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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "firearms"

Democrats Once Again Ask Us to Give Up Our Guns As They Promote Physical Conflict

Westlake Legal Group ar-15-protest-620x338 Democrats Once Again Ask Us to Give Up Our Guns As They Promote Physical Conflict Violence Politics Joe Biden Guns gun crime Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story diane feinstein democrats Chris Murphy ar-15 Allow Media Exception

If someone with an electricity problem came to me about it I would direct them to an electrician, not begin rattling off nonsense about how power cables are a danger to society and resorting to disproven ways of keeping us safe from electric shock and outlet fires.

Democrats seem to have this kind of mindset about firearms, and consistently rattle off “facts” and insight that is particularly ridiculous, especially given the fact that much of what they suggest only seems to worsen problems or, at the very least, exposes their ignorance.

It’s worse when politicians are on the campaign trail simultaneously suggesting that Democrats get physical with Republicans.

Diane Feinstein (D-Calif) and Chris Murphy (D- Conn) recently penned an article in TIME, once again calling for the ban of America’s most popular rifle, the AR-15.

The dystopian duo made the usual case you hear from Democrats trying to get you to give up your gun rights. There have been shootings and gun violence, and Republicans are standing in the way of lawmakers passing strict gun regulations that would magically make all of this stop.

It wouldn’t, and getting rid of guns in America would be impossible, as I explain in this video below.

They then begin asking why nothing is changing and throw out the “97 percent of people agree” line about universal background checks. This number was found by a Quinnipiac poll in 2018 and has remained highly suspect due to the fact that 97 percent of people simply don’t agree on anything. Furthermore, if 97 percent of people did agree, then it’s odd that a universal background check law hasn’t been passed by Congress since in a no-contest vote.

Regardless, the core of the article is talking about how Republicans are essentially the reason you keep seeing shootings happen, completely ignoring the fact that the majority of these shootings occur due to being in a gun free zone where people are pretty much guaranteed not to shoot back.

They then attempted to tell you, the reader, about what AR-15’s are used for.

“Guns like the AR-15 aren’t used for hunting and they’re not viable for home protection,” wrote the Democrats. “They have only one purpose, and that’s to fire as many rounds as possible, as quickly as possible.”

Expect not.

As David Rutz at the Free Beacon notes, many hunters do use the AR-15 for just that purpose, not to mention home defense:

However, the AR-15, the most popular rifle in America, is used for hunting and home defense. MRC-TV noted a poll showing more than 25 percent of hunters reported using the rifle to hunt big game. In addition, the rifle is popular for home defense given its light weight and limited recoil, making it easier for owners to handle.

The Daily Signal reported on eight recent examples of civilians using AR-15s to protect themselves and others, including a 15-year-old Texas boy who fought off two home invaders threatening him and his 12-year-old sister.

The Democrats finish by putting in on Republicans to fall in with Democrats on banning and restricting firearms and lists the classic Democrat warning of “people will die” if they don’t.

“Senate Democrats are ready to vote,” wrote the Democrats. “It’s time for Senate Republicans to show some courage and implement sane gun safety reforms. If we don’t, more will die.”

It should be noted that Democrats don’t truly care about the AR-15. Handguns are used far more in violent crime, and Democrats have more or less given up on going that route in their quest for gun control. The attack on the AR-15 is just an attempt to chip away at what they think is the weakest part of the wall.

The truth is that guns aren’t going anywhere. America’s foundation literally involves the use of guns by civilians as a method of keeping its government in check. The 2nd Amendment wasn’t created to protect us from deer and clay pigeons, but oppression. While it’s true that guns are used in malicious ways, they are also primarily responsible for saving lives either through law enforcement or self-defense.

Especially in an age where Democrats are getting more physical than ever, and with their leaders suggesting physicality on the regular — Joe Biden just did it on Monday — I’m not exactly feeling good about giving up my best means of defense. If politicians like Maxine Waters and Corey Booker are out there urging their base to find them wherever they are, get in their face, and make them feel unwelcome, then giving up our best means of defense is out of the question.

We live in an era where Antifa will literally show up at your door or assault you on the street. Where an angry mob may confront you while you’re trying to sit down to dinner. At some point, someone is going to take something too far and I’d rather be prepared than sorry.

The sheepdog doesn’t hand over his teeth to the wolves. You shouldn’t hand over your teeth either.

The post Democrats Once Again Ask Us to Give Up Our Guns As They Promote Physical Conflict appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group ar-15-protest-300x164 Democrats Once Again Ask Us to Give Up Our Guns As They Promote Physical Conflict Violence Politics Joe Biden Guns gun crime Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story diane feinstein democrats Chris Murphy ar-15 Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

At the N.R.A., a Cash Machine Sputtering

The tantalizing leaks have spilled out in the weeks since the National Rifle Association’s annual convention in Indianapolis devolved into civil war.

Amid anxiety over falling revenue and mounting legal trouble has come news that the gun group’s longtime chief executive, Wayne LaPierre, billed $275,000 for purchases at the Zegna luxury men’s wear boutique in Beverly Hills. Its largely ceremonial president, Oliver L. North, had a contract worth millions of dollars a year. And a litany of payments benefited prominent officials, like the $60,000 for advertising on a TV show featuring the rock musician and N.R.A. board member Ted Nugent.

But behind the internecine squabbling lie deeper financial problems. A review of tax records by The New York Times shows that, to steady its finances, the powerful lobbying group has increasingly relied on cash infusions and other transactions involving its affiliated foundation — at least $206 million worth since 2010.

The role of the foundation is among the issues being examined in a new investigation into the N.R.A.’s tax-exempt status by the New York attorney general, Letitia James. The N.R.A. and the charity received separate letters last month from Ms. James’s office ordering them to preserve pertinent records, according to several people who had seen them.

At issue for investigators, tax experts say, would be whether that money was being used for charitable purposes, as required by law, and not to help finance the N.R.A.’s political activities.

The N.R.A.’s financial woes — what Mr. North called an “existential crisis” — are at the root of the power struggle that has pitted Mr. LaPierre, the public face of the American gun-rights movement, against Mr. North, a right-wing celebrity since the Iran-contra scandal in the 1980s. Also enmeshed in the conflict is the N.R.A.’s longtime and now estranged advertising firm, Ackerman McQueen.

Many of the latest revelations came in a cache of internal documents posted online and spotted last week by a reporter for the Washington Free Beacon, a conservative website. In addition to his Beverly Hills wardrobe purchases, Mr. LaPierre, who earns more than $1.4 million a year, billed $267,000 in personal expenses, including flights and limousine service for trips to the Bahamas, Florida, Nevada, Budapest and an Italian lake resort, the leaked documents show. He even arranged for Ackerman to pay an intern’s rent.

