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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Daryl Morey"

LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem

Westlake Legal Group lebron-yelling-national-anthem-SCREENSHOT-copy-620x350 LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem Uncategorized Texas Sports Patriotism los angeles lebron james lakers Houston Rockets Hong Kong Front Page Stories Free Speech Featured Story Entertainment Daryl Morey Culture China California Allow Media Exception

[Screenshot from NBA on ESPN, https://twitter.com/ESPNNBA/status/1186834190869942274?]

 

On Tuesday night, ESPN tweeted a video of LeBron James yelling during “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

Subsequently, some fans aren’t happy.

It was the season opener for the Lakers, and before the anthem was finished, the sports star walked away, shouting, “Let’s go!”

ESPN took it to be the shout of a man fired up to win; do you?

The timing wasn’t particularly good, given the power forward’s recent controversial comments about China and free speech — he called Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey’s tweeted defense of Hong Kong freedom protests uneducated, in addition to pointing out the “negative” potential of free speech:


Thus:

In response to his pumped-up walkaway, some outraged onlookers suggested he would’ve been more respectful of the Chinese national anthem.

And there was this:

And, might I say, it’s tremendous.

Moving on…

The tweets of the unenthused:

Westlake Legal Group tweet-lebron-yelling-national-anthem-SCREENSHOT-620x899 LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem Uncategorized Texas Sports Patriotism los angeles lebron james lakers Houston Rockets Hong Kong Front Page Stories Free Speech Featured Story Entertainment Daryl Morey Culture China California Allow Media Exception

[Screenshot from Twitter, https://twitter.com/MaxMiller80/status/1186976698933399554?]

In reaction to Daryl’s remarks, China cut all business ties with the Rockets.

Then there was this, as reported by the Washington Examiner:

The NBA apologized to China before backlash forced NBA commissioner Adam Silver to say they stood by Morey and freedom of speech.

China has said the differences on the issue of free speech might have no “reconciliation.”

The NBA has responded to pressure from China by kicking fans out of basketball games who showed support for the Hong Kong protests and has also banned media from accessing players in China.

China has shut down the airing of the NBA preseason in its country and has threatened future business with the NBA if the league continues to speak against the Communist Party.

Good grief.

LeBron didn’t want anything else to do with the China issue:

“Let me clear up the confusion. I do not believe there was any consideration for the consequences and ramifications of the (Morey) tweet. I’m not discussing the substance. Others can talk About that.”

Well, now they’re talking about something else.

But it’s still him.

Westlake Legal Group 1f641 LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem Uncategorized Texas Sports Patriotism los angeles lebron james lakers Houston Rockets Hong Kong Front Page Stories Free Speech Featured Story Entertainment Daryl Morey Culture China California Allow Media Exception

Do you take LeBron’s shout over the anthem as disrespect? Or was he just too ready to rumble? Let us all know in the Comments section.

-ALEX

 

See 3 more pieces from me:

A New Study Reveals What Americans Really Think About Transgender Athletes In Women’s Sports

Former ESPN Host Jemele Hill: Black Athletes Should Leave Mainstream Schools And Stop Making ‘White Folks Rich’

New Video Shows Male Track Runners Absolutely Blow Away A Woman At The World Athletic Championships

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

The post LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group lebron-yelling-national-anthem-SCREENSHOT-copy-300x170 LeBron Catches the Outrage of Fans After Yelling and Walking Away During the National Anthem Uncategorized Texas Sports Patriotism los angeles lebron james lakers Houston Rockets Hong Kong Front Page Stories Free Speech Featured Story Entertainment Daryl Morey Culture China California Allow Media Exception  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shaquille O’Neal: “Daryl Morey was right”

Westlake Legal Group so Shaquille O’Neal: “Daryl Morey was right” The Blog shaquille o'neal NBA injustice Hong Kong Daryl Morey China charles barkley Business

Shaq might not do LeBron-scale business in China but he does plenty. Ernie Johnson makes a point of introducing him in the clip below by noting how often O’Neal travels there. There’s a 50-foot statue of Shaq in Beijing, for cripes sake.

So, as you watch, bear in mind that he’s leaving money on the table too by taking this position. Didn’t stop him from taking it.

