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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "DAYTON, Ohio"

N.R.A. Gets Results on Gun Laws in One Phone Call With the President

President Trump spent at least 30 minutes on the phone Tuesday with Wayne LaPierre, the chief executive of the National Rifle Association, the latest conversation in an aggressive campaign by gun rights advocates to influence the White House in the weeks since the back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

The call ended the way that Mr. LaPierre had hoped it would: with Mr. Trump espousing N.R.A. talking points in the Oval Office and warning of the radical steps he said Democrats wanted to take in violation of the Second Amendment.

“We have very, very strong background checks right now, but we have sort of missing areas and areas that don’t complete the whole circle,” the president told reporters Tuesday afternoon, adding, “I have to tell you that it’s a mental problem.”

“Democrats would, I believe, give up the Second Amendment,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of the people that put me where I am are strong believers in the Second Amendment, and I am also.”

For Mr. Trump, his dealings with Mr. LaPierre and other gun rights advocates in recent weeks have been a reminder that even if his initial instinct after the mass shootings this month was to say he would press for aggressive gun legislation, any such push would be seen as a betrayal of the N.R.A. members who helped elect him.

At the N.R.A.’s annual convention in 2017, Mr. Trump assured the group’s members, “You came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.” And that is what he was doing on his call with Mr. LaPierre, according to two people familiar with their conversation, assuring Mr. LaPierre that even after another round of mass shootings, he was not interested in legislation establishing universal background checks and that his focus would be on the mental health of the gunmen, not their guns.

Mr. Trump — who did most of the talking on the call with Mr. LaPierre, according to those briefed on the conversation — made it clear that he believes there are ways to scrutinize people’s fitness for gun ownership other than the current proposals. But his latest comments on guns were the strongest sign to date that he is unlikely to make bipartisan gun legislation a priority this fall, when Congress returns from its summer recess. Without his backing, congressional Republicans said, any chance of a bipartisan bill passing the Senate is likely to be dead on arrival.

Instead, the president told Mr. LaPierre that he wanted to focus on mental health and access to juvenile criminal records. Those measures fall far short of the sweeping new restrictions that Democrats sought and that Mr. Trump said he was prepared to endorse in the immediate aftermath of the mass shootings on Aug. 3 and 4 that left more than 30 dead.

The president’s remarks also demonstrated how the N.R.A., which spent $30 million on Mr. Trump’s campaign in 2016 and stuck with him when other Republicans wavered in their support, still wields great influence over the White House, even as its own future is in question. The organization has been mired in investigations into its finances by two attorneys general, in New York and Washington, as well as a legal battle with its former advertising firm and calls from its own board members for change.

But those problems have not diminished the group’s influence in the West Wing, despite Mr. Trump’s frequent insistence to aides that Mr. LaPierre and his team are “going bankrupt.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_137694441_5ef4b48b-712e-4cac-a39c-1effd9f6d1f9-articleLarge N.R.A. Gets Results on Gun Laws in One Phone Call With the President United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Second Amendment (US Constitution) National Rifle Assn mass shootings Law and Legislation LaPierre, Wayne gun control firearms El Paso, Tex, Shooting (2019) El Paso (Tex) Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Cox, Chris W

A video of Wayne LaPierre, the president of the N.R.A., at the organization’s annual meeting in Dallas last year.CreditJustin Sullivan/Getty Images

In a statement, Mr. LaPierre expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the call. “I spoke to the president today,” he said. “We discussed the best ways to prevent these types of tragedies. President Trump is a strong 2A President and supports our right to keep and bear arms!”

Aides to Mr. Trump insist that he is still seeking legislative action. But they acknowledge that the president’s definition of background checks is different from the type of universal background checks that Democrats have urged him to pursue. And the type of sweeping bill he is discussing — which at the moment is loosely defined and could contain several different piecemeal proposals — would be viewed warily by a number of Republican senators, as well as Democrats, who would consider it either too much or too little.

The weakening of Mr. Trump’s stated interest in pursuing what he had described this month as “very meaningful background checks” fits a pattern of behavior.

In the past, when Mr. Trump has shown a willingness to compromise on gun legislation after a mass shooting, some West Wing officials have made sure to secure an audience with the president for Mr. LaPierre and Christopher W. Cox, the N.R.A.’s former top lobbyist, who resigned in June. After the February 2018 mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 students and staff members were killed, Mr. Trump expressed support for universal background checks, keeping guns away from mentally ill people and restricting gun sales for some young adults.

But that support quickly evaporated after a late-night Oval Office meeting with N.R.A. officials. Mr. Trump later threatened to veto a background check bill.

The N.R.A. has not been pressing its case alone. Mr. Trump has heard from a wide range of conservative allies who have warned him that he will imperil his re-election chances if he makes a deal with Democrats on guns.

The country’s leading gun group has been embattled this year amid internal fighting, investigations, financial strains and scandal. A revolt against Mr. LaPierre has already led to the departures of the N.R.A.’s president and its top lobbyist, as well as five board members, including the NASCAR team owner Richard Childress, who resigned this week.

Many of those who oppose Mr. LaPierre internally harbor hard-line gun rights views and want him gone before the 2020 election cycle begins in earnest. But the period after the shootings has provided Mr. LaPierre with an opening to show off the N.R.A.’s organizing muscle.

Earlier this month, he said he “opposes any legislation that unfairly infringes upon the rights of law-abiding citizens.” Willes K. Lee, the second vice president of the N.R.A. board and a key ally of Mr. LaPierre, went further, tweeting recently that “Nothing short of disarming America satisfies @democrats. Give them NOTHING,” and even promoting the hashtag “#allguncontrolisracist.”

This year, the House passed its first two significant gun control measures in a quarter century. One of the bills would require background checks at gun shows and on internet sites, where private buyers and sellers can arrange to meet in person to complete a sale. A second bill would increase the waiting period if a potential buyer does not immediately pass a background check, a measure aimed at closing a loophole used by Dylann S. Roof, who killed nine people in 2015 at a church in Charleston, S.C.

Those measures have stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate.

So have the so-called red flag laws, which give the police extra powers to confiscate firearms, and were the subject of a study released this week by researchers at the University of California, Davis, which said that “this urgent, individualized intervention can play a role in efforts to prevent mass shootings.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

N.R.A. Gets Results on Gun Laws in One Phone Call With the President

President Trump spent at least 30 minutes on the phone Tuesday with Wayne LaPierre, the chief executive of the National Rifle Association, the latest conversation in an aggressive campaign by gun rights advocates to influence the White House in the weeks since the back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

The call ended the way that Mr. LaPierre had hoped it would: with Mr. Trump espousing N.R.A. talking points in the Oval Office and warning of the radical steps he said Democrats wanted to take in violation of the Second Amendment.

“We have very, very strong background checks right now, but we have sort of missing areas and areas that don’t complete the whole circle,” the president told reporters Tuesday afternoon, adding, “I have to tell you that it’s a mental problem.”

“Democrats would, I believe, give up the Second Amendment,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of the people that put me where I am are strong believers in the Second Amendment, and I am also.”

For Mr. Trump, his dealings with Mr. LaPierre and other gun rights advocates in recent weeks have been a reminder that even if his initial instinct after the mass shootings this month was to say he would press for aggressive gun legislation, any such push would be seen as a betrayal of the N.R.A. members who helped elect him.

At the N.R.A.’s annual convention in 2017, Mr. Trump assured the group’s members, “You came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.” And that is what he was doing on his call with Mr. LaPierre, according to two people familiar with their conversation, assuring Mr. LaPierre that even after another round of mass shootings, he was not interested in legislation establishing universal background checks and that his focus would be on the mental health of the gunmen, not their guns.

Mr. Trump — who did most of the talking on the call with Mr. LaPierre, according to those briefed on the conversation — made it clear that he believes there are ways to scrutinize people’s fitness for gun ownership other than the current proposals. But his latest comments on guns were the strongest sign to date that he is unlikely to make bipartisan gun legislation a priority this fall, when Congress returns from its summer recess. Without his backing, congressional Republicans said, any chance of a bipartisan bill passing the Senate is likely to be dead on arrival.

Instead, the president told Mr. LaPierre that he wanted to focus on mental health and access to juvenile criminal records. Those measures fall far short of the sweeping new restrictions that Democrats sought and that Mr. Trump said he was prepared to endorse in the immediate aftermath of the mass shootings on Aug. 3 and 4 that left more than 30 dead.

The president’s remarks also demonstrated how the N.R.A., which spent $30 million on Mr. Trump’s campaign in 2016 and stuck with him when other Republicans wavered in their support, still wields great influence over the White House, even as its own future is in question. The organization has been mired in investigations into its finances by two attorneys general, in New York and Washington, as well as a legal battle with its former advertising firm and calls from its own board members for change.

But those problems have not diminished the group’s influence in the West Wing, despite Mr. Trump’s frequent insistence to aides that Mr. LaPierre and his team are “going bankrupt.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_137694441_5ef4b48b-712e-4cac-a39c-1effd9f6d1f9-articleLarge N.R.A. Gets Results on Gun Laws in One Phone Call With the President United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Second Amendment (US Constitution) National Rifle Assn mass shootings Law and Legislation LaPierre, Wayne gun control firearms El Paso, Tex, Shooting (2019) El Paso (Tex) Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Cox, Chris W

A video of Wayne LaPierre, the president of the N.R.A., at the organization’s annual meeting in Dallas last year.CreditJustin Sullivan/Getty Images

In a statement, Mr. LaPierre expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the call. “I spoke to the president today,” he said. “We discussed the best ways to prevent these types of tragedies. President Trump is a strong 2A President and supports our right to keep and bear arms!”

Aides to Mr. Trump insist that he is still seeking legislative action. But they acknowledge that the president’s definition of background checks is different from the type of universal background checks that Democrats have urged him to pursue. And the type of sweeping bill he is discussing — which at the moment is loosely defined and could contain several different piecemeal proposals — would be viewed warily by a number of Republican senators, as well as Democrats, who would consider it either too much or too little.

The weakening of Mr. Trump’s stated interest in pursuing what he had described this month as “very meaningful background checks” fits a pattern of behavior.

