstein with a senior homicide prosecutor, Joan Illuzzi. The personnel change reflected a tension between the Police Department and the district attorney’s office over how to handle the case.

May 25, 2018

Mr. Weinstein was indicted and surrendered at the First Precinct station house in Lower Manhattan on charges of rape and criminal sexual act.

The rape charge stemmed from an alleged assault on an unnamed woman at the Doubletree Hotel in Midtown Manhattan in 2013. She was later revealed to be Jessica Mann, a former aspiring actress from a small town in Washington State.

The criminal sexual act charge involved Lucia Evans, a marketing executive who told investigators that Mr. Weinstein forced oral sex during a casting meeting in his TriBeCa office in 2004.

Mr. Weinstein’s then-lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, set the tone for his defense by saying that while he might have engaged in “bad behavior,” he had not committed any crimes.

July 2, 2018

Manhattan prosecutors announced they were adding charges to Mr. Weinstein’s indictment.

The new charges were related to accusations of forced oral sex at his TriBeCa apartment in July 2006 on an unnamed woman. She was later identified as Miriam Haley, a former production assistant on the television show “Project Runway.”

The new charges included predatory sexual assault, which requires prosecutors to prove that a defendant committed sexual felonies against two people and carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

Oct. 11, 2018

A judge dismissed the forcible oral sex charge against Mr. Weinstein involving Ms. Evans after prosecutors acknowledged that the lead detective in the case failed to inform them about a witness who had cast doubt on Ms. Evans’s account.

Three months before the indictment, the detective, Nicholas DiGaudio, had learned from the witness, a friend of Ms. Evans’s, that Ms. Evans had once claimed that she willingly performed oral sex on Mr. Weinstein in exchange for the promise of an acting job.

Detective DiGaudio never told prosecutors about this contradictory account, raising questions about the viability of the broader indictment.

Jan. 17, 2019

Mr. Brafman, Mr. Weinstein’s lawyer, withdrew from the case, delaying the trial schedule.

Mr. Brafman said he had uncovered several emails between Mr. Weinstein and his accusers, which suggested that aspects of their relationships were consensual.

July 11, 2019

Mr. Weinstein’s third set of lawyers, who represented him at trial, held a news conference outside State Supreme Court in Manhattan to announce their role. They had taken the case after Mr. Weinstein had hired and fired a second legal team.

The lead lawyer, Donna Rotunno of Chicago, said at the event that Mr. Weinstein had been “railroaded” by the #MeToo movement.

Aug. 26, 2019

Moving to shore up their case, prosecutors obtained a new indictment against Mr. Weinstein, allowing them to call Ms. Sciorra, the actress from “The Sopranos,” as a witness at the trial.

By her own account, Ms. Sciorra’s alleged encounter with the producer happened nearly 30 years before — too long ago to be charged as a separate count of rape under New York State law. But the indictment permitted her to testify under the theory that her statements would support the charges of predatory sexual assault.

Jan. 6, 2020

In a surprising move, prosecutors in Los Angeles charged Mr. Weinstein with raping one woman and groping and masturbating in front of a second within two days in February 2013.

The California charges were filed even as the parties in New York gathered on the first day of Mr. Weinstein’s trial in Manhattan to discuss jury selection and other legal issues.

Jan. 23, 2020

Ms. Sciorra told a hushed courtroom that Mr. Weinstein had pushed his way into her apartment in the early 1990s, after giving her a ride home from a dinner party, and forced her onto a bed.

“I was trying to get him off me,” Ms. Sciorra told the jury, her voice cracking with emotion. “I was punching him, kicking him.” But Mr. Weinstein held her down, she said, adding: “He got on top of me and he raped me.”

Jan. 27, 2020

Miriam Haley testified that Mr. Weinstein had held her down on a bed and forced oral sex on her in his TriBeCa apartment in July 2006, despite her protests.

“I’m being raped,” Ms. Haley recalled thinking.

She added, “I was in so much shock at the time that I just checked out.” Ms. Haley said she had sex with Mr. Weinstein two weeks after the first encounter at a hotel and “didn’t physically resist.”

On cross-examination, she acknowledged that, after the assault, she had continued to accept gifts from him and to correspond with him, sending him friendly emails.

Jan. 31, 2020

Ms. Mann took the witness stand, accusing Mr. Weinstein of raping her in a Midtown Manhattan hotel room after he blocked her from leaving it.

He ordered her to undress, and injected his genitals with a medication, she said, adding, “I gave up at that point.”

