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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "David Jeremiah"

David Jeremiah: In coronavirus crisis we all need hope – Pray, control your mind and be a good neighbor

Westlake Legal Group image David Jeremiah: In coronavirus crisis we all need hope – Pray, control your mind and be a good neighbor fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 74ce0fb2-ee0b-551b-a093-58bf721d3f75

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I’m a pastor, not an infectious disease expert. But there’s one thing I know about the unprecedented coronavirus crisis: we need hope.

I find that hope in words Jesus spoke to his disciples on the night of his crucifixion. He said: “Peace I leave with you. My peace I give to you. Not only as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”

Here’s something else I know about the frightening pandemic in front of us: We can choose to respond with faith and wisdom instead of fear and panic. Here are three ways we can do that in the midst of this chaos.

SCOTT GUNN: A SUNDAY SERMON IN THE TIME OF CORONAVIRUS — WE ARE NEVER ALONE

Pray

In the middle of all the uncertainty that surrounds us, it is difficult for us to think of a better thing to do than to pray. And it is difficult to think of a better prayer than the one spoken by a desperate but confident Judean King Jehoshaphat.

In his context, this ancient king faced a dangerous enemy closing in on his nation, but his faith wasn’t shaken. When you read this verse it sounds almost as if it could have been in the news today.

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King Jehoshaphat said in II Chronicles 20:9: “If disaster comes upon us, swords, judgment or pestilence, or famine, we will stand before this temple and in your presence, for your name is in this temple, and we will cry out to you in our affliction, and you will hear us and save us.”

That’s all we can do in a situation like this. We try to understand it, but even the most brilliant scientists and academics in the world don’t have all the right answers. And so here we are, in a situation where we can either pray or we can worry.

We should remain alert and do our best to take precautions, but also realize that worrying is not going to change any of this. It won’t help us fight off illness. It won’t move us to action.

It takes the same amount of energy to worry as it does to pray, and one leads to peace and the other leads to panic.

Control your mind

The great teacher Oswald Chambers once said: “Your mind is the greatest gift God has given you, and it ought to be devoted entirely to Him.”

And I love the eloquent way Paul puts it in 2 Timothy 1:7: “For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but he has given us a spirit of power and of love and a sound mind.”

The human imagination is a powerful force. It can create a beautiful vision of a desirable future, or it can conjure up the worst-case scenario. These dark products of the imagination can put us in the grip of fear, a place where a loving God would never have us go.

Life is so much less stressful when we remember we have a captain of the ship we can trust. We know who He is, and we know He knows what He is doing. He is worthy of our trust – I’ve been around long enough to realize that.

Be a good neighbor

Whenever we face a crisis like this, most of us are concerned about our own well-being, and we should be. We also worry about our families. I’m concerned about my wife and I know she’s concerned about me. I’m concerned about my children and grandchildren and I know they are concerned about us.

Yet throughout history, followers of Christ have often stood out because they were willing to lay down their own needs for the sake of others.

Another pastor just wrote recently: “Throughout history, Christians have often stood out because they were willing to help the sick even during plagues, pandemics, and persecutions. … By stepping into the mess of sickness and disease, they were able to demonstrate their faith to a watching world.”

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Take care of yourself, yes, but let’s not forget there may be others around us more desperate for help than we are. Unfortunately, we now have to socially distance ourselves from each other. That means physical contact should be limited.

But I would like to suggest that while we’re distancing ourselves from each other physically, why don’t we try to get closer together spiritually?

How do we do that? Use that thing in your hand that you use frequently even when there’s no pandemic – your phone. It’s a powerful tool during this time of isolation.

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I’m committing to spending five minutes every day calling somebody to encourage them, pray with them, and make sure they know they’re deeply cared for in this crisis. I hope you’ll join me in this new routine.