In the past, when Mr. Trump has shown a willingness to compromise on gun legislation after a mass shooting, some West Wing officials have made sure to secure an audience with the president for Mr. LaPierre and Christopher W. Cox, the N.R.A.’s former top lobbyist, who resigned in June. After the February 2018 mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 students and staff members were killed, Mr. Trump expressed support for universal background checks, keeping guns away from mentally ill people and restricting gun sales for some young adults.

But that support quickly evaporated after a late-night Oval Office meeting with N.R.A. officials. Mr. Trump later threatened to veto a background check bill.

The N.R.A. has not been pressing its case alone. Mr. Trump has heard from a wide range of conservative allies who have warned him that he will imperil his re-election chances if he makes a deal with Democrats on guns.

The country’s leading gun group has been embattled this year amid internal fighting, investigations, financial strains and scandal. A revolt against Mr. LaPierre has already led to the departures of the N.R.A.’s president and its top lobbyist, as well as five board members, including the NASCAR team owner Richard Childress, who resigned this week.

Many of those who oppose Mr. LaPierre internally harbor hard-line gun rights views and want him gone before the 2020 election cycle begins in earnest. But the period after the shootings has provided Mr. LaPierre with an opening to show off the N.R.A.’s organizing muscle.

Earlier this month, he said he “opposes any legislation that unfairly infringes upon the rights of law-abiding citizens.” Willes K. Lee, the second vice president of the N.R.A. board and a key ally of Mr. LaPierre, went further, tweeting recently that “Nothing short of disarming America satisfies @democrats. Give them NOTHING,” and even promoting the hashtag “#allguncontrolisracist.”

This year, the House passed its first two significant gun control measures in a quarter century. One of the bills would require background checks at gun shows and on internet sites, where private buyers and sellers can arrange to meet in person to complete a sale. A second bill would increase the waiting period if a potential buyer does not immediately pass a background check, a measure aimed at closing a loophole used by Dylann S. Roof, who killed nine people in 2015 at a church in Charleston, S.C.

Those measures have stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate.

So have the so-called red flag laws, which give the police extra powers to confiscate firearms, and were the subject of a study released this week by researchers at the University of California, Davis, which said that “this urgent, individualized intervention can play a role in efforts to prevent mass shootings.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

N.R.A. Gets Results in One Phone Call With the President

President Trump spent at least 30 minutes on the phone Tuesday with Wayne LaPierre, the chief executive of the National Rifle Association, the latest conversation in an aggressive campaign by gun rights advocates to influence the White House in the weeks since the back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

The call ended the way that Mr. LaPierre had hoped it would: with Mr. Trump espousing N.R.A. talking points in the Oval Office and warning of the radical steps he said Democrats wanted to take in violation of the Second Amendment.

“We have very, very strong background checks right now, but we have sort of missing areas and areas that don’t complete the whole circle,” the president told reporters Tuesday afternoon, adding, “I have to tell you that it’s a mental problem.”

“Democrats would, I believe, give up the Second Amendment,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of the people that put me where I am are strong believers in the Second Amendment, and I am also.”

For Mr. Trump, his dealings with Mr. LaPierre and other gun rights advocates in recent weeks have been a reminder that even if his initial instinct after the mass shootings this month was to say he would press for aggressive gun legislation, any such push would be seen as a betrayal of the N.R.A. members who helped elect him.

At the N.R.A.’s annual convention in 2017, Mr. Trump assured the group’s members, “You came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.” And that is what he was doing on his call with Mr. LaPierre, according to two people familiar with their conversation, assuring Mr. LaPierre that even after another round of mass shootings, he was not interested in legislation establishing universal background checks and that his focus would be on the mental health of the gunmen, not their guns.

Mr. Trump — who did most of the talking on the call with Mr. LaPierre, according to those briefed on the conversation — made it clear that he believes there are ways to scrutinize people’s fitness for gun ownership other than the current proposals. But his latest comments on guns were the strongest sign to date that he is unlikely to make bipartisan gun legislation a priority this fall, when Congress returns from its summer recess. Without his backing, congressional Republicans said, any chance of a bipartisan bill passing the Senate is likely to be dead on arrival.

Instead, the president told Mr. LaPierre that he wanted to focus on mental health and access to juvenile criminal records. Those measures fall far short of the sweeping new restrictions that Democrats sought and that Mr. Trump said he was prepared to endorse in the immediate aftermath of the mass shootings on Aug. 3 and 4 that left 31 dead.

The president’s remarks also demonstrated how the N.R.A., which spent $30 million on Mr. Trump’s campaign in 2016 and stuck with him when other Republicans wavered in their support, still wields great influence over the White House, even as its own future is in question. The organization has been mired in investigations into its finances by two attorneys general, in New York and Washington, as well as a legal battle with its former advertising firm and calls from its own board members for change.

But those problems have not diminished the group’s influence in the West Wing, despite Mr. Trump’s frequent insistence to aides that Mr. LaPierre and his team are “going bankrupt.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_137694441_5ef4b48b-712e-4cac-a39c-1effd9f6d1f9-articleLarge N.R.A. Gets Results in One Phone Call With the President United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Second Amendment (US Constitution) National Rifle Assn mass shootings Law and Legislation LaPierre, Wayne gun control firearms El Paso, Tex, Shooting (2019) El Paso (Tex) Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Cox, Chris W

A video of Wayne LaPierre, the president of the N.R.A., at the organization’s annual meeting in Dallas last year.CreditJustin Sullivan/Getty Images

In a statement, Mr. LaPierre expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the call. “I spoke to the president today,” he said. “We discussed the best ways to prevent these types of tragedies. President Trump is a strong 2A President and supports our right to keep and bear arms!”

Aides to Mr. Trump insist that he is still seeking legislative action. But they acknowledge that the president’s definition of background checks is different from the type of universal background checks that Democrats have urged him to pursue. And the type of sweeping bill he is discussing — which at the moment is loosely defined and could contain several different piecemeal proposals — would be viewed warily by a number of Republican senators, as well as Democrats, who would consider it either too much or too little.

The weakening of Mr. Trump’s stated interest in pursuing what he had described this month as “very meaningful background checks” fits a pattern of behavior.

In the past, when Mr. Trump has shown a willingness to compromise on gun legislation after a mass shooting, some West Wing officials have made sure to secure an audience with the president for Mr. LaPierre and Christopher W. Cox, the N.R.A.’s former top lobbyist, who resigned in June. After the February 2018 mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 students and staff members were killed, Mr. Trump expressed support for universal background checks, keeping guns away from mentally ill people and restricting gun sales for some young adults.

But that support quickly evaporated after a late-night Oval Office meeting with N.R.A. officials. Mr. Trump later threatened to veto a background check bill.

The N.R.A. has not been pressing its case alone. Mr. Trump has heard from a wide range of conservative allies who have warned him that he will imperil his re-election chances if he makes a deal with Democrats on guns.

The country’s leading gun group has been embattled this year amid internal fighting, investigations, financial strains and scandal. A revolt against Mr. LaPierre has already led to the departures of the N.R.A.’s president and its top lobbyist, as well as five board members, including the NASCAR team owner Richard Childress, who resigned this week.

Many of those who oppose Mr. LaPierre internally harbor hard-line gun rights views and want him gone before the 2020 election cycle begins in earnest. But the period after the shootings has provided Mr. LaPierre with an opening to show off the N.R.A.’s organizing muscle.

Earlier this month, he said he “opposes any legislation that unfairly infringes upon the rights of law-abiding citizens.” Willes K. Lee, the second vice president of the N.R.A. board and a key ally of Mr. LaPierre, went further, tweeting recently that “Nothing short of disarming America satisfies @democrats. Give them NOTHING,” and even promoting the hashtag “#allguncontrolisracist.”

This year, the House passed its first two significant gun control measures in a quarter century. One of the bills would require background checks at gun shows and on internet sites, where private buyers and sellers can arrange to meet in person to complete a sale. A second bill would increase the waiting period if a potential buyer does not immediately pass a background check, a measure aimed at closing a loophole used by Dylann S. Roof, who killed nine people in 2015 at a church in Charleston, S.C.

Those measures have stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate.

So have the so-called red flag laws, which give the police extra powers to confiscate firearms, and were the subject of a study released this week by researchers at the University of California, Davis, which said that “this urgent, individualized intervention can play a role in efforts to prevent mass shootings.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A Call With the President Gets the N.R.A. Results

WASHINGTON — President Trump spent at least 30 minutes on the phone Tuesday with Wayne LaPierre, the chief executive of the National Rifle Association, the latest conversation in an aggressive campaign by gun rights advocates to influence the White House in the weeks since the back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

The call ended the way that Mr. LaPierre had hoped it would: with Mr. Trump espousing N.R.A. talking points in the Oval Office and warning of the radical steps he said Democrats wanted to take in violation of the Second Amendment.

“We have very, very strong background checks right now, but we have sort of missing areas and areas that don’t complete the whole circle,” the president said, adding, “I have to tell you, it’s a mental problem.”

“Democrats would give up the Second Amendment,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of the people that put me where I am are strong believers in the Second Amendment, and I am also.”

For Mr. Trump, his dealings with Mr. LaPierre and other gun rights advocates in the weeks since the mass shootings have been a reminder that even if his initial instinct after the deaths of 31 people in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, earlier this month was to say he would be an advocate for aggressive gun legislation, any such push would be seen as a betrayal of the N.R.A. members who helped elect him.

At the N.R.A.’s annual convention in 2017, Mr. Trump assured the group’s members: “You came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.” And that’s what he was doing on his call with Mr. LaPierre, according to two people familiar with their conversation, assuring him that even after another round of mass shootings, he was not interested in legislation establishing universal background checks and that his focus would be on the mental health of the gunmen, not their guns.

Mr. Trump, who did most of the talking with Mr. LaPierre, according to those briefed on the call, made it clear that he believes there are ways to probe people’s fitness for gun ownership other than the current proposals. But his latest comments on guns were the strongest sign to date that the president is unlikely to make bipartisan gun legislation a priority this fall, when Congress returns from its summer recess. Without his backing, congressional Republicans said, any chance of a bipartisan bill passing the Senate is likely to be dead on arrival.

Instead, the president told Mr. LaPierre that he wants to focus on mental health and access to juvenile criminal records, measures that fall far short of the sweeping new restrictions that Democrats sought and that Mr. Trump said he was prepared to endorse in the immediate aftermath of the mass shootings on Aug. 3 and 4.

