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Facebook Cryptocurrency Plans Have a Problem: Facebook’s Reputation

Westlake Legal Group 16libra-facebookJumbo Facebook Cryptocurrency Plans Have a Problem: Facebook’s Reputation Zuckerberg, Mark E Virtual Currency United States Politics and Government United States Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Social Media Senate Committee on Banking Securities and Exchange Commission Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Powell, Jerome H PayPal Money Laundering Mnuchin, Steven T Marcus, David A Libra (Currency) House Financial Services Committee Federal Trade Commission Federal Reserve System Facebook Inc E-Commerce Consumer Protection Computers and the Internet Brown, Sherrod Bitcoin (Currency) Banking and Financial Institutions

Lawmakers made it clear at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Tuesday that they believe the biggest roadblock to Facebook’s plan to enter the world of cryptocurrency and global finance is the company’s reputation.

Facebook’s cryptocurrency project, Libra, has been in the works for more than a year. It has an ambitious goal: to offer an alternative financial system that makes it possible to send money around the world with few fees.

But almost immediately, the company has run into resistance from Washington.

“Facebook is dangerous,” Senator Sherrod Brown, Democrat of Ohio, said at the hearing. “Facebook has said ‘just trust us.’ And every time Americans trust you, they seem to get burned.”

The initiative is far from the first effort of its kind. The best-known cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, is in wide circulation, and it introduced the idea of digital currencies that are free from government control.

But the Libra effort has put a spotlight on cryptocurrencies and amplified the voices of critics who say the technology has little value beyond speculative investing and illegal transactions, like online drug sales.

When Facebook announced Libra in June, it also faced immediate skepticism from people who are wary of the power the social media company has already accumulated. Within days, regulators in Washington were calling for hearings on Facebook’s plans.

That concern was obvious on Tuesday when members of the committee questioned David Marcus, who leads the company’s cryptocurrency initiative, for more than two hours. Mr. Marcus was asked about a range of Facebook controversies, from lax protection of the private information of its users to Russian disinformation on Facebook’s platforms to claims that is tries to muzzle conservative viewpoints.

“Why in the world should Facebook of all companies do this?” asked Senator Brian Schatz, a Democrat from Hawaii. “Maybe before you do a new thing you should make sure you have your own shop fixed.”

Mr. Marcus, adopting a conciliatory tone, said the company would do its best to fight fraud and to earn back the trust of the more than two billion people who use Facebook’s services regularly.

“We’ve made mistakes in the past,” Mr. Marcus said. “We have been working, and are working hard to get better.”

The Senate session was the first in a day of Capitol Hill hearings involving the technology industry. House lawmakers were set to question multiple tech executives at an afternoon hearing focused on competition issues as part of a broad antitrust inquiry. And Google executives were scheduled to face questions at another hearing on the subject of whether the company censors conservative voices.

Facebook officials will also have to answer more questions about the company’s cryptocurrency plans in a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Wednesday.

Some lawmakers and regulators — most notably at the Securities and Exchange Commission — have been raising concerns about the legality and usefulness of cryptocurrencies for some time.

The involvement of Facebook, which has faced an onslaught of controversy over the last two years and is expected to pay a $5 billion settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, has put a charge into those discussions.

Last week, the chair of the Federal Reserve, Jerome H. Powell, said Libra raised “serious concerns” around “money laundering, consumer protection and financial stability.”

“I just think it cannot go forward without there being broad satisfaction with the way the company has addressed money laundering” and other issues, Mr. Powell said as he testified before the House Financial Services Committee. Central bankers from Britain, China, France, Singapore and the European Central Bank have all voiced similar concerns.

President Trump also criticized Libra and Bitcoin, writing on Twitter last week that the digital tokens were “highly volatile and based on thin air.”

And at a news conference on Monday afternoon, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also raised questions about Libra and other cryptocurrencies. Facebook has “a lot of work to do before we get to the point where we’re comfortable with it,” Mr. Mnuchin told reporters.

The issue provides a rare instance when the Trump administration is lining up with Democrats rather than other Republicans. While Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee lashed into Facebook, several Republicans on the committee voiced support for Facebook and its new initiative.

“I just think we should be exploring this and considering the benefits as well as the risks,” said Patrick Toomey, a Republican from Pennsylvania. “To announce in advance that we have to strangle this baby in the crib seems wildly premature.”

But not all Republicans on the committee were so positive.

Martha McSally, a Republican from Arizona, said “I don’t trust you guys.”

And Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, worried that conservatives would not be treated fairly in the Libra system, echoing a frequent Republican talking point about the liberal bias of tech companies.

Mr. Marcus, a former PayPal executive, was handpicked by Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, to lead the Libra effort.

Facebook’s role in the project will be run through a subsidiary company called Calibra, led by Mr. Marcus and other top Facebook employees. If the Libra digital token become popular, Calibra could build a business around offering customer financial services, including loans and other actions traditionally offered by the banking industry.