If everybody tries their hand at some spiritual closeness, I think we’ll come out the other side stronger than we’ve ever been.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DR. DAVID JEREMIAH

Westlake Legal Group image David Jeremiah: In coronavirus crisis we all need hope – Pray, control your mind and be a good neighbor fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 74ce0fb2-ee0b-551b-a093-58bf721d3f75  Westlake Legal Group image David Jeremiah: In coronavirus crisis we all need hope – Pray, control your mind and be a good neighbor fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 74ce0fb2-ee0b-551b-a093-58bf721d3f75

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dr. David Jeremiah: Need some joy this Christmas? Here’s how to find it

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113023524001_6113023622001-vs Dr. David Jeremiah: Need some joy this Christmas? Here’s how to find it fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 41b006ba-5b42-532e-9df1-f8a56fd3d741

Wouldn’t you love to live in a Norman Rockwell painting or on a Currier and Ives card in December? Christmas is when we roast chestnuts on an open fire, deck the halls with boughs of holly, ride in a one-horse open sleigh, hang our stockings by the chimney with care, and have ourselves a “merry little Christmas.”

Year after year we try to create a perfect Christmas-postcard experience during the holidays, but the effort seems counterproductive. Instead of the most wonderful time of the year, Christmas can be the most stressful time of the year — a whirlwind of traveling, shopping, spending, baking, partying, entertaining, and even churching.

All these activities swirl around us while the unchanging promise of the Advent season — that the Savior would come — beckons us to celebrate its fulfillment on Christmas. This is truly the foundation of everlasting joy in a believer’s life. Yet, too often, the day-to-day steals the focus from the spiritual aura of Advent, and with it our joy.

THOMAS MCDANIELS: WHY PEOPLE ARE LEAVING AMERICA’S CHURCHES — AND HOW THEY WILL SURVIVE

So how can you and I recover the spirit of joy to the season?

 Identify Joy Killers

First, I’d suggest you identify the things that steal your joy. If it’s overscheduling, remember you control that in advance. When I’m having trouble saying “No” to an invitation, I determine whether that event can go right on without me. If it can, it makes the decision to politely decline so much easier. Sometimes we can gracefully bow out of gatherings, and they’ll do just fine on their own.

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Another joy stealer comes when we handle memories the wrong way. How often have you found yourself with a strong feeling of melancholy during the holidays? We must learn to reminisce wisely. Dr. Krystine Batcho of Le Moyne College in Syracuse specializes in the study of nostalgia and its effect on us. Everything about Christmas triggers deeply felt memories, she says, and sometimes they leave us sad.

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“Most often,” Batcho wrote, “holidays remind us of people who have played important roles in our lives and the activities we shared with them.” She advises us to be mindful of the way we approach these memories and to reflect with thanksgiving rather than regret.

We treasure our memories, but we shouldn’t let them cast us down. View your past from an eternal perspective as part of God’s tapestry. In every event there’s an item of praise. In every memory, there’s a foothold for thanksgiving. As we’re told in Philippians 4:8, whatever things are true, noble, just, pure, lovely, and of good report — think on these things.

Implement a Joy Plan

The second step is to implement a joy plan. If more stresses you out, decide to do less this year. Perhaps create a holiday ambiance with fewer decorations. Focus on a tree, a festive centerpiece, a mantel display, or a well-placed nativity set — but not on all four. Don’t unbox all your decorations.

You can choose a verse of joy as a theme for the season. There are hundreds of texts about joy and rejoicing in the Bible, and they don’t take December off.

Do less shopping. Decide in advance what you can afford per person, keep the names and amounts on a private list, and check them off throughout the month. Don’t try to do it all at once, and stick to your budget.

Do less entertaining. Be selective where you go and whom you invite. Don’t be afraid to ask friends to bring a dish or two if you’re having a function. Few friendships have been ruined by the words, “Can you please bring a dessert?”

If you’re traveling, cut your trip short a day to give yourself time at home before heading back to work. This isn’t always possible, of course, but a buffer-day can be a lifesaver.