The president’s remarks also demonstrated how the N.R.A., which spent $30 million on Mr. Trump’s campaign in 2016 and stuck with him when other Republicans wavered in their support, still wields great influence over the White House, even as its own future is in question. The organization has been mired in investigations into its finances by two attorneys general, in New York and Washington, as well as a legal battle with its former advertising firm and calls from its own board members for reform.

But those problems have not diminished the group’s influence in the West Wing, despite Mr. Trump’s frequent insistence to aides that Mr. LaPierre and his team are “going bankrupt.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_137694441_5ef4b48b-712e-4cac-a39c-1effd9f6d1f9-articleLarge A Call With the President Gets the N.R.A. Results United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Second Amendment (US Constitution) National Rifle Assn mass shootings Law and Legislation LaPierre, Wayne gun control firearms El Paso, Tex, Shooting (2019) El Paso (Tex) Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Cox, Chris W

A video of Wayne LaPierre, the president of the N.R.A., at the organization’s annual meeting in Dallas last year.CreditJustin Sullivan/Getty Images

In a statement, Mr. LaPierre expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the call. “I spoke to the president today,” he said. “We discussed the best ways to prevent these types of tragedies. President Trump is a strong 2A President and supports our Right to Keep and Bear Arms!”

Aides to Mr. Trump insist that he is still seeking legislative action. But they acknowledge that the president’s definition of background checks is different from the type of universal background checks that Democrats have urged the president to pursue. And the type of sweeping bill he is discussing — which at the moment is loosely defined and could contain several different piecemeal proposals — would be viewed warily by a number of Republican senators, as well as Democrats, who would consider it either too much or too little.

The weakening of Mr. Trump’s stated interest in pursuing what he had described earlier this month as “very meaningful background checks” fits the pattern of his behavior.

In the past, when Mr. Trump has shown a willingness to compromise on gun legislation after a mass shooting, some West Wing officials have made sure to secure an audience with the president for Mr. LaPierre and Chris W. Cox, the N.R.A.’s former top lobbyist, who resigned in June. After the February 2018 mass shooting in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 students and staff members were killed at a high school, Mr. Trump expressed support for universal background checks, keeping guns away from mentally ill people and restricting gun sales for some young adults.

But that support quickly evaporated after a late-night Oval Office meeting with N.R.A. officials. Mr. Trump later threatened to veto a background check bill.

The N.R.A. has not been pressing its case alone. Mr. Trump has heard from a wide range of conservative allies who have warned him that he will imperil his re-election chances if he makes a deal with Democrats on guns.

The country’s leading gun group has been embattled this year amid internal fighting, investigations, financial strains and scandal. An ongoing revolt against Mr. LaPierre has already led to the departures of the N.R.A.’s president and its top lobbyist, as well as five board members, including NASCAR team owner Richard Childress, who resigned this week.

Many of those who oppose Mr. LaPierre internally harbor hard-line gun rights views and want him gone before the 2020 election cycle begins in earnest. But the period after the shootings has provided Mr. LaPierre with an opening to show off the N.R.A.’s organizing muscle.

Earlier this month, he said he “opposes any legislation that unfairly infringes upon the rights of law-abiding citizens.” Willes K. Lee, the second vice president of the N.R.A. board and a key ally of Mr. LaPierre, went further, tweeting recently that “Nothing short of disarming America satisfies @democrats. Give them NOTHING,” and even promoting the hashtag “#allguncontrolisracist.”

Earlier this year, the House passed its first two significant gun control measures in a quarter century. One of the bills would require background checks at gun shows and on internet sites, where private buyers and sellers can arrange to meet in person to complete a sale. A second bill would increase the waiting period after a potential buyer does not immediately pass a background check, a measure aimed at closing a loophole used by Dylann Roof, who killed nine people at a church in Charleston, S.C., in 2015.

Those measures have stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate.

So have the so-called red flag laws, which give police extra powers to confiscate firearms, and were the subject of a new study released this week by researchers at the University of California, Davis, which said that “this urgent, individualized intervention can play a role in efforts to prevent mass shootings.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A Common Trait Among Mass Killers: Hatred Toward Women

The man who shot nine people to death last weekend in Dayton, Ohio, seethed at female classmates and threatened them with violence.

The man who massacred 49 people in an Orlando nightclub in 2016 beat his wife while she was pregnant, she told authorities.

The man who killed 26 people in a church in Sutherland Springs, Tex., in 2017 had been convicted of domestic violence. His ex-wife said he once told her that he could bury her body where no one would ever find it.

The motivations of men who commit mass shootings are often muddled, complex or unknown. But one common thread that connects many of them — other than access to powerful firearms — is a history of hating women, assaulting wives, girlfriends and female family members, or sharing misogynistic views online, researchers say.

As the nation grapples with last weekend’s mass shootings and debates new red-flag laws and tighter background checks, some gun control advocates say the role of misogyny in these attacks should be considered in efforts to prevent them.

The fact that mass shootings are almost exclusively perpetrated by men is “missing from the national conversation,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom of California on Monday. “Why does it have to be, why is it men, dominantly, always?”

While a possible motive for the gunman who killed 22 people in El Paso has emerged — he posted a racist manifesto online saying the attack was in response to a “Hispanic invasion of Texas” — the authorities are still trying to determine what drove Connor Betts, 24, to murder nine people in Dayton, including his own sister.

Investigators are looking closely at his history of antagonism and threats toward women, and whether they may have played a role in the attacks.

Since the killings, people who knew Mr. Betts described a man who was offbeat and awkward; others recalled his dark rages and obsession with guns.

Those rages were frequently directed at female acquaintances. In high school, Mr. Betts made a list threatening violence or sexual violence against its targets, most of whom were girls, classmates have said. His threats were frightening enough that some girls altered their behavior: Try not to attract his attention, but don’t antagonize him, either.

“I remember we were all distant, like maybe we should just shy away from him,” said Shelby Emmert, 24, a former classmate. “My mom wanted me to just not associate. She said to stay away from Connor Betts.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00misogyny-02-articleLarge A Common Trait Among Mass Killers: Hatred Toward Women mass shootings gun control everytown for gun safety Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio

Mourners at a vigil for the victims of the shooting in Dayton, Ohio.CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, cited a statistic that belies the sense that mass shootings are usually random: In more than half of all mass shootings in the United States from 2009 to 2017, an intimate partner or family member of the perpetrator was among the victims.

(The study, by the gun control advocacy group Everytown for Gun Safety, defined mass shootings as those in which four or more people died, not including the gunman.)

“Most mass shootings are rooted in domestic violence,” Ms. Watts said. “Most mass shooters have a history of domestic or family violence in their background. It’s an important red flag.”

Federal law prohibits people convicted of certain domestic violence crimes, and some abusers who are subject to protective orders, from buying or owning guns. But there are many loopholes, and women in relationships who are not married to, do not live with, or have children with their abusers receive no protection. Federal law also does not provide a mechanism for actually removing guns from abusers, and only some states have enacted such procedures.

Judges can consider an individual’s history of domestic abuse, for example, under red-flag laws adopted in at least 17 states. Such laws allow courts to issue a special type of protective order under which the police can take guns, temporarily, from people deemed dangerous.

The National Rifle Association, the nation’s largest gun lobby, has opposed efforts to expand the situations in which individuals accused of abuse can lose the right to own guns, saying that doing so would deny people due process and punish people for behavior that is not violent.

But Allison Anderman, senior counsel at Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, said measures that facilitate the removal of guns from abusers “are a critical step in saving the lives of abuse survivors.” And given the link between domestic abuse and mass shootings, she said, these laws may also help prevent massacres.

The plagues of domestic violence and mass shootings in the United States are closely intertwined. The University of Texas tower massacre in 1966, generally considered to be the beginning of the era of modern mass shootings in America, began with the gunman killing his mother and wife the night before.

Devin P. Kelley, who opened fire on parishioners at a Sunday service in Sutherland Springs, on Nov. 5, 2017, had been convicted of domestic violence by an Air Force general court-martial, for repeatedly beating his first wife and breaking the skull of his infant stepson. That conviction should have kept him from buying or owning guns, but the Air Force failed to enter the court-martial into a federal database.

In attacking the church, Mr. Kelley appeared to be targeting the family of his second wife.

In a case that highlights the so-called boyfriend loophole, in 2016, a man who had been convicted of stalking a girlfriend and had been arrested on a charge of battery against a household member shot Cheryl Mascareñas, whom he had briefly dated, and her three children, killing the children. Because the man had not been married to or had children with the woman he was convicted of stalking, his conviction did not prevent him from having or purchasing guns.

A vigil to honor the female college students that were killed during a shooting in Santa Barbara in 2014.CreditJae C. Hong/Associated Press

A professed hatred of women is frequent among suspects in the long history of mass shootings in America.

There was the massacre in 1991, when a man walked into Luby’s Cafeteria in Killeen, Tex., and fatally shot 22 people in what at the time was the worst mass shooting in modern United States history. The gunman had recently written a letter to his neighbors calling women in the area “vipers,” and eyewitnesses said he had passed over men in the cafeteria to shoot women at point blank range.

“Even some of the incidents that people don’t know about or aren’t really familiar with now or don’t come to mind, there definitely is a thread of this anger, and misogyny,” said James M. Silver, a professor of criminal justice at Worcester State University who has worked with the F.B.I. to study the motivations of mass gunmen.

In recent years, a number of these men have identified as so-called incels, short for involuntary celibates, an online subculture of men who express rage at women for denying them sex, and who frequently fantasize about violence and celebrate mass shooters in their online discussion groups.

Special reverence is reserved on these websites for Elliot O. Rodger, who killed six people in 2014 in Isla Vista, Calif., a day after posting a video titled “Elliot Rodger’s Retribution.” In it, he describes himself as being tortured by sexual deprivation and promises to punish women for rejecting him. Men on these sites often refer to him by his initials and joke about “going ER” — or a murderous rampage against “normies,” or non-incels.

Several mass killers have cited Mr. Rodger as an inspiration.

Alek Minassian, who drove a van onto a sidewalk in Toronto in 2018, killing 10 people, had posted a message on Facebook minutes before the attack praising Mr. Rodger. “The Incel rebellion has already begun!” he wrote. “All hail Supreme Gentleman Elliot Rodger!”