A separate entity called the Libra Association, whose proposed board would include more than a dozen partners in the tech and financial industries, would manage the cryptocurrency system once it is up and running, which Facebook is hoping to do next year.

Mr. Brown asked if there was any amount of opposition that would convince Facebook to scrap Libra.

“Is there anything that elected leaders can say that will convince you and Facebook that it should not launch this currency?” he said.

Mr. Marcus said that the company would not move ahead with the project until the concerns of regulators are answered.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A Fox 10 Reporter Had Explicit Words for Her Bosses Who Want Her to Hide Her Right-Leaning Connections

Westlake Legal Group Capture-5 A Fox 10 Reporter Had Explicit Words for Her Bosses Who Want Her to Hide Her Right-Leaning Connections Social Media Politics PHOENIX parler New York Times Media Kari Lake John Hook Front Page Stories Fox 10 Featured Story Arizona Allow Media Exception

Fox 10’s Kari Lake out in Phoenix, Arizona, is an Emmy award winning journalist and isn’t scared to about what people might think of her connections to the right despite what her bosses may fear. Not only is she not afraid of having to answer for her account on Parler, she has some bombs to throw at her managers who are pushing her to hide her account.

As Lake was about to do a Facebook live with her co-host John Hook, when Hook informed Lake that the higher ups would like her to hide her Parler account because of its associations with the “far-right.”

“I think they just think it’s been branded as a far-right kind of place,” Hook said.

“Jesus,” said Lake, clearly annoyed.

“So they don’t want you tied in with anything like that, where you’re going to get blowback from the New Times or whoever it is,” continued Hook.

“F**k them. They’re 20-year-old dopes,” Lake asserted. “That’s a rag for selling marijuana ads”.

“I know,” Hook responded. “But then you’re in a position where they’ve gotta explain it or you’ve gotta explain it”.

“I’m reaching people,” Lake said.

To be clear, Parler is not a “far-right” social media network. Thousands on thousands have joined up with Parler over the last year due to Twitter’s clear preference for left-leaning accounts and its punishment of right-leaning accounts for so much as sneezing in the wrong direction.

It’s ridiculous that Lake should have to hide her Parler account out of fear that someone like the New York Times would see it and make she or the station answer for it, and while it’s fun to watch Lake drop “f-bombs” all over her timid managers, the real lede here shouldn’t be buried.

The entire reason that Lake was told to hide her Parler account in the first place is because of fears that the mainstream media would swoop in and label she or the station as alt-right sympathizers, showing the fear the mainstream media puts into people when it comes to expressing themselves, or even associated with certain people. The underlying words used by Hook show us some interesting things. Firstly that they fear the New York Times would actually feel the need to spotlight Lake’s association with the Parler platform, and that they would promote the idea that it is something that only far-right people associate with.

In truth, Lake had the right idea. It’s unclear if she is right or left leaning and, to be honest, it doesn’t matter. As she said, she’s reaching people. She’s willing to venture into places where people who think differently are and having conversations with them on level ground.

That, in my opinion, puts her above in a class of journalism above the New York Times.

 

The post A Fox 10 Reporter Had Explicit Words for Her Bosses Who Want Her to Hide Her Right-Leaning Connections appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Capture-5-300x169 A Fox 10 Reporter Had Explicit Words for Her Bosses Who Want Her to Hide Her Right-Leaning Connections Social Media Politics PHOENIX parler New York Times Media Kari Lake John Hook Front Page Stories Fox 10 Featured Story Arizona Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Don’t Scoff at Influencers. They’re Taking Over the World.

ANAHEIM, Calif. — When the first TikTok star is elected president, I hope she will save some room in her cabinet for older and more conventional bureaucrats, even if they don’t have millions of followers, great hair or amazing dance moves.

I say “when,” not “if,” because I just spent three days at VidCon, the annual social media convention in Anaheim, hanging out with a few thousand current and future internet celebrities. And it’s increasingly obvious to me that the teenagers and 20-somethings who have mastered these platforms — and who are often dismissed as shallow, preening narcissists by adults who don’t know any better — are going to dominate not just internet culture or the entertainment industry but society as a whole.

On the surface, this can be a terrifying proposition. One day at VidCon, I hung out with a crew of teenage Instagram stars, who seemed to spend most of their time filming “collabs” with other creators and complimenting one another on their “drip,” influencer-speak for clothes and accessories. (In their case, head-to-toe Gucci and Balenciaga outfits with diamond necklaces and designer sneakers.) Another day, I witnessed an awkward dance battle between two budding TikTok influencers, neither of whom could have been older than 10. (Adults who are just catching up: TikTok is a short-form video app owned by the Chinese internet company Bytedance.)