On cross-examination, Ms. Mann acknowledged that she had consensual sex with Mr. Weinstein before and after the alleged assault, the last encounter being in 2016.

She broke down in tears when it was revealed in court that she had been sexually abused when she was younger. The moment came as she read a letter she had written to a boyfriend, in which she described Mr. Weinstein as “a pseudo father” who had given her “all the validation I ever needed.”

Feb. 18, 2020

The five men and seven women on the jury began deliberations after a monthlong trial that included testimony from six accusers in all, as well as from experts and other witnesses.

The jurors grappled with difficult questions. They had to decide if the relationships between the women and Mr. Weinstein were consensual and transactional, as his lawyers suggested. They also had to determine if consensual sex between Mr. Weinstein and some of the women undermined the claims that on other occasions, he assaulted them.

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Harvey Weinstein Is Found Guilty of Sex Crimes in #MeToo Watershed

Westlake Legal Group HFO-00weinstein-verdict-ledeall01-facebookJumbo-v2 Harvey Weinstein Is Found Guilty of Sex Crimes in #MeToo Watershed Young, Lauren Wulff, Tarale Weinstein, Harvey Vance, Cyrus R Jr sexual harassment Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Rotunno, Donna Perez, Rosie Mann, Jessica (Actor) Illuzzi-Orbon, Joan Haleyi, Mimi Haley, Miriam Dunning, Dawn Decisions and Verdicts Burke, James M #MeToo Movement

Harvey Weinstein, the powerhouse film producer whose downfall over sexual misconduct ignited a global movement, was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial in which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.

The jury found Mr. Weinstein guilty of rape and criminal sexual act but acquitted him of three other counts, including the two most serious charges against him — that he is a sexual predator.

Mr. Weinstein displayed little emotion as the verdict was read. He appeared stunned as he was handcuffed and led out of court, limping between two court officers on his way to jail to await sentencing. He faces a possible sentence of between five and 25 years.

The verdict offered a measure of justice to the dozens of women who had come forward with similar allegations against Mr. Weinstein. For many, the trial was a watershed moment for the #MeToo movement and a crucial test in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual harassment in the workplace.

Complaints about Mr. Weinstein, an Oscar-winning producer of films including “Shakespeare in Love,” had opened the floodgates in late 2017, as hundreds of thousands of women aired their own stories of harassment. Mr. Weinstein quickly became a symbol not just of the casting couch culture in Hollywood, but of the abuse women had endured for hundreds of years.

The criminal charges brought in Manhattan against Mr. Weinstein, 67, rested narrowly on the complaints of two women: Miriam Haley, a production assistant who said he had forced oral sex on her in 2006, and Jessica Mann, a former actress who alleged he had raped her at a hotel in 2013.

Jurors also had to consider the testimony of the actress Annabella Sciorra, who claimed Mr. Weinstein had raped her in the early 1990s, in deciding whether he was a sexual predator. Three other women were allowed give their accounts of alleged assaults to establish a pattern of behavior, but Mr. Weinstein was not charged in those incidents.

But the jury found him not guilty on the two counts of predatory sexual assault, suggesting that the jurors did not believe Ms. Sciorra’s allegation.

The case, heard in State Supreme Court, was an unusually risky one for Manhattan prosecutors, who had little or no physical or forensic evidence to support the women’s allegations. The trial turned into a battle over the women’s credibility.

Donna Rotunno, the lead defense lawyer, tried to put the #MeToo movement on trial, arguing that public outrage over Mr. Weinstein’s behavior had stripped him of a career and branded him as a rapist without due process. He was, she said, “a target of a cause and of a movement.”

Prosecutors portrayed Mr. Weinstein as a calculated predator who kept his victims close after his attacks to control them, using his power over their futures in the film industry to silence them.

“The power and balance he deviously exploited was not just physical, it was also professional and profoundly psychological,” one of the prosecutors, Meghan Hast, said in her opening statement.

But defense lawyers said the women had sex with Mr. Weinstein willingly to further their careers. Only years later, they said, after he had been accused of sexual harassment in The New York Times and The New Yorker, did the women say their encounters with him were not consensual.

The defense presented evidence that Ms. Haley and Ms. Mann not only had friendly communications with Mr. Weinstein after the alleged attacks, but also had consensual sex with him.

The verdict was a victory for the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., whose legacy turned on the outcome of the case. He had come under heavy political pressure to bring charges against Mr. Weinstein after he had declined to prosecute him in 2015, after allegations the producer had groped an Italian model during a business meeting.