His point is simple. We understand China’s values and look the other way at them, why can’t they do the same for us? If LeBron and Adam Silver can shrug off mass internment of religious minorities in concentration camps, the ChiCom government might reasonably be expected to shrug off one g-ddamned tweet by a team executive in support of Hong Kong. The reason this NBA/China standoff resonates is precisely because Americans on both sides of the aisle worry that Chinese economic power is pressuring American corporations like the NBA into following Chinese standards of free speech. That point seems to escape Johnson, who chides Morey for making trouble while there were NBA players in China (i.e. he turned them into rude guests), and Charles Barkley, who’s laser-focused on the bottom line. Barkley in particular can’t seem to see that the reason this has become a minor international incident isn’t because Morey made it one but because China did. They could have ignored his pro-Hong-Kong tweet. Instead they chose to seize on it and bludgeon the league with it to send the message that further dissent won’t be tolerated. All Chuck can do, seemingly, is cheer them on.

And that’s the other takeaway from this clusterfark. It’s not merely that the ChiComs are demanding silence from Americans about their political crises, it’s that they’ve coopted NBA personalities into taking the Chinese government’s position. Barkley places 100 percent of the blame for this incident on Morey, not an iota on Chinese totalitarianism, just as Beijing itself would. He also goes on and on about how poor LeBron James was unfairly forced to say something when James had nothing to do with Morey’s tweet. Remember what LeBron *did* say, though, once he finally chose to speak up — accusing Morey of not necessarily being “educated” about the politics of the Hong Kong situation. That’s a talking point straight from the Chinese government, aimed at marginalizing critics by painting them as somehow not seeing the nuance in a basic demand for human rights. If LeBron wanted to wimp out to protect his business interests by simply declining comment, he could have done that. Instead he took China’s side.

Which is what this is ultimately about. Shaq wants a live-and-let-live approach where China does what it wants and Americans say what they want and both sides live with it. China says no. Either Americans tacitly approve of their totalitarianism by maintaining total silence about it or they don’t do business with China. Barkley and James side with China. Simple as that.

Kudos to TNT for giving this topic some time on the season’s opening night, though. Meanwhile in China, the Lakers/Clippers game was aired — but the Raptors/Pelicans contest was not. The TV blackout of NBA games over there is still partially in effect, it seems. I guess airing the Lakers game was LeBron’s reward for choosing the right side.

The post Shaquille O’Neal: “Daryl Morey was right” appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group so-300x159 Shaquille O’Neal: “Daryl Morey was right” The Blog shaquille o'neal NBA injustice Hong Kong Daryl Morey China charles barkley Business  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

LeBron to Adam Silver: If a player tweeted what Daryl Morey tweeted, they’d be punished for costing the NBA money in China

Westlake Legal Group lb LeBron to Adam Silver: If a player tweeted what Daryl Morey tweeted, they’d be punished for costing the NBA money in China The Blog NBA lebron james Houston Rockets Daryl Morey China Adam Silver

The link to this Daily Caller piece is circulating on conservative Twitter with the claim that James tried to pressure the commissioner into punishing Morey. Before last night I would have told you that that was an uncharitable read of his point. “He’s not saying Morey should be punished,” I would have told you, “he’s saying that the league has a double standard for executives versus players. Execs get more freedom to gamble with the NBA’s bottom line than players do, which is unfair. Just apply the same standard the next time a player says something that might cost the league a buck.”

But after watching James go face-first into the tank for China in the name of the almighty dollar, I no longer think that read is unfair. He probably was nudging Silver to sanction Morey. We can’t have a double standard for executives and players, says LeBron; both should be censored equally in the name of pleasing the NBA’s Chinese masters.

James argued that if something a NBA player had tweeted had cost the league money they would have been punished, and questioned why the same wasn’t happening to Morey, according to Dave McMenamin on ESPN.

“Nearly a week ago today, in a Shanghai hotel room, or Shanghai hotel ballroom, Adam Silver got up and addressed the players, and LeBron James is one of the players who got up and spoke and said, ‘Hey, what are we doing here? Daryl Morey made these statements,’” McMenamin recalled on air Tuesday. “You know damn well if a player made the same statements and caused such poor ramifications for the league, there would be some sort of league recourse.”

“There would be repercussions the player has to pay. You know, potentially this tweet could cost the NBA hundreds of millions of dollars. That could come out of the players’ pockets, and so that’s the double standard that was being addressed in that meeting,” he continued.

