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Westlake Legal Group > United States Politics and Government

Britain Defies Trump Plea to Ban Huawei From 5G Network

Westlake Legal Group 00ukhuawei-02-facebookJumbo-v2 Britain Defies Trump Plea to Ban Huawei From 5G Network United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Telephones and Telecommunications Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Great Britain Defense and Military Forces Computers and the Internet Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

LONDON — Britain said on Tuesday that it would not ban equipment made by the Chinese technology giant Huawei from being used in its new high-speed 5G wireless network, the starkest sign yet that an American campaign against the telecommunications company is faltering.

Despite more than a year of intense lobbying by the Trump administration, which has accused Huawei of having ties to China’s Communist Party that pose a national security threat, the British government announced it would allow the company to provide equipment in some portions of a next-generation network to be built in the coming years.

The British decision was crucial in a broader fight for tech supremacy between the United States and China. Britain, a key American ally, is the most important country so far to reject White House warnings that Huawei is an instrument of Beijing. Britain’s membership in the “five eyes” intelligence-sharing group of countries, which also includes Canada, Australia and New Zealand, gave the outcome an added significance.

Many countries have been caught between the United States and China in their tech cold war. American officials have threatened to withhold intelligence if countries do not ban Huawei, while Chinese representatives have warned of economic retaliation if they do.

“This is a U.K.-specific solution for U.K.-specific reasons and the decision deals with the challenges we face right now,” said Nicky Morgan, the secretary for digital, culture, media and sport, the government agency that oversaw the decision.

“It not only paves the way for secure and resilient networks, with our sovereignty over data protected, but it also builds on our strategy to develop a diversity of suppliers,” she said.

The rules were announced on Tuesday after Prime Minister Boris Johnson met with his National Security Council. The decision did not mention Huawei by name, instead referring more broadly to “high-risk vendors” that “pose greater security and resilience risks to U.K. telecoms networks.” Such vendors will be limited to certain parts of the wireless infrastructure, such as antennas and base stations, that are not seen as posing a threat to the integrity of the system.

No single high-risk vendor will be allowed to exceed a 35 percent market share of the network, the rules said, an effort to encourage new competition that could benefit companies including Nokia and Ericsson.

A Trump administration official said the United States was “disappointed” by Mr. Johnson’s decision.

“We look forward to working with the U.K. on a way forward that results in the exclusion of untrusted vendor components from 5G networks,” the official said. “We continue to urge all countries to carefully assess the long-term national security and economic impacts of allowing untrusted vendors access to important 5G network infrastructure.”

Huawei has long denied that it is beholden to the Chinese government.

“Huawei is reassured by the U.K. government’s confirmation that we can continue working with our customers to keep the 5G rollout on track,” Victor Zhang, Huawei’s vice president, said in a statement. “This evidence-based decision will result in a more advanced, more secure and more cost-effective telecoms infrastructure that is fit for the future.”

The crown jewel of China’s tech sector, Huawei is the largest provider of equipment to build systems based on fifth-generation wireless technology, known as 5G. That technology is seen as essential infrastructure in an increasingly digitized global economy. The networks will provide dramatically faster download speeds, as well as new commercial applications in industries such as transportation, manufacturing and health care.

Huawei’s prominence has made it a target of the United States. Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer and the daughter of the company’s founder, is fighting an extradition order in Canada stemming from an American indictment on fraud charges.

The Trump administration’s global effort against Huawei has had some success. In 2018, Australia imposed a ban on Huawei gear, and Japan put restrictions on purchasing Huawei equipment for government use.

But in Europe, the White House has had more trouble. While the European Union has warned of national security risks related to 5G, it has not called out China or Huawei by name or recommended an outright ban. In France, the government said it didn’t believe a ban was necessary. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has shared similar views, though a final decision has not been made and some in the government are calling for a harder line.

Perhaps no country was lobbied by the United States and China as hard as Britain, delaying the country’s decision-making about building its new 5G network. President Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have all warned Britain in recent weeks. Earlier this month, an American delegation visited London to make a last-minute case against Huawei. Mr. Pompeo is scheduled to visit Britain this week.

Huawei first began working in Britain more than 15 years ago and now employs 1,600 people in the country, helping it gain acceptance and a foothold to expand to other parts of Europe. Combined with the Middle East and Africa, Europe is now Huawei’s largest market outside of China.

Steve Tsang, director of the China Institute at SOAS University of London, said the British announcement is “a big deal” that gives Huawei “a level of credibility that it craves.”

British officials have said the risk Huawei presents can be managed through oversight and by limiting its access to more critical areas of the network that handle sensitive data. Huawei would be limited to providing antennas and other equipment that send data directly to consumer devices, and kept out of areas considered the nerve center of the network, such as servers that route traffic within the system.

Britain has always kept Huawei out of those parts of its telecommunications networks that handle sensitive data to limit the vulnerability to espionage or eavesdropping. In 2010, British officials set up a lab where Huawei’s equipment could be reviewed for security flaws. The lab has identified security vulnerabilities in the equipment, but officials have said the problems weren’t a result of interference from the Chinese government and could be managed.

“High risk vendors have never been — and never will be — in our most sensitive networks,” said Ciaran Martin, the chief executive of the National Cyber Security Center that oversees the lab.