That decision came back to haunt Mr. Vance in late 2017 when dozens of women came forward to accuse Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct; some of the allegations dated back decades. Once considered an ally by feminists, Mr. Vance became the target of protests, even as jurors began to hear testimony against Mr. Weinstein last month.

With his legacy as district attorney and his political future in the balance, Mr. Vance sat in on the trial most days.

From the start, much about the story of Mr. Weinstein’s mistreatment of women had been outsize, from the number of women who accused him — at least 90 — to the range of the alleged misconduct: everything from lewd propositions and unwanted touching to forced oral sex and rape.

But the authorities in New York faced hurdles in putting together a case, law enforcement officials said. Many of the alleged crimes happened outside the state. Others were too old to prosecute under the statute of limitations. Some of the women were not willing to testify.

The criminal case Mr. Vance’s office brought in May 2018 was challenging for prosecutors to prove, in part because two of the three accusers had continued to see Mr. Weinstein after the alleged assaults.

Then, charges related to the third woman were thrown out because, prosecutors said, the lead detective on the case had withheld evidence from them that could have been used to discredit the woman’s account.

To bolster the weakened case, prosecutors won permission last summer from Justice James M. Burke, the judge overseeing the trial, to include a rape allegation from Ms. Sciorra, the actress known for her work on “The Sopranos.”

Though the incident had happened too long ago to be the basis of a separate rape charge, prosecutors sought to use it to support charges of predatory sexual assault, which carry a penalty of life in prison. Those charges require the state to prove that Mr. Weinstein committed a serious sex crime against at least two women.

Ms. Sciorra, 59, testified Mr. Weinstein had pushed his way into her apartment in the early 1990s and violently raped her even as she kicked and punched him after giving her a ride home from a dinner party.

The actress Rosie Perez backed up her testimony, recounting how Ms. Sciorra had told her at the time, “I think I was raped,” and had later identified Mr. Weinstein as her attacker.

Justice Burke also allowed prosecutors to call three women — Tarale Wulff, Dawn Dunning and Lauren Young — who said Mr. Weinstein lured them into private meetings, either at hotels or at his apartment, under the pretense of discussing job opportunities, then sexually assaulted them. At the time, they were aspiring actresses trying to get film parts.

One of those incidents happened in Los Angeles, and two were barred by New York State’s statute of limitations. Still, the judge allowed the women, who had all been working as waitresses or models, to testify to establish a pattern of abuse — the legal strategy led to a conviction in the sexual assault trial of the comedian Bill Cosby in Pennsylvania.

The defense called friends of Ms. Mann’s and Ms. Sciorra’s, who said the women had never described their experiences with Mr. Weinstein as rape. Ms. Sciorra, the defense suggested during cross-examination, had misremembered what happened, noting that she could not recall the date of the assault, nor explain how Mr. Weinstein got past a doorman and to her apartment.

Defense lawyers also introduced scores of friendly and sometimes flirtatious emails showing that Ms. Mann and Ms. Haley maintained relationships with Mr. Weinstein for years after the alleged attacks.

In one message to a friend, for instance, Ms. Mann described Mr. Weinstein as “a pseudo father” who had given her “all the validation” she needed. In another, she bragged about performing oral sex on a “super rich producer” who could ruin careers.

Ms. Mann, 34, acknowledged under three days of grueling questioning that her romantic relationship with Mr. Weinstein was “complicated and different.” At one point, she became inconsolable when it came out in court she had been sexually abused when she was young. She said that she last had sex with Mr. Weinstein in 2016, after he asked her to console him because his mother had died.

“It does not change the fact that he raped me,” she said.

Ms. Haley, 42, who changed her legal name from Mimi Haleyi, said that Mr. Weinstein asked her for a massage at their first professional meeting, but that she rejected his advances at subsequent meetings. He eventually helped get her a job as a production assistant on the television show “Project Runway,” she said.

Then, on July 11, 2006, Ms. Haley accepted an invitation to visit Mr. Weinstein at his apartment in Lower Manhattan. She said he pushed her onto a bed, even as she protested, held her down and forced oral sex on her. “I’m being raped,” she recalled thinking.

The defense elicited testimony from Ms. Haley that she continued to see Mr. Weinstein after the alleged attack, having consensual sex with him two weeks later at a hotel. She also told her friends about her friendship with him, pitched him ideas for projects, and accepted tickets to movie premieres and for a flight to London.

