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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "197"

Miles & Stockbridge Beefs Up DC Tax Team With Bryan Cave Hires

Westlake Legal Group 101917gold-scales-law-books-and-a-gavel-1 Miles & Stockbridge Beefs Up DC Tax Team With Bryan Cave Hires 197

Westlake Legal Group 101917gold-scales-law-books-and-a-gavel Miles & Stockbridge Beefs Up DC Tax Team With Bryan Cave Hires 197

Miles & Stockbridge added nine lawyers on Tuesday to the firm’s affordable housing and tax credit practice in Washington, D.C.

The group arrives from the Washington office of Midwestern firm Bryan Cave, and includes a paralegal and two legal assistants along with the lawyers. Four are joining as principals, including Jerry BreedBill DriggersDonna Rodney and John Dalton. Four more are joining as counsel and one as an associate. 

The additions bring the total number of Miles & Stockbridge lawyers working in Washington’s  K Street corridor to 32, said John Frisch, the firm’s chairman and chief executive officer, in a statement. The group will work with others to advise real estate developers, investors, and lenders across all stages of tax-credit transactions.

The hires also show Miles & Stockbridge is still focused on growing in the D.C. market. The Baltimore-based firm counted nine total lawyers in its D.C. offices in 2013, which was then its smallest office by head count, according to ALM data. The office has now outgrown the firm’s other outposts outside Baltimore.

Miles & Stockbridge’s newest additions are also joining at what could become the busiest possible time for their practice as the Washington market prepares to adjust to the ramifications of the GOP’s tax cut legislation.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group 101917gold-scales-law-books-and-a-gavel-1 Miles & Stockbridge Beefs Up DC Tax Team With Bryan Cave Hires 197

Marcia Coyle: It's Winter Break at the Supreme Court, But There's a Lot Still Going On

Westlake Legal Group logo-alm-3 Marcia Coyle: It's Winter Break at the Supreme Court, But There's a Lot Still Going On 197

Marcia Coyle: It’s Winter Break at the Supreme Court, But There’s a Lot Still Going On | National Law Journal

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group logo-alm-3 Marcia Coyle: It's Winter Break at the Supreme Court, But There's a Lot Still Going On 197

Staff Buyouts Don't Augur Layoffs, Arnold & Porter Says

Westlake Legal Group Arnold-Porter-Washington-Office-Article-201802022233-3 Staff Buyouts Don't Augur Layoffs, Arnold & Porter Says 197
Westlake Legal Group Arnold-Porter-Washington-Office-Article-201802022233-2 Staff Buyouts Don't Augur Layoffs, Arnold & Porter Says 197   Arnold & Porter offices in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM)

Richard Alexander, chairman of the firm known until recently as Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer, said Tuesday that a new voluntary buyout program for its legal secretaries had nothing to do with the firm’s financial health.

Alexander rejected the idea that the buyout program would have far-reaching effects on the firm or that it could presage a round of layoffs, as suggested by the legal industry blog Above the Law, which first reported the buy-out offers.

“This is not a layoff, this is not a prelude to a layoff,” Alexander said. “This does not at all relate to the financial health of the firm.”

In an internal memo dated Monday and addressed to associates in several offices, the firm said it would offer buyouts to all its U.S.-based legal secretaries later this spring. The memo said volunteers would get “generous” severance packages, but that changes were warranted by changes to “the manner in which we and our competitors are delivering secretarial services.”

While Above the Law speculated that the buyouts could affect “thousands,” Alexander said he anticipated only a handful of the firm’s 140 total U.S.-based legal secretaries would choose to participate in the program.

Alexander said his firm offered the voluntary buyouts after analyzing its lawyers’ use of secretaries. He said the firm realized that the advent of new technology has meant lawyers are taking more initiative over tasks usually accomplished by secretaries, such as booking travel.

“We, like every other law firm in the United States, have seen some shift in how our lawyers use secretaries—it relates to technology,” Alexander said. “We at our firm, like every other firm, have been moving toward a more sharing, collaborative arrangement.”

Alexander said the firm was on heathy financial footing, and said its decision to shorten its name to “Arnold & Porter” on its website has no connection to the firm’s financial stability after its 2017 merger with Kaye Scholer.

“We exceeded our budget for 2017, even though we had one-time merger expenses,” Alexander said. He said he expects 2018 to be even stronger. (The firm’s financial results for 2017 have not yet been reported.)

Before the consummation of the $1 billion merger with Kaye Scholer early last year, Arnold & Porter was the much larger firm, with more than $624 million in 2016 revenues and more than 650 lawyers, according to ALM data.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group Arnold-Porter-Washington-Office-Article-201802022233-3 Staff Buyouts Don't Augur Layoffs, Arnold & Porter Says 197

State AGs Take EPA to Court Over Clean Water Rule

Westlake Legal Group E-Scott-Pruitt-Article-201710102251-1 State AGs Take EPA to Court Over Clean Water Rule 197
Westlake Legal Group E-Scott-Pruitt-Article-201710102251 State AGs Take EPA to Court Over Clean Water Rule 197   Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt

A coalition of 11 attorneys general filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s suspension of the 2015 Clean Water Rule.

The group includes New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen and New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. The attorneys general claim the Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers violated the Administrative Procedures Act in suspending the Obama-era rule. The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

“We will fight back against this reckless rollback and the Trump administration’s continued assault on our nation’s core public health and environmental protections,” Schneiderman said in a statement.

The 2015 rule expanded the definition of waters granted certain protections under the Clean Water Act. President Donald Trump issued an executive order last year directing the EPA to review the regulation, also known as the Waters of the United States rule. Administrator Scott Pruitt began that process last week, suspending implementation of the rule for two years via a suspension rule that became effective Tuesday.

The suspension came after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled late last month that legal challenges to the WOTUS rule must be filed in federal district courts, and not in federal appellate courts. The decision nullified a Sixth Circuit injunction against the rule that had been in place since 2015.