There are reports on the wires this afternoon of protesters in Hong Kong destroying James-branded merchandise in disgust at his comment. Says a Twitter pal, remembering the fiasco after James ditched Cleveland for Miami, “Has anyone had their jerseys burned en masse by the residents of more cities than LeBron?”

Lakers superstar LeBron James took a hit in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory, where basketball fans trampled on jerseys bearing his name after the four-time MVP waded into the NBA controversy involving the country…

“Please remember, all NBA players, what you said before: ‘Black lives matter.’ Hong Kong lives also matter!” one of the protesters, William Mok, 36, told a crowd of hundreds…

“James was trying, you know, to take a side, on the China side, which is like ridiculous,” said Aaron Lee, 36, a marketing director. “He was being honest, financially. Financial is money. Simple as that. LeBron James stands for money. Period.

LeBron James stands for money. Period. If you want to make him rethink his fascist apologetics, you need to hit him in the wallet. The only solution is a boycott of the NBA.

Meanwhile on ESPN, here’s Stephen A. Smith mustering some righteous indignation … at Daryl Morey, for supposedly thinking only of himself when he tweeted. How the hell did we arrive at a point in this fiasco where the overt moneygrubbers like LeBron are supposedly being thoughtful while the one guy in the league willing to make a tiny gesture of support for demonstrators opposing a totalitarian state is mindlessly selfish? And what about the question raised in the tweet — until when, exactly, does Smith think Morey should have waited to send his pro-HK tweet? He can’t possibly believe that China would be okay with NBA personnel supporting the protests just as long as they waited until they’re back on U.S. soil to do so. If that’s the case, then what’s LeBron’s excuse for not speaking up in favor of Hong Kong now?

The post LeBron to Adam Silver: If a player tweeted what Daryl Morey tweeted, they’d be punished for costing the NBA money in China appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group lb-300x153 LeBron to Adam Silver: If a player tweeted what Daryl Morey tweeted, they’d be punished for costing the NBA money in China The Blog NBA lebron james Houston Rockets Daryl Morey China Adam Silver  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

LeBron: Morey is “misinformed”, “not educated” about Hong Kong protests

Westlake Legal Group c184c5a7-a02a-4451-b652-ae71759a21ff LeBron: Morey is “misinformed”, “not educated” about Hong Kong protests The Blog protests NBA lebron james Human Rights Houston Rockets Hong Kong Daryl Morey China

LeBron James weighed in on the controversy sparked over Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey’s tweet in support of the protesters in Hong Kong. He slammed Morey for sending the tweet while at the same time James said he didn’t want to “get into a feud with Daryl Morey.”

King James sure has a funny way of trying to stay away from a feud with Morey. Did LeBron think that calling Morey “misinformed” and “not educated” about the protests going on in the streets of Hong Kong was a way of making friends and influencing Morey? He essentially said that Morey is ignorant and should have just waited a week to send his tweet because, you know, it affects his bottom line.

“I don’t want to get into a … feud with Daryl Morey,” James told reporters, “but I believe he wasn’t educated on the situation at hand and he spoke.

“So many people could have been harmed, not only financially, but physically, emotionally, spiritually, so, just be careful what we tweet, what we say, what we do. Even though yes, we do have freedom of speech, there can be a lot of negative that comes from that.”

Spiritually? Maybe for those who worship at the alter of the all-mighty dollar. Let’s be honest, what LeBron means about the negative actions coming from Morey’s tweet is all wrapped up in his ability to make money. His jersey is the most popular selling basketball jersey and he doesn’t want to rock the boat. The status quo in Hong Kong and China is serving him very well. There are 600 million NBA fans in China and that’s a huge market.

This was LeBron’s first public response to the protests in Hong Kong. While he was busy slamming Morey for a seven-word tweet which was quickly deleted, he was standing firm in his support of “the league”. That ‘s the same league that shut down a reporter last week when she asked a question during a press conference with James Harden and Russell Westbrook. The CNN reporter asked, “After the events of this week and the fallout we’ve seen, whether you both would feel differently about speaking out in that way in the future.” A Houston Rockets spokesperson shut her down.

“I’m not here to judge how the league handled the situation,” James said. “I think that, when you’re misinformed or not educated about something, and I’m just talking about the tweet itself, you never know the ramifications that can happen and we all see what that did. Not only did for our league, for all of us in America, for people in China as well. Sometimes you have to think through things that you say that may cause harm to not only for yourself, but for the majority of people. I think that’s just a prime example of that.”