Mr. Weinstein’s lawyers also asked why none of the six women reported the incidents to the police.

Prosecutors told jurors that the women feared Mr. Weinstein would ruin their careers if they reported the encounters to law enforcement. Prosecutors also called an expert on the psychology of sexual assault victims, Dr. Barbara Ziv, who said victims often do not report such crimes to the authorities and sometimes maintain relationships with their attackers.

Ms. Rotunno had said the prosecutors invented a world where women have no free will and are not responsible for their own decisions, suggesting Mr. Weinstein’s accusers now regretted having had consensual sex with him at the time when they stood to benefit.

But Joan Illuzzi, the lead prosecutor, countered that it was Mr. Weinstein who had created a world in which women with less than him, and more to lose, had no choice but to subjected to his unwanted advances and abuse, until now.

“He was the master of his universe, and the witnesses here were merely ants that he could step on without consequences,” Ms. Illuzzi said. “The fact they wanted to get into his universe was all he needed to turn around and say — they don’t get to complain when they are stepped on, spit on, demoralized, and yes, raped and abused by the defendant.”

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Harvey Weinstein Trial: Jury Suggests It Is Split on 2 Most Serious Charges

Westlake Legal Group 21weinstein-trial-promo-facebookJumbo Harvey Weinstein Trial: Jury Suggests It Is Split on 2 Most Serious Charges Weinstein, Harvey Sex Crimes Sciorra, Annabella Mann, Jessica (Actor) Jury System Haley, Miriam Burke, James M #MeToo Movement

The jury in Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial sent a note to the judge on Friday afternoon suggesting that it was deadlocked on the most serious charges in the indictment, but that it might have reached a verdict on three other counts.

In their note, on the fourth day of deliberations, the jurors asked if they could return a unanimous verdict on one of the lesser charges of rape or criminal sexual act, but remain split on two charges of predatory sexual assault, which carry a possible life sentence.

“We the jury request to understand if we can be hung on 1 and /or 3 but unanimous on the other charges,” read the note, which was entered during the lunch break.

Mr. Weinstein’s lawyers said they would accept a partial verdict, but prosecutors said they were not yet willing to do so.

Justice James M. Burke of State Supreme Court in Manhattan told the jurors to continue deliberating. Minutes later, at 3 p.m., he adjourned the proceedings and sent the jurors home for the weekend because one of the defense lawyers had a funeral to attend. Deliberations resume on Monday.

The jury did not say what it had decided on the lesser counts. The predatory sexual assault count requires prosecutors to prove that Mr. Weinstein committed a serious sexual felony against at least two people.

The case against Mr. Weinstein, 67, was built primarily on the accusations brought by two women: Miriam Haley, 42, a former production assistant who testified that Mr. Weinstein forced oral sex on her in 2006; and Jessica Mann, 34, an actress who said Mr. Weinstein raped her in a Midtown Manhattan hotel room in 2013.

In weighing the predatory sexual assault charges, the jury was also asked to consider testimony given by the actress Annabella Sciorra, who said Mr. Weinstein raped her in the early 1990s. Prosecutors were barred by New York State’s statute of limitations from bringing charges in the incident involving Ms. Sciorra, 59, who was the prosecution’s strongest witness.

The jury’s note suggested that one or some jurors did not believe Ms. Sciorra. In previous notes, jurors have asked to review testimony given by both she and Ms. Haley, as well as to review communications and emails related to the two women.

Mr. Weinstein has pleaded not guilty and claims all his sexual encounters with his accusers were consensual. He did not respond to reporters’ questions as he left the courthouse on Friday.

Michael Gold and Emily Palmer contributed reporting.

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Barclays C.E.O. Faces U.K. Inquiry on Jeffrey Epstein Ties

British banking regulators want to know if the chief executive of Barclays has been honest about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein.

Barclays said on Thursday that regulators were investigating how its chief executive, James E. Staley, had described to bank officials his ties with Mr. Epstein, the financier who killed himself in August after facing new allegations of sex trafficking of underage girls.

Mr. Staley, one of a handful of prominent Wall Street financiers who have been linked to Mr. Epstein, said he had been fully forthcoming about their relationship, which he said had ended before he arrived at the bank five years ago.

“I feel very comfortable, going back to 2015, I have been transparent and open with the bank,” he said on a conference call with analysts on Thursday. Mr. Staley did not respond to messages seeking comment.