A memorial for the victims of a van attack in Toronto.CreditCole Burston/Getty Images

And Scott P. Beierle, who last year shot two women to death in a yoga studio in Tallahassee, had also expressed sympathy with Mr. Rodger in online videos in which he railed against women and minorities and told stories of romantic rejection. Mr. Beierle had twice been charged with battery after women accused him of groping them.

Federal law enforcement officials said the F.B.I. was looking at whether the gunman in Dayton had connections with incel groups, and considered incels a threat.

Experts say the same patterns that lead to the radicalization of white supremacists and other terrorists can apply to misogynists who turn to mass violence: a lonely, troubled individual who finds a community of like-minded individuals online, and an outlet for their anger.

“They’re angry and they’re suicidal and they’ve had traumatic childhoods and these hard lives, and they get to a point and they find something or someone to blame,” said Jillian Peterson, a psychologist and a founder of the Violence Project, a research organization that studies mass shootings. “For some people, that is women, and we are seeing that kind of take off.”

David Futrelle, a journalist who for years has tracked incel websites and other misogynistic online subcultures on a blog called “We Hunted the Mammoth,” described incel websites as a kind of echo chamber of despair, where anyone who says anything remotely hopeful quickly gets ostracized.

“You get a bunch of these guys who are just very angry and bitter, and feel helpless and in some cases suicidal, and that’s just absolutely a combination that’s going to produce more shooters in the future,” Mr. Futrelle said.

Psychiatrists, however, say that the attention on mental health generated by mass shootings, and the common argument that mental illness is the explanation for these massacres, cannot explain the link between misogyny and mass shootings. Misogyny — or other types of hatred — is not necessarily a diagnosable mental illness.

Instead, said Amy Barnhorst, the vice chair of community psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, who has studied mass shootings, what ties together many of the perpetrators is “this entitlement, this envy of others, this feeling that they deserve something that the world is not giving them. And they are angry at others that they see are getting it.”

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‘Something Just Keeps Happening’: Dayton Shooting Hit a City Already in Pain

DAYTON, Ohio — First, the Ku Klux Klan came to town. Two days later, tornadoes destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses and obliterated entire neighborhoods in and around the western Ohio city of Dayton.

Then this past weekend, a gunman stormed onto a crowded sidewalk in the entertainment district — an area of town typically swarming with revelers who stay until the bars close in the early morning — and fired at least 41 shots into the crowd, killing nine people before he was shot dead by the authorities.

“Something just keeps happening,” said Amanda Hensler, an owner of a store, Heart Mercantile, that is across the street from where the massacre took place.

The day after the mass shooting — the second within a 13-hour period in America — residents flocked to Ms. Hensler’s store to buy T-shirts that read “Dayton Strong,” which has become something of a motto for this grieving, shocked city. The customers knew that the store would have them in stock because they had been printed three months earlier, after the catastrophic tornado outbreak.

Indeed, Dayton has been through a brutal six-month stretch, even before the Klan held a rally at the city’s downtown Courthouse Square. Since the beginning of February, the city has also endured a large infrastructure failure and federal indictments at City Hall.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158880543_b0ade202-6a0d-42df-b15f-234b481f7f8f-articleLarge ‘Something Just Keeps Happening’: Dayton Shooting Hit a City Already in Pain Whaley, Nannette L Tornadoes ku klux klan gun control Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio

Mourners attended a vigil this week in Dayton, which has faced several challenges this year.CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Seeing the city through all this has been Mayor Nan Whaley, 43, a blunt and outspoken second-term Democrat who is believed to have political ambitions beyond Dayton, a city with about 140,000 residents who have endured more trauma this year than many larger cities experience in a decade.

Since Sunday morning, when she first appeared before a throng of reporters, Ms. Whaley has found herself in the biggest moment of her political life — and at the worst moment of her city’s modern history. She has been a whirlwind presence across the city, too, talking to victims’ families, briefing reporters and working with the state’s Republican governor to form bipartisan alliances on gun policy.

And then there is the Twitter feud with the president of the United States.

“She’s going to be governor one day,” said Senator Sherrod Brown, a fellow Democrat who represents Ohio. Mr. Brown was not speaking of Ms. Whaley’s presence solely over the past few days, but over the whole, bad year.

“There have been these three big things, two of them tragic,” he said, “and then you put all that in the context of the past 30 years, with globalization. It’s sort of been one thing after another.”

In February — after a water line break left tens of thousands without water, but before the federal indictments of current and former local officials — Montgomery County granted the Klan a permit to come to town on the last weekend in May. Afterward, the city sued, arguing that a paramilitary-style rally would present serious public safety concerns. Officials ultimately agreed to a consent decree that limited the weapons the marchers could carry.

The rally cost the city at least $600,000 in security costs, but in the end, only nine Klansmen showed up. They were hemmed in by more than 700 law enforcement officers and were easily drowned out by the shouts and chants of the hundreds who had come out to oppose the march. When the rally ended uneventfully, it seemed that the potential for serious violence had passed.

The nine people who attended a Ku Klux Klan rally in May were drowned out by the shouts and chants of the hundreds who opposed the march.CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Two days later, the tornadoes hit.

“It was almost as if it was a metaphor of a divine nature,” said the Rev. Renard Allen Jr., the pastor of St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church, one of the larger churches in Dayton.

That tornado outbreak on May 27 devastated suburban communities and littered city streets with fallen trees. For weeks, residents lifted branches off strangers’ homes and served meals at temporary shelters.

“I think the tornadoes really brought the community together in a really bizarro kind of way,” said Shelley Dickstein, Dayton’s city manager. “We were very much still in the process of healing from the tornadoes when the mass shooting hit.”

When Ms. Whaley was elected to the City Commission at age 29, Dayton, like much of the industrial Midwest, was struggling to recover from a prolonged decline. Over the decades, factories and Fortune 500 companies had left Dayton. So had nearly half its residents.

But during her nearly six years as mayor, Ms. Whaley has presided over a downtown revival. Buildings that had long been vacant are being redeveloped. Some neighborhoods that had been emptied are seeing an infusion of new residents.

And during this time, Ms. Whaley has steadily built a larger profile for herself, taking on a leadership role in a national mayors’ organization, speaking openly about the toll of the opioid crisis on the state and briefly seeking the Democratic nomination for governor.

Two days after the rally, tornadoes destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses in the Dayton area.CreditAndrew Spear for The New York Times

“People see that she’s striving for a higher political level,” said Gary Leitzell, her predecessor as mayor, who said Ms. Whaley’s ambitions have been seen by some as overshadowing the concerns in some neighborhoods.

“I don’t dislike her,” he added. But, “I do not trust her.”

Still, among mayors across the country, Ms. Whaley has become something of a celebrity.

“She is just so smart, she’s so accessible, she’s so real. Like, what you see is what you get,” said Christine Hunschofsky, the mayor of Parkland, Fla., which endured the unwelcome spotlight last year when 17 people, including 14 students, were killed at a high school in her city. “She is definitely someone other mayors look up to and learn from.”

But on Sunday, it was Ms. Hunschofsky who had guidance for Ms. Whaley. While Dayton police officers were still outside Ned Peppers bar, collecting evidence and methodically combing the vast crime scene, Ms. Hunschofsky texted words of encouragement. Buddy Dyer, the mayor of Orlando, Fla., the site of the Pulse nightclub shooting in June 2016 that left 49 people dead and more than 50 wounded, called Ms. Whaley. So did Bill Peduto, the mayor of Pittsburgh, where 11 people were killed in a synagogue last October.

At a vigil on Sunday, Ms. Whaley talked about joining an unfortunate fraternity of mayors whose cities had been the site of mass shootings. The crowd roared with approval for the mayor. A moment later, they drowned out the Republican governor, Mike DeWine, imploring him to push for tighter gun laws with chants of “Do something!”

Ms. Whaley said in an interview that she was not sure how Mr. DeWine would react. “After that I said to him, ‘I’m sorry, people are just wound up,’” she recalled. “He said to me, ‘Nan, that’s part of the job.’”

Ms. Whaley, who some think could be Ohio’s governor someday, met with President Trump on Wednesday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Since that vigil, the two have spoken every day, she said. They have effusively complimented each other at news conferences and tried to put on a bipartisan front for gun control proposals.

“She’s done a great job,” said Mr. DeWine, who grew up about 20 miles from Dayton. “Communities always look for leadership from the mayor when you have a crisis, and she’s stepped up.”

On Tuesday, Mr. DeWine proposed expanding background checks and enacting a version of a “red flag” law that would allow guns to be seized from people deemed dangerous. But feisty exchanges between Ms. Whaley and President Trump have not made a bipartisan alliance very easy.

[‘Red Flag’ Gun Laws Aren’t Airtight. But Officials Say They’ve Saved Lives.]

Before Mr. Trump visited the city on Wednesday, Ms. Whaley said she planned to tell him “how unhelpful he’s been” on gun policy. She also would needle him about mistaking Dayton for Toledo in a national address on Monday about the shooting.

After leaving Dayton on Wednesday, Mr. Trump said on Twitter that Ms. Whaley’s characterization of his visit was “a fraud.”

For her part, Ms. Whaley said on Thursday that she was relieved he had left town.

“We’ve got to get to the work of grieving and bringing our community together,” she said. “All of the national drama about what President Trump is thinking and what he’s not thinking, it’s not helpful to our community.”

And there has been no shortage of help needed in Dayton.

On Thursday, for Ms. Whaley, this meant a news conference at a children’s hospital, lunch with the governor and her regular appointment with a counselor, which she highlighted on Twitter to emphasize the importance of mental health.

Still, officials in Dayton were looking ahead. Plans were already underway, the city manager said, for a New Year’s Eve party to bid good riddance to 2019.

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Trump Echoes ‘Fox & Friends’ on Shootings. The New York Post Dissents.

Westlake Legal Group 05SHOOTINGMEDIA-02-facebookJumbo Trump Echoes ‘Fox & Friends’ on Shootings. The New York Post Dissents. Trump, Donald J School Shootings and Armed Attacks Santorum, Rick News and News Media New York Post French, David A Fox&Friends (TV Program) Fox News Channel El Paso (Tex) DAYTON, Ohio CNN Bush, George Prescott

In linking this weekend’s mass shootings to “gruesome and grisly video games” and inadequate treatment of mental illness, President Trump echoed talking points that emerged from conservative media strongholds even before his Monday address from the White House.