Speaking of ramifications, was LeBron James worried about ramifications after he called President Trump a bum? That happened over a disagreement about an invitation to the White House. Was he worried about the Trump supporters who might not buy his jerseys?

Lebron James had no problem standing in support with Colin Kaepernick taking a knee in protest during NFL games. Yet when Morey stood with the Hong Kong protesters – who carry American flags as they protest – suddenly James wants Americans to kowtow to the brutal Communist dictatorship.

Morey is an educated man. He graduated from the M.I.T. Sloan M.B.A. program and is one of the winningest general managers in the NBA. While Adam Silver, NBA commissioner, publicly supported Morey’s right to excercise free speech, the league went silent.

When James began to receive criticism over his remarks, he doubled down and tried to explain.

While LeBron was in China with the Lakers, some American politicians were in Hong Kong. Senator Josh Hawley tweeted his response. He points out that people are being harmed – the protesters in the streets.

James is a Nike sponsored athlete. Nike prides itself in delivering woke social justice messages in advertising. It’s not like LeBron James doesn’t speak out in political ways. For him to now tell others to just shut up because it will affect his earning capacity is beyond the pale. He would have been better off just remaining silent himself.

The post LeBron: Morey is “misinformed”, “not educated” about Hong Kong protests appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group c184c5a7-a02a-4451-b652-ae71759a21ff-300x153 LeBron: Morey is “misinformed”, “not educated” about Hong Kong protests The Blog protests NBA lebron james Human Rights Houston Rockets Hong Kong Daryl Morey China  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Yao Ming is the man in the middle – what’s he going to do?

Westlake Legal Group 09d49a6c-a3fb-409c-8c8b-ea3475810bf7 Yao Ming is the man in the middle – what’s he going to do? Yao Ming The Blog sovereignty NBA Commissioner Adam Silver NBA Houston Rockets Hong Kong protests Daryl Morey China

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver would like to have a conversation with Yao Ming. Silver’s office has reached out and he hopes a meeting can be set up, perhaps in Shanghai Wednesday.

The Los Angeles Lakers and the Brooklyn Nets are scheduled to play an exhibition game in Shanghai Thursday and then another game in Shenzhen on Saturday. Shenzhen is a southern city that neighbors Hong Kong. China state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) is refusing to broadcast both games. The decision to not broadcast the games came after Silver voiced support of Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey’s right of free speech.

“We voice our strong dissatisfaction and opposition to Adam Silver offering as an excuse the right to freedom of expression,” CCTV said in its statement announcing the cancellation of the N.B.A. broadcasts. “We believe that no comments challenging national sovereignty and social stability fall within the scope of freedom of expression.”

The NBA Commissioner expressed disappointment but also acknowledged that this is a tough issue that won’t be settled any time soon.

“I think it’s unfortunate,” Silver said. “But if that’s the consequences of us adhering to our values, we still feel it’s critically important we adhere to those values.”

Silver said that he would still travel to Shanghai on Wednesday and that it was his hope to meet with Chinese government officials to try to defuse the conflict.

“But I’m a realist as well, and I recognize that this issue may not die down so quickly,” Silver said.

I suppose that it is a better response to the whole situation between the money-grubbing NBA and the brutal communist government of China – the NBA landing on the side of free speech – than the original response by the commissioner, which was to express regret that Chinese bureaucrats were offended by an innocent tweet. How about the freedom of the Hong Kong people? You know, the ones who even carry American flags during their protests.

Will Yao Ming be able to step in and act as a mediator in this situation?

Silver said he and Yao “have been close friends since the joined the league.” He talked of finding “mutual respect for each other’s political systems and beliefs.”

Yao Ming is Chairman of the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA) now, a government-directed body. Technically speaking, Yao’s stamp of approval would be on the decision to not broadcast the pre-season games. He played for the Shanghai Sharks in the CBA before being drafted by the Houston Rockets in 2002. He is punishing his former team and many Houstonians are deeply disappointed.

“There’s no question that Daryl’s tweet has hit what I would describe as a third-rail issue in China,” Silver said. “I think Yao is extremely unsettled. I’m not quite sure he accepts how we are operating our business right now.”

