web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fishing"

Stephen Booth: With four months left to get a Brexit deal, state aid is the major stumbling block for the UK and EU.

Stephen Booth is Head of the Britain in the World Project at Policy Exchange.

At this delicate stage, predictions of whether the Brexit negotiations will conclude with a trade agreement or not are bound to be no more than guesswork. With only four months until the end of the Brexit transition period, the chances of a UK-EU trade deal being ready for January 1, 2021 are in fifty-fifty territory.

The EU’s “parallelism” policy – blocking progress in one area as long as there isn’t progress elsewhere – means that Michel Barnier is refusing to discuss British proposals on fishing until the UK moves on other issues, including the most difficult of them all: the EU’s desire to establish a “level playing field” for state aid. It could be argued that Brussels’ insistence on solving the difficult issues first prevents rather than permits progress.

Ultimately, fishing is not likely to be the deal-breaker. The eight EU member states with significant fishing fleets will completely lose access to UK waters if there is no deal at all, so cutting a deal is clearly better than the default, even if it falls well short of the desire for “relative stability” for existing EU quotas.

At the start of the summer there were reasons for optimism about a deal. The EU had signalled a willingness to water down its most ambitious demands on fishing and state aid and the UK had acknowledged the EU’s concerns about the overall structure of the agreement.

However, the mood appears to have turned and the last negotiating round yielded very little, according to the readouts from both sides. This week Jean-Yves Le Drian, the French Foreign Minister, cited the “intransigent and frankly unrealistic attitude” of the UK for the lack of progress. Barnier yesterday gave a speech outlining the continued areas of disagreement. Equally, recent media reports suggest the UK is preparing the ground to walk away from the talks if the stalemate continues much longer.

State aid is the major stumbling block. The impasse would appear to be a bigger problem in theory than in practice. UK orthodoxy has seen past governments refrain from major interventions in the economy. According to the European Commission’s “State aid Scoreboard”, the UK spent state aid equivalent to 0.34 per cent of GDP in 2018, compared to an EU average of 0.76 per cent. Meanwhile, France spent 0.79 per cent, slightly above the EU average, and Germany spent a much larger per cent.

The perception in Brussels is that this UK Government is different. David McAllister, the German MEP who chairs the European Parliament’s Brexit committee and who is close to Angela Merkel, has said the “UK’s interest in subsidising sectors”, such as steel and cars, would have “direct consequences for EU industries and jobs if these goods have ‘duty-free, quota-free’ access to the single market”.

This precise fear of the UK turning to a historically continental strategy of promoting “national champions” may be wide of the mark. Nevertheless, it is clear that some members of this Government view industrial policy and strategic investment as important levers at its disposal.

In this area, the devil will be in the detail. In the post-Covid world, it is difficult to predict what will be required of the state and nimbleness may be critical. Therefore, it is understandable that the UK would not want to find itself bound permanently by treaty into the EU state-aid regime, much of which is “temporarily” suspended in any case due to the pressures of the crisis on national and regional governments.

Little headway appears likely until the UK sets out its blueprint for domestic state subsidy control, which is expected to be later this month. At a minimum, the UK will need to comply with WTO rules, but these fall far short of the requirements of the current EU regime.

WTO rules only apply to goods, while the EU rules apply to both goods and services. The EU rules are prescriptive in what and what is not permitted, whereas, in practice, WTO rules set a high threshold because complainant countries must demonstrate that disputed aid is harmful in its effect.

The EU appears to have walked back from its initial position – clearly unacceptable to the Government – that the UK should continue to be bound by EU state aid rules into the future, with the European Court of Justice (ECJ) having the final say in respect of enforcement. In contrast, the EU’s agreement with Canada simply uses the WTO model as a basis and expands it to services, but there are limited options for enforcement.

A possible compromise would be for the UK to implement domestic legislation, adopting some aspects of the status quo, enforced by an independent UK authority and subject to review by Parliament and the UK courts (not the ECJ). Subject to dispute settlement, set out in the UK-EU trade agreement, the EU (and the UK) would retain the right to adopt countermeasures, such as tariffs, against any state aid deemed to be trade-distorting.

Whether this would be acceptable to the EU remains to be seen. The essential objective from the UK’s perspective is to depart from the EU’s desire to micromanage the UK’s subsidy policy by treaty. However, the UK would need to accept the principle that the EU could deal with the consequences of UK subsidies with countermeasures such as retaliatory tariffs.

A bust up in September or October does not necessarily preclude a deal at the last minute. Weighed against these important, yet technocratic considerations, is the prospect of no agreement at all.