“It’s worth noting that these lawsuits are over an embattled regulation that’s been put on hold by the courts to prevent it from taking effect,” an EPA representative said. “Our delay rule will keep in place that status quo.”

In their lawsuit, the attorneys general claim the EPA does not have the authority under the Clean Water Act to suspend the 2015 rule, that the agency did not provide a “meaningful opportunity” for public comment on the new suspension rule, and that its promulgation was arbitrary and capricious.

“The Clean Water Rule protected the States’ environmental interests by strengthening and clarifying CWA protections of waters within the States’ jurisdictions and by helping to ensure that polluted water from other states did not flow into their waters,” the lawsuit said. “The Suspension Rule harms the States’ waters by limiting the Act’s protections and by making implementation of the Act more difficult. The Suspension Rule also imposes economic burdens and costs upon the States and harms their proprietary interests.”

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group E-Scott-Pruitt-Article-201710102251-1 State AGs Take EPA to Court Over Clean Water Rule 197

SEC, CFTC Testify Before Senate on What's Needed for Virtual Currency

Westlake Legal Group Clayton-Giancarlo-Article-201802061823-1-1 SEC, CFTC Testify Before Senate on What's Needed for Virtual Currency 197
Westlake Legal Group Clayton-Giancarlo-Article-201802061823-1 SEC, CFTC Testify Before Senate on What's Needed for Virtual Currency 197   Jay Clayton, left, and Christopher Giancarlo, right. Photos: ALM/File

The heads of two federal regulatory bodies seeking stronger oversight for the cryptocurrency space testified before U.S. senators Tuesday morning. They made it clear that more enforcement actions are underway and it is going to take a team effort to properly regulate these markets.

During the session titled “Virtual Currencies: The Oversight Role of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission,” U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission chair Jay Clayton and Commodity Futures Trading Commission chair Christopher Giancarlo talked about solutions for cryptocurrency, a burgeoning area for investment that has also proved volatile. 

Clayton and Giancarlo appeared before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs to address the question of how regulation can be realistically tackled.

The two told lawmakers that there is an ongoing multiagency effort to try to figure out how to best regulate the space, but there are hurdles such as personnel cuts within the agencies and challenges around educating retail investors on the risks involved with virtual currencies.

Trying to get to the heart of whether cryptocurrency regulation has sufficient resources with the SEC and CFTC’s oversight, Clayton said there is certainly a possibility the regulators could be back before Congress asking for additional legislation.

Giancarlo pointed out that the CFTC lacks authority to “set the standards” in the virtual currency space. However, it does have the right to carry out enforcement actions against people defrauding cryptocurrency investors. 

The CFTC took three cryptocurrency enforcement actions in January of this year and Giancarlo emphasized that the public can expect more. As for agencies outside of the CFTC monitoring the virtual currency markets, “there’s a patchwork here, but there’s not a comprehensive structure,” he said, adding, “I think that’s something that’s a policy discussion and an important one to be had.”

The senators instructed Clayton and Giancarlo to build out a task force with other regulators within the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) and state banking regulators and report back if and how the agencies can coordinate with one another to oversee the digital currency markets. 

There was a clearer response when the discussion turned to the regulation of initial coin offerings. “We should regulate ICOs like we regulate securities offerings,” Clayton said. “End of story.”

He noted that companies selling “tokens” in their ICOs are different than companies selling cryptocurrency.

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada asked whether there is any issue with public companies such as Eastman Kodak Co. introducing KodakCoin to be used for payments on licensing photographs and Long Island Iced Tea Corp., which recently changed its name to Long Island Blockchain, introducing blockchain technology and thereby changing its business model. Both companies’ announcements resulted in soaring stock prices, she noted.

While not calling out any one company by name, Clayton acknowledged that this is an area of concern. He added that any public company that has “raised the values of its securities without the underlying goods being there is problematic.”

Clayton also responded to questions about celebrity endorsements of cryptocurrencies. Professional boxer Floyd Mayweather is one of several celebrities who have helped promote the sale of virtual currencies through social media.

Clayton said he believes that because of warnings from the SEC, fewer celebrities are promoting these currencies without disclosing it is a paid endorsement. “If you’re promoting a security, you’re opening yourself up to securities law liability,” he said.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group Clayton-Giancarlo-Article-201802061823-1-1 SEC, CFTC Testify Before Senate on What's Needed for Virtual Currency 197

With the Three R's, Here's How Williams & Connolly's Deneen Howell Powers Through Her Day

Westlake Legal Group Art-Deneen-Howell-1 With the Three R's, Here's How Williams & Connolly's Deneen Howell Powers Through Her Day 197
Westlake Legal Group Art-Deneen-Howell With the Three R's, Here's How Williams & Connolly's Deneen Howell Powers Through Her Day 197   Deneen Howell, second from left, with husband Donald Vieira and their children Vivian and Jasper. Photo: Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM

With clients who include Barack Obama, novelist James Patterson and John Boehner, efficiency is an art form for Williams & Connolly partner Deneen Howell. She and her husband Donald Vieira, a partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, have two children—Jasper, 8, and Vivian, 5—and two goldfish. Howell, 46, is co-chair of the employment counseling and litigation practice group at the Washington, D.C.-based law firm, where she’s worked since 1998. Here’s what a typical workday looks like for Howell, who lives in D.C.’s Cleveland Park neighborhood.

Pushups and Planks  I set an alarm on my phone and I usually get up between 5:45 and 6. First thing I do is check my phone and see if any emails have come in from the night before that might make me need to shift my to-do list. Right now what I’m doing is a workout challenge. It’s a series of pushups and planks, so I do that. Then I have my debate about whether I wake up the kids first or I take a shower first. They could always benefit with a little more sleep but I feel like as a family we can benefit with a little more time spent getting ready.