As for Mr. North, while the N.R.A’s presidency is traditionally unpaid, he was agitating to change that — in spite of a lucrative perk, a contract with Ackerman that, according to Mr. LaPierre, paid him “millions of dollars annually.” And Ackerman has been reaping $40 million a year, even though its signature product, the online streaming service NRATV, has minuscule web traffic.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_154060788_cd224401-b701-40c0-b967-c0e78cd3ce28-articleLarge At the N.R.A., a Cash Machine Sputtering NRATV North, Oliver National Rifle Assn LaPierre, Wayne gun control firearms Executive Compensation Conflicts of Interest Ackerman McQueen Inc

Oliver L. North’s departure as president was announced at the N.R.A.’s annual meeting in April.CreditScott Olson/Getty Images

Many N.R.A. officials have said its woes are overstated. Opponents “are trying to paint this false narrative that we’re in deep financial trouble, and I think it’s wishful thinking on their part,” Todd Rathner, a lobbyist and longtime N.R.A. board member, said in an interview.

But signs of stress are evident.

Member dues fell to their lowest level in a half-decade in 2017, after President Trump’s election. A legal battle in New York threatens a gun owners’ insurance program that the N.R.A. had envisioned as a financial lifeline. And the group’s $25 million line of credit, secured by the deed to its headquarters in the Washington suburbs, is nearly tapped out.

Against that backdrop, the N.R.A. has found a variety of ways to draw money from its foundation, which over the years has provided financial support for a wide range of gun safety programs and special training programs for women, children and people with disabilities.

Originally, the N.R.A. promised to provide free office space and staff when it set up the foundation in 1991, but it now charges more than $6 million a year for that. Outright transfers from the foundation listed for charitable purposes have also risen fivefold since 2001, and exceed $100 million since 2012.

“It tells me that the N.R.A. itself is in very poor financial health and they’re being subsidized in large part by their foundation,” said David Nelson, a former partner at Ernst & Young who has specialized in tax-exempt groups. “They’re kind of running the organization into the ground.”

While both the N.R.A. and the foundation are tax-exempt, only donations to the foundation are tax-deductible, because the N.R.A. takes part in political activity.

“We know that people can get their tax deductions by giving to the foundation, so you’d rather give to that than the N.R.A., but the N.R.A. is the one spending all the money,” Mr. Nelson added.

N.R.A. officials said they had followed appropriate accounting rules, and that transfers reflected the foundation’s evolution.

“As the foundation has grown over the years, so has its use of N.R.A. office space, supplies and staff,” Christie Majors, the foundation’s finance director, said in a statement.

Mr. North had moved to change the N.R.A. presidency, traditionally a ceremonial role, into a paid position.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

Regarding Mr. LaPierre’s spending, William A. Brewer III, a lawyer for the N.R.A., said in a statement that “there is no suggestion that any of Mr. LaPierre’s expenses were improper in any way.” As to why travel and wardrobe expenses were billed through a contractor, and not directly through the N.R.A. — an arrangement that may also interest investigators — Mr. Brewer said it was a practice “abandoned some time ago” that had been done “for confidentiality and security purposes.”

Mr. Brewer’s role has also been a flash point; he is the brother-in-law of Ackerman’s chief executive, and the ad firm’s allies saw a family feud as the backdrop when the N.R.A. recently sued Ackerman McQueen. Before Mr. North left the N.R.A., he called for an internal review of billings by Mr. Brewer’s firm. In a recently leaked letter, Mr. North said that for the last year, the firm had been paid nearly $100,000 a day, “draining N.R.A. cash at mind-boggling speed.” (An N.R.A. official said that characterization “reflects a misinformed view.”)

The power struggle has yet to abate. On Tuesday, Allen B. West, a former congressman, became the first board member since the convention to call on Mr. LaPierre to resign. He accused the current leadership of “outright lies” and said board members had not been made aware of the controversial spending practices. “It is imperative that the N.R.A. cleans its own house,” Mr. West said in a statement.

In response, Carolyn Meadows, the N.R.A.’s new president, and two other senior officials said that board members had been apprised of the issues and had ample opportunity to delve into the details at the Indianapolis convention.

With the 2020 election looming, President Trump wants the N.R.A. to get back on track; he tweeted last month for the N.R.A. to “stop the internal fighting, & get back to GREATNESS — FAST!”

Despite the president’s ardent support for the N.R.A.’s agenda, he has been part of the problem. The $128 million in dues the group reported in 2017 was the lowest since 2012; fund-raising often slips when Republicans take over the White House and N.R.A. members’ worries recede.

“We have an unusual business model,” Mr. Rathner said. “The more successful we are, the less money we make, but clearly that doesn’t stop us from doing the job our members expect us to do, and as history has proven, we find ways to make it back each election cycle.”

The call came at 2:58 p.m. on a Wednesday in April.

Mr. North was on the phone. He had called a senior aide to Mr. LaPierre to convey a message. Mr. North, a retired marine lieutenant colonel and right-wing celebrity since the Iran-contra scandal in the 1980s, warned that if Mr. LaPierre didn’t retire, a damaging letter would be delivered to the N.R.A. board.

Mr. LaPierre was taken aback.

“I was forced to confront one of those defining choices, styled, in the parlance of extortionists, as an offer I couldn’t refuse,” he wrote to the board. “I refused it.”

President Trump, who was the gun lobby’s favored candidate in 2016, appeared at the N.R.A.’s annual meeting last month.CreditBryan Woolston/Reuters

The feud played out swiftly, with Mr. LaPierre, a veteran inside operator, easily outmaneuvering Mr. North, who was ousted a few days later.

But Mr. North’s threat effectively came to fruition in the recent leaks that documented not only Mr. LaPierre’s wardrobe and assorted expenses, but also a menu of other N.R.A. perks.

Marion Hammer, a longtime board member and lobbyist, received $270,000 in consulting fees from the gun group last year. The N.R.A. also paid David Keene, a former president, $40,000 last year, even as he was enmeshed in the scandal involving his one-time business partner Maria Butina, a Russian who pleaded guilty to being a covert foreign agent.

And there was the nearly $14,000 Ackerman paid over three months, at Mr. LaPierre’s request, to rent an apartment in Virginia for a young woman who was then a summer intern, and is now an N.R.A. employee.

“The N.R.A. was introduced to this young lady by her father, who is a local first responder and longtime N.R.A. member,” said Andrew Arulanandam, an N.R.A. spokesman, who added that the accommodation was made after housing at a nearby university, where interns typically stayed, became unavailable.

Ms. Meadows, the new president, called the revelations “stale news — being recycled by those with personal agendas.”

Such payments are likely to be scrutinized by Ms. James’s office, which is examining “transactions between the N.R.A. and its board members, unauthorized political activity, and potentially false or misleading disclosures in regulatory filings,” according to a copy of a letter sent to the N.R.A. and reviewed by The Times. (The attorney general of New York has jurisdiction because the N.R.A. was established there.)

Federal rules restrict transactions that confer economic benefits on high-ranking employees of tax-exempt organizations. A number of such transactions have already drawn scrutiny, and others are emerging.

The N.R.A., for instance, has for several years held its World Shooting Championship at Peacemaker National Training Center in Glengary, W.V. The center, which received $70,500 last year for hosting the competition, is owned by Cole McCulloch, the N.R.A.’s director of competitive shooting, according to a document among those recently leaked.

Letitia James, center, the new attorney general of New York, is investigating the gun group’s tax-exempt status.CreditSeth Wenig/Associated Press

Mr. Arulanandam said Mr. McCulloch’s ownership of the shooting range had been disclosed to the gun group’s general counsel “and approved by the N.R.A. Audit Committee.”