But if you can look past the silliness and status-seeking, many people at VidCon are hard at work. Being an influencer can be an exhausting, burnout-inducing job, and the people who are good at it have typically spent years working their way up the ladder. Many social media influencers are essentially one-person start-ups, and the best ones can spot trends, experiment relentlessly with new formats and platforms, build an authentic connection with an audience, pay close attention to their channel analytics, and figure out how to distinguish themselves in a crowded media environment — all while churning out a constant stream of new content.

Not all influencers are brilliant polymaths, of course. Some of them have succeeded by virtue of being conventionally attractive, or good at video games, or in possession of some other surface-level attribute. Others have made their names with dubious stunts and extreme political commentary.

But as social media expands its cultural dominance, the people who can steer the online conversation will have an upper hand in whatever niche they occupy — whether that’s media, politics, business or some other field.

“The way to think of influencers or creators is as entrepreneurs,” said Chris Stokel-Walker, the author of “YouTubers.” “These people are setting up businesses, hiring staff, managing budgets. These are massively transferable skills.”

Just look at Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York Democrat who has become a powerful force in Congress by pairing her policy agenda with an intuitive understanding of what works online. Or look at what’s happening in Brazil, where YouTubers are winning political elections by mobilizing their online fan bases.

In the business world, influencer culture is already an established force. A generation of direct-to-consumer brands that were built using the tools and tactics of social media has skyrocketed to success — like Glossier, the influencer-beloved beauty company that recently raised $100 million at a valuation of more than $1 billion, or Away, the luggage start-up whose ubiquitous Instagram ads helped it reach a valuation of $1.4 billion. Many social media stars strike endorsement deals with major brands, in addition to earning money through advertising and merchandise sales. And even executives in sleepy, old-line industries now hire “personal branding consultants” to help increase their online followings.

Natalie Alzate, a YouTuber with more than 10 million subscribers who goes by Natalies Outlet, is an example of the wave of influencers who treated their online brand-building as a business rather than a fun hobby. Four years ago, when Ms. Alzate first came to VidCon, she was a marketing student with fewer than 7,000 subscribers. She decided to study her favorite YouTubers, watch how they made their videos and then test videos in multiple genres, seeing which ones performed best on her channel.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157990158_e884758e-6684-49ef-af87-678ad8e9f95c-articleLarge Don’t Scoff at Influencers. They’re Taking Over the World. YouTube.com Youth Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming VidCon United States Politics and Government TikTok (ByteDance) Social Media Instagram Inc Computers and the Internet Advertising and Marketing

VidCon attracts young influencers the way Davos attracts older ones.CreditJerod Harris/Getty Images

“I grew up watching people, like Michelle Phan, that were building legacies out of, honestly, just being really relatable online,” Ms. Alzate said. “It was always an aspiration.”

Eventually, she hit on formats — like beauty tips and lifehacks — that reliably performed well, and she was off to the races. Today, she is a full-time YouTuber with a small staff, a production studio and the kind of fame she once coveted.

In truth, influencers have been running the world for years. We just haven’t called them that. Instead, we called them “movie stars” or “talk-radio hosts” or “Davos attendees.” The ability to stay relevant and attract attention to your work has always been critical. And who, aside from perhaps President Trump, is better at getting attention than a YouTube star?

VidCon, which started 10 years ago as a meet-and-greet event for popular YouTubers, is a perfect place to observe influencers in their natural habitat. And many of them were here to promote their channels, to network with other creators and to make strides toward the dream of internet fame.

Sometimes, that meant appearing in photos and videos with more popular influencers in an attempt to increase their own following, a practice known in influencer circles as “clout chasing.” Other times, it meant going to panels with titles like “Curating Your Personal Brand” and “How to Go Viral and Build an Audience.” For VidCon’s featured creators, the super-famous ones with millions of followers, it can mean spending the day at a meet-and-greet with fans before going out to V.I.P. parties at night.

Not all of the young people I met at VidCon will spend their whole lives pursuing internet fame. Some of them will grow up, go off to college and wind up becoming doctors, lawyers or accountants. Some will fizzle out and be replaced by a younger generation of internet stars.

But the lessons they learned from performing on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok will stick with them, regardless of where they end up. Just as the 20th century groomed a generation of children steeped in the ethos of TV culture, the 21st century will produce a generation of business moguls, politicians and media figures who grew up chasing clout online and understand how to operate the levers of the attention economy.

“In the early days, it felt like this was a sub-niche of youth culture,” Beau Bryant, the general manager of talent at Fullscreen, a management agency for digital creators, told me at VidCon. He gestured around at a room filled with influencers sitting on velvet couches. Some were taking selfies and editing their Instagram stories. Others were holding business meetings about partnerships and sponsored content deals.

“Now, it just feels like this is what youth culture is,” Mr. Bryant said.

In other words, influencers are the future. Dismiss them at your peril.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Don’t Scoff at Influencers. They’re Taking Over the World.

ANAHEIM, Calif. — When the first TikTok star is elected president, I hope she will save some room in her cabinet for older and more conventional bureaucrats, even if they don’t have millions of followers, great hair or amazing dance moves.

