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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "daylight saving time"

Child not sleeping because of daylight saving time? Here are 3 tips

Westlake Legal Group toddler-sleeping Child not sleeping because of daylight saving time? Here are 3 tips sleep parents health and wellness Health family health Family Features expert advice doctors daylight saving time children's national hospital children's national children's health children
Photo by Jelleke Vanooteghem

Daylight saving time arrived this weekend, and many families are still feeling its effect on their sleep schedules. With this lost hour, many parents are wondering how to adjust their child’s schedule without losing any more good nights’ rest.

We spoke with Daniel Lewin, Ph.D, DABSM, the associate director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Hospital, to get tips on how to combat daylight saving time’s impact on children’s sleep.

Stick with a Bedtime Routine

Dr. Lewin recommends that  a bedtime routine is key for young children. “A routine helps create a powerful signal for sleep,” explains Dr. Lewin. A bedtime routine is even more important when there are changes in a child’s environment. Now that daylight saving time is here, maintaining a structured bedtime routine can make a huge difference in the way your child reacts to the new time change.

Power down

Daylight saving time tends to throw off the body’s internal circadian clock. To help, Dr. Lewin recommends dimming your child’s bedroom lights and turning off electronics 30 minutes to an hour before bedtime. He also suggests increasing the amount of light in the morning to help your child wake up. “Amplify bright light in the morning, particularly during the dark morning hours, to help wake the body up,” says Lewin.

Be understanding

“The time change can cause changes in your child’s mood,” says Lewin. Try to be more forgiving if your child is throwing extra temper tantrums in the days following daylight saving time. “I encourage all parents to be understanding and be supportive to help their child adjust a little better,” Dr. Lewin says

Daniel S. Lewin, Ph.D, DABSM, is a pediatric psychologist, sleep specialist and licensed clinical psychologist. He is board-certified in sleep medicine and behavioral sleep medicine and is the associate director of the Pediatric Sleep Medicine, as well as director of the Pulmonary Behavioral Medicine Program, at Children’s National. He is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

For more family and health reads, subscribe to our weekly newsletters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Child not sleeping because of daylight saving time? Here are 3 tips

Westlake Legal Group toddler-sleeping Child not sleeping because of daylight saving time? Here are 3 tips sleep parents health and wellness Health family health Family Features expert advice doctors daylight saving time children's national hospital children's national children's health children
Photo by Jelleke Vanooteghem

Daylight saving time arrived this weekend, and many families are still feeling its effect on their sleep schedules. With this lost hour, many parents are wondering how to adjust their child’s schedule without losing any more good nights’ rest.

We spoke with Daniel Lewin, Ph.D, DABSM, the associate director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Hospital, to get tips on how to combat daylight saving time’s impact on children’s sleep.

Stick with a Bedtime Routine

Dr. Lewin recommends that  a bedtime routine is key for young children. “A routine helps create a powerful signal for sleep,” explains Dr. Lewin. A bedtime routine is even more important when there are changes in a child’s environment. Now that daylight saving time is here, maintaining a structured bedtime routine can make a huge difference in the way your child reacts to the new time change.

Power down

Daylight saving time tends to throw off the body’s internal circadian clock. To help, Dr. Lewin recommends dimming your child’s bedroom lights and turning off electronics 30 minutes to an hour before bedtime. He also suggests increasing the amount of light in the morning to help your child wake up. “Amplify bright light in the morning, particularly during the dark morning hours, to help wake the body up,” says Lewin.

Be understanding

“The time change can cause changes in your child’s mood,” says Lewin. Try to be more forgiving if your child is throwing extra temper tantrums in the days following daylight saving time. “I encourage all parents to be understanding and be supportive to help their child adjust a little better,” Dr. Lewin says

Daniel S. Lewin, Ph.D, DABSM, is a pediatric psychologist, sleep specialist and licensed clinical psychologist. He is board-certified in sleep medicine and behavioral sleep medicine and is the associate director of the Pediatric Sleep Medicine, as well as director of the Pulmonary Behavioral Medicine Program, at Children’s National. He is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

For more family and health reads, subscribe to our weekly newsletters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How to adjust your child’s sleep schedule for daylight saving time

Westlake Legal Group child-on-bed How to adjust your child’s sleep schedule for daylight saving time sleeping sleep parents health tips Health Family Features Family daylight saving time children's national children's health
Photo by Marisa Howenstine

Getting your child to bed at a decent time can be tough. When daylight saving time ends (officially at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 3) and clocks get set back an hour, bedtime can become even more difficult.

Many parents wonder what happens to a child’s body during daylight saving time. According to Dr. Daniel Lewin, associate director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Hospital, “The adjustment to daylight saving time differs by age group and by chronotype or their preference for morning or evening activities, based on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children.”

For example, most teens are naturally evening chronotypes, according to Lewin, while most young children are morning chronotypes.

Lewin has provided five foolproof tips to help make the transition easier and safer for everyone in your family

  1. Increase total sleep time before any type of sleep disturbance is anticipated.
  2. A gradual shift in the sleep schedule one to two days before a change in clock time is optimal. For example, a 10- to 15-minute adjustment each day for young children, such as planning for a slightly later bedtime, can help them prepare.
  3. Increase exercise, eat healthy and eliminate caffeine intake (this can include soda and coffee) in the days before a schedule adjustment.
  4. Turn off electronics and dim lights in the evening, especially for adolescents. Amplified bright light in the morning, particularly during the dark morning hours, can also be helpful for waking up.
  5. Pay attention to a teen’s sleep schedule. We know they struggle with going to bed early and waking up early, which can impact their focus. Keep a teen driver off the roads if they’ve had less than eight hours of sleep per night on consecutive nights.

Daniel S. Lewin, Ph.D., DABSM, is a pediatric psychologist, sleep specialist and licensed clinical psychologist. He is board-certified in sleep medicine and behavioral sleep medicine and is the associate director of the Pediatric Sleep Medicine, as well as director of the Pulmonary Behavioral Medicine Program, at Children’s National. He is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com