It was Ms. James’s threats to investigate the N.R.A.’s tax-exempt status that led the N.R.A. to audit its contractors last summer, touching off the power struggle. N.R.A. officials have said Ackerman refused to turn over numerous financial documents. Ackerman has rebutted that, but some board members feared the N.R.A. was being overbilled.

It was a shocking standoff. The Oklahoma-based advertising firm has defined the modern N.R.A.’s voice, going back to the “I’m the N.R.A.” campaign in the 1980s. Ackerman’s top executive in the Washington area, Tony Makris, is a former business associate of Mr. LaPierre’s.

But Ackerman declined even to provide the N.R.A. with internal statistics on NRATV’s viewership. A review of data from Comscore, which tracks web traffic, suggests why that might be: The NRATV site had just 49,000 unique visitors in January, and less traffic in March than Oklahoman.com, the website of Ackerman’s hometown newspaper.

The most contested document was a contract Ackerman struck with Mr. North. When Mr. North became president of the gun rights group a year ago, he left Fox News, and wanted to keep getting paid. But N.R.A. presidents, including celebrities like Charlton Heston, have served without pay. Last month, Mr. North wrote to two prominent N.R.A. officials to complain that because of the group’s “difficult financial situation, I am spending much more time on the road raising money” than expected.

Senior N.R.A. executives are well compensated; eight of them make more than the head of the American Red Cross, a tax-exempt organization with 10 times the revenue of the N.R.A. Mr. LaPierre’s total pay spiked in 2015 to more than $5 million because of an early retirement payout.

Mr. North did, in effect, turn the presidency into a paid position by signing a deal with Ackerman to host an NRATV web series called “American Heroes,” though Mr. LaPierre told the board that Mr. North appeared in only three of the dozen expected episodes.

N.R.A. officials have said Mr. North was not supposed to work directly for the group’s contractor, because of the potential for conflicts of interest.

Mr. North has rebutted that.

“Wayne knew about my contract since its inception,” he wrote in his letter to the two N.R.A. officials. “Wayne helped negotiate the contract.”

The N.R.A. has nearly tapped out a $25 million line of credit secured by the deed to its headquarters in the Washington suburbs.CreditJustin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

Some members believe the group has been woefully managed. In a recent open letter, Steve Hoback, a former N.R.A. official in its training department, warned that the organization had “become the swamp that many have lashed out against in our Federal government.”

Another former staff member, Andrew Lander, wrote in his own open letter that “the things that are taking place within the organization, I feel are things that corrupt Congressmen would be doing” — not, he said, the leaders of the “oldest civil rights organization in the country.”

The extent of the group’s financial problems has in some ways been masked by the foundation, which is sitting on more than $29 million that is counted as an asset on the N.R.A.’s books. Without it, the N.R.A. would have a negative net worth. The gun group said the money was largely an endowment set up for the N.R.A., but also encompassed reimbursements to the N.R.A. — for staff, supplies and rent — that had not yet been transferred.

Marcus Owens, a partner at Loeb & Loeb who served for a decade as director of the exempt organizations division of the Internal Revenue Service, said the sums moving to the N.R.A. from the foundation were “substantial related-party transactions,” and that “in normal times, they would attract regulatory attention from the I.R.S. and a state attorney general.”

Opponents see opportunity.

“Each day, there’s a new drip, drip, drip,” said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, a gun control group. “The N.R.A. is not a gun advocacy organization but a business that has been engaged in self-dealing, awarding contracts with little accountability to their friends, and it seems like a business run amok. It’s questionable whether they can play in 2020 the way they have in the past.”

Such groups showed unusual financial strength in the recent midterm elections. Take Nevada. For years, there had been a push to close loopholes in background checks related to private gun sales, culminating in a successful 2016 ballot initiative. Adam Laxalt, then the state’s Republican attorney general, appeared in a commercial opposing the measure, and was criticized when he later helped block it from going into effect.

When Mr. Laxalt ran for governor last year, he had the N.R.A.’s endorsement and A+ rating, and was fiercely opposed by gun control groups. He lost to Steve Sisolak, a Democrat who in February signed background check legislation into law.

“That is Exhibit 1 of their diminishing power, and their inability to do what they used to do,” Mr. Feinblatt said.

Mr. Rathner, the lobbyist and longtime N.R.A. board member, sees it differently. The organization’s members, he said, pay their dues “to protect them from anti-gun legislation and anti-gun policies, and quite frankly, we gave them a president who appointed two good Supreme Court justices and over 100 lower court judges to protect them for a generation or two. And we did that because that’s what our members expect us to do.”

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N.R.A. President to Step Down as New York Attorney General Investigates

INDIANAPOLIS — Oliver L. North announced on Saturday that he would not serve a second term as the National Rifle Association’s president, deciding to step down as the organization grappled with a bitter dispute over its future and its worst leadership crisis in decades.

He made the announcement as the N.R.A. faced a challenge from the New York attorney general, Letitia James, who had opened an investigation into the gun group’s tax-exempt status.

On Friday, Ms. James’s office sent letters instructing the N.R.A. and affiliated entities, including its charitable foundation, to preserve relevant financial records. Some of the N.R.A.’s related businesses also received subpoenas, according to people with knowledge of the inquiry. A lawyer for the N.R.A. confirmed the investigation.

The move by Ms. James came amid a stunning internal power struggle that took a major turn on Saturday when Mr. North, in a letter that was read on his behalf at the N.R.A.’s convention, said he would not be renominated. He and insurgents in the N.R.A. this past week had been trying to oust Wayne LaPierre, the group’s longtime chief executive.

“It was a great privilege to serve as your president this past year,” Mr. North said in the letter. He added that the N.R.A. had “a clear crisis” that it needed to deal with “immediately and responsibly,” and that he had recently created a committee to investigate financial improprieties.

His move appeared to end the struggle against Mr. LaPierre, though it was likely that their dispute would be fully resolved at a board meeting on Monday. Supporters of Mr. North spoke up during a contentious gathering after his statement, but Mr. LaPierre appeared to hold substantial support in the room.

Their standoff began on Wednesday, when Mr. North urged Mr. LaPierre to resign. On Thursday, Mr. LaPierre sent a letter to the board in which he accused Mr. North of threatening to release damaging information about him and other executives if he refused to step down.

The shadow cast by Ms. James’s looming action had in some ways spurred the confrontation unfolding at the N.R.A.’s annual convention.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_153871365_999d87b7-d0b5-4e53-9fc1-35fd2b714972-articleLarge N.R.A. President to Step Down as New York Attorney General Investigates United States Politics and Government NRATV North, Oliver L Nonprofit Organizations National Rifle Assn LaPierre, Wayne James, Letitia Iran-Contra Affair gun control firearms Cuomo, Andrew M Ackerman McQueen Inc

The New York attorney general, Letitia James, had promised to investigate the N.R.A. before her election last year.CreditMandel Ngan/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Even before her election last year, Ms. James had promised to investigate the organization’s tax status, and had told Ebony magazine that the N.R.A. held itself “out as a charitable organization” but was actually “a terrorist organization.”