I say “when,” not “if,” because I just spent three days at VidCon, the annual social media convention in Anaheim, hanging out with a few thousand current and future internet celebrities. And it’s increasingly obvious to me that the teenagers and 20-somethings who have mastered these platforms — and who are often dismissed as shallow, preening narcissists by adults who don’t know any better — are going to dominate not just internet culture or the entertainment industry but society as a whole.

On the surface, this can be a terrifying proposition. One day at VidCon, I hung out with a crew of teenage Instagram stars, who seemed to spend most of their time filming “collabs” with other creators and complimenting one another on their “drip,” influencer-speak for clothes and accessories. (In their case, head-to-toe Gucci and Balenciaga outfits with diamond necklaces and designer sneakers.) Another day, I witnessed an awkward dance battle between two budding TikTok influencers, neither of whom could have been older than 10. (Adults who are just catching up: TikTok is a short-form video app owned by the Chinese internet company Bytedance.)

But if you can look past the silliness and status-seeking, many people at VidCon are hard at work. Being an influencer can be an exhausting, burnout-inducing job, and the people who are good at it have typically spent years working their way up the ladder. Many social media influencers are essentially one-person start-ups, and the best ones can spot trends, experiment relentlessly with new formats and platforms, build an authentic connection with an audience, pay close attention to their channel analytics, and figure out how to distinguish themselves in a crowded media environment — all while churning out a constant stream of new content.

Not all influencers are brilliant polymaths, of course. Some of them have succeeded by virtue of being conventionally attractive, or good at video games, or in possession of some other surface-level attribute. Others have made their names with dubious stunts and extreme political commentary.

But as social media expands its cultural dominance, the people who can steer the online conversation will have an upper hand in whatever niche they occupy — whether that’s media, politics, business or some other field.

“The way to think of influencers or creators is as entrepreneurs,” said Chris Stokel-Walker, the author of “YouTubers.” “These people are setting up businesses, hiring staff, managing budgets. These are massively transferable skills.”

Just look at Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York Democrat who has become a powerful force in Congress by pairing her policy agenda with an intuitive understanding of what works online. Or look at what’s happening in Brazil, where YouTubers are winning political elections by mobilizing their online fan bases.

In the business world, influencer culture is already an established force. A generation of direct-to-consumer brands that were built using the tools and tactics of social media has skyrocketed to success — like Glossier, the influencer-beloved beauty company that recently raised $100 million at a valuation of more than $1 billion, or Away, the luggage start-up whose ubiquitous Instagram ads helped it reach a valuation of $1.4 billion. Many social media stars strike endorsement deals with major brands, in addition to earning money through advertising and merchandise sales. And even executives in sleepy, old-line industries now hire “personal branding consultants” to help increase their online followings.

Natalie Alzate, a YouTuber with more than 10 million subscribers who goes by Natalies Outlet, is an example of the wave of influencers who treated their online brand-building as a business rather than a fun hobby. Four years ago, when Ms. Alzate first came to VidCon, she was a marketing student with fewer than 7,000 subscribers. She decided to study her favorite YouTubers, watch how they made their videos and then test videos in multiple genres, seeing which ones performed best on her channel.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157990158_e884758e-6684-49ef-af87-678ad8e9f95c-articleLarge Don’t Scoff at Influencers. They’re Taking Over the World. YouTube.com Youth Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming VidCon United States Politics and Government TikTok (ByteDance) Social Media Instagram Inc Computers and the Internet Advertising and Marketing

VidCon attracts young influencers the way Davos attracts older ones.CreditJerod Harris/Getty Images

“I grew up watching people, like Michelle Phan, that were building legacies out of, honestly, just being really relatable online,” Ms. Alzate said. “It was always an aspiration.”

Eventually, she hit on formats — like beauty tips and lifehacks — that reliably performed well, and she was off to the races. Today, she is a full-time YouTuber with a small staff, a production studio and the kind of fame she once coveted.

In truth, influencers have been running the world for years. We just haven’t called them that. Instead, we called them “movie stars” or “talk-radio hosts” or “Davos attendees.” The ability to stay relevant and attract attention to your work has always been critical. And who, aside from perhaps President Trump, is better at getting attention than a YouTube star?

VidCon, which started 10 years ago as a meet-and-greet event for popular YouTubers, is a perfect place to observe influencers in their natural habitat. And many of them were here to promote their channels, to network with other creators and to make strides toward the dream of internet fame.

Sometimes, that meant appearing in photos and videos with more popular influencers in an attempt to increase their own following, a practice known in influencer circles as “clout chasing.” Other times, it meant going to panels with titles like “Curating Your Personal Brand” and “How to Go Viral and Build an Audience.” For VidCon’s featured creators, the super-famous ones with millions of followers, it can mean spending the day at a meet-and-greet with fans before going out to V.I.P. parties at night.