The bank’s announcement of an investigation by regulators including the Financial Conduct Authority, the main overseer of banks in Britain, was another black eye for Mr. Staley, who is the latest Barclays chief to have regulatory troubles. John S. Varley faced regulatory and legal charges over capital infusions from the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar, and Robert E. Diamond Jr. was caught up in the LIBOR-rigging scandal.

Even as Mr. Staley has cut costs and bolstered the company’s commitment to investment banking, his tenure has been marked by a series of questions over his judgment. The bank and Mr. Staley were both fined by regulators over a whistle-blower scandal, and other stumbles have prompted some shareholders to demand his resignation.

In a statement, Barclays said it believed that “Mr. Staley has been sufficiently transparent with the company as regards the nature and extent of his relationship with Mr. Epstein.” Mr. Staley, the bank said, retained the full confidence of its board.

The inquiry began sometime last year when the Financial Conduct Authority contacted Barclays with questions about Mr. Staley’s relationship with Mr. Epstein, according to the bank’s annual report, which was published Thursday.

Barclays responded to the regulator’s questions, but some element of that response raised questions within the agency, according to a bank official who spoke on the condition of anonymity. A more formal investigation then began in December.

Thursday’s announcement undercut a positive earnings report from the bank. Total income for 2019 rose 2 percent, and profit after taxes rose 30 percent for the year. Barclay’s shares ended the day down 1.7 percent.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 13barclays2-articleLarge Barclays C.E.O. Faces U.K. Inquiry on Jeffrey Epstein Ties Staley, James E Sex Crimes London Stock Exchange Financial Conduct Authority (Great Britain) Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Company Reports Barclays PLC

Mr. Epstein referred dozens of wealthy clients to Mr. Staley and JPMorgan. Credit…New York State Sex Offender Registry, via Associated Press

Mr. Epstein portrayed himself as indispensable to corporate executives and built up a small but powerful finance network, which Mr. Staley remained a part of even after Mr. Epstein’s 2008 guilty plea to a charge of soliciting prostitution from a teenage girl. The men had known each other since at least 1999, when the future Barclays chief was running the private banking business of JPMorgan and using Mr. Epstein to connect with potential clients.

The relationship was close enough that Mr. Staley visited Mr. Epstein about 10 years ago, while he was serving time in Florida for soliciting prostitution from a minor. The visit occurred at Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach office, where he was allowed to serve part of his 13-month sentence. They were still close enough in April 2015 for Mr. Staley and his wife, Debora, to sail their boat to Little St. James, Mr. Epstein’s private island. Mr. Staley was named chief executive of Barclays that December.

Among others, Mr. Epstein connected Mr. Staley with Glenn Dubin, who ran Highbridge Capital Management, a hedge fund in which JPMorgan bought a majority stake in 2004. The deal elevated the asset management division that Mr. Staley ran at JPMorgan into a major player in the hedge-fund world. (Mr. Dubin, who married a former girlfriend of Mr. Epstein’s, Eva Andersson, left JPMorgan in 2013. He left his most recent venture, the hedge fund Engineers Gate, last month, saying he wanted to focus on his family office.)

Mr. Epstein invoked his relationship with Mr. Staley as part of his own business maneuvers. He listed Mr. Staley and JPMorgan as references when he applied for a license to set up a bank, Southern Country International, in the Virgin Islands in 2013. Mr. Staley’s spokesman said he was unaware of this at the time.

Until Thursday, Mr. Staley’s history with Mr. Epstein had not appeared to pose a serious threat to his leadership. (Indeed, their ties were known as of the middle of 2015, when Mr. Staley was merely a contender for the Barclays position.)

But Mr. Staley’s tenure has faced other bouts of turmoil.

In 2016, he tried to unmask a whistle-blower who had criticized one of his senior hires. That led to a fine of $15 million for Barclays from New York’s banking regulator, which said that it had uncovered “shortcomings in governance, controls and corporate culture” at the bank. British bank regulators also fined Mr. Staley about $1.5 million and required the bank to submit reports on parts of its whistle-blowing program.

Mr. Staley also upset a big client, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, in 2016 after trying to help his brother-in-law’s business interests.

His conduct is now under scrutiny by the Financial Conduct Authority, whose responsibilities include assessing the “fitness and propriety” of senior executives at financial institutions. Among the qualities the regulator looks at, according to its website, is honesty, “including openness with self-disclosures, integrity and reputation.”