Peanut Butter and a Tiny Spoon  My husband usually goes downstairs and makes breakfast. The kids eat the same thing and we’re fairly routinized. It’s usually fruit and oatmeal or sometimes some extra protein. I will eat peanut butter everyday because I would eat only peanut butter all day—that and popcorn if I was being honest. Literally I get a measuring spoon and a little dish and I spoon out a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter. I have this tiny little espresso spoon I like to use to eat it.

Trade Offs  My husband and I trade off on which one of us gets the kids finished eating, their teeth brushed, their clothes on, their backpacks packed, snacks in the bag, their library books that need to be returned. Our goal is to be out the door by 7:50. We only live about four blocks from the school.

Westlake Legal Group Workday-Juggle-bug With the Three R's, Here's How Williams & Connolly's Deneen Howell Powers Through Her Day 197   Dual Calendars  Other than the first email check in, I’m not working again until I get to my desk usually at about 9. I check emails again to see what came in between 6 or so and 9. I’ll see whether that changes the way I run my day. I have a month-at-a-glance spiral paper calendar that I usually carry with me everywhere. Then I have the Outlook calendar on my phone. I try to have the same appointments in each. I make sure those things match up, and I’ll think about what are my pockets of time between calls and meetings. During those times, I’m reviewing contracts, editing, talking to colleagues.

Unusual Practice  I usually have 20 to 30 active client engagements going on at one time. There really is no typical day. I think my practice is unique for a Big Law practice. Most lawyers are representing companies and not individuals. I have a handful of clients that are companies with employment-related work. But the vast majority of clients are individuals. I almost never know who might call me.

The Three R’s  When I was an associate, work was hard, but it was the only thing I was doing. When I got married and had kids, I felt I knew the law game pretty well, but I had to figure out how to make the family game work. I like to think about both my work life and home life with my own set of three R’s: Being realistic, responsive and relatable. I’m realistic with my clients in helping them manage expectations about me. With my kids, I’m realistic about what they can expect from their mom. With being responsive, I try to meet their needs, whether it’s clients or my kids as best I can. For relatable, I really want my clients to know and understand me and for me to know and understand them, so that I can meet their needs. I’ve learned that people love to talk about their families. It helps me to understand what it is that they want. Taking the time to make sure you know your clients and they know you helps with managing everyone’s expectations.

Lots of Files  I have three desks—three work surfaces. One is a large partner desk with no electronics or phone. I can just printout and look at things that way. Behind that I have a credenza with a computer and two-full size monitors. I also have a separate conference table that has a mobile speaker phone. I generally have lots and lots of paper around me. I have probably 35 files around me.

Early Lunch  I tend to graze through the morning, and I’ve usually eaten whatever I’m eating for lunch by 11:30. If I pack my lunch, I’ll bring humus,  cut veggies, maybe a hardboiled egg and some fruit. I eat that throughout the morning.

Steps and More Steps  I try to get out of the office but some days I can’t because of the pace of the calls. If a colleague wants to talk, I’ll ask them if they want to go for a walk. I have three different Fitbits that I use depending on what I’m wearing, My goals are 11,000 or 12,000 steps. I don’t always hit it. Some days I will bike [to get steps in]. On other days, I might take the Metro but walk a couple of stops.

School’s Out  Our nanny gets the kids and brings them home or takes them to playdates or to afterschool activities. She prepares them dinner and makes sure my daughter gets a bath. By the time we get home around 6:30 or 7 our kids have had dinner. The kids are in bed between 8 and 8:30. For those couple hours before bed we’re playing games, reading books, picking out clothes for the next day. Both my kids are voracious listeners and readers.

Winding Down  After all the reading is done, that’s usually when I make myself some dinner. Most nights I have salmon. I’m a creature of habit. My husband and I tend to do our own thing. He usually grabs something to eat right when he hits the door because he’s super hungry. I’m able to wait, and I want to make something. He’ll scrounge for whatever’s left in the fridge.

Checking In  After the kids are in bed, I’m almost always checking email just to see if anything I might have been working on got moved forward in any way that I need to keep up with before the next morning. A handful of nights a month, sometimes more concentrated than that, I’ve scheduled calls. I’ll get back on the phone at 9 o’clock or 10 o’clock depending on the time zone involved. On nights when I don’t have scheduled calls, it’s usually just status checking, and I might respond to an email or two and reset my priorities for the next day, depending.

TV and Books  I love to watch Homeland when it’s on. I watch lots of things on BBC—I watched Downton Abbey when that was on, and I love to watch all the detective shows. But lately, I’m kind of getting into my kids’ books. I might finish whatever I’ve started with them. I just recently finished the book “Wonder.” My son got the book for his birthday. I go to bed sometime between 11 and midnight.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group Art-Deneen-Howell-1 With the Three R's, Here's How Williams & Connolly's Deneen Howell Powers Through Her Day 197

Call for Entries: Introducing ALM's New 2018 Awards

Westlake Legal Group Daily-Report-InHouse-Awards-Article-201801161554-1 Call for Entries: Introducing ALM's New 2018 Awards 197

Westlake Legal Group Daily-Report-InHouse-Awards-Article-201801161554 Call for Entries: Introducing ALM's New 2018 Awards 197

Today, the legal community is increasingly interconnected. A look at the coverage across ALM’s  brands illustrates the ever-increasing ways law firms, legal technology companies and others are crossing paths. To better reflect the evolution of the way legal services are delivered, this year ALM is revamping how it recognizes success in the legal industry.

In 2018, The National Law Journal will continue to celebrate honorees selected for our traditional and ever-competitive special reports — including the Pro Bono Hot List, D.C. Litigation Departments of the Year, Winning Litigators, D.C. Legal Departments of the Year and The Appellate Hot List. (Look for the rules for each NLJ award are posted as “Calls for Nominations” between 2.5 and 3 months ahead of each special report’s magazine run date.) We will also continue to note firms that appear in our rankings like the NLJ 500/Am Law 200.