Not all of the young people I met at VidCon will spend their whole lives pursuing internet fame. Some of them will grow up, go off to college and wind up becoming doctors, lawyers or accountants. Some will fizzle out and be replaced by a younger generation of internet stars.

But the lessons they learned from performing on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok will stick with them, regardless of where they end up. Just as the 20th century groomed a generation of children steeped in the ethos of TV culture, the 21st century will produce a generation of business moguls, politicians and media figures who grew up chasing clout online and understand how to operate the levers of the attention economy.

“In the early days, it felt like this was a sub-niche of youth culture,” Beau Bryant, the general manager of talent at Fullscreen, a management agency for digital creators, told me at VidCon. He gestured around at a room filled with influencers sitting on velvet couches. Some were taking selfies and editing their Instagram stories. Others were holding business meetings about partnerships and sponsored content deals.

“Now, it just feels like this is what youth culture is,” Mr. Bryant said.

In other words, influencers are the future. Dismiss them at your peril.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

It’s Like AOC’s “Squad” Wants Trump To Win

Westlake Legal Group tlaib-omar-aoc-pressley-620x317 It’s Like AOC’s “Squad” Wants Trump To Win The Squad socialism Social Media rashia tlaib Ilhan Omar Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Ayanna Pressley AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

In this combination image from left; Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., July 10, 2019, Washington, Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., March 12, 2019, in Washington, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-NY., July 12, 2019, in Washington, and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., July 10, 2019, in Washington. In tweets Sunday, President Donald Trump portrays the lawmakers as foreign-born troublemakers who should go back to their home countries. In fact, the lawmakers, except one, were born in the U.S. (AP Photo)

Like many, I was not thrilled to see President Donald Trump’s tweets on the four members of “The Squad,” the freshmen Congresswomen seemingly led by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Whether you believe the tweets were racist or not, they represented Trump’s worst impulse: The need to be involved in the big political news.

Granted, it was a story that the media was not covering, but the moment he tweeted, it gave them cover. They could write about his “appalling” tweets, let the politicians hem and haw over the “racist” comments. It was as though Trump saw a circular firing squad and decided to run right into the middle of it.

However, something extraordinary happened on Monday. As he got into that circular firing squad, he tripped and the Democrats all fired on each other thinking they were hitting the President.

The President’s tweets did something extraordinary. They made Nancy Pelosi come to The Squad’s defense. She had to give them her support, giving up even more of her authority over them and granting them more power. They took to the podium and demanded Trump be impeached (for tweeting?). Impeachment, of course, is something Pelosi has been trying to avoid since she became the Speaker.

Their press conference was the culmination of everything they have been doing since they arrived in Congress. They were the victims of the Big Bad Republican President. They continued to play to the very extreme. They wanted everyone to know their feelings were hurt. More than anything, it appeared to be a show of weakness as they stomped their feet like children because someone said something mean about them.

The American public is aware of Trump’s character. He is a known quantity. However, these four Congresswomen are becoming the most known Democrats in the country, and if you think Trump’s approval numbers are bad, you should see theirs.

The findings:

  • Ocasio-Cortez was recognized by 74% of voters in the poll; 22% had a favorable view.
  • Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota — another member of The Squad — was recognized by 53% of the voters; 9% (not a typo) had a favorable view.

Socialism was viewed favorably by 18% of the voters and unfavorably by 69%.

  • Capitalism was 56% favorable; 32% unfavorable.
  • “Socialism is toxic to these voters,” said the top Democrat.

That’s not good. They are scaring the swing voters. Trump is a known quantity to them. They know who he is. They don’t approve of his character or his statements. However, his inability to control himself on Twitter is nothing compared to the fear instilled in those voters when they see a growing trend toward socialism in Trump’s opposition.

So, you can say Trump made a mistake when he tweeted. I do, in fact, and I honestly wish he’d stop tweeting every time someone he has an opinion about is in the news.

However, the Democrats clearly want you to hold their beer as they attempt to outdo him. It’s incredible, and it’s the reason they are going to struggle in 2020.

The post It’s Like AOC’s “Squad” Wants Trump To Win appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group tlaib-omar-aoc-pressley-300x153 It’s Like AOC’s “Squad” Wants Trump To Win The Squad socialism Social Media rashia tlaib Ilhan Omar Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Ayanna Pressley AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Confirmed: The ‘Trump Is Delaying the Harriet Tubman Bill Because Racism’ Narrative Was Totally Bogus

Westlake Legal Group TubmanHamilton Confirmed: The ‘Trump Is Delaying the Harriet Tubman Bill Because Racism’ Narrative Was Totally Bogus white house washington D.C. Social Media Politics North Carolina Media journalism Harriet Tubman Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post fake news donald trump democrats Culture Allow Media Exception

Remember the controversy stirred up by the New York Times last month about how the Trump administration was deliberately delaying the rollout of the Harriet Tubman $20 bill because racism? As it turns out, the report was bogus all along, according to officials from President Obama’s administration.