In his remarks, Mr. Trump condemned “racism, bigotry and white supremacy,” though he did not propose any new gun control measures, in keeping with several right-wing personalities who declined to endorse weapons bans in the hours after the massacres in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, left 31 dead and scores wounded.

Mr. Trump’s public statements often mirror comments made by pundits on Fox News, and there were striking connections between his remarks on video games and mental illness and what the cable network’s commentators said on Monday.

Pete Hegseth, a guest host on the morning Fox News program “Fox & Friends,” said on Monday’s broadcast that video games “desensitize folks to the violence.”

Mr. Hegseth’s co-host Ainsley Earhardt agreed, adding: “There’s so many different factors, you don’t know. I mean, maybe a child’s born with something — mental illness.”

“It does come back to that a lot,” chimed in the third host, Steve Doocy.

A day earlier on Fox News, Representative Kevin McCarthy, Republican of California and the House minority leader, had made the same argument about the supposed role that video games played in mass shootings. A “Fox & Friends” guest on Sunday, Dan Patrick, the lieutenant governor of Texas, took a similar line.

One reliably pro-Trump outlet, The New York Post, took a different tack, urging Mr. Trump to take action with an editorial billboarded on the tabloid’s front page with the headline “BAN WEAPONS OF WAR.”

It was not the first time The Post had spoken out in favor of gun regulation. In the wake of the shooting at a school in Parkland, Fla., in February 2018, in a front-page editorial, the tabloid argued for an assault-weapons ban. The headline for that edition was “MR. PRESIDENT, PLEASE ACT.”

In a statement on Monday, a spokeswoman for the newspaper said: “The New York Post has a long history of advocating for gun control, and today’s editorial speaks for itself.”

Rupert Murdoch, the influential media tycoon who controls The Post — as well as Fox News — has made his views in favor of stricter gun control legislation known at least since 2012, when he weighed in from his personal Twitter account on the school shooting in Newtown, Conn.

On “Fox & Friends” on Monday, however, Mr. Hegseth, whom Mr. Trump has considered for a post in his administration, took issue with The Post’s call to ban the sale of assault weapons in the United States. He suggested that shoppers at the El Paso Walmart where the shooting took place would have been better off if the store had not been a gun-free zone.

“This is Texas,” Mr. Hegseth said. “We would expect someone to immediately be shooting back. Well, not in a place where you’re told you can’t have a personal firearm. So it’s not as simple as saying, ‘Ban weapons of war.’”

Rick Santorum, a former senator and Republican presidential candidate, made a similar point about the perceived downsides of stricter gun control during an appearance on CNN on Sunday.

“They go to soft targets,” said Mr. Santorum, who is a regular CNN analyst. “So the whole point is, when you restrict guns to law-abiding people, you make more soft targets.”

Another conservative CNN pundit, David Urban, an adviser to Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign, insisted that addressing mental illness was more crucial to stopping mass shootings than any gun control measure.

“These people are twisted,” he told the CNN anchor Jim Sciutto. “They’ll find ways around that.”

After noting that high-powered weapons “have been available” for decades, Mr. Urban added, “What has changed in American culture that makes people do what they’re doing today?”

The first law enforcement officer arrived at the scene of the El Paso massacre six minutes after the shooting started. In Dayton, where nine people were killed and more than two dozen were injured, the police shot and killed the assailant within one minute of the first gunshots.

Some conservative commentators focused on legislation pertaining to high-powered weaponry, but George P. Bush, a Republican who serves as the Texas land commissioner, highlighted the role played by white nationalists in mass shootings in his public statements on Sunday and in an article published on The Atlantic’s website on Monday.

In the article, headlined “White-Nationalist Terrorism Must Be Stopped,” Mr. Bush, the son of former Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida, referred to recent testimony by the F.B.I. director, Christopher Wray, to argue that “most of the terrorist attacks in the U.S. are a consequence of white-nationalist terrorism.”

David French, a prominent “Never Trump” conservative who flirted with a presidential run in 2016, went further in an article on the website of the right-wing magazine National Review, blaming Mr. Trump and certain quarters of Fox News for giving comfort to white nationalists.

“Think of the thrills, energy and inspiration they’ve experienced from the highest office in the land — and from parts of the most popular cable network in the land — since Trump came down the escalator in 2015,” Mr. French wrote.

Outside the United States, many global news organizations focused on American racism and Mr. Trump.

In Australia, a headline for an opinion article in The Sydney Morning Herald on Sunday declared, “US in the midst of a white nationalist terrorism crisis.” A column in the German publication Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung argued that Mr. Trump “has not withdrawn the poison from the political climate of which he is a beneficiary, but has contributed to it becoming more and more widespread.”

People’s Daily, the main newspaper of China’s Communist Party, cited “controversial remarks allegedly inciting racial hatred” by Mr. Trump. Taiwan’s government-owned Central News Agency reported that his White House tenure had helped “promote the rationale of white nationalism.”

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9 Killed in Ohio Shooting

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Westlake Legal Group 04daytonshooting-video2-videoSixteenByNine3000 9 Killed in Ohio Shooting Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )

Officials said the gunman killed nine people and injured 27 others in less than one minute in a busy entertainment district.CreditCreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

The gunman who killed nine people, including his sister, early Sunday morning in Dayton, Ohio, wore a mask, body armor and hearing protection, and he possessed a high-capacity magazine capable of holding 100 rounds, the police said.

The gunman, identified as Connor Betts, 24, used what the police described as an “assault-style rifle” when he opened fire in a busy entertainment district in Dayton. A shotgun was also found in Mr. Betts’s car. Both guns were purchased legally, the police said.

The authorities said they still had not established a motive for the shooting. They said Mr. Betts arrived in the entertainment district Saturday evening with his sister, Megan K. Betts, 22, and another “companion.” Mr. Betts then split from the rest of the group for a period of time before opening fire, the authorities said.

Ms. Betts was not the first person killed in the assault, and it remained unclear whether Mr. Betts had sought to kill her, the police said. The companion was one of 27 people wounded in the attack, and the police said they had spoken to him.

“We do not have substantial information to answer the question everyone wants to know: Why?” said Richard S. Biehl, Dayton’s police chief. “We are very, very early in this investigation.”

Chief Biehl, who said officers killed Mr. Betts within 30 seconds of his opening fire, added that the police had no evidence that racial bias had motivated Mr. Betts.

The attack in the popular Oregon district occurred less than 24 hours after 20 people were shot dead at a Walmart store in El Paso. Chief Biehl said there was no indication of a link between the two shootings.

Asked if the Dayton gunman was on the police’s radar, Mr. Biehl said: “Not at all. Not at all.”

[For the latest updates on the El Paso shooting, read our live briefing.]

Along with Ms. Betts, eight people were killed. They ranged in age from 25 to 57. The police identified them as:

  • Lois L. Oglesby, 27, a black female;

  • Saeed Saleh, 38, a black male;

  • Derrick R. Fudge, 57, a black male;

  • Logan Turner, 30, a white male;

  • Nicholas P. Cumer, 25, a white male;

  • Thomas J. McNichols, 25, a black male;

  • Beatrice N. Warren-Curtis, 36, a black female;

  • Monica E. Brickhouse, 39, a black female.

Dayton, which was hit by 14 tornadoes in May, reacted in grief and shock. “We have suffered two tragedies in Dayton this year, but one was avoidable” Mayor Nan Whaley wrote in a statement that cited one tally of mass shootings compiled by a group that tracks them. (Using a different definition, there have been 32 mass shootings this year.) “This same tragedy has been inflicted on our nation 250 times this year alone,” the mayor wrote. “When is enough, enough?”

Relatives came forward to remember the victims. Mr. McNichols was “a great father, a great brother — he was a protector,” said Jevin Lamar, a cousin, in a phone interview. Everyone called him Teejay, Mr. Lamar said, adding that he played kickball at family gatherings.

Mr. Lamar said he also knew a second victim, Ms. Oglesby, who he said had at least two children, including a new baby. “Now she is gone, and they are never going to see their mother again,” he said.

Mr. Lamar said the Oregon district, where the shooting took place, was considered the safest place in the city to party.

“If you go anywhere else in Dayton, you could be shot by gang members or robbed,” he said. “But that strip is safe, because it’s nearby colleges. It’s the nice part of downtown Dayton.”

James Williams, 50, who owns a pizzeria called Double Deuce, had been seated with friends on the patio at Ned Peppers, the bar at the scene of the shooting, as a line of people waiting to get into the bar snaked along the sidewalk. Then he and his friends moved to a bar across the street called Newcom’s Tavern. Suddenly, they heard shots.

“We heard the bang-bang-bang-bang,” Mr. Williams recalled in a telephone interview on Sunday. “Everybody started rushing to the back of the bar. Then the shots stopped, and people were screaming, ‘Help!’”

Mr. Williams and his friend Holly Redman rushed back to Ned Peppers, and found bodies lying all over the ground outside. Officers at the scene were asking for belts to use as tourniquets, Mr. Williams said, so he offered his.

Ms. Redman, 31, a paraprofessional who works with disabled children and is certified in CPR, began helping an effort to save a man who had been shot in the groin.

They did chest compressions. Ms. Redman said she began breathing into his mouth, felt for a pulse, and stripped off her shirt to use to try to stem his bleeding.

“He was gurgling,” she said on Sunday. “I looked him in the eye. I tried to talk to him. I said ‘Hang on, buddy.’” But he didn’t survive.

She said another man next to her screamed a woman’s name.

“They were like ‘She’s gone,’” Ms. Redman said. “And he was like, ‘No. Please, God. Tell me it’s not true.’”

There were bodies “everywhere you looked,” she said. “It was like World War II. I just started crying and looking at all these people. That could have been us. Three or four minutes, and that could have been us.”

Mr. Williams said he was told that the bouncer at Ned Peppers had prevented the gunman from entering the bar, which opened onto a crowded dance floor. In a Facebook message, Ned Peppers said the bouncer was sent to the hospital for shrapnel-related injuries but was expected to recover.