She has special jurisdiction over the group because it was chartered in New York. Her office has broad authority to investigate nonprofits and can seek a number of potential remedies against them in court; a previous inquiry by Ms. James’s predecessors led to the shuttering of President Trump’s charitable foundation, a far smaller enterprise.

“The N.R.A. will fully cooperate with any inquiry into its finances,” William A. Brewer III, the N.R.A.’s outside counsel, said in a statement on Saturday. “The N.R.A. is prepared for this, and has full confidence in its accounting practices and commitment to good governance.”

Ms. James’s office declined to comment.

Mr. Brewer has assailed Ms. James in the past for threatening to investigate the N.R.A. before she was elected, saying she was embarking on “a taxpayer-funded fishing expedition.”

But such warnings were taken seriously, and last August the N.R.A. embarked on a review of its relationships with all of its contractors.

N.R.A. officials, including Mr. LaPierre, have said that its most prominent contractor, the Oklahoma-based ad firm Ackerman McQueen, did not comply with its requests to turn over financial records, a contention that Ackerman has contested.

The dispute led the N.R.A. to sue Ackerman earlier this month, and the lawsuit is at the heart of the infighting. Mr. North is an employee of Ackerman and is paid “millions of dollars annually” by the company, Mr. LaPierre told the board on Thursday. Mr. North had sided with Ackerman in the legal battle, alarming some board members.

The legal fight has crippled a longstanding relationship between the N.R.A. and Ackerman, two organizations that are tightly intertwined. Ackerman came up with memorable lines such as Charlton Heston’s proclamation that his gun would have to be pried “from my cold, dead hands.” Ackerman also developed NRATV, a controversial online streaming network that had aroused concerns among some board members for straying too far from gun rights. The network’s personalities warned of race wars and portrayed the talking trains in the children’s show “Thomas & Friends” in Ku Klux Klan hoods.

There are a number of potential issues that could arise in Ms. James’s inquiry. Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that the N.R.A.’s affiliated charity, the N.R.A. Foundation, had transferred more than $100 million since 2012 to the N.R.A., and that it also lent the N.R.A. $5 million in 2017. Donations to the N.R.A. Foundation are tax-deductible, while those to the N.R.A. are not, and the transfers concerned some tax experts.

Mr. North was involved in a power struggle against Wayne LaPierre, the N.R.A.’s longtime chief executive.CreditEvan Vucci/Associated Press

The Times also reported that the N.R.A. had paid $18 million since 2010 to a company that produces “Under Wild Skies,” a hunting show on NRATV. Tyler Schropp, the N.R.A.’s advancement director, had a stake in the production company until at least 2017; nonprofit rules require a cautious approach for transactions that benefit key executives.

The Wall Street Journal has reported on multiple transactions benefiting firms with ties to N.R.A. officials, while The New Yorker further scrutinized internal conflicts within the organization.

Mr. North cited reporting by all three organizations as the impetus for actions he had recently taken, saying “these allegations of financial improprieties could threaten our nonprofit status.”

The latest developments come amid a variety of challenges for the N.R.A., including lagging contributions and an increasingly well-financed gun control movement, motivated by a string of mass shootings.

And the attorney general’s inquiry is not the only threat the gun group faces in New York. The N.R.A. is already in a legal battle with the administration of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo over insurance it offers to gun owners.

Speaking at the convention on Saturday, Mr. LaPierre lashed out at Mr. Cuomo, saying he “hates the N.R.A. and he hates our freedom.” He also asked how Ms. James’s description of the N.R.A. as a “terrorist organization” made its members feel. The crowd answered with a cascade of boos.

Going back to the late 1970s, the N.R.A. has had upheavals every couple of decades that have altered the organization’s trajectory. Board members see their meeting on Monday as the latest such defining battle.

Mr. North, who was recently installed as president, was the central figure in the Reagan-era Iran-contra affair and remains a hero to many on the right.

His announcement caught high-ranking members of the organization off guard. One member approached a reporter on Saturday outside a ballroom where the group was meeting, and asked, “Can you tell me what’s going on?”

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In N.R.A. Power Struggle, Insurgents Seek to Oust Wayne LaPierre

Westlake Legal Group in-n-r-a-power-struggle-insurgents-seek-to-oust-wayne-lapierre In N.R.A. Power Struggle, Insurgents Seek to Oust Wayne LaPierre Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Politics and Government NRATV North, Oliver L National Rifle Assn LaPierre, Wayne Iran-Contra Affair gun control firearms Cox, Chris W

INDIANAPOLIS — Turmoil wracking the National Rifle Association is threatening to turn the group’s annual convention into outright civil war, as insurgents maneuver to oust Wayne LaPierre, the foremost voice of the American gun rights movement.

The confrontation pits Mr. LaPierre, the organization’s longtime chief executive, against its recently installed president, Oliver L. North, the central figure in the Reagan-era Iran-contra affair, who remains a hero to many on the right.

Behind it is a widening crisis involving a legal battle between the N.R.A. and its most influential contractor, Ackerman McQueen, amid renewed threats from regulators in New York, where the N.R.A. is chartered, to investigate the group’s tax-exempt status. With contributions lagging, the N.R.A. is also facing an increasingly well-financed gun control movement, motivated by a string of mass shootings.

Mr. North asked Mr. LaPierre to resign on Wednesday, according to documents reviewed by The New York Times. He said he had also created a committee to review allegations of financial improprieties that threaten the N.R.A.’s status as a nonprofit organization.

But Mr. LaPierre, in a stinging letter sent on Thursday night to the N.R.A.’s board, accused Mr. North of threatening to leak damaging information about him and other N.R.A. executives unless he stepped down.

“Yesterday evening, I was forced to confront one of those defining choices — styled, in the parlance of extortionists — as an offer I couldn’t refuse,” Mr. LaPierre wrote. “I refused it.”

Even as the leadership tussled behind the scenes, President Trump addressed the N.R.A. faithful at the convention on Friday and proclaimed himself a champion of gun rights. In a speech that was part political rally and part pep talk, he said his administration would not ratify an arms treaty designed to regulate the international sale of conventional weapons.

The power struggle within the N.R.A. is an abrupt escalation of a legal battle between the organization and Ackerman McQueen. The Times reported earlier this year that prominent members of the N.R.A. board had grown dismayed at the performance of Ackerman because of its NRATV online media service, which has drifted into right-wing politics far beyond gun rights. Ackerman employs Mr. North, who hosts an NRATV series called “American Heroes.”

It is not clear whether Mr. North has the board support to oust Mr. LaPierre, who has led the N.R.A. for decades. Previously, the presidency has been a ceremonial position, though Mr. North, in documents reviewed by The Times, has asked for it to be a paid post. A key factor will be Chris Cox, who runs the N.R.A.’s Institute for Legislative Action and is effectively the group’s second-ranking official.

The dispute represents the N.R.A.’s deepest internal crisis since a struggle for control of the board in the late 1990s, when Mr. LaPierre and Ackerman were on the same side.