Fox News reports:

After Democrat lawmakers and commentators spent months hammering the Trump administration for supposedly delaying the release of a $20 bill featuring abolitionist Harriet Tubman, several officials appointed by President Barack Obama have reportedly admitted that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has followed the Obama timeline for producing the new currency.

The Obama administration said [in] 2016 that it wanted to remove Andrew Jackson from the $20 bill and replace him with Tubman, who helped free slaves through the Underground Railroad, and that the bills would be ready in 2020. But a current “high-ranking government official” appointed by Obama, as well as a former official, confirmed to The Washington Post that the Tubman bill had “had “always been scheduled for release toward the end of the next decade.”

Obama Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s 2016 claims that a “final concept design” of the bill would be released in 2020 were viewed with skepticism internally, according to the report. Larry R. Felix, the director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 2006 to 2015, told The Post that too much security work needed to be done to realistically release the bill in 2020.

“Those announcements were not grounded in reality,” Felix said. “The U.S. had not at the time acquired the security features to redesign and protect the notes.”

Trump’s Treasury Dept. pushed back on the reports in June, noting the reasons for the delay in the rollout of the bill:

BEP Director Len Olijar, an Obama appointee, also issued a statement at the time which read, in part:

“As technology has evolved, banknote production has vastly changed over the last three decades. The next family of notes require new, overt and covert security features for the public, the banknote equipment manufacturers, and the central bank, to keep our currency safe and secure. Security features also need to work in mass production. A design can change during testing. The overwhelming success of the redesigned $100 in thwarting counterfeiting, is greatly due to the effectiveness of the blue security thread which is a public feature (and which a design was integrated around afterwards). That development alone of that security feature took approximately 10 years to finalize.

“Moreover, BEP was never going to unveil a note design in 2020. To keep our currency safe and secure, it is unwise to give counterfeiters a look at a potential future note far in advance of a note going into circulation. Additionally, if the concept of a note that was made public by the government were to change during that lengthy amount of time, it would create confusion in the global marketplace, further aiding counterfeiters.”

But those explanations were not good enough for The Usual Suspects like the frauds at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who blasted off about how the delay in the Tubman bill equated to more “racism” and “misogyny” from Trump, etc etc.

Will they walk back those false narratives now that news outlets they find reliable (like the Washington Post) and numerous officials from the Obama administration are confirming the Tubman bill was always going to be delayed? Don’t count on it.

———–
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Confirmed: The ‘Trump Is Delaying the Harriet Tubman Bill Because Racism’ Narrative Was Totally Bogus appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group TubmanHamilton-300x150 Confirmed: The ‘Trump Is Delaying the Harriet Tubman Bill Because Racism’ Narrative Was Totally Bogus white house washington D.C. Social Media Politics North Carolina Media journalism Harriet Tubman Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post fake news donald trump democrats Culture Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

After Pelosi-AOC Fight, Liberal NY Times Columnist Suddenly Finds Race Card Tactic Offensive

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-2-1-620x317 After Pelosi-AOC Fight, Liberal NY Times Columnist Suddenly Finds Race Card Tactic Offensive Social Media Politics NY Times North Carolina New York Nancy Pelosi Media maureen dowd journalism Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats Culture Congress AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

On Friday, I wrote about how the Congressional Black Caucus played the “let me show you how it’s done” game with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) after she insinuated in a Wednesday interview that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (CA) was singling out the Queenie Quartet because they were “women of color.”

As it turns out, all this race card playing back and forth has really upset New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, whose interview with Pelosi a few weeks ago was what set off the AOC firestorm.

We’ll get to that in a minute, but first, a brief recap of what went down Friday – via The Hill:

Congressional Black Caucus members are furious at Justice Democrats, accusing the outside progressive group aligned with firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) of trying to oust lawmakers of color, specifically African American lawmakers.

[…]

“It just seems strange that the social Democrats seem to be targeting members of the Congressional Black Caucus, individuals who have stood and fought to make sure that African Americans are included and part of this process,” Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.), a senior CBC member, told The Hill.

“I don’t know what that agenda is, but if they want to come after members of the Black Caucus, it’s two ways,” warned Meeks, the Queens Democratic Party boss who clashed with Justice Democrats in a local district attorney race last month.

Meeks’s “it’s two ways” comments were in reference to Ocasio-Cortez playing the race card against Pelosi just two days prior:

“When these comments first started, I kind of thought that she was keeping the progressive flank at more of an arm’s distance in order to protect more moderate members, which I understood,” Ocasio-Cortez told the Post.

“But the persistent singling out … it got to a point where it was just outright disrespectful … the explicit singling out of newly elected women of color,” she added.