Choose a Joy Verse for the Season

And how about a new holiday tradition? You can choose a verse of joy as a theme for the season. There are hundreds of texts about joy and rejoicing in the Bible, and they don’t take December off. Comb through the Bible for a verse and say something like: This Christmas the joy of the Lord is my strength (Nehemiah 8:10), this Christmas my soul shall be joyful in the Lord; it shall rejoice in His salvation (Psalm 35:9) or, this is the Christmas the Lord has made. I will rejoice and be glad in it (Psalm 118:24).

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You can print out the verse and stick it on the fridge or somewhere else visible, and when you start feeling down or stressed, you can look up to it and be encouraged.

Be a Joy Giver

Most of all, remember that you’re managing your holidays not just for your own benefit, but so you’ll be more cheerful for others. Emotions are infectious. If you’re blue, you’ll make those around you feel the same way. If you’re stressed, your tension will spread like the tide. But a smile, a cheerful word, a laugh, a warm embrace, an uplifting conversation — those are gifts that go right to the heart and spread the true spirit of Christmas.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DR. DAVID JEREMIAH

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113023524001_6113023622001-vs Dr. David Jeremiah: Need some joy this Christmas? Here’s how to find it fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 41b006ba-5b42-532e-9df1-f8a56fd3d741  Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113023524001_6113023622001-vs Dr. David Jeremiah: Need some joy this Christmas? Here’s how to find it fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article 41b006ba-5b42-532e-9df1-f8a56fd3d741

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

David Jeremiah: America’s future depends on our relationship with Israel

Westlake Legal Group david-jeremiah-americas-future-depends-on-our-relationship-with-israel David Jeremiah: America’s future depends on our relationship with Israel fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article a4b6ed51-82e4-59e2-b83d-66ef43e0caa2
Westlake Legal Group AP19119856272766 David Jeremiah: America’s future depends on our relationship with Israel fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article a4b6ed51-82e4-59e2-b83d-66ef43e0caa2

The deadly April 27 attack on the Chabad of Poway synagogue in California was particularly jarring for our Shadow Mountain Church Community. Our congregation is a half hour from the synagogue, and our proudly Zionist church cherishes the Jews in our community, in Israel and around the world.

This has generally been our history in the United States since the first 23 Jewish immigrants landed in New Amsterdam (now New York City) in 1654.

Space prevents me from retelling the entire story of the mutual affection expressed between a Jewish congregation in Newport, Rhode Island, and the newly elected President George Washington.

AMERICAN JEWS EXPERIENCING ‘NEAR-HISTORIC LEVELS’ OF ANTI-SEMITISM, ADL REPORTS

But after a visit to Newport, President Washington wrote to the congregation: “May the Children of the Stock of Abraham, who dwell in this land, continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other Inhabitants; while everyone shall sit under his own vine and fig tree, and there shall be none to make him afraid.”

What I’m about to say is a dramatic statement, but not an overstatement. I believe America’s future, and any nation’s future, depends in large part on one simple factor: our relationship to the tiny nation of Israel.

You may be wondering whether my thinking is upside down. America is the world’s greatest superpower with a population of nearly 329 million; Israel is a tiny sliver of land accommodating only about 9 million people. One would think that America is the key to Israel’s survival, not the other way around.

But I’m an unapologetic believer in the promises God has laid out in Scripture. He tells us in Genesis 12:3, speaking to Abraham, “I will bless those who bless you, and I will curse him who curses you.” And God has a perfect track record for keeping His promises.

In some parts of Israel, herding one’s family to a bomb shelter is an almost routine experience. But when Israelis take the tough but necessary measures to defend themselves, they are slammed by world censure by the likes of the United Nations.

Meanwhile, today a number of elected U.S. politicians openly voice their opposition to the “Children of the Stock of Abraham.”

The Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign has also gained a disturbing level of popularity in America, from college campuses to Capitol Hill.

Proponents claim to be holding Israel accountable for alleged human rights violations. Yet in reality, we know the BDS movement is merely a cover for a deep-seated, centuries-long hatred of Israel and the Jewish people.