The crisis has led to the splintering of a more than three-decade relationship between the N.R.A. and Ackerman, which crafted such memorable lines as Charlton Heston’s proclaiming that his gun would have to be pried “from my cold, dead hands.” Ackerman’s NRATV has taken on an apocalyptic tone, warning of race wars, calling for a march on the Federal Bureau of Investigation and portraying the talking trains in the children’s show “Thomas & Friends” in Ku Klux Klan hoods.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_154022493_995b1c82-6d17-4a33-a84c-479473e643c1-articleLarge In N.R.A. Power Struggle, Insurgents Seek to Oust Wayne LaPierre Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Politics and Government NRATV North, Oliver L National Rifle Assn LaPierre, Wayne Iran-Contra Affair gun control firearms Cox, Chris W

The request for Mr. LaPierre’s resignation came from Oliver L. North, the N.R.A.’s recently installed president.CreditScott Olson/Getty Images

A lawsuit recently filed by the N.R.A. against Ackerman raised concerns that the company might have overbilled the N.R.A. and that Mr. North was conflicted in his duties because Ackerman paid him. Mr. North, it said, had refused to provide his contract with Ackerman to the N.R.A.

In the suit, the N.R.A. claimed that Ackerman had resisted providing financial records as part of a review of contractors it was conducting amid the threats of aggressive regulatory action.

“As you know, the N.R.A. has over this past year taken steps to strengthen its efforts to document and verify compliance by our vendors with our purchasing practices and their contracts,” Mr. LaPierre wrote in his letter on Thursday to the board. “We’ve met extraordinary resistance from one vendor — Ackerman McQueen.”

He noted that Ackerman paid Mr. North “millions of dollars annually,” and that Ackerman, via Mr. North, was threatening to release a letter that would be “a devastating account of our financial status, sexual harassment charges against a staff member, accusations of wardrobe expenses and excessive staff travel expenses.”

He also wrote that Mr. North said “the letter would not be sent — if I were to abruptly resign,” adding, “He stated that he could ‘negotiate’ an ‘excellent retirement’ for me.”

Later on Thursday evening, close to midnight, in his own letter to the board, Mr. North said he was creating a special committee to investigate allegations of financial impropriety reported by The Times, The Wall Street Journal and The New Yorker. “I did this because I am deeply concerned that these allegations of financial improprieties could threaten our nonprofit status.”

He also said he tasked the special committee with “investigating allegations of financial misconduct related to Mr. LaPierre” that have been made by Ackerman in the wake of the lawsuit.

In a statement, a lawyer for the N.R.A., William A. Brewer III, said the organization had been reviewing many of the issues raised by Mr. North since last year.

“In our view,” Mr. Brewer said, “the items involving Mr. LaPierre may reflect a misinformed view of his and the N.R.A.’s commitment to good governance.”

Ackerman McQueen declined to comment.

With the N.R.A.’s board due to meet on Monday, the crisis could come to a head soon.

“All of this is painful for me,” Mr. LaPierre wrote. “I will not judge Col. North, but must report what many of you already know: He has contractual and financial loyalties to AM.”

Mr. North, for his part, wrote, “We are facing a serious crisis,” adding, “To date, my repeated efforts to inquire about the propriety of management’s financial decisions have consistently been rebuffed.”

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In N.R.A. Power Struggle, Insurgents Seek to Oust Wayne LaPierre

INDIANAPOLIS — Turmoil wracking the National Rifle Association is threatening to turn the group’s annual convention into outright civil war, as insurgents maneuver to oust Wayne LaPierre, the foremost voice of the American gun rights movement.

The confrontation pits Mr. LaPierre, the organization’s longtime chief executive, against its recently installed president, Oliver L. North, the central figure in the Reagan-era Iran-contra affair, who remains a hero to many on the right.

Behind it is a widening crisis involving a legal battle between the N.R.A. and its most influential contractor, Ackerman McQueen, amid renewed threats from regulators in New York, where the N.R.A. is chartered, to investigate the group’s tax-exempt status. With contributions lagging, the N.R.A. is also facing an increasingly well-financed gun control movement, motivated by a string of mass shootings.

Mr. North asked Mr. LaPierre to resign on Wednesday, according to documents reviewed by The New York Times. He said he had also created a committee to review allegations of financial improprieties that threaten the N.R.A.’s status as a nonprofit organization.

But Mr. LaPierre, in a stinging letter sent on Thursday night to the N.R.A.’s board, accused Mr. North of threatening to leak damaging information about him and other N.R.A. executives unless he stepped down.

“Yesterday evening, I was forced to confront one of those defining choices — styled, in the parlance of extortionists — as an offer I couldn’t refuse,” Mr. LaPierre wrote. “I refused it.”

Even as the leadership tussled behind the scenes, President Trump addressed the N.R.A. faithful at the convention on Friday and proclaimed himself a champion of gun rights. In a speech that was part political rally and part pep talk, he said his administration would not ratify an arms treaty designed to regulate the international sale of conventional weapons.

The power struggle within the N.R.A. is an abrupt escalation of a legal battle between the organization and Ackerman McQueen. The Times reported earlier this year that prominent members of the N.R.A. board had grown dismayed at the performance of Ackerman because of its NRATV online media service, which has drifted into right-wing politics far beyond gun rights. Ackerman employs Mr. North, who hosts an NRATV series called “American Heroes.”

It is not clear whether Mr. North has the board support to oust Mr. LaPierre, who has led the N.R.A. for decades. Previously, the presidency has been a ceremonial position, though Mr. North, in documents reviewed by The Times, has asked for it to be a paid post. A key factor will be Chris Cox, who runs the N.R.A.’s Institute for Legislative Action and is effectively the group’s second-ranking official.

The dispute represents the N.R.A.’s deepest internal crisis since a struggle for control of the board in the late 1990s, when Mr. LaPierre and Ackerman were on the same side.

The crisis has led to the splintering of a more than three-decade relationship between the N.R.A. and Ackerman, which crafted such memorable lines as Charlton Heston’s proclaiming that his gun would have to be pried “from my cold, dead hands.” Ackerman’s NRATV has taken on an apocalyptic tone, warning of race wars, calling for a march on the Federal Bureau of Investigation and portraying the talking trains in the children’s show “Thomas & Friends” in Ku Klux Klan hoods.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_154022493_995b1c82-6d17-4a33-a84c-479473e643c1-articleLarge In N.R.A. Power Struggle, Insurgents Seek to Oust Wayne LaPierre Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Politics and Government NRATV North, Oliver L National Rifle Assn LaPierre, Wayne Iran-Contra Affair gun control firearms Cox, Chris W

The request for Mr. LaPierre’s resignation came from Oliver L. North, the N.R.A.’s recently installed president.CreditScott Olson/Getty Images

A lawsuit recently filed by the N.R.A. against Ackerman raised concerns that the company might have overbilled the N.R.A. and that Mr. North was conflicted in his duties because Ackerman paid him. Mr. North, it said, had refused to provide his contract with Ackerman to the N.R.A.

In the suit, the N.R.A. claimed that Ackerman had resisted providing financial records as part of a review of contractors it was conducting amid the threats of aggressive regulatory action.

“As you know, the N.R.A. has over this past year taken steps to strengthen its efforts to document and verify compliance by our vendors with our purchasing practices and their contracts,” Mr. LaPierre wrote in his letter on Thursday to the board. “We’ve met extraordinary resistance from one vendor — Ackerman McQueen.”