American officials disagree that the risks can be contained since software plays a bigger role in 5G networks, with constantly-updating code making it harder to maintain complete oversight.

“Digital technology is being upgraded regularly and a level of risk with present-day technology that is manageable today may or may not be so four or five years down the line,” Mr. Tsang said.

The decision over whether to use Huawei equipment in Britain’s 5G network would usually be a technical one made by agencies that oversee cybersecurity and the nation’s digital infrastructure. But it became a political dilemma that spanned two administrations — first Theresa May when she was British prime minister, and now Boris Johnson.

British officials and executives at wireless companies have said the United States did not share smoking-gun evidence that would justify a ban of the Chinese company. American officials emphasized the vulnerabilities it could create within a national communications network in the event of a future confrontation with China.

Under the rules announced on Tuesday, high-risk firms would be excluded from providing technology at sensitive geographic locations, such as nuclear sites and military bases.

“There is definitely a potential security risk,” said Alan Woodward, a cybersecurity expert and visiting professor at the University of Surrey. “Is it manageable? That is the big question out there.”

Britain is in a precarious position as it negotiates an exit from the European Union. The country must forge new stand-alone trade deals in the aftermath. So while maintaining close ties to Washington is vital for Britain’s security and economy, it also needs to foster ties with China, which is a significant investor in the country and a growing buyer of British good“Post-Brexit Britain will increasingly have to rely on China even more than we already do,” said Anthony Glees, professor emeritus at the University of Buckingham, where he was head of the Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies.

Mr. Woodward said Huawei provides the best technology at the most affordable price for components essential for operating new networks. A ban, he said, would have left the country’s network overly dependent on Huawei’s biggest rivals — Ericsson and Nokia.

British telecommunications companies have warned that banning Huawei would be costly and cause delays because old equipment would have to be replaced.

David McCabe contributed reporting from Washington.

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Britain Says Huawei Won’t Be Banned From Its 5G Network

Westlake Legal Group 00ukhuawei-02-facebookJumbo Britain Says Huawei Won’t Be Banned From Its 5G Network United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Telephones and Telecommunications Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Great Britain Defense and Military Forces Computers and the Internet Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

LONDON — Britain said on Tuesday that it would not ban equipment made by the Chinese technology giant Huawei from being used in its new high-speed 5G wireless network, the starkest sign that an American campaign against the telecommunications company is faltering.

Despite more than a year of intense lobbying by the Trump administration, which has accused Huawei of having ties to China’s Communist Party that pose a national security threat, the British government announced it would allow the company to provide equipment in some portions of a next-generation network to be built in the coming years.

But by limiting Huawei gear to less-critical parts of the new network, Britain also gave the Trump administration a partial victory that would allow it to claim that its message about the Chinese company had gotten through.

The British decision was crucial in a broader fight for tech supremacy between the United States and China. Britain, a key American ally, is the most important country so far to reject White House warnings that Huawei is an instrument of Beijing. Britain’s membership in the “five eyes” intelligence-sharing group of countries, which also includes Canada, Australia and New Zealand, gave the outcome an added significance.

Many countries have been caught between the United States and China in their tech Cold War. American officials have threatened to withhold intelligence if countries do not ban Huawei, while Chinese representatives have warned of economic retaliation if they do.

This is a breaking story. Check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What to Watch For in Trump’s Impeachment Trial on Tuesday

Westlake Legal Group 28dc-whattowatch1-facebookJumbo What to Watch For in Trump’s Impeachment Trial on Tuesday United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate impeachment Bolton, John R

President Trump’s lawyers will complete their third and final day of oral arguments on Tuesday, wrapping up a defense that has sought to give Republican senators reasonable doubt and present them with alternative explanations for the president’s actions toward Ukraine.

Their assignment grew more difficult on Sunday after the revelation that John R. Bolton, the former White House national security adviser, wrote in an unpublished manuscript that Mr. Trump refused to release military aid for Ukraine until the country provided investigative information on his political rivals. That corroborates a central element of the abuse of power charge against Mr. Trump, which accuses him of using his position to pressure a foreign power to interfere on his behalf in the 2020 election.

Now, the question is whether the disclosure will move enough Republican senators to join Democrats in insisting on calling Mr. Bolton as a witness in the impeachment trial.

What we’re expecting to see: A summation of the president’s legal defense, including a strong argument against calling witnesses who would shed more light on Mr. Trump’s actions. His legal team will seek to drive home the argument that the House made a shoddy case, and the Senate need not reach in and bolster it by hearing new evidence.

When we’re likely to see it: The trial will convene at 1 p.m. and could stretch into the evening. Mr. Trump’s lawyers have used less than half of the 24 hours they were allotted, although they are not expected to take all of their time.

How to follow it: The New York Times’s congressional and White House teams will be following all the developments. Visit nytimes.com for coverage throughout the day.

News of Mr. Bolton’s forthcoming book landed like a bombshell in the middle of the impeachment trial, angering some Republicans who complained privately that they had been blindsided by the White House and snarling plans for a quick move to an acquittal of Mr. Trump as early as Friday.