Many U.S. politicians have publicly supported the BDS movement, or at least are too scared to criticize it. Fortunately some – including House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., – have been courageous enough to confront members of their own party on this dangerous movement.

America is not the only nation in Western civilization to have politicians making poor choices regarding Israel and her descendants.

In Great Britain, there’s been a dramatic rise in anti-Semitic rhetoric, especially within Britain’s Labour Party, which has been the traditional home for most Jewish voters. And all of this is taking place on a continent that should mind some extra caution, given its history with anti-Semitism.

We all know where intolerance can lead if left unchecked, and that oppression and opposition to Jews is nothing new.

That being said, whether or not our politicians, professors and pundits leave Israel alone, I’ve got a feeling that Israel is going to be just fine.

After originally reaching their promised homeland, the people of the young nation were continually attacked by hostile tribes and other nations.

In 722 B.C. the Assyrians conquered northern Israel and deported its people. In 586 B.C. Babylon conquered southern Israel and exiled its citizens. The Jews returned to their homeland 70 years later, but the Romans finally crushed them in A.D. 70, leaving them without a country for 1,878 years.

In the countries of their exile, the Jews were oppressed, denied rights, isolated in ghettos and persecuted.

In 1933, there were 9 million Jews living throughout Europe, but by 1945 two out of three European Jews had been gassed, beaten, starved to death or died of disease in Nazi concentration camps. The Holocaust led to the elimination of one-third of the world’s Jewish population.

Since 1948 and the establishment of the modern state of Israel – despite being hemmed in on all sides by hostile nations and against all odds or human logic – Israel has survived all-out war and constant threats of terrorism.

Israel has been forced to maintain a continual state of warfare throughout its 71 years of existence. Yet increasingly, the international media portray Israel as an aggressor nation, an occupying force, a brutal regime afflicting poor and disenfranchised Palestinians who have had their land stolen out from under them.

Indeed, many among the Palestinians genuinely want a peaceful resolution to the current conflict. But a Palestinian nationalism continues to thrive with its singular fixation: the death of Israel. The Palestinian leaders pay stipends to terrorists and their families who kill Israelis, financed in part by the Israel-hating and America-hating regime of Iran.

Modern Israel has mainly been surrounded by enemies who do not recognize its right to exist and openly vow to annihilate it. These nations occupy a land mass of more than 5 million square miles. Tiny Israel occupies a land mass of almost 9,000 square miles.

In some parts of Israel, herding one’s family to a bomb shelter is an almost routine experience. But when Israelis take the tough but necessary measures to defend themselves, they are slammed by world censure by the likes of the United Nations.

The problem seems to be that many in the West won’t admit that Israel is in a fight for its very survival. Yet the story of the Jews is not over yet.

In spite of overwhelming odds and seemingly insurmountable challenges, the Jewish people have maintained Israel’s position as the only true democracy in the Middle East and the epicenter of progress in their region of the world.

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As Professor Amnon Rubinstein has noted,  Israel “has turned itself from a poor, rural country to an industrial and post-industrial powerhouse. . . . It has reduced social, educational and health gaps . . . between Arabs and Jews. Some of its achievements are unprecedented: Israeli Arabs have a higher life expectancy than European whites.”

My hope is that world leaders today will change their tune and will extend the same goodwill that George Washington sought for the Jewish people centuries ago.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DAVID JEREMIAH

Westlake Legal Group AP19119856272766 David Jeremiah: America’s future depends on our relationship with Israel fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article a4b6ed51-82e4-59e2-b83d-66ef43e0caa2  Westlake Legal Group AP19119856272766 David Jeremiah: America’s future depends on our relationship with Israel fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Jeremiah article a4b6ed51-82e4-59e2-b83d-66ef43e0caa2

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The promise of Christmas: Why we still celebrate the birth of Jesus 2,000 years after it happened

Let us take a moment to remember just how long the world waited for its savior.

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