He noted that Ackerman paid Mr. North “millions of dollars annually,” and that Ackerman, via Mr. North, was threatening to release a letter that would be “a devastating account of our financial status, sexual harassment charges against a staff member, accusations of wardrobe expenses and excessive staff travel expenses.”

He also wrote that Mr. North said “the letter would not be sent — if I were to abruptly resign,” adding, “He stated that he could ‘negotiate’ an ‘excellent retirement’ for me.”

Later on Thursday evening, close to midnight, in his own letter to the board, Mr. North said he was creating a special committee to investigate allegations of financial impropriety reported by The Times, The Wall Street Journal and The New Yorker. “I did this because I am deeply concerned that these allegations of financial improprieties could threaten our nonprofit status.”

He also said he tasked the special committee with “investigating allegations of financial misconduct related to Mr. LaPierre” that have been made by Ackerman in the wake of the lawsuit.

In a statement, a lawyer for the N.R.A., William A. Brewer III, said the organization had been reviewing many of the issues raised by Mr. North since last year.

“In our view,” Mr. Brewer said, “the items involving Mr. LaPierre may reflect a misinformed view of his and the N.R.A.’s commitment to good governance.”

Ackerman McQueen declined to comment.

With the N.R.A.’s board due to meet on Monday, the crisis could come to a head soon.

“All of this is painful for me,” Mr. LaPierre wrote. “I will not judge Col. North, but must report what many of you already know: He has contractual and financial loyalties to AM.”

Mr. North, for his part, wrote, “We are facing a serious crisis,” adding, “To date, my repeated efforts to inquire about the propriety of management’s financial decisions have consistently been rebuffed.”

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Trump Pulls Out of Arms Treaty During Speech at N.R.A. Convention

Westlake Legal Group trump-pulls-out-of-arms-treaty-during-speech-at-n-r-a-convention Trump Pulls Out of Arms Treaty During Speech at N.R.A. Convention United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J National Rifle Assn gun control firearms
Westlake Legal Group 26dc-nra-sub-facebookJumbo Trump Pulls Out of Arms Treaty During Speech at N.R.A. Convention United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J National Rifle Assn gun control firearms

INDIANAPOLIS — In a speech to National Rifle Association members on Friday that was part political rally and part pep talk, President Trump called himself a champion of gun rights. Then he proved it, whipping out a pen onstage to sign a letter that would effectively cease America’s involvement in an arms treaty designed to regulate the international sale of conventional weapons.

Mr. Trump said that his administration “will never” ratify the Arms Trade Treaty, which seeks to discourage the sale of conventional weapons to countries that do not protect human rights.

Although the accord was brokered by the United Nations and signed by President Barack Obama, it has never been ratified by the Senate. Experts in arms control note that the accord, even if ratified by the Senate, would not require the United States to alter any existing domestic laws or procedures governing how it sells conventional weapons overseas.

Still, Mr. Trump said his decision to sign a letter asking the Senate to send the treaty back to the White House “is a big, big factor,” calling the accord a “badly misguided” arrangement.

To supporters of the decision, making certain that the United States does not ratify the treaty is one more step toward deregulation that Mr. Trump has championed. In a call with reporters, a senior administration said that a major factor in his decision was the lack of compliance with the treaty from other large conventional arms exporters, including China and Russia.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the United States had its own set of controls to ensure the appropriate sale of arms abroad, and added that the Trump administration opposed possible future amendments to the treaty up for consideration in 2020.

Critics see it as a concession to the gun lobby, and another effort by the Trump administration to distance itself from multilateral diplomatic initiatives — from the nuclear deal with Iran to the Paris climate agreement — that advocates say are meant to make the world a safer place.

The president’s action today is yet another mistaken step that threatens to make the world less safe, rather than more secure,” Thomas Countryman, a former assistant secretary of state for international security and nonproliferation and lead American negotiator on the Arms Trade Treaty, said in a statement.

Mr. Countryman also pointed out that a ratification of the treaty would not have caused the United States to change any existing laws or procedures governing how it sells the weapons.

“It is sad, but to be expected, that this president opposes efforts to require other countries to meet the high standards of U.S. military export decisions,” Mr. Countryman said.

Mr. Trump’s move means that the United States would be in the company of countries like North Korea and Iran, who abstained from participation in the treaty, and leaving behind a group of the world’s largest gun manufacturers, including France and Germany, who signed on.

But in Indianapolis, the president’s announcement prompted a standing ovation, as did some of the other red-meat campaign rally topics.

Mr. Trump touted gains in the economy and railed against a “corrupt” news media. He also disparaged the special counsel investigation into his campaign that he said had been part of a coup attempt carried out at the highest levels of the government.

“They tried for a coup, didn’t work out so well,” Mr. Trump said. “Didn’t need a gun for that one, did I?”

The president’s speech delivered a much-appreciated shot in the arm to an organization besieged by inner turmoil. A group known for deploying steely messaging toward its enemies, the N.R.A. — which billed itself as “freedom’s safest place” during its annual convention this year — fed attendees a steady diet of slogans to suggest that their beliefs, way of life and ability to protect themselves is at stake by Hollywood, politicians and the press.

Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence helped reinforce that idea in front of a stadium crowd as they took jabs at 2020 Democrats and the party’s most liberal factions.

“Under this president and this vice president,” Mr. Pence said, “no one is taking your guns.”

The N.R.A. was hit with a rebuke for its lobbying tactics this month when the Democratic-controlled House approved a revamped Violence Against Women Act that would bar those convicted of abusing, assaulting or stalking a domestic partner from buying guns. Mr. Trump disparaged this and other legislative attempts as a move by Democrats to ensure that “bad guys” keep their guns.

The legislative setback played out as the N.R.A. has endured scrutiny over desperate calls for fund-raising and a rare dirty-laundry lawsuit. Earlier this month, the N.R.A. sued the ad firm Ackerman McQueen, one of its closest contractors and the operator of its media arm and the NRATV channel, of mishandling $40 million that it and its affiliates receive annually from the association.

It has also been named in a lawsuit filed against the Federal Election Commission by the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which has accused the group of abusing campaign finance laws to funnel money toward Mr. Trump and several other Republicans. (In a statement, the N.R.A. called it a “lawsuit based on a frivolous complaint.”)

“There’s definitely some bad news and the N.R.A. internally is suffering from some major turmoil,” Adam Winkler, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, who specializes in the Second Amendment, said in an interview. “But there’s been some major success with Donald Trump.”

Members of the N.R.A.’s five-million-strong gun rights advocates who have supported Mr. Trump from his days as a long shot Republican presidential candidate, looked toward his visit as welcome fuel to continue battling well-funded gun control groups and Democrats in the House.

“The president is the most enthusiastic supporter of the Second Amendment that has occupied the White House in recent history,” Jennifer Baker, an N.R.A. spokeswoman, said in an interview. “He has embraced the N.R.A., and the members, and the hundreds of millions of law-abiding gun owners of this country.”

Ms. Baker added that N.R.A. members have been fervently pro-Trump since the beginning because they understood what was at risk. “Our members are pretty politically astute,” Ms. Baker said. “The Supreme Court was at stake, and in recent history we haven’t had a presidential nominee that was so unabashed and vocal about their support for the Second Amendment and our organization.”