Republican moderates like Senators Mitt Romney of Utah and Susan Collins of Maine are now more likely than ever to vote for witnesses, although it is not clear whether others like Lamar Alexander of Tennessee were moved by the disclosures. Still, on Monday several more conservative Republicans expressed a new openness to hear from witnesses, suggesting that Mr. Bolton’s account may have changed the game.

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, cautioned his colleagues to remain calm and reserve judgment, but Republicans are already whispering among themselves about a potential negotiation over witnesses, and Democrats — who need only four Republicans to join them in voting to hear new evidence — are ratcheting up the pressure.

As Mr. Trump’s team wraps up its case and quiet discussions continue over whether to call witnesses, senators are turning their attention to their first opportunity to participate actively in the impeachment trial, during a 16-hour question-and-answer session.

Under the rules, the senators — who are sworn to silence during the impeachment trial — will submit written questions to the House impeachment managers and the president’s legal team through Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who is presiding over the trial. Chief Justice Roberts will read the questions aloud, alternating between Republicans and Democrats.

The questions are a chance for senators to gain a better understanding of the facts presented during the oral arguments, but they are also strategic opportunities for each side to focus on the aspects of the case most favorable to them. The process could begin as soon as Mr. Trump’s legal team completes its presentation.

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Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams

WASHINGTON — A former police chief, a prosecutor who won the conviction of an F.B.I. agent and one of Texas’ first Latina representatives. A constitutional law professor who once defended O.J. Simpson against a murder charge, a former special prosecutor who pursued the impeachment of President Bill Clinton and a litigator for the Christian right.

For the third time in American history, the Senate has convened as a court of impeachment to consider whether to remove a sitting president, and two teams of lawyers are facing off in a confrontation with heavy political and constitutional consequences.

The seven House Democratic impeachment managers, handpicked by Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, have argued that President Trump abused his power by pressuring Ukraine to help smear his political rivals and obstructed Congress to conceal his actions. Mr. Trump’s defense team — drawn from the White House counsel’s office and outside lawyers, including a few who frequently appear on television — has argued that the president did nothing wrong and accused Democrats of using impeachment as a tool to remove an opponent they could not defeat at the ballot box.

Here is a look at the opposing legal teams and how they see impeachment, in their own words.  

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-05-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“No Constitution can protect us if right doesn’t matter anymore, and you know you can’t trust this president to do what’s right for this country. You can trust he will do what’s right for Donald Trump.”

Representative Adam B. Schiff — Democrat of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee and the lead impeachment manager

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“We need to hold him accountable because no one is above the law. Nadie está encima de la ley.”

Representative Sylvia R. Garcia — Democrat of Texas and one of the first two Latina women to represent the state

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-03-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“We are here, sir, to follow the facts, apply the law, be guided by the Constitution and present the truth to the American people. That is why we are here.”

Representative Hakeem Jeffries — Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Democratic caucus

In the prior two presidential impeachment trials, all 20 members of the House selected to prosecute the cases — seven for Andrew Johnson in 1868 and 13 for Bill Clinton in 1999 — were white men. But the group chosen by Ms. Pelosi includes two African-Americans, a Latina and three women.

Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the lead impeachment manager, spoke for as long as the six other managers combined, according to C-SPAN. He spent hours building the House’s case by laying out the central themes and then delivering impassioned closing statements that drew grudging praise even from Republicans who disagreed — along with his share of criticism from those who said they were insulted by his sharp assertions.

Representatives Jerrold Nadler of New York and Zoe Lofgren of California, both veterans of the Clinton impeachment, drew on historic precedents from the proceedings against him and Johnson. Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York recounted the July 25 phone call at the heart of the Democratic case and worked in at least one hip-hop reference — a signature flourish — telling senators after he made the case to subpoena Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff: “And if you don’t know, now you know.” (The line is from “Juicy,” a 1994 hit by the Notorious B.I.G.)

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-06-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“This moment is about ensuring that every voter — whether a maid or a janitor, whether a nurse, a teacher, or a truck driver, whether a doctor or a mechanic — that their vote matters and that American elections are decided by the American people.”

Representative Val B. Demings — Democrat of Florida and the first female police chief of Orlando, Fla.

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-07-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“I remember what it feels like to not have the equipment you need when you need it. Real people’s lives are at stake. That’s why this matters.”

Representative Jason Crow — Democrat of Colorado, a lawyer and a former Army Ranger

Representatives Val B. Demings, Jason Crow and Sylvia R. Garcia, all comparatively newer lawmakers, often sought to connect the charges facing Mr. Trump to their own backgrounds. Ms. Demings drew from her experience as a police chief in Florida. Ms. Garcia recalled her time as a judge. And Mr. Crow reflected on his time as an Army Ranger dependent on military resources.

Over the allotted three days of presentation — and another day spent unsuccessfully pushing for subpoenas for additional documents and witnesses — the seven lawmakers argued that Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign against Ukraine warranted his removal from office, pointing to what they said was a dangerous pattern of putting his own interests above those of the country.

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-02-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“The impeachment clause exists to protect our freedom and our democracy in between elections. It exists to remind presidents that they serve the public, not the other way around.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler — Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-04-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“President Trump’s obstruction of Congress is not merely unprecedented and wrong, it’s also a high crime and misdemeanor as the framers used and understood that phrase.”