How we are operating our business right now? What is Silver talking about? He came out and groveled to the Chinese right away and Morey deleted his tweet in support of the Hong Kong protesters right away. Seven words. “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong.” Would Silver even be half-way supportive of Morey now if the outcry from Americans – Houston Rockets fans, politicians, and basketball fans across the country – hadn’t been so swift and strong?

Basketball is huge in China. The Rockets are big in Houston. When Yao Ming came to Houston, he was welcomed with open arms and made the toast of the city. I remember my husband and son coming home on Saturday after running into him in an electronics store, not long after Yao came here. They said how quiet and reserved he was and had a translator in tow. Houston made him a very wealthy man. He brought his parents over and they opened a restaurant. His daughter was born in Houston. The ties between Yao and the Rockets are deep, even today. He is a legend.

In other words, Yao Ming was given the opportunity to live the American Dream in Houston. When he retired he returned to China. He owns the Shanghai Sharks. He is also under the control of the Communist Chinese. The NBA makes millions of dollars from Chinese fans. Rockets players secure lucrative endorsement deals, too. It’s all fun and games until the Communist government reminds you of who they are. Freedom is a bad word.

Chinese fans also are fanatic about the Rockets and the NBA. Basketball shoes have become increasingly popular in China while sales have declined in the U.S. for the past four years.

NBA players frequently make promotional appearances in China for their affiliated shoe companies. Warriors star Klay Thompson, who has a 10-year contract with the Chinese company Anta, has been labeled “China Klay” during some of his outings. Former Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade has a lifetime deal with Li-Ning. Rockets star guard James Harden has made many trips to China to promote adidas products.

“Kobe Bryant never sold a lot of shoes in the U.S. (but) he was wildly popular in China,” said Matt Powell, a senior adviser for NPD Group, a global market research company. “(NBA players) draw crowds like rock stars.”

Politics is commonplace these days in sports. Sports stars are looked to for woke hot takes on everything. Is this a watershed moment? The American people are sick and tired of America kowtowing to China in order to not upset the status quo and affect the bottom line. This mess with the NBA is more of the same.

Yao has to decide where his loyalty is now. Can he smooth everything over and keep his position intact? Some damage has already been done in Houston. The only good thing happening right now is the fact that Morey is still employed by the Houston Rockets. If he is fired, it will be further proof of the weakness of the NBA.

The post Yao Ming is the man in the middle – what’s he going to do? appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group 09d49a6c-a3fb-409c-8c8b-ea3475810bf7-300x180 Yao Ming is the man in the middle – what’s he going to do? Yao Ming The Blog sovereignty NBA Commissioner Adam Silver NBA Houston Rockets Hong Kong protests Daryl Morey China  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

ESPN warns staff: Don’t go into specifics about China and Hong Kong when discussing Daryl Morey’s tweet

Westlake Legal Group e-1 ESPN warns staff: Don’t go into specifics about China and Hong Kong when discussing Daryl Morey’s tweet The Blog protest Houston Rockets Hong Kong ESPN Disney Daryl Morey Chuck Salituro China

Remember that ESPN is owned by Disney, and that China is willing and able to punish a parent organization for criticism by its subsidiary. It’s not just Houston Rockets games that have been banned from Chinese airwaves over Daryl Morey’s pro-Hong-Kong tweet, after all. It’s the entire NBA preseason.

So imagine what the consequences might be for Disney’s operations in China, starting with access to Chinese movie theaters for Disney films, if ESPN began applying a little of its famous wokeness towards China’s regard for human rights.

Some network employees are playing dumb about any change in the network’s coverage of this subject…

…but Deadspin has the goods in the form of a memo sent to staff by ESPN’s senior news director urging them not to delve into details about the dispute between China and Hong Kong. Congrats to the network, I guess, on finally discovering a political topic that it doesn’t want to opine on.

The memo doesn’t ask staff to take China’s side in the Hong Kong debate but, wouldn’t you know it, according to Deadspin much of the commentary thus far has been critical of Morey and scrupulously neutral on the sensitive subject of whether Hong Kongers deserve basic due process rights.