A trade agreement, with no tariffs on UK-EU trade and regulatory cooperation, would better enable the UK to implement the Northern Ireland Protocol in the light-touch way the Government has outlined.

Any disruption attributed to a no deal exit, however transient, would give Keir Starmer ammunition in his continued attack on Government competence. Against this, the Government is in a much stronger position than it was in the autumn of 2019 when renegotiating the Withdrawal Agreement.

Failure would have economic and geopolitical consequences for the EU too. The UK may only be Germany’s seventh largest trade partner, but it ranks second in contributing to Germany’s trade surplus.

It is notable that Tom Tugendhat MP has on this site recently called for the UK to break with EU policy on Iran to adopt an approach closer to the United States. In the event of a breakdown in the trade relationship, Brussels should not be surprised to encounter a more muscularly independent UK in other fields.

We are now approaching the end game. The technical negotiations have probably achieved as much as they can at this stage. It will soon be up to the politicians on both sides of the table to make the big call about whether to make the deal or not.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Stephen Booth: The UK’s parallel trade negotiations are of unprecedented ambition

Stephen Booth is Head of the Britain in the World Project at Policy Exchange.

Brexit is necessarily reshaping Britain’s trade relationship with the EU. Meanwhile, the UK is simultaneously trying to ensure continuity of, or build upon, existing trade agreements with non-EU countries, such as Japan, and reach entirely new deals with partners including the United States, Australia and New Zealand.

The UK also intends to accede to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which currently includes 11 countries on the Pacific rim including Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

Predictably, the EU negotiations are set to go down to the wire. Since Boris Johnson became Prime Minister all signs have pointed to a so-called “skinny” free trade agreement (FTA) or none at all. For this Government, Brexit is primarily about establishing sovereign independence, while the EU has sought to underline and assert its role as the dominant regulatory and economic power.

It is no wonder that politics has trumped economics throughout the Brexit process. The EU is a political endeavour pursued by economic means. The €750bn economic recovery plan agreed by EU leaders last month illustrates the extent to which the UK’s preference for confining deeper political and economic integration to the Eurozone faced an uphill struggle had it remained in the bloc. It is impossible to imagine any British government agreeing to such a dramatic expansion of the EU’s financial firepower or the precedent it has set for further moves towards a common EU fiscal policy.

Nevertheless, there are reasons to be cautiously optimistic about a UK-EU deal being reached. The latest negotiating round appeared to mark a breakthrough on governance issues. David Frost’s statement welcomed the EU’s “more pragmatic approach” on the Court of Justice and suggested the UK was ready to consider the EU’s preference for one set of governance arrangements, rather than a suite of separate arrangements.

The remaining sticking points are fishing and state aid. Fishing is not significant in terms of GDP but is politically totemic in the UK and certain EU member states. Therefore, a deal must be left to the last minute. Establishing a “level-playing field” on state aid is proving to be the biggest substantive issue to resolve. The EU is moving away from its request for dynamic alignment and the issue now is what domestic regime the UK will propose.

Negotiations with the US appear to have got off to a good start. However, both sides accept that a deal cannot now be reached until after the US elections in November. Therefore, the most difficult areas, such as agriculture, will not be addressed until later in the year at the earliest.

The most pressing issue Liz Truss, the Trade Secretary, discussed on her trip to Washington earlier this week is the removal of US retaliatory tariffs as part of the ongoing Airbus/Boeing dispute, which sits outside the FTA negotiations. The US has levied tariffs on whisky and further tariffs could be extended to gin and other products if the dispute is not resolved.

The prospect of delay with the US has made UK engagement with the Asia-Pacific countries all the more important and pushed accession to the CPTPP up the agenda. Toshimitsu Motegi, the Japanese Foreign Minister, is in London this week in an attempt to finalise talks on the UK-Japan FTA.

The Japan deal is an important stepping stone towards CPTPP accession, since Japan is the biggest economy within the agreement. The Japan negotiations are working to a condensed timetable because the parties are aiming to ensure a successor to the EU-Japan FTA is in place before the end of the Brexit transition period on January 1, 2021.

The time constraints mean that a UK-Japan deal will be largely modelled on the EU precedent. However, media reports have suggested Japan might be prepared to accelerate tariff cuts for British pork, and Japan is seeking the immediate elimination of car tariffs. The major opportunities for innovation in UK-Japan trade relations is on regulatory cooperation in the services and digital sectors. The FTA can provide the architecture but domestic regulators will need to work together to realise long-term gains.