Representative Zoe Lofgren — Democrat of California and a veteran of three impeachment inquiries

Mr. Trump’s defense team includes well-known veteran prosectors from the Clinton era, including Ken Starr, the independent counsel whose report led to the impeachment of Mr. Clinton, and Robert W. Ray, Mr. Starr’s successor.

Other members include fixtures on Fox News like Alan M. Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer who defended Mr. Simpson, Claus von Bülow, Mike Tyson and Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who was accused of sex trafficking and killed himself last year in jail.

Led by the president’s personal lawyer Jay Sekulow and Pat A. Cipollone, the White House counsel, the defense has argued that the House Democrats rushed through the process of impeachment in their zeal to overturn the results of an election they disagreed with, and that there was no evidence in the House case beyond hearsay that Mr. Trump had sought to tie the investigations to release of the security aid.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167735706_97b340c8-323f-4833-833d-21e4340566b2-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“We live in a constitutional republic where you have deep policy concerns and deep differences. That should not be the basis of an impeachment.”

Jay Sekulow — The president’s personal lawyer

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167735691_48e010cd-2919-4128-b46c-da70dbc4de2f-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“They’re asking you to tear up all of the ballots across this country on your own initiative, take that decision away from the American people.”

Pat A. Cipollone — The White House counsel

Mr. Cipollone and Mr. Sekulow have been the president’s most frequent defenders on the Senate floor, providing most of the arguments against the Democratic effort to vote on subpoenas for documents and witnesses ahead of the team arguments. The crux of their argument is that Mr. Trump is accused of no crime and thus cannot be impeached, a legal theory that is rejected by most constitutional scholars. They also argue that Democrats are seeking to remove the president for policy judgments with which they disagree, thus nullifying the will of voters nine months before the next election.

In a remarkable twist, Mr. Starr, known for his aggressive pursuit of Mr. Clinton’s impeachment for lying about an affair with a White House intern, told the Senate on Monday that the use of the constitutional remedy should be rare, and that Mr. Trump’s actions did not rise to it.

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-managerphotos-wh-02-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“Instead of a once-in-a-century phenomenon, which it had been, presidential impeachment has become a weapon to be wielded against one’s political opponent.”

Ken Starr — The independent counsel whose report led to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-managerphotos-wh-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A   Credit…

“You cannot turn conduct that is not impeachable into impeachable conduct simply by using words like ‘quid pro quo’ and ‘personal benefit.’”

Alan M. Dershowitz — Professor emeritus at Harvard Law School

Other lawyers on the president’s trial team include Pam Bondi, the former Florida attorney general; Eric D. Herschmann; Michael Purpura and Patrick Philbin, deputy White House counsels; and Jane Serene Raskin, who helped defend Mr. Trump during the investigation by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel who investigated Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and ties with the Trump campaign.

On Monday, Mr. Dershowitz was the only one of the group to directly address the revelations by John R. Bolton in an unpublished manuscript that Mr. Trump directly tied aid to Ukraine aid to investigations of his political rivals. Even if true, Mr. Dershowitz said, it was not impeachable.

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Bolton Was Concerned That Trump Did Favors for Autocratic Leaders, Book Says

Westlake Legal Group 27dc-bolton-facebookJumbo Bolton Was Concerned That Trump Did Favors for Autocratic Leaders, Book Says ZTE Corp Xi Jinping United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Turkey Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Halkbank Erdogan, Recep Tayyip Embargoes and Sanctions China Bolton, John R Barr, William P

WASHINGTON — John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, privately told Attorney General William P. Barr last year that he had concerns that President Trump was effectively granting personal favors to the autocratic leaders of Turkey and China, according to an unpublished manuscript by Mr. Bolton.

Mr. Barr responded by pointing to a pair of Justice Department investigations of companies in those countries and said he was worried that Mr. Trump had created the appearance that he had undue influence over what would typically be independent inquiries, according to the manuscript. Backing up his point, Mr. Barr mentioned conversations Mr. Trump had with the leaders, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey and President Xi Jinping of China.

Mr. Bolton’s account underscores the fact that the unease about Mr. Trump’s seeming embrace of authoritarian leaders, long expressed by experts and his opponents, also existed among some of the senior cabinet officers entrusted by the president to carry out his foreign policy and national security agendas.

Mr. Bolton recounted his discussion with Mr. Barr in a draft of an unpublished book manuscript that he submitted nearly a month ago to the White House for review. People familiar with the manuscript described its contents on the condition of anonymity.

The book also contains an account of Mr. Trump telling Mr. Bolton in August that he wanted to continue freezing $391 million in security assistance to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations of political rivals, The New York Times reported on Sunday. The matter is at the heart of the articles of impeachment against the president.

A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment on Mr. Barr’s conversations with Mr. Bolton, as did a spokesman for the National Security Council. In a statement on Monday, Mr. Bolton, his publisher and his literary agency said they had not shared the manuscript with The Times.

“There was absolutely no coordination with The New York Times or anyone else regarding the appearance of information about his book, ‘The Room Where It Happened,’ at online booksellers,” Mr. Bolton, Simon & Schuster and Javelin said in a joint statement. “Any assertion to the contrary is unfounded speculation.”

Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The Times, responded that “The Times does not discuss its sources, but I should point out that no one has questioned the accuracy of our report.”

Mr. Bolton wrote in the manuscript that Mr. Barr singled out Mr. Trump’s conversations with Mr. Xi about the Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE, which agreed in 2017 to plead guilty and pay heavy fines for violating American sanctions on doing business with North Korea, Iran and other countries. A year later, Mr. Trump lifted the sanctions over objections from his own advisers and Republican lawmakers.

Mr. Barr also cited remarks Mr. Trump made to Mr. Erdogan in 2018 about the investigation of Halkbank, Turkey’s second-largest state-owned bank. The Justice Department was scrutinizing Halkbank on fraud and money-laundering charges for helping Iran evade sanctions imposed by the Treasury Department.

Mr. Erdogan had been making personal appeals to Mr. Trump to use his authority to halt any additional enforcement against the bank. In 2018, Mr. Erdogan told reporters in Turkey that Mr. Trump had promised to instruct cabinet members to follow through on the matter. The bank had hired a top Republican fund-raiser to lobby the administration on the issue.

For months, it looked as though the unusual lobbying effort might succeed; but in October, the Justice Department indicted the bank for aiding Iran. The charges were seen in part as an attempt by the administration to show that it was taking a tough line on Turkey amid an outcry over Mr. Trump’s endorsement of its incursions in Syria.

Mr. Bolton’s statements in the book align with other comments he has made since leaving the White House in September. In November, he said in a private speech that none of Mr. Trump’s advisers shared the president’s views on Turkey and that he believed Mr. Trump adopted a more permissive approach to the country because of his financial ties there, NBC News reported. Mr. Trump’s company has a property in Turkey.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly praised dictators throughout his presidency. Last year, he said, “Where’s my favorite dictator?” as he waited to meet with President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Mr. Trump’s soft spot for authoritarians dates at least to his presidential campaign, when he praised Saddam Hussein for being “good” at killing terrorists and suggested that the world would be better off were Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, the deposed Libyan dictator who was killed in a violent uprising in 2011, “in charge right now.” Mr. Trump then suggested the ouster of both men was ultimately worse for the Middle East because the Islamic State had filled the void.

Mr. Trump declared himself “a big fan” of Mr. Erdogan as they sat side by side in the Oval Office last fall after Mr. Trump cleared the way for Turkish forces to invade Syria, though he warned Mr. Erdogan behind the scenes against the offensive.

Of Mr. Xi, Mr. Trump has been similarly effusive. When the Chinese Communist Party eliminated term limits, allowing Mr. Xi to keep his tenure open-ended, Mr. Trump extolled the outcome.

Mr. Xi had personally asked Mr. Trump to intervene to save ZTE, which was on the brink of collapse because of tough American penalties for sanctions violations.

Lifting the sanctions on ZTE, a Chinese telecommunications giant that also serves as a geopolitical pawn for its government, most likely helped Mr. Trump negotiate with Mr. Xi in the trade war between the two countries. But Republican lawmakers and others objected to helping a Chinese company that broke the law and has been accused of posing a national security threat.

Mr. Bolton’s reputation for muscular foreign policy was always an odd fit with Mr. Trump, who often threatens excessive force but rarely reacts with it. Mr. Bolton was pleased when Mr. Trump withdrew from the nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers, including the United States, that the Obama administration had entered into. Other Trump advisers had urged him against it.

But Mr. Trump’s lack of action after Iranian aggression against the United States rankled Mr. Bolton.

Mr. Bolton’s book has already netted significant sales. Shortly after the disclosure of its contents on Sunday night, Amazon listed the book for purchase. By Monday evening, it was No. 17 on Amazon’s best-seller list.

Eric Lipton contributed reporting.

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Live Impeachment Trial Highlights

Video

Westlake Legal Group 27vid-impeach-videoSixteenByNine3000 Live Impeachment Trial Highlights United States Politics and Government Schiff, Adam B Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party Bolton, John R

President Trump’s lawyers continue their opening arguments before the Senate amid intensifying calls for witnesses to appear in the impeachment trial.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

President Trump’s lawyers avoided on Monday any mention of a newly disclosed firsthand account from his former national security adviser, John R. Bolton, that directly undercuts one of the defense’s main arguments.

The New York Times first reported details from drafts of Mr. Bolton’s upcoming book Sunday night, including Mr. Bolton’s assertion that Mr. Trump said he wanted to continue a freeze on military aid to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Mr. Trump’s political rivals.

Calls for witnesses intensified as a result, and three Republican senators — Mitt Romney of Utah, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — indicated they might vote with Democrats to allow new witnesses to testify at the trial. Democrats need four Republicans for such a measure to pass.

Mr. Romney told reporters on Monday, “I think it’s increasingly likely that other Republicans will join those of us who think we should hear from John Bolton.”

The decision not to address Mr. Bolton’s explosive account hung over the lawyers’ first round of arguments as they repeated many of the same assertions offered over the past six months from Mr. Trump and the White House about why a hold was placed on military aid to Ukraine.

Mr. Trump denied Mr. Bolton’s account on Monday.