Additionally, ALM will add new recognition awards — backed by the company’s signature national brands, The American Lawyer, Corporate Counsel, The National Law Journal and Legaltech News — that reflect the evolution in the ways the legal industry achieves success—such as the best law firm-client partnership and the best business team within a law firm.

These company-wide awards are focused at the national level, largely around large law firms and in-house departments. There will be some categories within the national awards for large firms based on their regional expertise. And our regional brands will continue to honor key constituents in their markets, while adding a new element of the mid-market awards, focused on firms outside of the Am Law 200/Global 100.

How will this all work? We will retain our traditional processes for The National Law Journal awards. And to make application seamless for the new ALM-wide set of awards, we have created one form that allows our readers to select in one place the categories for which they’d like to submit. Our National Law Journal awardees will be recognized at a Washington, D.C. event at the end of the year. Additionally, for the ALM-wide set of awards, “The American Lawyer Awards,” described in more detail below, will be celebrated at an event in New York, NY, bringing together key players from across the legal industry. Stay tuned for more details on both events.

The categories: Below please find the various categories, notes on who may want to enter each category, submission requirements and deadlines. Please feel free to reach out to Pearl Wu at pwu@alm.com with any questions. The fine print: ALM reserves the right to consider and award organizations whether or not they have submitted nominations. We also reserve the right to take notice of external information that would impact the submission. ALM also may choose not to select an awardee in categories where reviewers determine the submissions don’t warrant it. For some awards, an distinguished outside judging panel will be involved in the selection of winners. For all categories, please include the appropriate contact information in case we require more information. Deadlines: Submission deadlines vary. Please be mindful of the submission deadlines. Limits: For the ALM-wide awards, an organization can only submit up to two entries per category. More on the ALM-wide awards follows below. Good luck! 

Award: Lifetime Achievement

Who Should Apply: Nominees can come from all corners of the legal profession, whether it be a law firm, in-house legal department, government, public interest, education, alternative legal service providers, etc. They should be nearing the end of their career.

Award Description: The distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award will honor those professionals who have left an indelible mark on the legal profession through their substantive area of work as well as a strong public service component, whether that be through government work, diversity and inclusion efforts or some other form of public service. This is an elite award and the bar is set high. We will honor no more than seven individuals.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: No more than one page describing why this individual deserves this highly selective honor. Describe their work and public service and how it has left a mark on the profession. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit via email:EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Lifetime Achievement” in the subject line

Finalists Announced: N/A

Winners Announced: August 2018


Award: Law Firm Distinguished Leader

Who Should Apply: A current or former law firm managing partner, chair or other firmwide leader nearing the end of their career.

Award Description: This award is given to someone who has transformed their firm and whose leadership will leave its mark well beyond their tenure.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: No more than one page describing how the individual has changed and improved their firm in a meaningful way. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Law Firm Distinguished Leader” in the subject line

Finalists Announced: N/A

Winner Announced: August 2018


Award: Best Law Firm of the Year

Who Should Apply: Any Am Law 200/Global 100 firm

Award Description: This prestigious award goes to a law firm that has had an exceptional year across its service offerings, netting big wins but also showing a commitment to and progress in an area not solely related to their practice, such as pro bono, diversity or innovation in how legal services are delivered.This award covers the time frame from January 2017 through the date of submission.  

Deadline: May 30, 2018

Materials required: A document briefly describing why the firm had such a successful year (no more than 500 words for the essay portion). Also include up to 3-6 examples of client matters (across any practice area) that demonstrate the firm’s prowess in its service offerings and ability to handle its clients’ most serious issues. Explain why the matters were so impactful. Additionally, include evidence of how the firm made strides in an area not related to their practice (see award description above). Any data to support the submission criteria is encouraged. Also please include a contact for firm leadership.  Detailed instructions and submission forms are available for download in the survey.

To go directly to the survey, click on the following hyperlink:  2018 Best Law Firm of the Year

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the event in December 2018


Award: Attorney of the Year

Who Should Apply: Any attorney from any part of the legal industry, whether it be law firm, in-house legal department, public interest, government, education or elsewhere, that has made a profound impact in the profession or community. Tenure in the profession is irrelevant to this award.

Award Description: This award goes beyond success in their practice, but rather honors a lawyer who has perhaps changed an area of law, reshaped their institution or an industry, accomplished something of great public service or otherwise made a lasting impact within the time frame for this award, which is January 2017 through the submission deadline.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: Please submit no more than one page describing why this individual is deserving of the esteemed honor, giving detailed explanations of how they had such a significant impact in the last year. A Word, Google or PDF document is acceptable.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Attorney of the Year” in the subject line

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Legal Services Innovation Award

Who Should Apply: Any Am Law 200/Global 100 law firm

Award Description: This award is given to a law firm that has made significant strides in the last two years (2016 and 2017) to innovate how it delivers legal services. This could be through an impactful individual program run through a certain practice area or firmwide, to a full revamping of the firm’s processes. This award will honor a law firm that has changed the way it does business to better deliver value to the client.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than two pages) of how the firm demonstrated true innovation to its legal services delivery model. Supporting documents are allowed. Any data to show the impact of the innovation is encouraged. Client testimonials are also welcome. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Legal Services Innovation” in the subject line

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Use of Technology

Who Should Apply: Any Am Law 200/Global 100 law firm

Award Description: This award, which is different from our Legal Services Innovation award, is focused on the implementation of technology within a law firm to either improve the delivery of legal services, improve efficiency in internal or client-facing operations, improve work-life balance, etc.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than two pages) of how technology was implemented in the last two years (since early 2016) to improve life at the firm or for clients, with any data to support the technology’s impact and efficacy. Internal or external testimonials are welcome. Also explain whether this technology was developed internally or externally. Supporting documentation is accepted. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Use of Technology” in the subject line

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Alternative Legal Services Provider

Who Should Apply: Any provider of legal services outside of the traditional law firm model.