If you paid attention to ESPN channels yesterday, you saw the network repeatedly attempt to grapple with the story of Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey creating an international incident after tweeting and then deleting his support for pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong. You heard talking head after talking head castigate Morey for sending the tweet, speculation over whether he’d keep his job, speculation about the sincerity of his convictions, discussions about what this meant for the Rockets’ bottom line, the observation that it’s unreasonable to expect for-profit companies like the NBA to act morally, and the non-take that cowing to China is simply the cost of doing business in China

Chuck Salituro, the senior news director of ESPN, sent a memo to shows mandating that any discussion of the Daryl Morey story avoid any political discussions about China and Hong Kong, and instead focus on the related basketball issues. The memo, obtained by Deadspin, explicitly discouraged any political discussion about China and Hong Kong. Multiple ESPN sources confirmed to Deadspin that network higher-ups were keeping a close eye on how the topic was discussed on ESPN’s airwaves…

Any summary of the tensions between China and Hong Kong is going to be necessarily reductive, but a summary of what’s actually going on at least provides basic context for the rest of the discussion. The idea that Chinese politics are simply too complex to talk about on sports TV just isn’t convincing.

ESPN has toned down its on-air politicking over the past 18 months after justified complaints from righties that the network had adopted a conspicuously “woke” identity. Too much politics, not enough sports, viewers claimed. Jemele Hill, their most outspoken host, was moved off the SportsCenter desk and the network’s president vowed to stick to the thing that ESPN became famous for in the first place. But there was an exception to that policy: Obviously, some sports stories do involve politics. If the network is going to cover Colin Kaepernick’s collusion grievance against the NFL, for instance, it has to discuss the claim that he’s been blackballed for refusing to stand during the anthem.

The NBA’s quagmire in China is a textbook example of that sports/politics intersection, notes Deadspin. If you can’t cover Kaepernick’s legal battle with the NFL without discussing the underlying details, how can you discuss the NBA’s standoff with China without addressing the merits of Morey’s pro-Hong-Kong tweet? Political context is crucial to letting viewers decide which party is in the right, which depends in part on their assessment of the righteousness of the cause in Hong Kong. Did Morey say something so egregious that China, and the NBA, are entitled to be angry with him, and the Rockets to fire him? Or is China trying to censor an anodyne expression of support for a pro-democracy movement, aided and abetted by propaganda pushed by American corporations that fear loss of access to the Chinese market?

If American sports figures are being unjustly pressured to genuflect to Chinese communist sensibilities, that seems like a story. I wonder why Disney-owned ESPN, which also happens to have a deal with Chinese tech leviathan Tencent, isn’t eager to tell it.

At Slate, Tom Scocca says it’s time for the NBA to pull the plug on China. It’ll only get worse from here, not better.

The message of a spiel like Tsai’s is that foreign institutions can coexist with the Chinese government on mutual terms of respect, as long as those institutions honor the boundaries around China’s nonnegotiable sensitivities. The truth, though, is that those boundaries are constantly moving. Ever since the 2008 Beijing Olympics, which were supposed to celebrate China’s full integration into the international order, the government has been aggressively tightening the limits, confident that the terms of engagement mean foreign entities will have to go along—whether it’s a matter of putting Communist Party officials onto university boards, or stifling news coverage of leadership’s self-enrichment, or censoring a movie, or removing apps from the Chinese market…

China has already played its hand. If Hong Kong is nonnegotiable, there’s nothing to discuss. The subject will become more sensitive, not less, if the Hong Kong police move from tear gas and rubber bullets to the routine use of live ammunition, or if the People’s Liberation Army moves in. Would the NBA muzzle its employees then? Would the players and staff of a globally prominent American company censor their own feelings to protect the Chinese market? Why not take the stand before it gets to that?

If you want a firsthand look at how pitiful ESPN’s coverage can be, go watch the Deadspin video of Stephen A. Smith ranting yesterday — not about Chinese human-rights abuses, not about the NBA groveling and risking cooptation by a totalitarian state in the name of making a buck, but about Morey’s alleged selfishness in not thinking of the Rockets’ bottom line before tweeting. Coming soon to the Stephen A. Smith Show, I presume: The Uighur menace. Could it happen here? Stay tuned.” Ironically, one person who has acquitted herself well in all this is — ta da — Jemele Hill, who has a piece at the Atlantic today taking the NBA to task for its hypocrisy. If the league is going to speak up in defense of NBA players’ right to protest social injustice, she insists, it needs to speak up in defense of Daryl Morey’s right to do the same. Indeed.