Mr. Bolton said weeks ago that he would testify at the Senate trial if he was subpoenaed to do so. Democrats have said Republican attempts to prevent new witnesses like Mr. Bolton from coming forward suggests they are covering up for Mr. Trump.

One of Mr. Trump’s lawyers, Michael Purpura, said the president’s decisions regarding Ukraine were rooted in his desire to get European countries to pitch in more with aid.

“Scrutinizing, and in some cases curtailing, foreign aid was a central plank of his campaign platform,” Mr. Purpura said. “President Trump is especially wary of sending American taxpayer dollars abroad when other countries refuse to pitch in.”

Mr. Purpura left out details about Trump administration officials scrambling to find legal justification for freezing the military aid. An independent government watchdog concluded that Mr. Trump’s decision to withhold the funds was against the law.

Jane Raskin, a member of the president’s defense team, raised the topic of Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, and his role in the Ukraine affair.

Ms. Raskin listed Mr. Giuliani’s accomplishments and called him a “colorful distraction.” She said the central role Democrats have affixed to him is undercut by their decision not to subpoena him to testify in the impeachment inquiry last year. (Democrats subpoenaed Mr. Giuliani to provide documents, but he did not comply).

In the midst of the White House efforts to pressure Ukraine, Mr. Bolton last summer described Mr. Giuliani as “a hand grenade who’s going to blow everybody up,” according to testimony from one of Mr. Bolton’s aides. And it was in part the involvement of Mr. Giuliani, who was not a government official, in American foreign policy that prompted an intelligence officer to file a whistle-blower complaint that ultimately led to the impeachment of Mr. Trump.

Ken Starr, the dogged independent counsel during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, resumed Mr. Trump’s defense on Monday afternoon with a discursive and at times academic overview of the history of impeachment.

“Like war, impeachment is hell. Or at least presidential impeachment is hell,” said Mr. Starr, who has been a regular guest on Fox News during the Trump administration.

Mr. Trump added Mr. Starr to his legal team shortly before his trial began.

“Those of us who lived through the Clinton impeachment, including members of this body, full well understand that a presidential impeachment is tantamount to domestic war, but thankfully protected by our beloved First Amendment, a war of words and a war of ideas,” said Mr. Starr, who resigned as independent counsel in 1999 over the “intense politicization” of the investigation.

Mr. Starr’s choice to dwell on history appeared to ignore criticism from some Republican senators that the House managers spent too much time last week on the rehashing of historical references and past legal precedents to justify removing Mr. Trump from office. Mr. Trump’s other lawyers have steered clear of any suggestion that the proceedings will leave an indelible mark on the nation’s history.

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Trump Impeachment Trial Stream: Full Highlights

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 27vid-impeach-videoSixteenByNine3000 Trump Impeachment Trial Stream: Full Highlights United States Politics and Government Schiff, Adam B Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party Bolton, John R

President Trump’s lawyers continue their opening arguments before the Senate amid intensifying calls for witnesses to appear in the impeachment trial.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

House impeachment managers and Senate Democrats have been clamoring to persuade Republicans to allow new evidence and witnesses into President Trump’s Senate trial. In particular, they want John R. Bolton, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, who has already said he would be willing to appear if subpoenaed.

Those calls intensified on Sunday night when The New York Times reported details from Mr. Bolton’s upcoming book, including Mr. Bolton’s assertion that Mr. Trump said he wanted to continue a freeze on military aid to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Mr. Trump’s political rivals. The revelation could undercut a key element of Mr. Trump’s impeachment defense: that the hold was separate from the investigations Mr. Trump wanted.

Mr. Trump denied Mr. Bolton’s account on Monday.

It was not yet clear whether the details from Mr. Bolton would be enough to persuade the handful of Senate Republicans needed to join Democrats voting in favor of calling witnesses. But one of the Republicans who has been open to hearing new witnesses, Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, said late Monday morning that he expected other Senate Republicans to come around.

It’s rare to see a defendant attack the lead prosecutor in the middle of a trial. But that’s what Mr. Trump did a day after his defense team began their opening arguments, making the case that the president should not be removed from office.

Mr. Trump on Sunday lashed out at Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California, who led the House impeachment inquiry and is serving as the lead prosecutor in the Senate trial.

Mr. Schiff is “a CORRUPT POLITICIAN, and probably a very sick man,” Mr. Trump wrote in a Twitter post, followed by a warning: “He has not paid the price, yet, for what he has done to our Country!”

Asked if he took that to be a threat, Mr. Schiff on Sunday, appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” said, “I think it’s intended to be.”

Mr. Trump’s defense team used just two hours on Saturday out of their 24-hour allotment in their first opportunity in the Senate to respond to the case made by House impeachment managers last week during the trial.

The president’s team went straight to offense, accusing the Democrats of levying a partisan witch hunt against Mr. Trump to help gain an advantage in the 2020 presidential election. As part of that, they offered a diametrically different interpretation of the Constitution than the Democrats presented a week earlier, and argued that nothing that Mr. Trump did warranted removing a president from office.

The length of the arguments on Saturday — just two hours compared with the Democrats’ eight hours on their first day — was notable, as some Republican senators had complained about the repetition of the House managers’ arguments over the course of their three days.