Award Description: This award will honor a player in the alternative legal services space that has made a significant impact since Jan. 1, 2017, on how legal services were delivered.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief (no more than two pages) description of why your organization has made an impact in the ALSP space, including concrete examples and any data that supports the impact the organization has had. Client testimonials are welcome. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted. Supporting materials are also accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Alternative Legal Services Provider” in the subject line.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Client Law-Firm Team

Who Should Apply: Any Am Law 200/Global 100 firm or legal department (likely in conjunction)

Award Description: This award honors a relationship and arrangement between a law firm and client that exemplifies a true partnership that drives value for both sides. Examples may be related to fee arrangements, secondments, training, or the many other ways the pair may have creatively structured their working arrangement.

Deadline: April 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief (no more than two pages) description of why the arrangement is unique and beneficial. Please give details of how long the parties have worked together, on what types of matters and how that relationship is structured. Give examples of the ways the parties work together, how they help one another and why each finds the relationship unique and beneficial.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Client Law Firm Team” in the subject line.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Business Team

Who Should Apply: Am Law 200/Global 100 Firms Only

Award Description: The role of the business professional within a law firm is growing in number and importance. This award honors those teams that have been allowed to, and have had, an identifiable impact on their organization, from how it is run to the client work they have brought in and anything in between. It covers their work from January 2016 through the present.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than two pages) of who is part of the business team, how they are empowered to make an impact on their organization and how they have done so. Any data to support their efforts is encouraged. Client testimonials or other supporting documents are also welcome. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Business Team” in the subject line.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Mentor: Law Firm

Who Should Apply: Any lawyer or staff professional within an Am Law 200/Global 100 firm.

Award Description: This award will honor someone who has dedicated a significant portion of their time and energy to mentoring younger professionals. This could be demonstrated through the lawyer or professional’s deep commitment to an individual or through mentoring a litany of younger professionals over their career.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than two pages) of how the lawyer has shown his or her dedication to mentoring.This award has no time parameters for when the mentoring was done. Please include specific examples of mentoring and anything that shows its impact. Testimonials from mentees are welcome. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Mentor Law Firm” in the subject line.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


Award: Best Mentor: In-House Legal Department

Who Should Apply: Any lawyer or staff professional working in an in-house legal department.

Award Description: This award will honor someone who has dedicated a significant portion of their time and energy to mentoring younger professionals. This could be demonstrated through the lawyer or professional’s deep commitment to an individual or through mentoring a litany of younger professionals over their career.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than two pages) of how the lawyer has shown his or her dedication to mentoring.This award has no time parameters for when the mentoring was done. Please include specific examples of mentoring and anything that shows its impact. Testimonials from mentees are welcome. A Word, Google or PDF document is accepted.

Submit to: EditorialAwards@alm.com with “The American Lawyer Awards Best Mentor In-house” in the subject line.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


CORPORATE COUNSEL AWARDS

Award: Best Legal Departments

There is one survey for all 5 subcategories.  To go directly to the survey, click on the following hyperlink:   Best Legal Departments Survey

Detailed instructions and submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Five Subcategories:

1.U.S. Legal Dept. of the Year (for U.S. companies)

Who Should Apply: Legal department leader/GC, in-house attorney or in-house staff memberAward Description: This prestigious award goes to the legal department that surmounted extreme challenges, was innovative in its thinking and achieved measurable successes in 2017.

Deadline: February 26, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than 1,000 words) of your most significant activities in the last year, including litigation achievements (you can include arbitrations and settlements) and any strategies that you put into play to achieve measurable success. Items can include but are not limited to:

  • Describe any unique strategies for multiple litigation matters, such as suits involving the same product.
  • Describe any out-of-the-ordinary nonlitigation matters in the last year, such as working on a major M&A transaction or responding to a government investigation.
  • Describe any unique strategies for routine nonlitigation matters, such as patent applications or employment contracts. 
  • In describing all matters, please provide specific details about what your in-house lawyers did in each case. Please limit yourself to accomplishments that occurred during the past year (though you can describe work done in prior years that contributed to the accomplishment).   The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Winner Announced: June 1

  1. Compliance Dept. of the Year (in-house compliance departments)

Who Should Apply: Legal department leader/GC, in-house attorney or in-house staff memberAward Description: An award recognizing an in-house team that has developed or implemented creative innovative compliance plans to achieve success.

Deadline: February 26, 2018

Materials required: A brief description (no more than 1,000 words) describing:

  • Any innovative compliance programs that your legal department put into place in the last year.
  • How have you creatively communicated compliance information to all employees to ensure that they understand and adhere to company policy?
  • How have you used technology to help manage your compliance program?

Please include any key performance indicators used by their program. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Winner Announced: June 1

  1. Startup Solo GC of the Year

Who Should Apply: General Counsel of a startup company

Award Description: An award recognizing the challenges a startup GC has and acknowledges the achievement of successfully overcoming those obstacles by innovation and determination.

Deadline: February 26, 2018

Materials required:  A brief description (no more than 1,000 words) of how a startup solo from scratch achieved success by innovation and determination. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Winner Announced: June 1

  1. Best Use of Technology

Who Should Apply: General Counsel or in-house counsel teams

Award Description:This award recognizes the legal department that showed innovative uses of technology to solve issues and enhance productivity.

Deadline: February 26, 2018

Materials required:  Please submit a short essay (no more than 1,000) describing:

  • Any innovative uses of technology that your legal department put into place in during the last year. We’re specifically interested in how people use technology, and how it’s made work in the department easier and more efficient.
  • A problem you used technology to solve. Give specifics. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Winner Announced: June 1

  1. General Counsel of the Year

Who Should Apply: General Counsel

Award Description: This award is focused on the significant positive impact a GC has had on their business and broader industry.

