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Westlake Legal Group > Uncategorized (Page 45)

New York City Mayor de Blasio announces plans to seize private property

Westlake Legal Group MayorDeBlasio New York City Mayor de Blasio announces plans to seize private property The Blog socialism New York City expropriation Bill de Blasio

Mayor Bill de Blasio has never really hidden his feelings about private property. Back in 2017 de Blasio gave an interview to New York magazine in which he said, “Our legal system is structured to favor private property.” He then added, “If I had my druthers, the city government would determine every single plot of land, how development would proceed.” I guess he was serious about that because last Thursday the mayor created an Office to Protect Tenants which would he hopes will ultimately be able to seize private property and hand it over to community nonprofits. From the NY Daily News:

De Blasio created the office mid-speech, pulling out an executive order from beneath his lectern with flourish.

“When a landlord tries to push out a tenant by making their home unlivable, a team of inspectors and law enforcement agents will be on the ground to stop it in time,” he said. “If the fines and the penalties don’t cut it, we will seize their buildings and we will put them in the hands of a community nonprofit that will treat tenants with the respect they deserve.”

The executive order de Blasio signed creates the new city office but Reason reports that in order to seize the private property, de Blasio will need a new local law passed.

So what will the Office to Protect Tenants do? De Blasio didn’t really explain, though his executive order says it will serve as a “central resource for tenants, social service agencies, advocacy organizations, legal services providers, landlords and management companies of affordable housing, and others on tenant issues,” including “tenant harassment.”

According to his office’s website, De Blasio is “pursuing new local law to seize upwards of 40 of the most distressed multiple dwelling buildings annually and transition them to responsible, mission driven ownership.” Passage of this legislation would presumably give the Office to Protect Tenants the authority to seize land.

So, it sounds like the sort of expropriation practiced by socialists everywhere. The city already has a program called Third-Party Transfer which does what the Mayor is describing and has for more than a decade. But in practice, some of the people losing their homes haven’t been slum lords at all. From the Brooklyn Reader:

James E. Caldwell, president of the 77th Precinct Community Council and longtime Crown Heights activist, calls it a sham.

“When the city started the program, it was to hold slumlords accountable who didn’t pay their heat or water bills,” said Caldwell. “But the city then expanded the program to people who don’t have any mortgages on the houses anymore. That way, whoever takes over the house doesn’t have to go the bank to pay it off, because it’s already free and clear. They’re stealing from hardworking black folks!”

The problem with TPT, Caldwell explained, is that the homeowners receive no warning when this transfer occurs.

“According to a new law, the homeowners don’t need to be notified anymore,” Caldwell said. “They find out, once the third party takes over their house and sends them a notification requesting rent. This is highway robbery. The city puts the house into foreclosure based on an unpaid water bill or something like that. That makes no sense.”

Once you start down this road, it’s a little hard to stop. After all, if this is really a better way to manage housing, why stop with a few dozen distressed properties? Why not seize some of the glitzier properties around Central Park? I suspect de Blasio himself would be all for it. Here’s a local news report PIX 11 broadcast last month:

The post New York City Mayor de Blasio announces plans to seize private property appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group MayorDeBlasio-300x159 New York City Mayor de Blasio announces plans to seize private property The Blog socialism New York City expropriation Bill de Blasio   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Republicans taking no-mercy approach to even longshot 2020 Democrats

Even lesser-known prospective Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls are already facing a withering barrage of criticism from the Republican establishment, foreshadowing a historically fierce and competitive campaign season as higher-profile potential candidates like former Vice President Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harirs wait in the wings.

Westlake Legal Group Castro-1 Republicans taking no-mercy approach to even longshot 2020 Democrats Gregg Re fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 79eb3082-68d5-598c-8832-8848a59b473e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Privilege: Will House Dems subpoena Trump’s Russian interpreter?

Westlake Legal Group PutinTrump Privilege: Will House Dems subpoena Trump’s Russian interpreter? Vladimir Putin The Blog subpoena interpreters House Democrats executive privilege donald trump

Six months ago, this amounted to nothing more than an academic exercise. With a new House majority, Democrats appear ready to make it into a big legal fight with the White House. ABC News reports that lawyers for two House committees will meet today to discuss whether they can subpoena Marina Gross, the Russian interpreter for President Donald Trump, in an effort to hear the details of their conversation in Helsinki:

Lawyers for the two committees are planning to meet Monday to evaluate their legal options for subpoenaing both Gross and another interpreter, who was present during a meeting in Hamburg, Germany, between Trump and Putin that occurred without aides present.

When Democrats took control of the House earlier this month, some members voiced concerns that interviewing interpreters would be a significant break in protocol. They argued the precedent could be problematic for future administrations by making it more difficult to conduct face-to-face diplomacy. They also raised concerns they could face objections from White House lawyers, who could mount a legal argument that the president’s executive privilege extends to the interpreter.

But a senior Democratic aide on the House Foreign Affairs Committee said a new report in The Washington Post has “changed the calculus.” It describes the president going to extraordinary lengths to conceal details of his conversations with Putin, including moves Trump allegedly took to seize notes from the interpreter at a meeting he held with Putin in Hamburg.