Mr. Trump has also complained that the Saturday television viewership was less than ideal and previously said it “is called Death Valley in T.V.” in the world of television ratings.

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Live Trump Impeachment Trial Stream

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 27vid-impeach-videoSixteenByNine3000 Live Trump Impeachment Trial Stream United States Politics and Government Schiff, Adam B Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party Bolton, John R

President Trump’s lawyers continue their opening arguments before the Senate amid intensifying calls for witnesses to appear in the impeachment trial.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

House impeachment managers and Senate Democrats have been clamoring to persuade Republicans to allow new evidence and witnesses into President Trump’s Senate trial. In particular, they want John R. Bolton, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, who has already said he would be willing to appear if subpoenaed.

Those calls intensified on Sunday night when The New York Times reported details from Mr. Bolton’s upcoming book, including Mr. Bolton’s assertion that Mr. Trump said he wanted to continue a freeze on military aid to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Mr. Trump’s political rivals. The revelation could undercut a key element of Mr. Trump’s impeachment defense: that the hold was separate from the investigations Mr. Trump wanted.

Mr. Trump denied Mr. Bolton’s account on Monday.

It was not yet clear whether the details from Mr. Bolton would be enough to persuade the handful of Senate Republicans needed to join Democrats voting in favor of calling witnesses. But one of the Republicans who has been open to hearing new witnesses, Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, said late Monday morning that he expected other Senate Republicans to come around.

It’s rare to see a defendant attack the lead prosecutor in the middle of a trial. But that’s what Mr. Trump did a day after his defense team began their opening arguments, making the case that the president should not be removed from office.

Mr. Trump on Sunday lashed out at Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California, who led the House impeachment inquiry and is serving as the lead prosecutor in the Senate trial.

Mr. Schiff is “a CORRUPT POLITICIAN, and probably a very sick man,” Mr. Trump wrote in a Twitter post, followed by a warning: “He has not paid the price, yet, for what he has done to our Country!”

Asked if he took that to be a threat, Mr. Schiff on Sunday, appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” said, “I think it’s intended to be.”

Mr. Trump’s defense team used just two hours on Saturday out of their 24-hour allotment in their first opportunity in the Senate to respond to the case made by House impeachment managers last week during the trial.

The president’s team went straight to offense, accusing the Democrats of levying a partisan witch hunt against Mr. Trump to help gain an advantage in the 2020 presidential election. As part of that, they offered a diametrically different interpretation of the Constitution than the Democrats presented a week earlier, and argued that nothing that Mr. Trump did warranted removing a president from office.

The length of the arguments on Saturday — just two hours compared with the Democrats’ eight hours on their first day — was notable, as some Republican senators had complained about the repetition of the House managers’ arguments over the course of their three days.

Mr. Trump has also complained that the Saturday television viewership was less than ideal and previously said it “is called Death Valley in T.V.” in the world of television ratings.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Denies Telling Bolton That Ukraine’s Aid Depended on Biden Investigations

Westlake Legal Group 27dc-REAX-facebookJumbo Trump Denies Telling Bolton That Ukraine’s Aid Depended on Biden Investigations United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Monday pushed back on a firsthand account from his former national security adviser, John R. Bolton, about tying military aid for a foreign ally to his own personal agenda, as senators consider the president’s future in the Oval Office.

“I NEVER told John Bolton that the aid to Ukraine was tied to investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens,” Mr. Trump wrote just after midnight, referring to a widely debunked theory that the president had pursued about former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his son Hunter.

In an unpublished manuscript of his upcoming book, Mr. Bolton described the White House decision to withhold military aid from Ukraine until he left the White House in September. As national security adviser, Mr. Bolton would have been involved in many of the high-level discussions about Ukraine.

Mr. Bolton’s account directly undercuts one of Mr. Trump’s defense arguments, that the frozen funding was not connected to his petitioning of Ukraine’s leader, President Volodymyr Zelensky, to help him in the 2020 presidential election by announcing an anticorruption investigation into the Bidens.

The new details come at a time when senators approach making a final decision — possibly by the end of the week — on whether to allow new evidence and new witnesses, like Mr. Bolton, to be introduced in Mr. Trump’s trial in the Senate. Mr. Trump’s defense team started presenting his defense on Saturday and has through Tuesday to argue against his removal from office.

Hours after his midnight posts, Mr. Trump falsely stated that the Democrats never asked Mr. Bolton to testify during the House impeachment inquiry last year. Republicans and Mr. Trump’s defense team have argued that to call witnesses at this stage in the impeachment proceedings amounts to Democrats telling the Senate to do the work the House did not.

Mr. Trump also falsely claimed that his White House released the critical military aid to Ukraine ahead of schedule.

Democrats have been pushing the Republican-led Senate to allow new witnesses, and others could include Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff who played a key role in the Ukraine pressure campaign. A handful of Republican senators had indicated they would be open to hearing new witnesses, but by the end of last week, there were few signs that they would vote with Democrats on the matter.

“There can be no doubt now that Mr. Bolton directly contradicts the heart of the president’s defense,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, said in a joint statement on Sunday after The New York Times’s article about Mr. Bolton’s account was published.

Mr. Bolton’s potentially explosive details about Mr. Trump’s motivations for freezing the military aid could provide the impetus that could potentially sway some Republican senators to reconsider hearing new testimony.