In response to the escalation in the public infighting between the two camps, Dowd wrote a column Saturday in which she noted she had suddenly discovered how harmful leveling false accusations of racism against someone is:

Pelosi told me, after the A.O.C. Squad voted against the House’s version of the border bill and trashed the moderates — the very people who provided the Democrats the majority — that the Squad was four people with four votes. She was talking about a legislative reality. If it was a knock, it was for abandoning the party.

That did not merit A.O.C.’s outrageous accusation that Pelosi was targeting “newly elected women of color.” She slimed the speaker, who has spent her life fighting for the downtrodden and who was instrumental in getting the first African-American president elected and passing his agenda against all odds, as a sexist and a racist.

A.O.C. should consider the possibility that people who disagree with her do not disagree with her color.

Gee, ya think?

Dowd continued, condemning another tactic frequently used by the Queenie Quartet: The “You’re putting my life in danger with your dissent” tactic:

The young lawmaker went further, implying that the speaker was putting the Squad in danger, asking why Pelosi would criticize them, “knowing the amount of death threats” and attention they get. Huh?

[…]

The progressives act as though anyone who dares disagree with them is bad. Not wrong, but bad, guilty of some human failing, some impurity that is a moral evil that justifies their venom.

It would be truly touching if Dowd had come to these conclusions out of a sincere desire to bury the offensive tactic of falsely playing the race/woman/danger card to silence your opposition. She’s not. The only reason why the accusations from AOC towards Pelosi offended Dowd was because they were a distraction from what she feels should unite them both: Defeating Trump:

In the age of Trump, there is no more stupid proposition than that Nancy Pelosi is the problem. If A.O.C. and her Pygmalions and acolytes decide that burning down the House is more important than deposing Trump, they will be left with a racist backward president and the emotional satisfaction of their own purity.

In other words, it’s ok to play the race card as long as your target is a Republican or conservative.

Liberals are nothing if not predictable.

———–
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post After Pelosi-AOC Fight, Liberal NY Times Columnist Suddenly Finds Race Card Tactic Offensive appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-2-1-300x153 After Pelosi-AOC Fight, Liberal NY Times Columnist Suddenly Finds Race Card Tactic Offensive Social Media Politics NY Times North Carolina New York Nancy Pelosi Media maureen dowd journalism Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats Culture Congress AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

BOURBON ON THE ROCKS: O.J. SIMPSON REAL AUDIO #834

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Bourbon On The Rocks for Monday July-15-2019 has Duke talking about one of the best national anthems around, O.J. Simpson gets into some trouble on Twitter and local ELECTION TIME is coming up. Check it all out by LISTENING HERE.

The post BOURBON ON THE ROCKS: O.J. SIMPSON REAL AUDIO #834 appeared first on RedState.

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Video: Lindsey Graham 2.0 Responds to Outrage Over Trump’s Tweets With Some Sage Advice

Westlake Legal Group lindsey-graham-pointing-620x413 Video: Lindsey Graham 2.0 Responds to Outrage Over Trump’s Tweets With Some Sage Advice white house washington D.C. south carolina Social Media republicans Politics North Carolina Media Lindsey Graham Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Lindsey Graham by Gage Skidmore, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0/Original

Last Friday, I wrote about an interview Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) did on Fox News in which he gave President Trump some advice on how to handle the public infighting and squabbles between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY). During the interview segment, Graham said:

Literally. Mr. President if you’re watching tonight, just enjoy this. Be quiet.

Well, the President wasn’t quiet and the result was a series of tweets he wrote this weekend that have led to outrage across the political spectrum.

Monday morning on an episode of “Fox and Friends”, Graham did not condemn Trump’s tweets but did offer him some more sage advice (transcribed)

“We all know that AOC and this crowd are a bunch of communists. They hate Israel, they hate our own country. They’re calling guards along our border — the Border Patrol agents — concentration camp guards. They accuse people who support Israel of doing it for ‘the Benjamins.’ They’re anti-Semitic. They’re anti-America. Don’t get down. Aim higher. We don’t need to know anything about them personally. Talk about their policies.”

There was some crosstalk where it sounded like Graham was asked if he found the tweets negative. Here’s what Graham said in response (transcribed):

“I think they’re American citizens who are duly elected that are running on an agenda that is disgusting, that the American people will reject. Talk about what it means for America to have free healthcare for illegal immigrants, and no criminalization of coming into the country — see how that works for controlling immigration.

Their ideas, they’re anti-Semitic. They talk about the Israeli state as if they’re a bunch of thugs, not victims of the entire region. They wanted to impeach Trump on day one. They are socialist, they’re anti-Semitic, they stand for all the things that most Americans disagree with. Make them the face of the future Democratic Party and you will destroy the Democratic Party.”

Watch video of Graham’s remarks below:

Sounds like the President was listening. Trump tweeted a partial transcript of Graham’s remarks on his Twitter feed earlier today.

———–
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Video: Lindsey Graham 2.0 Responds to Outrage Over Trump’s Tweets With Some Sage Advice appeared first on RedState.