Another reason why the CPTPP may become increasingly important is that Joe Biden has indicated that he might be prepared to (re-)join the CPTPP if his presidential bid is successful. President Trump pulled out of its previous iteration, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, spearheaded by President Obama. However, this could be a slow process, since Biden’s campaign has also emphasised that his primary focus will be on domestic investment and he has previously suggested he would seek to renegotiate CPTPP if the US were to re-join.

Some have suggested that engaging with the US via the CPTPP rather than bilaterally would defuse some of the thorniest issues, such as agricultural standards on chlorine-washed chicken or hormone-treated beef. However, the reality is that while the optics might be different, the UK will face many of the same substantive trade-offs whoever is president.

The CPTPP rulebook is much closer to the US approach – indeed the World Trade Organisation’s (WTO) approach – to regulating agriculture than we have inherited from the EU. Blanket bans on agricultural imports, not supported by scientific evidence, will not only be viewed as a protectionist move by the US but potentially by other members of the CPTPP.

The question of agricultural liberalisation cannot be ducked for much longer. Equally, as we noted in the recent Policy Exchange paper, The art of the UK-US trade deal, the issue need not be as stark as some of the hyperbole has suggested. The starting points should be to promote consumer choice, while ensuring consumer safety. The UK already has the right, under WTO rules, to prohibit the import of unsafe food. Labelling, either via domestic legislation or voluntary certifications, can be used to inform consumers of food production methods.

The UK’s domestic and international policies must also work in tandem. UK tariff liberalisation can be phased in gradually, giving UK producers time to adjust to new trading conditions. This would reflect the gradual introduction of the UK’s Environmental Land Management scheme, replacing the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy. Meanwhile, it should also be remembered that agricultural liberalisation is an export opportunity for high quality UK products, particularly beef and lamb.

In today’s world, trade agreements do not merely set tariffs or regulate cross-border investment. For medium-sized powers in particular, they are important building blocks for wider political relationships and alliances. However, in order to unlock these relationships, the UK must be willing to live up to its rhetoric on free trade.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Search intensifies for 2 missing firefighters off Florida

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say they are ramping up the search for two missing firefighters who set out by boat last week from the state’s Atlantic coast.

Jacksonville Interim Fire Chief Keith Powers said the agency was calling for as “many boats” as could be mustered Tuesday in the ongoing search for Brian McCluney and Justin Walker. The firefighters departed last Friday on their outing aboard a 24-foot (7.3-meter) vessel from Port Canaveral.

The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies have been searching a wide expanse of ocean between Cape Canaveral and Jacksonville off Florida’s east coast. On Monday, crews found McCluney’s fishing tackle bag some 50 miles (80 kilometers) off St. Augustine in north Florida.

McCluney works for the Jacksonville department while Walker is a master technician with the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department in Virginia, just outside the nation’s capital.

McCluney’s wife said Tuesday the discovery of her husband’s tackle bag has given her hope that the men will be found. In a Facebook post, Stephanie McCluney added that she believed the bag was thrown overboard by the men to help those who are searching for them.

Source

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Why yes, I do believe that’s a giant shark trying to get in our boat

Westlake Legal Group Shark Why yes, I do believe that’s a giant shark trying to get in our boat The Blog Sharks shark sightings fishing Boston

I thought I’d finish up this evening with something a bit on the lighter side as I prepare to head out on vacation. (So if you don’t see my byline around here until the first Saturday in August, you’ll know why.) As is my usual habit, I’ll be spending some time out on the water being embarrassed by some fish that generally wind up being considerably more clever than I am. But hey… a bad day fishing is still better than a good day watching cable news, amirite?

With that as our theme, I thought you might enjoy this brief fishing video taken from WBZ News Channel 4, the local CBS outlet in Boston. Some vacationing fisherman were out off the shore of Cape Cod this week fishing for striped bass. They hooked a nice one, but before it could be brought into the boat a twelve-foot great white decided that it needed dinner more urgently than the guys in the boat did. There’s not much for them to do aside from saying, “I think we need a bigger boat.”

I was rather shocked that they still wound up getting roughly 2/3 of the bass into the boat. The shark disappeared without suffering any apparent injuries.

Needless to say, I’m not anticipating any of that kind of action myself. I stick strictly to fresh water during the summer and the biggest danger we generally encounter is a bald eagle stealing one of your fish on the way in. (That’s actually happened and it’s a pretty incredible sight.) Still, it’s not the size of the fish you catch, but how much you enjoy the trip. Even coming up empty is okay when you’re out far away from any light pollution and the night sky shows you more stars than you’ll ever see closer to a city.