Mr. Williams, who also has a civilian job at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base outside the city, said he had watched the news of the El Paso mass shooting earlier on Saturday. At the time, he said, he thought it was “just another mass shooting that we hear about all the time, and you never think it’s going to hit home.”

He said he counted at least seven bodies, including one in the doorway of Ned Peppers, which had been handcuffed. That was the gunman, he said the police told him. A backpack lay nearby.

“You just wouldn’t believe the people who have pulled together and tried to save these people, and there wasn’t any saving,” Mr. Williams said. “Most of them were probably dead.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158854863_0c503ab1-8d2b-484f-acb6-a71d66706627-articleLarge 9 Killed in Ohio Shooting Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )

Mayor Nan Whaley said officers on patrol in the area shot and killed the gunman within one minute of the first gunshots.CreditLuke Sharrett for The New York Times

The shooting began at 1:07 a.m. on East Fifth Street in the city’s Oregon entertainment district, which was bustling with more than one thousand late-night revelers enjoying a warm summer evening, Mayor Whaley said. Uniformed officers on routine patrol in the area responded, shooting and killing the gunman within one minute of his first gunshots, she said.

Mr. Betts appeared ready to exact an even higher toll. He was outfitted with a tactical vest, hearing protection, carried a rifle with .223-caliber ammunition and a high-capacity magazine that could hold up to 100 rounds. He had a shotgun in his car that was not used in the attack.

The police played a video recording of officers fatally shooting Mr. Betts and another tape in which dozens of gunshots could be heard as frightened people ran down a street.

The police said Mr. Betts had been trying to enter a crowded bar, Ned Peppers, when officers fatally shot him. Had he succeeded in getting inside the bar, Mr. Biehl, the police chief, said there would have been far more deaths.”

“Had this individual made it through the doorway of Ned Peppers with that level of weaponry, there would have been a catastrophic injury and loss of life, so stopping him before he got inside there — you saw all those people were running in there — was essential,” Mr. Biehl said.

No manifesto or social media presence has been found so far for Mr. Betts.

The police said they are treating Mr. Betts’ family like other victims given that they have lost their daughter.

Theo Gainey, 25, who lived for 10 years down the block from the Bettses and was a year ahead of Connor Betts in school, remembered him as a “bit of an outcast,” ostracized in large part because of threats he made at school that got him into serious trouble.

“He got arrested on the school bus” for the threats, said Mr. Gainey, who added that he was on the bus himself when it happened. He recalled Mr. Betts being a freshman or sophomore at the time. Mr. Gainey did not remember the specifics of the threats but said that Mr. Betts had to leave school for the rest of that year. When he returned, “the threat thing followed him, and people didn’t want to hang out with him.”

BELLBROOK, Ohio — The police searched a house in a quiet suburb southeast of Dayton early Sunday morning, where the man identified by the officials as the gunman lived with his parents.

The house is on a cul-de-sac that had been blocked on Sunday with temporary barriers, a strange sight in a neighborhood of otherwise peaceful homes of freshly mowed lawns and people doing yard work.

“Just like everybody else in the world, you don’t expect it to be a few blocks from your place,” said Brian Harris, who was standing up the street with his wife, Diane; they own a machine shop. “This is one of the safest places,” Ms. Harris said.

Nikki Peralli, 25, remembered the suspected gunman, Mr. Betts, only as “tall, skinny and brown-haired.”

Brad Howard, 25, said he had known Mr. Betts since before kindergarten and rode the bus with him to school for years, talking about rock bands like the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Mr. Howard added, “Obviously, if you’re going to go and make an action like that — if you’re going to do that — there’s clearly something that had caused that in his mind.”

He had not talked with Mr. Betts for months, he said. “I had a bunch of missed calls, I opened my phone,” he said. “It was just another one of those things, just a kick in the teeth.”

Cassandra Lopez, 23, said she first thought the gunshots were part of the music.

She and five of her friends were at Ned Peppers for a “normal Saturday night” when they heard what she said were about 25 shots.

“I told my friend I was going to go to the back patio because I needed some air,” Ms. Lopez said Sunday in a telephone interview. “It was really hot in there. As I was walking towards the back, guns just started going off like crazy.”

“The next thing I knew, bodies were hitting the floor,” she added. “People were screaming and crying. I was on the floor, I couldn’t get up, I got trampled.”

In all, Ms. Lopez said she was on the floor for roughly two minutes, until someone helped her up and escorted her to safety. She told the police: “We just couldn’t get up. Too many people. Shoes everywhere.”

Ms. Lopez said she was injured in the chaos, but had not yet gone to the hospital to seek treatment. “I have a couple of pieces of glass that’s stuck in my foot,” she said. “Little shards. I’m banged up all over. My ribs are bruised, my knees are bruised. I lost my shoes, my clothes are ruined.”

She said none of her friends were seriously injured. The shooting took place outside the bar.

“It’s crazy, we can’t even go to a bar and have a drink without something like this happening,” she said.

Mayor Whaley said that the mayors of some 50 cities around the nation had contacted her. “Sadly, this isn’t something only the city of Dayton has experienced,” she said. “It’s sad to me that now Dayton is one of these communities as well.”

Ms. Whaley said that victims, including one who is in critical condition and several who were in serious condition, were receiving treatment at local hospitals.

An employee at Ned Peppers, a bar on the street, wrote in a post on Instagram that “all of our staff is safe and our hearts go out to everyone involved as we gather information.”

By The New York Times

It was the latest tragedy in one of the worst weeks in memory for gun violence in the United States. The shooting came less than a day after the El Paso massacre. Last week, a gunman killed three people and wounded 13 others in a shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy, Calif.

In all, there have been at least 32 mass shootings, defined as three or more killings in a single episode, in the United States this year.

On Twitter, most of the trending topics — the subjects talked about the most — were about gun violence. At one point Sunday morning, so many people used the phrase “another shooting” it became one of the nation’s top 10 topics.

Rod Rosenstein, the former deputy attorney general, wrote on Twitter late Saturday that “killing random civilians to spread a political message is terrorism.”

“F.B.I. classifies it as domestic terrorism, but ‘white terrorism’ is more precise,” Mr. Rosenstein said on Twitter. “Many of the killers are lone-wolf losers indoctrinated to hate through the internet, just like Islamic terrorists.”

Emergency crews on Sunday removed the bodies of victims of the shooting.CreditJohn Minchillo/Associated Press

President Trump weighed in on both of the weekend’s mass shootings early Sunday, writing on Twitter, “God bless the people of El Paso Texas. God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

In a second post, he wrote: “The F.B.I., local and state law enforcement are working together in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio. Information is rapidly being accumulated in Dayton.” He added: “Law enforcement was very rapid in both instances. Updates will be given throughout the day!”

Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio released a statement on Sunday expressing grief.

“Fran and I are absolutely heartbroken over the horrible attack that occurred this morning in Dayton,” he said, referring to his wife. “We join those across Ohio and this country in offering our prayers to victims and their families.”

Campbell Robertson, Mitch Smith, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Derrick Bryson Taylor and Daniel Victor contributed reporting.

Mass Shootings in 2019: A Week of Bloodshed Underscores the Scale of Violence

Aug 3, 2019

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Shooting at Festival in California Kills at Least 3

Jul 28, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 28xp-gilroy5-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 9 Killed in Ohio Shooting Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )
Day at a Shopping Center in Texas Turns Deadly

Aug 3, 2019

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Dayton Shooting Live Updates: Gunman Killed 9, Including His Sister

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Westlake Legal Group 04daytonshooting-video2-videoSixteenByNine3000 Dayton Shooting Live Updates: Gunman Killed 9, Including His Sister Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )

Mayor Nan Whaley said the suspected gunman had killed nine people and injured at least 27 in less than one minute. It was the second mass shooting in America in less than 24 hours.CreditCreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

The gunman who killed nine people, including his sister, early Sunday morning in Dayton, Ohio, had worn a mask, body armor, hearing protection and possessed a high-capacity magazine capable of holding 100 rounds, the police said.

The gunman, Connor Betts, 24, used what the police have described as an “assault-style rifle” when he opened fire in a busy entertainment district. A shotgun was also found in Mr. Betts’s car. Both guns were purchased legally, the police said.

The authorities said they still have not established a motive for the shooting, but that Mr. Betts had arrived in the entertainment district with his sister, Megan K. Betts, 22, and another “companion.” Ms. Betts was not the first person killed in the assault, and it remained unclear whether Mr. Betts had sought to kill her, the police said. The companion was wounded and the police have spoken to him.

“We do not have that answer at this time,” said Richard S. Biehl, Dayton’s police chief, about a possible motive for the attack.

Chief Biehl, who said officers had killed Mr. Betts within 30 seconds of his opening fire, added there was no evidence that racial bias had motivated Mr. Betts.

The attack in the popular Oregon entertainment district occurred less than 24 hours after 20 people were shot dead at a Walmart in El Paso. Chief Betts said there was no evidence of a link between the two shootings.

Along with Ms. Betts, eight people were killed. They ranged in age from 25 to 57. The police identified them as:

  • Lois L. Oglesby, 27, a black female;

  • Saeed Saleh, 38, a black male;

  • Derrick R. Fudge, 57, a black male;

  • Logan Turner, 30, a white male;

  • Nicholas P. Cumer, 25, a white male;

  • Thomas J. McNichols, 25, a black male;

  • Beatrice N. Warren-Curtis, 36, a black female;

  • Monica E. Brickhouse, 39, a black female.

Dayton, which was hit by 14 tornadoes in May, reacted in grief and shock. “We have suffered two tragedies in Dayton this year, but one was avoidable” Mayor Nan Whaley wrote in a statement that cited one tally of mass shootings compiled by a group that tracks them. (Using a different definition, there have been 32 mass shootings this year.) “This same tragedy has been inflicted on our nation 250 times this year alone,” the mayor wrote. “When is enough, enough?”

Relatives came forward to remember the victims. Mr. McNichols was “a great father, a great brother — he was a protector,” said Jevin Lamar, a cousin, in a phone interview. Everyone called him Teejay, Mr. Lamar said, adding that he played kickball at family gatherings.

Mr. Lamar said he also knew a second victim, Ms. Oglesby, who he said had at least two children, including a new baby. “Now she is gone, and they are never going to see their mother again,” he said.