Mr. Bolton’s lawyer blamed the White House for the disclosure of the book’s contents, which Mr. Bolton submitted for a standard security review 12 days after the House impeached Mr. Trump. It is possible that the submission of Mr. Bolton’s book to the White House deepened desires to keep Mr. Bolton from testifying.

By Monday morning, some Republican senators had reached out to the White House, pressing for who had visibility into Mr. Bolton’s manuscript as the Senate trial unfolded a week earlier.

In his manuscript, Mr. Bolton describes an effort, along with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper, to push Mr. Trump to release the aid. Mr. Bolton said he also spoke with Attorney General William P. Barr about his concerns over the parallel diplomacy with Ukraine led by the president’s personal lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani. Mr. Barr, whom Mr. Trump mentioned in his July phone call with Mr. Zelensky, has tried to distance himself from Mr. Giuliani and the Ukraine matter.

Mr. Bolton, who has said he would testify at the Senate trial if he was subpoenaed, wrote in the manuscript that Mr. Pompeo told him privately that there was no basis to criticize the American ambassador to Ukraine at the time, Marie L. Yovanovitch. Career diplomats have testified that there was no justification to fire Ms. Yovanovitch. Mr. Giuliani and two of his associates had been pushing Mr. Trump to fire her since the spring of 2018.

Maggie Haberman contributed reporting.

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Trump Denies Telling Bolton That Ukraine’s Aid Depended on Biden Investigations

Westlake Legal Group 27dc-REAX-facebookJumbo Trump Denies Telling Bolton That Ukraine’s Aid Depended on Biden Investigations United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Monday pushed back on a firsthand account from his former national security adviser, John R. Bolton, about tying military aid for a foreign ally to his own personal agenda, as senators consider the president’s future in the Oval Office.

“I NEVER told John Bolton that the aid to Ukraine was tied to investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens,” Mr. Trump wrote just after midnight, referring to a widely debunked theory that the president had pursued about former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his son Hunter.

In an unpublished manuscript of his upcoming book, Mr. Bolton described the White House decision to withhold military aid from Ukraine until he left the White House in September. As national security adviser, Mr. Bolton would have been involved in many of the high-level discussions about Ukraine.

Mr. Bolton’s account directly undercuts one of Mr. Trump’s defense arguments, that the frozen funding was not connected to his petitioning of Ukraine’s leader, President Volodymyr Zelensky, to help him in the 2020 presidential election by announcing an anticorruption investigation into the Bidens.

The new details come at a time when senators approach making a final decision — possibly by the end of the week — on whether to allow new evidence and new witnesses, like Mr. Bolton, to be introduced in Mr. Trump’s trial in the Senate. Mr. Trump’s defense team started presenting his defense on Saturday and has through Tuesday to argue against his removal from office.

Hours after his midnight posts, Mr. Trump falsely stated that the Democrats never asked Mr. Bolton to testify during the House impeachment inquiry last year. Republicans and Mr. Trump’s defense team have argued that to call witnesses at this stage in the impeachment proceedings amounts to Democrats telling the Senate to do the work the House did not.

Mr. Trump also falsely claimed that his White House released the critical military aid to Ukraine ahead of schedule.

Democrats have been pushing the Republican-led Senate to allow new witnesses, and others could include Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff who played a key role in the Ukraine pressure campaign. A handful of Republican senators had indicated they would be open to hearing new witnesses, but by the end of last week, there were few signs that they would vote with Democrats on the matter.

“There can be no doubt now that Mr. Bolton directly contradicts the heart of the president’s defense,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, said in a joint statement on Sunday after The New York Times’s article about Mr. Bolton’s account was published.

Mr. Bolton’s potentially explosive details about Mr. Trump’s motivations for freezing the military aid could provide the impetus that could potentially sway some Republican senators to reconsider hearing new testimony.

Mr. Bolton’s lawyer blamed the White House for the disclosure of the book’s contents, which Mr. Bolton submitted for a standard security review 12 days after the House impeached Mr. Trump. It is possible that the submission of Mr. Bolton’s book to the White House deepened desires to keep Mr. Bolton from testifying.

By Monday morning, some Republican senators had reached out to the White House, pressing for who had visibility into Mr. Bolton’s manuscript as the Senate trial unfolded a week earlier.

In his manuscript, Mr. Bolton describes an effort, along with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper, to push Mr. Trump to release the aid. Mr. Bolton said he also spoke with Attorney General William P. Barr about his concerns over the parallel diplomacy with Ukraine led by the president’s personal lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani. Mr. Barr, whom Mr. Trump mentioned in his July phone call with Mr. Zelensky, has tried to distance himself from Mr. Giuliani and the Ukraine matter.

Mr. Bolton, who has said he would testify at the Senate trial if he was subpoenaed, wrote in the manuscript that Mr. Pompeo told him privately that there was no basis to criticize the American ambassador to Ukraine at the time, Marie L. Yovanovitch. Career diplomats have testified that there was no justification to fire Ms. Yovanovitch. Mr. Giuliani and two of his associates had been pushing Mr. Trump to fire her since the spring of 2018.

Maggie Haberman contributed reporting.

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