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Trump’s Tweet About Congresswomen Is Full of Issues but It Isn’t Racist

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Dominating my feeds over the weekend was the fact that President Donald Trump tweeted out that people like Reps. Ilhan Omar and Rashida Talib should go back to their respective countries of origin and fix the problems there if they think America is horrible.

The tweet was heralded as racist from the top of every soapbox the leftist collective could find. It even prompted Omar to retweet an article that essentially labeled all of Trump’s supporters as racist if they support him, marking the first time Omar actually labeled Trump’s following as racist.

After looking at the tweet, I can easily arrive at two conclusions. The tweet is stupid and not very well thought out, but it’s definitely not racist nor is it without its point.

Before I start getting angry tweets thrown at me from both sides, let me explain.

Let’s take a look at the tweet in question.

Trump calls out the anti-American nature of these “Democrat Congresswomen,” and notes that their countries of origin are horribly run, not at all well-maintained, and are usually corrupt.

He then tells them to go back and fix the problems those countries have, then come back and show the U.S. how to solve these problems.

Let me just skip analyzing the countries that these women either hail or descend from. I don’t think I need to point out that Somalia is a horrible place or that the area around Israel is infested with terrorism and brutal governments.

Here are the two things that should be focused on and why I think it’s important to be able to differentiate between a stupid tweet and a racist tweet. For one, Trump isn’t saying that one race is better than another, he’s calling out the governments of foreign countries which definitely aren’t as good as ours. Trying to say that the United States is just as good as Somalia is just like trying to say a lion is the same as a house cat. It just doesn’t work.

Trump didn’t say “Omar and Tlaib’s races are inferior to the white race that dominated America’s history.” That would have been a racist tweet. What he said was that these women should retreat to these countries where these governments get it horribly wrong, then upon fixing these governments where problems that these hard-leftist claim to loath really are present, come back and show us how to fix the problems at home.

It’s key that he also said that they should come back. He doesn’t denounce their citizenship within the U.S., nor does he remove the idea that they’re elected officials. In fact, his tweet very clearly recognizes both.

Trump doesn’t demonstrate racism throughout these tweets, and it appears that claims of racism are inferred rather than proven from mainstream outlets that report on it. It’s the idea that Trump would tweet something like this because he’s racist. Thing is, the tweet doesn’t touch race, just crappy governments, and last I checked, government bodies don’t qualify as races.

On top of that, Trump has a point. These women consistently act like the United States is a cruel country with horrific problems generated from its embracing of a culture that was propagated by their favorite boogieman, the white male. I feel like I shouldn’t need to point out how racist and sexist this is, but funny enough, I constantly have to.

Their anger usually comes off as ignorant, like the spoiled ranting of first-world kids who haven’t truly known what it’s like to be oppressed, or live with little hope. Trump is advocating that they truly see what it’s like to have to live in a place where you don’t get a vote based on your genitalia, and prejudice and bigotry are a standard, not an exception like it is in the country they’re in now.

That said, this tweet was horribly worded and a reeked of ignorance. While not named, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the most famous of the “progressive Democrat Congresswomen” and while being born in in the U.S., she is a descendant of Puerto Ricans, a U.S. territory. It’s a place with a increasingly bad drug problem and a good deal of its citizens live below the poverty line, but it’s not exactly the hell-hole that is Somalia, where Omar actually hails from. Tlaib’s family is from Palestinian places outside of Israel, which are infested with terrorists and brutal governments, but Tlaib was born in the United States.

I’m not defending these women. The bigotry and ridiculousness they’ve shown eclipses anything stupid that Trump has done or said, but with that in mind, I think Trump’s tweet indicates that he doesn’t know much about these women other than the fact that they’re of foreign origin. Whether he mean to or not, this comes off as ignorance, and as such makes his already un-professional tweet come off as stupid. It’s likely that when he wrote of their countries of origin, he meant where they were descended from, but that doesn’t come off in the tweet.

Two things can be true at once. Trump’s tweet can be solid in its point, and it can be a ridiculous tweet that he shouldn’t have probably tweeted out in the first place. He’s definitely punching down at lawmakers who, while they have a very loud following, are generally recognized as silly people who don’t know what they’re doing half the time.

Let me be clear. I think addressing their comments in context and slapping them down when they tend to make news is a superb idea, but throwing out statements that contain generalities that come off like whispered comment on an episode of Real Housewives isn’t.

Omar and Ocasio-Cortez aren’t the brightest bulbs in the box, but we can easily sit back and let them prove that themselves without the President’s jabs. That said, what Trump tweeted wasn’t at all racist, and I think it’s a bit ridiculous that this isn’t obvious.

This is just one more incident that proves that the word “racism” has lost all meaning.

The post Trump’s Tweet About Congresswomen Is Full of Issues but It Isn’t Racist appeared first on RedState.

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