Mr. Lamar said the Oregon district, where the shooting took place, was considered the safest place in the city to party.

“If you go anywhere else in Dayton, you could be shot by gang members or robbed,” he said. “But that strip is safe, because it’s nearby colleges. It’s the nice part of downtown Dayton.”

James Williams, 50, who owns a pizzeria called Double Deuce, had been seated with friends on the patio at Ned Peppers, the bar at the scene of the shooting, as a line of people waiting to get into the bar snaked along the sidewalk. Then he and his friends moved to a bar across the street called Newcom’s Tavern. Suddenly, they heard shots.

“We heard the bang-bang-bang-bang,” Mr. Williams recalled in a telephone interview on Sunday. “Everybody started rushing to the back of the bar. Then the shots stopped, and people were screaming, ‘Help!’”

Mr. Williams and his friend Holly Redman rushed back to Ned Peppers, and found bodies lying all over the ground outside. Officers at the scene were asking for belts to use as tourniquets, Mr. Williams said, so he offered his.

Ms. Redman, 31, a paraprofessional who works with disabled children and is certified in CPR, began helping an effort to save a man who had been shot in the groin.

They did chest compressions. Ms. Redman said she began breathing into his mouth, felt for a pulse, and stripped off her shirt to use to try to stem his bleeding.

“He was gurgling,” she said on Sunday. “I looked him in the eye. I tried to talk to him. I said ‘Hang on, buddy.’” But he didn’t survive.

She said another man next to her screamed a woman’s name.

“They were like ‘She’s gone,’” Ms. Redman said. “And he was like, ‘No. Please, God. Tell me it’s not true.’”

There were bodies “everywhere you looked,” she said. “It was like World War II. I just started crying and looking at all these people. That could have been us. Three or four minutes, and that could have been us.”

Mr. Williams said he was told that the bouncer at Ned Peppers had prevented the gunman from entering the bar, which opened onto a crowded dance floor. In a Facebook message, Ned Peppers said the bouncer was sent to the hospital for shrapnel-related injuries but was expected to recover.

Mr. Williams, who also has a civilian job at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base outside the city, said he had watched the news of the El Paso mass shooting earlier on Saturday. At the time, he said, he thought it was “just another mass shooting that we hear about all the time, and you never think it’s going to hit home.”

He said he counted at least seven bodies, including one in the doorway of Ned Peppers, which had been handcuffed. That was the gunman, he said the police told him. A backpack lay nearby.

“You just wouldn’t believe the people who have pulled together and tried to save these people, and there wasn’t any saving,” Mr. Williams said. “Most of them were probably dead.”

BELLBROOK, Ohio — The police searched a house in a quiet suburb southeast of Dayton early Sunday morning, where the man identified by the officials as the gunman lived with his parents.

The house is on a cul-de-sac that had been blocked on Sunday with temporary barriers, a strange sight in a neighborhood of otherwise peaceful homes of freshly mowed lawns and people doing yard work.

“Just like everybody else in the world, you don’t expect it to be a few blocks from your place,” said Brian Harris, who was standing up the street with his wife, Diane; they own a machine shop. “This is one of the safest places,” Ms. Harris said.

Nikki Peralli, 25, remembered the suspected gunman, Mr. Betts, only as “tall, skinny and brown-haired.”

Brad Howard, 25, said he had known Mr. Betts since before kindergarten and rode the bus with him to school for years, talking about rock bands like the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Mr. Howard added, “Obviously, if you’re going to go and make an action like that — if you’re going to do that — there’s clearly something that had caused that in his mind.”

He had not talked with Mr. Betts for months, he said. “I had a bunch of missed calls, I opened my phone,” he said. “It was just another one of those things, just a kick in the teeth.”

Cassandra Lopez, 23, said she first thought the gunshots were part of the music.

She and five of her friends were at Ned Peppers for a “normal Saturday night” when they heard what she said were about 25 shots.

“I told my friend I was going to go to the back patio because I needed some air,” Ms. Lopez said Sunday in a telephone interview. “It was really hot in there. As I was walking towards the back, guns just started going off like crazy.”

“The next thing I knew, bodies were hitting the floor,” she added. “People were screaming and crying. I was on the floor, I couldn’t get up, I got trampled.”

In all, Ms. Lopez said she was on the floor for roughly two minutes, until someone helped her up and escorted her to safety. She told the police: “We just couldn’t get up. Too many people. Shoes everywhere.”

Ms. Lopez said she was injured in the chaos, but had not yet gone to the hospital to seek treatment. “I have a couple of pieces of glass that’s stuck in my foot,” she said. “Little shards. I’m banged up all over. My ribs are bruised, my knees are bruised. I lost my shoes, my clothes are ruined.”

She said none of her friends were seriously injured. The shooting took place outside the bar.

“It’s crazy, we can’t even go to a bar and have a drink without something like this happening,” she said.

Image<img alt="Police at the scene of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Sunday.

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/05/us/05dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/05/us/05dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/05/us/05dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/05/us/05dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 2048w” sizes=”((min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 1004px)) 84vw, (min-width: 1005px) 80vw, 100vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/05/us/05dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Police at the scene of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Sunday.CreditTom Russo/EPA, via Shutterstock

The shooting began at 1:07 a.m. on East Fifth Street in the city’s Oregon entertainment district, which was bustling with more than one thousand late-night revelers enjoying a warm summer evening, Mayor Nan Whaley said. Uniformed officers on routine patrol in the area responded, shooting and killing the gunman within one minute of his first gunshots, she said.

“While this is a terribly sad day for our city, I am amazed by the quick response of Dayton Police that saved literally hundreds of lives,” she said at a news conference.

Ms. Whaley said that the mayors of some 50 cities around the nation had contacted her. “Sadly, this isn’t something only the city of Dayton has experienced,” she said. “It’s sad to me that now Dayton is one of these communities as well.”

A Toyota with a shattered back windshield sits parked at the scene of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio. Mayor Nan Whaley said officers on patrol in the area shot and killed the gunman within one minute of the first gunshots.CreditLuke Sharrett for The New York Times

Ms. Whaley said that victims, including one who is in critical condition and several who were in serious condition, were receiving treatment at local hospitals.

An employee at Ned Peppers, a bar on the street, wrote in a post on Instagram that “all of our staff is safe and our hearts go out to everyone involved as we gather information.”

By The New York Times

The police have identified the gunman as Connor Betts, 24, of Bellbrook, Ohio, but little else was immediately known about him or a motive for the attack.

Mr. Betts appeared ready to exact an even higher toll. He was outfitted with a tactical vest, hearing protection, carried a rifle with .223-caliber ammunition and a high-capacity magazine that could hold up to 100 rounds. He had a shotgun in his car that was not used in the attack.

The police said Mr. Betts had been trying to enter a crowded bar, Ned Peppers, when officers fatally shot him. Had he succeeded in getting inside the bar, Mr. Biehl, the police chief, said “there would have been a catastrophic injury.”

No manifesto or social media presence has been found so far for Mr. Betts.

“We understand that the public wants to know who this person is, and that will be released,” said Mr. Carper, Dayton’s assistant chief of police. “Obviously, we’re working very hard to give the public an answer as to what the motivation might have been.”

It was the latest tragedy in one of the worst weeks in memory for gun violence in the United States. The shooting came less than a day after the El Paso massacre. Last week, a gunman killed three people and wounded 13 others in a shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy, Calif.

In all, there have been at least 32 mass shootings, defined as three or more killings in a single episode, in the United States this year.

On Twitter, most of the trending topics — the subjects talked about the most — were about gun violence. At one point Sunday morning, so many people used the phrase “another shooting” it became one of the nation’s top 10 topics.

Rod Rosenstein, the former deputy attorney general, wrote on Twitter late Saturday that “killing random civilians to spread a political message is terrorism.”

“F.B.I. classifies it as domestic terrorism, but ‘white terrorism’ is more precise,” Mr. Rosenstein said on Twitter. “Many of the killers are lone-wolf losers indoctrinated to hate through the internet, just like Islamic terrorists.”

President Trump weighed in on both of the weekend’s mass shootings early Sunday, writing on Twitter, “God bless the people of El Paso Texas. God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

In a second post, he wrote: “The F.B.I., local and state law enforcement are working together in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio. Information is rapidly being accumulated in Dayton.” He added: “Law enforcement was very rapid in both instances. Updates will be given throughout the day!”

Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio released a statement on Sunday expressing grief.

“Fran and I are absolutely heartbroken over the horrible attack that occurred this morning in Dayton,” he said, referring to his wife. “We join those across Ohio and this country in offering our prayers to victims and their families.”

Campbell Robertson, Mitch Smith, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Derrick Bryson Taylor and Daniel Victor contributed reporting.

Mass Shootings in 2019: A Week of Bloodshed Underscores the Scale of Violence

Aug 3, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 03-xp-shootings-elpaso-promo-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v4 Dayton Shooting Live Updates: Gunman Killed 9, Including His Sister Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )
Shooting at Festival in California Kills at Least 3

Jul 28, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 28xp-gilroy5-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Dayton Shooting Live Updates: Gunman Killed 9, Including His Sister Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )
Day at a Shopping Center in Texas Turns Deadly

Aug 3, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 03Shooting-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Dayton Shooting Live Updates: Gunman Killed 9, Including His Sister Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )

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Dayton, Ohio, Shooting: Victims Identified; Live Updates

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Westlake Legal Group 04daytonshooting-video2-videoSixteenByNine3000 Dayton, Ohio, Shooting: Victims Identified; Live Updates Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Dayton, Ohio, Shooting (2019) DAYTON, Ohio Betts, Connor (1994- )

Mayor Nan Whaley said the shooter had killed nine people and injured at least 27 in less than one minute. It was the second mass shooting in America in less than 24 hours.CreditCreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Questions mounted about the motive of a gunman who killed nine people in a popular entertainment district in Dayton, Ohio, early Sunday morning, less than 24 hours after 20 people were shot dead at a Walmart in El Paso.

The gunman in Dayton was identified as Connor Betts, a 24-year-old white man from Bellbrook, a Dayton suburb. One of the victims was his sister, Megan K. Betts, 22.

Of the eight others killed, six were black.