In his public comments, the president has not always been the most reliable ally, and at times he has — at least momentarily — embraced the types of gun-control proposals favored by Democrats. In the days after a mass shooting at a Florida high school last year, the president encouraged lawmakers to stand up to the N.R.A., and suggested a policy of “take the guns first, go through due process second” for people thought to be mentally ill.

“They have great power over you people,” Mr. Trump told a group of lawmakers who gathered at the White House last February. “They have less power over me.”

Days later, the president retreated from those comments shortly after a private meeting with N.R.A. leaders. He has since pushed for a ban on bump stocks — a modest move considered to be no great loss by the N.R.A. — and suggested that the arming of teachers could make schools safer.

The Trump administration has largely decided to blame gun violence on access to mental health care over curbing access to guns. But according to a recent Reuters poll, the majority of Americans support tougher gun control laws, even if they have little faith that lawmakers will be able to pass them.

“After Parkland, President Trump said he’d support common-sense gun safety laws, but instead, his administration has simply recycled tired gun lobby rhetoric in attempt to juice slumping gun sales,” Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, said in a statement.

“The majority of Americans, including the majority of Republicans and gun owners, support common-sense gun laws,” Ms. Watts said. “It’s infuriating to watch the president and vice president continue to prioritize the gun lobby’s profits over the safety of the American people.”

Gun rights advocates say Mr. Trump has delivered in an area where many of them say it matters most: reordering the judiciary by appointing two Supreme Court justices.

In its next term, in October, the Supreme Court will take up its first Second Amendment case in nearly a decade when it reviews a New York City gun law that limits residents from transporting their guns outside their homes. It will be the first test of a court that has been reoriented with the Trump-era appointments of Justices Brett M. Kavanaugh and Neil M. Gorsuch.

“There was one moment when it looked like maybe the N.R.A. had bet on the wrong horse” when the president began suggesting minor gun control measures, Mr. Winkler said. Under Mr. Trump, the group has not gotten its complete wish list accomplished, including congressional passage of a national reciprocity law — the right for concealed-carry permit holders from one state to legally carry their guns in any other state.

But the ideological shift occurring in courts across the country is more than enough, Mr. Winkler said.

“It’s not perfect,” Mr. Winkler said, “but it’s damn near close.”

On Friday, as he invited people onstage who used their firearms to help prevent mayhem and violence, the president announced that his administration would soon have appointed 145 federal judges — “fair, impartial and mostly conservative judges who will interpret the constitution as written,” Mr. Trump said.

His efforts, Mr. Trump said, were second only to George Washington’s.

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The N.R.A. Has Its Share of Problems. Trump Is Not One of Them.

Westlake Legal Group 26dc-nra-sub-facebookJumbo The N.R.A. Has Its Share of Problems. Trump Is Not One of Them. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J National Rifle Assn gun control firearms

INDIANAPOLIS — When President Trump travels to Indiana on Friday to deliver remarks to the National Rifle Association’s annual meeting, he will be reaffirming his commitment to an organization that could probably use a bit of a pep talk.

A group known for deploying steely and dystopian messaging toward its enemies, the N.R.A. saw its tactics fail this month when the Democratic-controlled House approved a revamped Violence Against Women Act that would bar those convicted of abusing, assaulting or stalking a domestic partner from buying guns.

The group has been subject to scrutiny over desperate calls for fund-raising. It is embroiled in a rare dirty-laundry lawsuit, accusing one of its closest contractors, which operates its media arm and the NRATV channel, of financial malfeasance. It has also been named in a lawsuit filed against the Federal Election Commission by the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which has accused the group of abusing campaign finance laws to funnel money toward Mr. Trump and several other Republicans. (In a statement, the N.R.A. called it a “lawsuit based on a frivolous complaint.”)

“There’s definitely some bad news and the N.R.A. internally is suffering from some major turmoil,” Adam Winkler, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles who specializes in the Second Amendment, said in an interview. “But there’s been some major success with Donald Trump.”

Members of the five-million-strong N.R.A., gun rights advocates who have supported Mr. Trump from his days as a long shot Republican presidential candidate, are looking toward his visit as welcome fuel to continue battling well-funded gun control groups and a Democratic-controlled House — essentially, reassurance that hands in Congress will stay tied as a judiciary remade by the Trump administration moves forward.

“The president is the most enthusiastic supporter of the Second Amendment that has occupied the White House in recent history,” Jennifer Baker, an N.R.A. spokeswoman, said in an interview. “He has embraced the N.R.A., and the members, and the hundreds of millions of law-abiding gun owners of this country.”

Ms. Baker added that N.R.A. members have been fervently pro-Trump since the beginning because they understood what was at risk. “Our members are pretty politically astute,” Ms. Baker said. “The Supreme Court was at stake, and in recent history we haven’t had a presidential nominee that was so unabashed and vocal about their support for the Second Amendment and our organization.”

There’s just one complicating factor: Privately, neither White House officials nor N.R.A. organizers say they are completely sure what the president might say when he takes the stage on Friday. It remains to be seen whether attendees will get a campaign, firebrand speech or one that focuses on issues important to gun rights advocates.

In his public comments, the president has not always been the most reliable ally, and at times he has — at least momentarily — embraced the types of gun-control proposals favored by Democrats. In the days after a mass shooting at a Florida high school last year, the president encouraged lawmakers to stand up to the N.R.A., and suggested a policy of “take the guns first, go through due process second” for people thought to be mentally ill.

“They have great power over you people,” Mr. Trump told a group of lawmakers who gathered at the White House last February. “They have less power over me.”

Days later, the president retreated from those comments shortly after a private meeting with N.R.A. leaders. He has since pushed for a ban on bump stocks — a modest move considered to be no great loss by the N.R.A. — and suggested that the arming of teachers could make schools safer. The Trump administration has largely decided to blame gun violence on access to mental health care over curbing access to guns, and the president has frequently targeted Democrats as the party most willing to rescind Second Amendment rights.

In his speech to the N.R.A. convention last year, the president declared that the Second Amendment would not be “under siege” as long as he is in office. “I think we’ll hear him talk about the importance of that right and that empowerment” of the Second Amendment, Ms. Baker predicted about this year’s speech.

Gun control advocates question how far the president’s message will go.

“At the end of the day, what’s clear is that the N.R.A. certainly isn’t thriving in the Trump years,” Igor Volsky, the executive director of Guns Down America, said in an interview. “What I think has become pretty clear is that the organization now has to talk to a smaller and smaller and smaller proportion of Americans.”

According to a recent Reuters poll, there is some truth to that logic. The majority of Americans support tougher gun control laws, even if they have little faith that lawmakers will be able to pass them. And gun rights advocates say Mr. Trump has delivered in an area where many of them say it matters most: reordering the judiciary by appointing two Supreme Court justices, in addition to over 90 judges in lower courts.

In its next term, in October, the Supreme Court will take up its first Second Amendment case in nearly a decade when it reviews a New York City gun law that limits residents from transporting their guns outside their homes. It will be the first test of a court that has been reoriented with the Trump-era appointments of Justices Brett M. Kavanaugh and Neil M. Gorsuch.