The post ESPN warns staff: Don’t go into specifics about China and Hong Kong when discussing Daryl Morey’s tweet appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group e-1-300x153 ESPN warns staff: Don’t go into specifics about China and Hong Kong when discussing Daryl Morey’s tweet The Blog protest Houston Rockets Hong Kong ESPN Disney Daryl Morey Chuck Salituro China  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Human Rights? Money? The NBA Had a Choice to Make, They Went for the Money

Westlake Legal Group basketball-330709_1280-620x465 Human Rights? Money? The NBA Had a Choice to Make, They Went for the Money Yao Ming Tilman Fertitta Social Justice NBA International Affairs Human Rights Houston Rockets Hong Kong protesters Front Page Stories Featured Story Daryl Morey Culture Chinese government Chinese Basketball Association China Allow Media Exception .

 

On Friday evening, Daryl Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets, tweeted his support for the people of Hong Kong. Almost immediately, the Chinese government, the Chinese Basketball Association and several Chinese businesses denounced Morey and moved to sever ties with the Rockets. The Ringer was told by league sources that the team’s ownership has been debating whether or not to fire him.

Here’s a screenshot of Morey’s original tweet, which has been deleted.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-10-07-at-10.25.23-AM-e1570458584441 Human Rights? Money? The NBA Had a Choice to Make, They Went for the Money Yao Ming Tilman Fertitta Social Justice NBA International Affairs Human Rights Houston Rockets Hong Kong protesters Front Page Stories Featured Story Daryl Morey Culture Chinese government Chinese Basketball Association China Allow Media Exception .

The team’s owner, Tilman Fertitta, quickly sent out a tweet distancing himself from Morey’s tweet.

The NBA has also separated itself from Morey’s comment. They issued a statement on Sunday night which read:

We recognize that the views expressed by Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey have deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China, which is regrettable. While Daryl has made it clear that his tweet does not represent the Rockets or the NBA, the values of the league support individuals’ educating themselves and sharing their views on matters important to them. We have great respect for the history and culture of China and hope that sports and the NBA can be used as a unifying force to bridge cultural divides and bring people together.

Following the swift backlash over Morey’s brave support for Hong Kong, he issued an apology. He wrote that he’s “had a lot of opportunity since his original tweet to hear and consider other perspectives.” I’ll bet he has.

According to the “NBA Red Card,” a study into the digital performance of the NBA compiled by the Mailman Group, the Rockets were the second most popular NBA team in China as of September 3. The Ringer points out that “Hall of Famer Yao Ming played for the Rockets and helped exponentially grow the sport’s popularity in the country. But Yao is now the chair of the Chinese Basketball Association, which criticized Morey in its statement for making “an inappropriate comment related to Hong Kong” and said it “strongly opposes” the general manager’s remarks.

Morey is being punished for speaking up for human rights and freedom. He took a stand against tyrrany. One would think he would have been celebrated for upholding the values upon which our country was founded.

Thankfully, many Americans rallied to his side. Here are a few of those responses via Twitchy, starting with my personal favorite:

This is a hostage video. What an embarrassment for the @NBA.

Houston Rockets suspended by Chinese sponsor after GM posted (and quickly deleted) this tweet.

This whole situation is gross. The NBA made a big deal about supporting players’ freedom of speech. Apparently that ends when money gets involved.

If you’re doing business in China, no disloyal politics allowed.

Houston Rockets suspended by Chinese sponsor after GM posted (and quickly deleted) this tweet…If you’re doing business in China, no disloyal politics allowed…NBA should stand with @dmorey. But won’t. $$$

Can’t believe the National Basketball Association is being run by *checks notes* the Chinese Communist Party.

Caving to godless, communist murderers of millions. The @NBA is trash and a total hypocrite being woke about how awful America is bit kneeling before China

People fighting for their freedom, there’s nothing “complicated” about that “I’m sorry to find that political freedom is not acceptable in the 2nd largest economy in the world”

This whole situation is gross. The NBA made a big deal about supporting players’ freedom of speech. Apparently that ends when money gets involved.

And it’s not like @dmorey said something all that provocative. Supporting democracy seems pretty safe.

Here’s how a Chinese newspaper reacted.

So far, three Republican senators and even one Democrat, have expressed support for Morey.

The post Human Rights? Money? The NBA Had a Choice to Make, They Went for the Money appeared first on RedState.

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