The police say they are continuing to search for a motive and did not say whether the gunman sought to kill his sister or was aware that she was in the area Saturday night.

Mr. Betts was killed by the police, who responded to the mass shooting in less than one minute, the authorities said.

The other eight people who were killed ranged in age from 25 to 57. The police identified them as:

  • Lois L. Oglesby, 27, a black female;

  • Saeed Saleh, 38, a black male;

  • Derrick R. Fudge, 57, a black male;

  • Logan Turner, 30, a white male;

  • Nicholas P. Cumer, 25, a white male;

  • Thomas J. McNichols, 25, a black male;

  • Beatrice N. Warren-Curtis, 36, a black female;

  • Monica E. Brickhouse, 39, a black female.

The authorities said it was unlikely that the gunman shot individuals based on their race.

“It’s hard to imagine that there was much discrimination in the shooting,” said Lt. Col. Matt Carper. “It happened in a very short period of time.”

Dayton, which was hit by 14 tornadoes in May, reacted in grief and shock. “We have suffered two tragedies in Dayton this year, but one was avoidable” Mayor Nan Whaley wrote in a statement that cited one tally of mass shootings compiled by a group that tracks them. (Using a different definition, there have been 32 mass shootings this year). “This same tragedy has been inflicted on our nation 250 times this year alone,” the mayor wrote. “When is enough, enough?”

Relatives came forward to remember the victims. Mr. McNichols was “a great father, a great brother — he was a protector,” said Jevin Lamar, a cousin, in a phone interview. Everyone called him Teejay, Mr. Lamar said, adding that he played kickball at family gatherings.

Mr. Lamar said he also knew a second victim, Ms. Oglesby, who he said had at least two children, including a new baby. “Now she is gone, and they are never going to see their mother again,” he said.

Mr. Lamar said the Oregon district, where the shooting took place, was considered the safest place in the city to party.

“If you go anywhere else in Dayton, you could be shot by gang members or robbed,” he said. “But that strip is safe, because it’s near by colleges. It’s the nice part of downtown Dayton.”

James Williams, 50, who owns a pizzeria called Double Deuce, had been seated with friends on the patio at Ned Peppers, the bar at the scene of the shooting, as a line of people waiting to get into the bar snaked along the sidewalk. Then he and his friends moved to a bar across the street called Newcom’s Tavern. Suddenly, they heard shots.

“We heard the bang-bang-bang-bang,” Mr. Williams recalled in a telephone interview on Sunday. “Everybody started rushing to the back of the bar. Then the shots stopped, and people were screaming ‘Help!’”

Mr. Williams and his friend Holly Redman rushed back to Ned Peppers, and found bodies lying all over the ground outside. Officers at the scene were asking for belts to use as tourniquets, Mr. Williams said, so he offered his.

Ms. Redman, 31, a paraprofessional who works with disabled children and is certified in CPR, began helping an effort to save a man who had been shot in the groin.

They did chest compressions. Ms. Redman said she began breathing into his mouth, felt for a pulse, and stripped off her shirt to use to try to stem his bleeding.

“He was gurgling,” she said on Sunday. “I looked him in the eye. I tried to talk to him. I said ‘Hang on, buddy.’” But he didn’t survive.

She said another man next to her screamed a woman’s name.

“They were like ‘She’s gone,’” Ms. Redman said. “And he was like, ‘No. Please, God. Tell me it’s not true.’”

There were bodies “everywhere you looked,” she said. “It was like World War II. I just started crying and looking at all these people. That could have been us. Three or four minutes, and that could have been us.”

Mr. Williams said he was told that the bouncer at Ned Peppers had prevented the gunman from entering the bar, which opened onto a crowded dance floor. In a Facebook message, Ned Peppers said the bouncer was sent to the hospital for shrapnel-related injuries but was expected to recover.

Mr. Williams, who also has a civilian job at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base outside the city, said he had watched the news of the El Paso mass shooting earlier on Saturday. At the time, he said, he thought it was “just another mass shooting that we hear about all the time, and you never think it’s going to hit home.”

He said he counted at least seven bodies, including one in the doorway of Ned Peppers, which had been handcuffed. That was the gunman, he said the police told him. A backpack lay nearby.

“You just wouldn’t believe the people who have pulled together and tried to save these people, and there wasn’t any saving,” Mr. Williams said. “Most of them were probably dead.”

BELLBROOK, Ohio — The police searched a house in a quiet suburb southeast of Dayton early Sunday morning, where the man identified by the officials as the gunman lived with his parents.

The house is on a cul-de-sac that had been blocked on Sunday with temporary barriers, a strange sight in a neighborhood of otherwise peaceful homes of freshly mowed lawns and people doing yard work.

“Just like everybody else in the world, you don’t expect it to be a few blocks from your place,” said Brian Harris, who was standing up the street with his wife, Diane; they own a machine shop. “This is one of the safest places,” Ms. Harris said.

Nikki Peralli, 25, remembered the suspected gunman, Mr. Betts, only as “tall, skinny and brown-haired.”

Brad Howard, 25, said he had known Mr. Betts since before kindergarten and rode the bus with him to school for years, talking about rock bands like the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Mr. Howard added, “Obviously, if you’re going to go and make an action like that — if you’re going to do that — there’s clearly something that had caused that in his mind.”

He had not talked with Mr. Betts for months, he said. “I had a bunch of missed calls, I opened my phone,” he said. “It was just another one of those things, just a kick in the teeth.”

Cassandra Lopez, 23, said she first thought the gunshots were part of the music.

She and five of her friends were at Ned Peppers for a “normal Saturday night” when they heard what she said were about 25 shots.

“I told my friend I was going to go to the back patio because I needed some air,” Ms. Lopez said Sunday in a telephone interview. “It was really hot in there. As I was walking towards the back, guns just started going off like crazy.”

“The next thing I knew, bodies were hitting the floor,” she added. “People were screaming and crying. I was on the floor, I couldn’t get up, I got trampled.”

In all, Ms. Lopez said she was on the floor for roughly two minutes, until someone helped her up and escorted her to safety. She told the police: “We just couldn’t get up. Too many people. Shoes everywhere.”

Ms. Lopez said she was injured in the chaos, but had not yet gone to the hospital to seek treatment. “I have a couple of pieces of glass that’s stuck in my foot,” she said. “Little shards. I’m banged up all over. My ribs are bruised, my knees are bruised. I lost my shoes, my clothes are ruined.”

She said none of her friends were seriously injured. The shooting took place outside the bar.

“It’s crazy, we can’t even go to a bar and have a drink without something like this happening,” she said.

Image<img alt="Police at the scene of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Sunday.

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/04/us/04dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/04/us/04dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/04/us/04dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/04/us/04dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 2048w” sizes=”((min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 1004px)) 84vw, (min-width: 1005px) 80vw, 100vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/08/04/us/04dayton-briefing-4/merlin_158860719_dfa6203b-306d-45dc-bc3e-0b9436d82b85-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Police at the scene of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Sunday.CreditTom Russo/EPA, via Shutterstock

The shooting began at 1:07 a.m. on East Fifth Street in the city’s Oregon entertainment district, which was bustling with more than one thousand late-night revelers enjoying a warm summer evening, Mayor Nan Whaley said. Uniformed officers on routine patrol in the area responded, shooting and killing the gunman within one minute of his first gunshots, she said.

“While this is a terribly sad day for our city, I am amazed by the quick response of Dayton Police that saved literally hundreds of lives,” she said at a news conference.

Ms. Whaley said that the mayors of some 50 cities around the nation had contacted her. “Sadly, this isn’t something only the city of Dayton has experienced,” she said. “It’s sad to me that now Dayton is one of these communities as well.”

A Toyota with a shattered back windshield sits parked at the scene of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio. Mayor Nan Whaley said officers on patrol in the area shot and killed the gunman within one minute of the first gunshots.CreditLuke Sharrett for The New York Times

Ms. Whaley said that victims, including one who is in critical condition and several who were in serious condition, were receiving treatment at local hospitals.

An employee at Ned Peppers, a bar on the street, wrote in a post on Instagram that “all of our staff is safe and our hearts go out to everyone involved as we gather information.”

By The New York Times

The police have identified the gunman as Connor Betts, 24, of Bellbrook, Ohio, but little else was immediately known about him or a motive for the attack.

Mr. Betts appeared ready to exact an even higher toll. He was outfitted in body armor, carried an “AK-style rifle” with .223-caliber ammunition and multiple high-capacity magazines, Ms. Whaley said.

No manifesto or social media presence has been found so far for Mr. Betts.

“We understand that the public wants to know who this person is, and that will be released,” said Mr. Carper, Dayton’s assistant chief of police. “Obviously, we’re working very hard to give the public an answer as to what the motivation might have been.”

It was the latest tragedy in one of the worst weeks in memory for gun violence in the United States. The shooting came less than a day after the El Paso massacre. Last week, a gunman killed three people and wounded 13 others in a shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy, Calif.

In all, there have been at least 32 mass shootings, defined as three or more killings in a single episode, in the United States this year.

On Twitter, most of the trending topics — the subjects talked about the most — were about gun violence. At one point Sunday morning, so many people used the phrase “another shooting” it became one of the nation’s top 10 topics.

Rod Rosenstein, the former deputy attorney general, wrote on Twitter late Saturday that “killing random civilians to spread a political message is terrorism.”

“F.B.I. classifies it as domestic terrorism, but ‘white terrorism’ is more precise,” Mr. Rosenstein said on Twitter. “Many of the killers are lone-wolf losers indoctrinated to hate through the internet, just like Islamic terrorists.”

President Trump weighed in on both of the weekend’s mass shootings early Sunday, writing on Twitter, “God bless the people of El Paso Texas. God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

In a second post, he wrote: “The F.B.I., local and state law enforcement are working together in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio. Information is rapidly being accumulated in Dayton.” He added: “Law enforcement was very rapid in both instances. Updates will be given throughout the day!”

Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio released a statement on Sunday expressing grief.

“Fran and I are absolutely heartbroken over the horrible attack that occurred this morning in Dayton,” he said, referring to his wife. “We join those across Ohio and this country in offering our prayers to victims and their families.”

Campbell Robertson, Mitch Smith, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Derrick Bryson Taylor and Daniel Victor contributed reporting.

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