“There was one moment when it looked like maybe the N.R.A. had bet on the wrong horse” when the president began suggesting minor gun control measures, Mr. Winkler said. Under Mr. Trump, the group has not gotten its complete wish list accomplished, including congressional passage of a national reciprocity law — the right for concealed-carry permit holders from one state to legally carry their guns in any other state.

But the ideological shift occurring in courts across the country is more than enough, Mr. Winkler said.

“It’s not perfect,” Mr. Winkler said, “but it’s damn near close.”

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Masked Gunman Immediately Regrets Threatening Houston Rapper’s Wife, and Then It Gets Worse

Westlake Legal Group handgun-shutterstock-620x411 Masked Gunman Immediately Regrets Threatening Houston Rapper’s Wife, and Then It Gets Worse Texas robbery Intruder Houston Guns Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story crime assault Allow Media Exception 2A

Houston rapper Bun B was forced to defend his home with a firearm against a masked intruder on Tuesday night who attempted to steal his wife’s luxury car.

According to TMZ, the masked assailant, later identified as Demonte Jackson, attempted to force Bun B’s wife to give up valuables at gunpoint. However, the intruder didn’t count on Bun B popping up with his own weapon, and soon found himself in a firefight:

Law enforcement sources tell TMZ around 5:45 last night, there was a knock at Bun B’s door … his wife, Queenie, opened it — thinking it was a possible delivery — to find a masked man holding a gun on the other side. The intruder demanded valuables, and Queenie offered up her Audi in the garage.

Bun B heard the commotion from upstairs, grabbed his gun, and confronted the intruder as he was getting into the Audi. A shootout between the two ensued, and the intruder ran away … leaving his gun behind.

Jackson was wounded during the exchange in the shoulder and made his way to the hospital. It was there that his wound was treated, but police soon showed up and arrested Jackson for 2 counts of aggravated robbery with a weapon and one count burglary.

The lesson here is that once again we see that a good guy with a gun can prevent a criminal from getting his way. It’s lucky that the intruder wanting nothing more than valuables and that Bun B was armed. If he hadn’t been, then Jackson would have gotten away, possibly to rob more people, or worse later on.

Thanks to Bun B, that’s one more criminal off the streets. Never underestimate the good guy with a gun.

The post Masked Gunman Immediately Regrets Threatening Houston Rapper’s Wife, and Then It Gets Worse appeared first on RedState.

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WATCH: No One Had a Problem Watching a Man Get Beaten Up Until He Pulled Out His Gun

Westlake Legal Group watch-no-one-had-a-problem-watching-a-man-get-beaten-up-until-he-pulled-out-his-gun WATCH: No One Had a Problem Watching a Man Get Beaten Up Until He Pulled Out His Gun self-defense Illinois Guns gun Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story Chicago assault Allow Media Exception 2A

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-1-6-620x354 WATCH: No One Had a Problem Watching a Man Get Beaten Up Until He Pulled Out His Gun self-defense Illinois Guns gun Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story Chicago assault Allow Media Exception 2A

Two black young men were assaulting an older white man in Chicago outside a McDonalds where one of its patrons was filming the whole thing. People from inside watched the struggle happen outside through the window and were more or less quiet until the white man pulled out a firearm, and that’s when people seemed to have the problem.

According to CWB Chicago, the incident occurred at Magnificient Mile where just two days prior, a violent mob forced police to intervene, resulting in 21 arrests.

Video shot from within the McDonalds showed two young black men attempted to assault an older white man. One of the young men attempted to wield mace against the older man, but quickly retreated as the other got into a grappling match with the older man. The fight resumes behind ads on McDonald’s windows, but suddenly the young man grappling with the older man retreated.

As the older man came into view, he could be seen holding a gun at the youth attacking him.

Up until that point, hardly anyone had murmured a peep about the man being assaulted. It was only when he drew his firearms that people began to panic. Screams could suddenly be heard from women within the McDonald’s with one screaming “NO!” as the man pushed forward with his pistol raised.

Thankfully, no one was seriously hurt as after the pistol was drawn, the incident deescalated. The young men seemingly moved off, no longer interested in assaulting the older man.

Two things we can take from this…

For one, a good guy with a gun absolutely does see to it that violence is stopped. According to CWB Chicago, the man is not affiliated with a police department and appears to just be an armed citizen. The two young men seem to have little problem doing violence to the older man until the weapon is drawn and suddenly there was peace.

The second, however, is that though the firearm stopped the fight, it would appear that this is where people decided the situation was disagreeable. This is a problem. If the man was aided against the two men then perhaps the gun wouldn’t have had to come out. Sadly, no one did. He was forced to rely on the firearm.

Society seems to have less of a problem watching someone get beaten up than watching the would-be victim defend himself with the best means possible.

The lesson here is that sometimes you don’t have anyone to rely on but yourself in the heat of the moment. Violence can come on suddenly and without warning. Arm yourself.

The post WATCH: No One Had a Problem Watching a Man Get Beaten Up Until He Pulled Out His Gun appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-1-6-300x171 WATCH: No One Had a Problem Watching a Man Get Beaten Up Until He Pulled Out His Gun self-defense Illinois Guns gun Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story Chicago assault Allow Media Exception 2A   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Colorado Sheriff: “Red Flag” Gun Laws Could Put Officers In Danger

Westlake Legal Group gun-store-620x414 Colorado Sheriff: “Red Flag” Gun Laws Could Put Officers In Danger Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams red flag law Politics Guns gun control Front Page Stories firearms Featured Story democrats Colorado Allow Media Exception

As I’ve previously written, County and City law enforcement throughout Colorado have made it clear that the state’s new “red flag” law is unconstitutional, and should judges order the carrying out of the law, officers would choose to face jail time instead of carrying out the order.

The “red flag” law is, in short, a third party holding a court hearing on whether or not someone is fit to own a firearm. The gun owner is not made aware of the hearing and is granted no opportunity to defend themselves. Should the search and seizure be ordered by the judge, a second hearing then occurs where the gun owner is tasked with proving that they deserve to have their Second Amendment right reinstated.

Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams has been the loudest voice among those in law enforcement speaking out against the law, and has told  The Hill’s Buck Sexton that this law also puts officers in unnecessary risk, if not physically then legally:

“That’s the issue. If this ex parte hearing happens, and a judge rules that a person can’t control their weapons, at that same hearing, the judge can also issue a search warrant based on the information of the affiant, or the person asking for the order,” Steve Reams, the sheriff of Weld County, told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton on “Rising.”

“That’s where this bill sorely goes awry because it asks law enforcement, or actually it demands law enforcement to go conduct a search warrant on the word of a third party and seize someone’s firearms,” he continued.

“That’s asking for a host of issues, and quite frankly, it’s putting my officers in a position where I don’t think it’s safe for them either,” he said. “In my mind, that’s a clear violation of the Constitution on the Fourth and Fifth amendments.”

As of this writing, 32 counties have made it clear that they’re ready to resist the “red flag” law. Some Democratic lawmakers have stated they are willing to see law enforcement go to jail after failing to enforce the “red flag” law, but that once the law is implemented law enforcement offices everywhere will fall in line.

The post Colorado Sheriff: “Red Flag” Gun Laws Could Put Officers In Danger appeared first on RedState.

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