In August, Mr. Epstein killed himself while in a Manhattan jail, where he was being held awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. He had been charged by Manhattan prosecutors in July with sexually exploiting dozens of women and girls in New York and Florida.

Those accusations involved actions up to 2005. A lawsuit filed last month by Denise N. George, the attorney general of the Virgin Islands, cited further evidence that Mr. Epstein had sexually abused and trafficked hundreds of young women and girls on his private Caribbean island, some as recently as 2018.

A judge in the Virgin Islands who is overseeing the administration of Mr. Epstein’s $635 million estate is considering a proposal to establish a compensation fund for his accusers. Ms. George is seeking to block that effort, contending the executors of the estate are conflicted because they were longtime business advisers to Mr. Epstein.

Michael de la Merced, Kate Kelly and Matthew Goldstein contributed reporting.

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Barclays C.E.O.’s Ties to Jeffrey Epstein Provoke U.K. Inquiry

Barclays said on Thursday that British financial regulators were investigating the relationship between James E. Staley, its chief executive, and Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who killed himself last August after facing new allegations of sex trafficking of underage girls.

Mr. Staley is one of a handful of prominent Wall Street financiers who have been linked to Mr. Epstein, who portrayed himself as indispensable to corporate executives and built up a small but powerful finance network. He had known Mr. Epstein since at least 1999, when the future Barclays chief was running the private banking business of the Wall Street bank JPMorgan.

“As has been widely reported, earlier in his career, Mr. Staley developed a professional relationship with Mr. Epstein,” Barclays said in a statement. It added that Mr. Staley, who is known as Jes, had told the bank that he had had no contact with Mr. Epstein after taking the top position at the lender in December 2015.

Barclays said regulators including the Financial Conduct Authority, the main overseer of banks in Britain, were examining how Mr. Staley characterized the relationship with Mr. Epstein to the company, as well as what the company subsequently told the financial conduct agency.

Barclays, the statement said, “believes that Mr. Staley has been sufficiently transparent with the company as regards the nature and extent of his relationship with Mr. Epstein.” It added that Mr. Staley retained the full confidence of the bank’s board.

The bank’s shares were trading about 1.6 percent lower on Thursday.

Over the years, Mr. Epstein referred dozens of wealthy clients to Mr. Staley and JPMorgan.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 13barclays2-articleLarge Barclays C.E.O.’s Ties to Jeffrey Epstein Provoke U.K. Inquiry Staley, James E Sex Crimes London Stock Exchange Financial Conduct Authority (Great Britain) Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Company Reports Barclays PLC

Jeffrey Epstein referred dozens of wealth clients to Mr. Staley and JPMorgan. Credit…New York State Sex Offender Registry, via Associated Press

The relationship was good enough that Mr. Staley visited Mr. Epstein about 10 years ago, while he was serving time in Florida for soliciting prostitution from a minor. The visit occurred at Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach office, where he was allowed to serve part of his 13-month sentence.

Among others, Mr. Epstein connected Mr. Staley with Glenn Dubin, who ran Highbridge Capital Management, a hedge fund in which JPMorgan bought a majority stake in 2004. The deal elevated the asset management division that Mr. Staley ran at JPMorgan into a major player in the hedge-fund world.

Mr. Staley was named C.E.O. of Barclays in 2015, becoming the fifth chief executive in about seven years at a bank that had suffered from regulatory troubles and involvement in the Libor-rigging scandal.

He has reshaped the bank, cutting costs and bolstering the company’s commitment to investment banking. But his tenure has also been marked by a series of questions over his judgment.

In 2016, he tried to unmask a whistle-blower who had criticized one of his senior hires. That led to a fine of $15 million from New York’s banking regulator, which said that it had uncovered “shortcomings in governance, controls and corporate culture” at the bank. British bank regulators also fined Mr. Staley about $1.5 million and required the bank to submit reports on parts of its whistle-blowing program.

Mr. Staley also upset a big client, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, after trying to help his brother-in-law’s business interests. That and other stumbles have spurred some shareholders to demand his resignation along the way.

In August, Mr. Epstein killed himself while in a Manhattan jail, where he was being held awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. He had been charged by Manhattan prosecutors in July with sexually exploiting dozens of women and girls in New York and Florida.

Those accusations involved actions up to 2005. A lawsuit filed last month by Denise N. George, the attorney general of the Virgin Islands, cited further evidence that Mr. Epstein had sexually abused and trafficked hundreds of young women and girls on his private Caribbean island, some as recently as 2018.

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