Deadline: February 26, 2018

Materials required:  A brief description (no more than 1,000) of what significant positive impact the GC has had on their business and/or industry. Please give specific examples. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the awards dinner in December 2018


GLOBAL LEGAL AWARDS

The Global legal awards will cover four broad categories that will each have finalists and one overall winner: M&A Deal of the Year, Finance Deal of the Year, Dispute Resolution of the Year, Pro Bono Deal/Initiative of the Year. These awards honor the teams of law firms and in-house counsel who work on the matter, often from all sides of the matter.

There is one survey for all 4 categories.  To go directly to the survey, click on the following hyperlink:   Global Legal Awards Survey

Detailed instructions and submission forms are available for download in the survey.

  1. Global Pro Bono Deal of the Year

Who Should Apply: Law firms or in-house legal departments that shephered a pro bono deal, pro bono financing,pro bono litigation or corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiative that had a clear global/cross-border component from January 2017 through the contest submission period.

Award Description:This award recognizes the legal team that had a major impact for the client or beyond when handling a matter or implementing an initiative pro bono. It could be anything from a pro bono deal to keep an orphanage open in another country to a organization-wide initiative to stem the European refugee crisis, as examples.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required:  Please submit a short essay (no more than 750 words) describing which organizations that worked on the matter, what the legal challenges were, what creative ways the team overcame them and the impact the work had for the client or, in the case of a CSR, the broader initiative. Please include names of all firms/entities that played a significant role in the matter. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the December 2018 awards dinner.

  1. Global M&A Deal of the Year

Who Should Apply: Law firms or in-house legal departments that completed a notable M&A deal between January 2017 and the contest submission period.

Award Description:This award recognizes the legal team that had a major impact for the client or beyond when handling an M&A deal with a strong global component. The monetary amount of the deal is only one component, with other factors including the complexity of the deal, the regulatory or business issues that needed to be overcome and the impact to the client. (M&A will be defined broadly to encompass any business combination, purchase or disposal. All deals must be global matters.)

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required:  Please submit a short essay (no more than 750 words) describing which organizations that worked on the matter, what the legal/regulatory/financial/time constraint challenges were, the creative ways the team overcame them and the impact the work had for the client or industry. Please include names of all firms/entities that played a significant role in the matter. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the December 2018 awards dinner.

  1. Global Finance Deal of the Year

Who Should Apply: Law firms or in-house legal departments that completed a notable financing deal between January 2017 and the contest submission period.

Award Description:This award recognizes the legal team that had a major impact for the client or beyond when handling a financing deal with a strong global component. The monetary amount of the financing is only one component, with other factors including the complexity of the financing, the regulatory or business issues that needed to be overcome and the impact to the client. A finance deal (including a capital markets deal) will be eligible if it involves significant lawyering under the securities, banking or other relevant laws of more than one nation; or if it is conducted by a law firm with origins in one nation under the securities, banking, or other relevant laws of another nation.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required:  Please submit a short essay (no more than 750 words) describing which organizations that worked on the matter, what the legal/regulatory/financial/time constraint challenges were, the creative ways the team overcame them and the impact the work had for the client or industry. Please include names of all firms/entities that played a significant role in the matter. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the December 2018 awards dinner.

  1. Global Litigation/Dispute Resolution of the Year

Who Should Apply: Law firms or in-house legal departments that resolved a notable dispute or litigation between January 2017 and the contest submission period.

Award Description:This award recognizes the legal team that had a major impact for the client or beyond when resolving a piece of litigation or dispute with a strong global component. Deadline: March 30, 2018

Materials required:  Please submit a short essay (no more than 750 words) describing which organizations that worked on the matter, what the legal/regulatory/financial/time constraint challenges were, the creative ways the team overcame them and the impact the work had for the client or industry. Please include names of all firms/entities that played a significant role in the matter. The submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Finalists Announced: TBA by the Fall

Winner Announced: At the December 2018 awards dinner.


REGIONAL LITIGATION DEPARTMENTS OF THE YEAR AWARDS

Am Law 200/Global 100 law firms can apply for our regional Litigation Department of the Year Awards for work performed by lawyers in the following jurisdictions: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, California, Texas, Florida, Georgia, Connecticut. These awards recognize the best litigation department in each jurisdiction, but the work can be done outside the jurisdiction as long as lawyers from the jurisdiction were substantially involved. Their roles should be explained in the submission.

There is one survey for all 7 regions.  To go directly to the survey, click on the following hyperlink:  Regional Litigation Departments of the Year Awards Survey

Detailed instructions and submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Submission Deadline: April 15, 2018

Materials Required:

  • Write an essay of no more than 500 words explaining why your firm should be a finalist.
  • Select up to 7 litigation results that demonstrate the excellence of your litigation department in that jurisdiction.Submissions must include one pro bono matter as part of the total 7 matters. Please limit the narrative description of each result to 400 words. Please be clear how this matter was significant to your client. Winning entries will demonstrate not necessarily a high dollar-figure (though they may), but work on high-stakes matters, the setting of important precedent and/or unique/exceptional lawyering.
  • Do not include results achieved by lateral hires when they were working at other firms.
  • These results must have occurred from August 1, 2016, through the contest submission period.
  • Please include full case names and docket numbers for all cases mentioned. Also include opposing counsel as well as the names of the lawyers in your firm who led the matters.
  • Please include 3 new matters to be handled by lawyers in the relevant jurisdiction. They should be matters taken on after Nov. 1, 2017. Just name the client, issue at stake and firm’s expected role.
  • Please name the biggest litigation loss for the group since August 1, 2016.
  • Firm information: please include the size of the firm’s litigation department in the relevant jurisdiction as of March 15, 2017, specifying the number of partners, associates and other counsel. Please include the percentage of your entire firm represented by the litigation department in the relevant jurisdiction. Please include the percentage of overall firm revenue generated by the litigation group in the relevant jurisdiction.
  • Please list two client references and their contact information.