“This raises a new host of questions,” the aide said. “We’re looking into the legal implications of that and we’ll discuss our options. Our lawyers are sitting down with intel committee lawyers to hash it out.”

The Post reported that Trump went so far as to take possession of Gross’ handwritten notes from the Helsinki meeting and others. Their report yesterday called such actions unprecedented, although they did note that other senior administration officials have been present for other conversations with Putin:

President Trump has gone to extraordinary lengths to conceal details of his conversations with Russian President Vladi­mir Putin, including on at least one occasion taking possession of the notes of his own interpreter and instructing the linguist not to discuss what had transpired with other administration officials, current and former U.S. officials said.

Trump did so after a meeting with Putin in 2017 in Hamburg that was also attended by then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. U.S. officials learned of Trump’s actions when a White House adviser and a senior State Department official sought information from the interpreter beyond a readout shared by Tillerson.

The constraints that Trump imposed are part of a broader pattern by the president of shielding his communications with Putin from public scrutiny and preventing even high-ranking officials in his own administration from fully knowing what he has told one of the United States’ main adversaries.

As a result, U.S. officials said there is no detailed record, even in classified files, of Trump’s face-to-face interactions with the Russian leader at five locations over the past two years. Such a gap would be unusual in any presidency, let alone one that Russia sought to install through what U.S. intelligence agencies have described as an unprecedented campaign of election interference.

It’s also rather unprecedented to have a president under investigation with a working hypothesis that he’s a Russian agent, too. Under those circumstances, any president might decide to get a little stingy with the notes and the details of those conversations.

At any rate, this doesn’t look like an area ripe for House subpoenas. The Constitution gives the executive branch the responsibility for foreign relations, not Congress. The Senate has the jurisdiction to ratify treaties, but the House is notably absent from the discussion except for the joint congressional jurisdiction in foreign commerce. Even if Trump and Putin discussed foreign commerce, however, the House doesn’t have jurisdiction over conversations — they only have jurisdiction over agreements thereof.

On top of that, no one has any evidence that Trump did anything wrong, other than the common assumption made by Trump’s political opposition that he does everything wrong. There is no probable cause to intervene — which makes this a fishing expedition. Its value has to get weighed against the damage done to the executive branch and its ability to have sensitive and private conversations with other world leaders. Simply put, there is no value to this infringement on executive privilege at the zenith of presidential authority, which means that the House should get slapped down by the federal courts, assuming it goes that far.

The post Privilege: Will House Dems subpoena Trump’s Russian interpreter? appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group PutinTrump-300x159 Privilege: Will House Dems subpoena Trump’s Russian interpreter? Vladimir Putin The Blog subpoena interpreters House Democrats executive privilege donald trump   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

We now apparently need an official definition of “meat”

Westlake Legal Group DinnerSteak715 We now apparently need an official definition of “meat” vegan The Blog Soybeans milk Meat definition beef

Whatever happened to that shining city upon a hill, whose beacon light guides freedom-loving people everywhere? In a land such as the one Reagan envisioned, you’d think that people would have enough common sense to know the difference between actual meat and whatever inedible cardboard products the vegans are always trying to sneak into our diets to save the planet. Not so, I’m afraid. At least not in Nebraska. Farmers there are pushing for new legislation, similar to what’s already been passed in Missouri, preventing companies from labeling products with no relation to any tasty animal as “meat.” (Associated Press)

More than four months after Missouri became the first U.S. state to regulate the term “meat” on product labels, Nebraska’s powerful farm groups are pushing for similar protection from veggie burgers, tofu dogs and other items that look and taste like real meat.

Nebraska lawmakers will consider a bill this year to prevent companies that package and sell food from advertising plant-based, insect-based and lab-grown products as meat. Similar measures are pending in Tennessee, Virginia and Wyoming.

The issue strikes a particularly strong cord in Nebraska, one of the nation’s top states for livestock production, where cars roll down the interstate with “Beef State” license plates and the governor each year proclaims May as “Beef Month.”

The legislation in Missouri has already drawn court challenges and Nebraska’s new bill will undoubtedly face the same hurdles if it passes. Groups opposing the measure include the Good Food Institute, the ACLU of Missouri (of course), and the Animal Legal Defense Fund. They are basing their challenges on both free speech concerns and the alleged stifling of competition.

That sounds rather crazy to me, but then a lot of what gets handed down from the courts these days is nuts. This shouldn’t be any sort of free speech question because your right to free speech does not include the ability to engage in false advertising. Plant-based products are not meat and we shouldn’t need the courts or the state government to provide definitions over something so basic. As far as competition goes, nobody is saying you can’t sell veggie burgers. You just can’t call them meat any more than you can sell motor oil and call it salad dressing.

While we’re on the subject, can we please have stores stop selling products labeled as “soy milk?” There is no such thing as soy milk because soybeans don’t lactate. If the liquid didn’t come from an animal in a fashion designed to feed their young it’s not milk. On an interesting side-note, it turns out that some cockroaches actually do produce milk and it’s some of the most nutritious liquid in the animal kingdom. But you need really tiny hands to be able to milk them.

The post We now apparently need an official definition of “meat” appeared first on Hot Air.

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