National Boutique/Specialty Litigation Department of the Year

This award is for national boutique/specialty firms focused on litigation, including IP litigation. This award recognizes the best boutique firm litigation department for work handled from August 1, 2016 through the contest submission period of April 15, 2018.

Submission Deadline: April 15, 2018

To go directly to the survey, click on the following hyperlink:  National Boutique Specialty Litigation Department of the Year Survey

Detailed instructions and submission forms are available for download in the survey.

Materials Required:

  • Write an essay of no more than 500 words explaining why your firm should be a finalist.
  • Select up to 7 litigation results that demonstrate the excellence of your litigation department. Please limit the narrative description of each result to 400 words. Please be clear how this matter was significant to your client. Winning entries will demonstrate not necessarily a high dollar-figure (though they may), but work on high-stakes matters, the setting of important precedent and/or unique/exceptional lawyering.
  • Do not include results achieved by lateral hires when they were working at other firms.
  • These results must have occurred from August 1, 2016, through the contest submission period.
  • Please include full case names and docket numbers for all cases mentioned. Also include opposing counsel as well as the names of the lawyers in your firm who led the matters.
  • Please include 3 new matters to be handled by your firm. They should be matters taken on after Nov. 1, 2017. Just name the client, issue at stake and firm’s expected role.
  • Please name the biggest litigation loss for the firm since August 1, 2016.
  • Firm information: please include the size of the firm’s litigation department as of March 15, 2017, specifying the number of partners, associates and other counsel. Please include the percentage of your entire firm represented by the litigation department. Please include the percentage of overall firm revenue generated by the litigation group.
  • Please list two client references and their contact information.

Other Awards

A-List, national Litigation Department of the Year, Litigator of the Year, a new Dealmaker of the Year award, Pro Bono and Diversity awards will also be given out based on the detailed surveys and reports on those topics done over the year by The American Lawyer and The National Law Journal. More information on that will be made available shortly.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group Daily-Report-InHouse-Awards-Article-201801161554-1 Call for Entries: Introducing ALM's New 2018 Awards 197

D.C.-area forecast: Warmer today, then wintry mix will mess with Wednesday morning commute

Westlake Legal Group 39171678535_2cda2390a8_k D.C.-area forecast: Warmer today, then wintry mix will mess with Wednesday morning commute 197
Tundra swans at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland. (Angela N./Flickr)

*Winter Weather Advisory from 3am to 10am EST Tomorrow*

TODAY’S DAILY DIGIT
A somewhat subjective rating of the day’s weather, on a scale of zero to 10.

5/10: Warmer is fine, but less sunshine

EXPRESS FORECAST

Today: Mostly cloudy. Highs: 42-47.
Tonight: Cloudy with wintry mix before dawn. Lows: 28-35.
Tomorrow: Morning frozen mixed, then rain. Highs: 43-50.

View the current weather conditions at The Washington Post headquarters.

FORECAST IN DETAIL

An approaching cold front delivers another chance of ice, which will complicate our morning commute tomorrow. An active weather pattern continues for the rest of this week with some warming trends into tomorrow, another cold spike Thursday, a warmer Friday and then a mixed weekend with more precipitation chances.

Listen to the latest forecast:

Get our daily forecasts on your Amazon Alexa device. Click here to find out how.

Today (Tuesday): The calm before the (next) storm. After a chilly morning with some clouds, we get some midday sunshine before clouding up again later in the afternoon. Warmer highs range through the 40s. Light winds blow from the south and west. Confidence: High

Tonight: Cloudy with mixed precipitation developing very late (from northwest to southeast), toward or just before dawn, when temperatures drop into the upper 20s to middle 30s.  Development time is 4 to 7 a.m., with better chances for sleet and snow north and west of the city with more likely sleet and/or freezing rain over the city and points south and east.  Watch out for icy conditions on all untreated surfaces.  Light winds from the east. Confidence: Low-medium

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for the latest updates. For related traffic news, check out Dr. Gridlock. Keep reading for the forecast through the weekend.

Tomorrow (Wednesday): Morning precipitation should change to freezing rain and sleet north and west of the city by 7 or so, while areas around the city to south and east should see plain rain between 7 and 10 a.m. The colder areas north and west of the city should finally see a shift to plain rain by midmorning to midday. Significant icing problems are a concern to monitor north and west of the city. Keep in mind that these times and details are subject to change — stay tuned for more updates today.

Otherwise, a cold rain dominates the afternoon as temperatures reach into the 40s to around 50 in the typically warmer areas. Light winds from the east and south. Total liquid equivalent precipitation of about a quarter- to half-inch, locally heavier amounts mostly in northern areas. Light winds from the south and east. Confidence: Low

Tomorrow night: Rain ends in the evening, with cloudy skies dominating and winds picking up from the northwest late (10 to 20 mph with higher gusts) as temperatures drop to a 25-35 range. Confidence: Medium

A LOOK AHEAD

Thursday finds some morning clouds but then shifts to mostly sunny conditions for most of the day. It’ll be breezy and chilly as temperatures peak in the 30s to just around 40. Thursday night looks mostly clear with lows in the 20s to around 30 in the city.  Confidence: High

Friday is warmer under partly sunny skies as highs edge into the 40s to about 50. Friday night features cloudy skies with lows in the 30s. Confidence: High

Saturday looks mostly cloudy with highs around 50 and a chance of showers toward evening. Rain showers abound Saturday night with lows in the 40s. Sunday continues mostly cloudy with showers and warmer temperatures into the 50s. It’s a somewhat gloomy weekend, but we need the rain. Confidence: Low-medium

SNOW POTENTIAL INDEX
A daily assessment of the potential for at least 1 inch of snow in the next week, on a zero-to-10 scale.

1/10 (→): Dulles may get some flakes early Wednesday, but otherwise there are no snow concerns in the near future.


Source: Local Weather {$excerpt:n}

DOJ's Political Appointees Missing as Career Lawyers Defend Mueller Probe

Westlake Legal Group Chad-Readler-Article-201802061718-1 DOJ's Political Appointees Missing as Career Lawyers Defend Mueller Probe 197
Westlake Legal Group Chad-Readler-Article-201802061718 DOJ's Political Appointees Missing as Career Lawyers Defend Mueller Probe 197   Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division Chad Readler speaks at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Photo: Andrew Harnik/AP.

Justice Department lawyers defended Robert Mueller, the special counsel, in court for the first time last week, but its political leaders were absent from the DOJ’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit from Paul Manafort challenging the investigation’s authority.

Chad Readler, the acting chief of the Civil Division, was not on the motion, nor was any deputy. Manafort’s civil lawsuit against Mueller, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the department challenges the authority and appointment of the special counsel, who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and potential ties to President Donald Trump’s campaign. 

Listed on the motion are three lawyers in DOJ’s Federal Programs branch: John Tyler, an assistant director, and two trial attorneys, Daniel Schwei and Anjali Motgi. Schwei signed the filing, which defended Mueller’s investigation as “entirely lawful.”

The same three lawyers, and no political leaders, were listed on another filing in the case Tuesday, which opposed a motion from the group Freedom Watch to intervene in Manafort’s case.

It’s routine to put the political leader of the office as the first name on a document, even if that person is acting. It’s unclear why Readler, who has led the division since January 2017 absent a Senate-confirmed nominee, was not named on the motion.

A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment on why Readler was absent from the filing.

Though prosecutors for the special counsel discussed plans to file the motion at a January hearing in Manafort’s criminal case, Peter Carr, a spokesman for the special counsel’s office, said in an email that Friday’s filing “makes clear” attorneys in the Civil Division, not lawyers in the special counsel’s office, filed the document on behalf of Mueller, Rosenstein and the DOJ. 

Several former Civil Division lawyers said the absence of political leaders on the document was puzzling, but might suggest DOJ wants to avoid the impression that political leadership is in any way shaping the defense of Mueller’s probe.

“It is virtually unheard of for the [Federal Programs] branch to file things without political supervisors,” said one former Civil Division lawyer. “I suspect they wanted to be clear that there was no interference or other involvement by the political people, so as to keep it crystal clear that nobody who was in the Trump political administration was hindering the career people in their effort to stop the lawsuit.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is recused from the special counsel’s investigation, and Mueller’s team interviewed him last month, according to press reports.

It’s unclear whether Readler could be a potential witness in the probe or would need to recuse from the Manafort lawsuit for some other reason. Readler was on the initial landing team of officials who took over at DOJ immediately after the inauguration on Jan. 20 last year.

The time period following the inauguration, up until the firing of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, has become a focus of the special counsel’s investigation, according to reports.

Before joining the administration, Readler worked on behalf of Trump’s campaign while in private practice at the law firm Jones Day. 

Readler, Tyler and Schwei have appeared together on briefs in other cases recently, including filings in the department’s defense of Trump’s travel ban policies.

Read more:

If Rosenstein Goes, Here’s Who Takes Over the Trump-Russia Investigation

Lawyers for Manafort Deputy Rick Gates Ask to Withdraw From Case

Thanks for Sharing: Lawyers Tweet It Up over WH Counsel McGahn’s Threat to Quit

Who Is Zack Harmon, New Chief of Staff to FBI Director Wray?

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group Chad-Readler-Article-201802061718-1 DOJ's Political Appointees Missing as Career Lawyers Defend Mueller Probe 197

SEC Chief Warns Lawyers to Stay Professional When Advising ICOs

Westlake Legal Group claytonjayconfirmdiegonljmi-1 SEC Chief Warns Lawyers to Stay Professional When Advising ICOs 197
Westlake Legal Group claytonjayconfirmdiegonljmi SEC Chief Warns Lawyers to Stay Professional When Advising ICOs 197   SEC Chairman Jay Clayton. (Photo: Diego Radzinschi/NLJ)

Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Jay Clayton warned lawyers Monday that the agency’s staff is “on high alert” for approaches to initial coin offerings, or ICOs, that “may be contrary to the spirit of our securities laws and the professional obligations of the U.S. securities bar.”

Clayton told attendees at the Securities Regulation Institute that unregistered securities investments offered by unregistered promoters “with no securities lawyers or accountants on the scene, are, in a word, dangerous.”

However, he pointed to two examples of how attorneys’ handling of ICOs is lacking.

“Most disturbing,” Clayton said, is ICOs where “lawyers involved appear to be, on the one hand, assisting promoters in structuring offerings of products that have many of the key features of a securities offering, but call it an ‘ICO,’ which sounds pretty close to an ‘IPO,’” Clayton said.

On the other hand, he continued, “those lawyers claim the products are not securities, and the promoters proceed without compliance with the securities laws, which deprives investors of the substantive and procedural investor protection requirements of our securities laws.”

Then there are ICOs where lawyers “appear to have taken a step back from the key issues — including whether the ‘coin’ is a security and whether the offering qualifies for an exemption from registration — even in circumstances where registration would likely be warranted,” he said.

Lawyers in this instance, “appear to provide the ‘it depends’ equivocal advice, rather than counseling their clients that the product they are promoting likely is a security,” Clayton continued. “Their clients then proceed with the ICO without complying with the securities laws because those clients are willing to take the risk.”

– Check out SEC Halts Approvals of Cryptocurrency Funds on ThinkAdvisor.

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Source: Law Journal {$excerpt:n} Westlake Legal Group claytonjayconfirmdiegonljmi-1 SEC Chief Warns Lawyers to Stay Professional When Advising ICOs 197