In any event, I hope you all find some time for relaxation as well and I’m confident the place won’t fall apart here while I’m gone. Try to be good to each other and I’ll try to check in on the comment section at least a couple times while I’m out. Fair winds and following seas, dear readers.

The post Why yes, I do believe that’s a giant shark trying to get in our boat appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group Shark-300x159 Why yes, I do believe that’s a giant shark trying to get in our boat The Blog Sharks shark sightings fishing Boston  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Get your paddles ready: Here are 5 places to spend your day on the water

Westlake Legal Group Lake-Accotink Get your paddles ready: Here are 5 places to spend your day on the water water activities Things to Do Features parks and rec Paddle Board Occoquan RIver kayak Fountainhead Regional Park fishing Burke Lake Park
Pedal boat the day away at Lake Accotink. (Photo courtesy of Fairfax County Park Authority)

If you’re spending days in the office gazing longingly out the window, it might be time for a weekend spent in the sun.

Whether you’re into paddling in the Potomac River or casually canoeing through Burke Lake, there’s a way for you to get your recommended dose of vitamin D and enjoy your free time on the water in Northern Virginia.

Where to fish:

Burke Lake Park
Convincing yourself to go fishing isn’t very difficult when you’ve been side-glancing your abandoned tackle box all winter. When you’re ready to buy the bait and find your local peace and quiet, head to Burke Lake Park. Rental rowboats, fishing kayaks and canoes are available throughout the season. // Burke Lake Park: 7315 Ox Rd, Fairfax Station; Rental prices vary

Where to kayak:

Fountainhead Regional Park
Clearing your head in a kayak is a pretty peaceful way to spend an evening, and Fountainhead Regional Park is the place to give it a shot. The park has planned paddle tours through October that take adventurers to see the sights during full moon nights, at sunset and even one to view the Perseids Meteor Shower in August. // Fountainhead Regional Park: 10875 Hampton Road, Fairfax Station; $30 per person

Where to pedal boat:

Lake Accotink Park
If you have little ones that aren’t quite ready for a solo boating adventure, taking the family out on a pedal boat lets everyone participate in the fun together, while keeping them all in one place. Grab your life jackets and make it a family fun day outside of the city. // Lake Accotink Park: 7500 Accotink Park Road, Springfield; Rental prices vary

Where to paddle board:

Occoquan Regional Park
It can be a challenge to keep yourself from swaying in the wind whenever you’re on the water, but paddleboarding takes that to another level. Find your physical and mental balance as you ease your way into the water of the Occoquan River and it might just be your new favorite (and challenging) hobby for the summer. // 9751 Ox Rd, Lorton; Rental prices vary

Where to try it all:

Lake Ridge Golf & Marina
As the trail head for the Occoquan Water Trail that allows local access to the Occoquan Reservoir, Lake Ridge is an ideal location to try out just about any activity you’re looking for. Paddleboarding, rowboats, canoes, kayaks, pedal boats and Jon boats with motors are available to rent throughout the season. // 12350 Cotton Mill Drive, Woodbridge; Rental prices vary

Opt outside with our Parks & Rec newsletter.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand

Westlake Legal Group a-must-watch-mans-fishing-line-breaks-so-he-dives-into-the-freezing-water-to-catch-the-fish-by-hand A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand YOLOtek Uncategorized Sports Not Today Internet lee sandt Front Page Stories fishing Featured Story donald trump d-i-y Allow Media Exception
Westlake Legal Group lee-sandt-fishing-dives-in-SCREENSHOT A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand YOLOtek Uncategorized Sports Not Today Internet lee sandt Front Page Stories fishing Featured Story donald trump d-i-y Allow Media Exception

[SCREENSHOT FROM URL]

 

Talk about Must-See TV.

On March 20th, devoted fisherman Lee Sandt was doing his thing at Georgia’s Lake Lanier, reeling in a largemouth bass. As the fish got near the boat, Lee’s 10-lb test line broke.

Westlake Legal Group 1f641 A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand YOLOtek Uncategorized Sports Not Today Internet lee sandt Front Page Stories fishing Featured Story donald trump d-i-y Allow Media Exception

But remember that whole “devoted” thing? Whereas most people woulda chalked up the loss to rotten luck, Lee dived the heck in.

He threw himself into the 50-degree water to catch his fish — with his bare hands.

 Who does this?

It’s a great way to spend the rest of the day wet, cold and still fishless.

But Lee obviously has a bit of Tarzan in him. Or Aquaman. Or…ninja.

Partly motivated by a determination to retrieve his spinner bait, the angler dived in and wrestled that bass into submission.

He kicked some bass!

And he crawled back in the boat with fish in hand.

Now that’s how it’s done.

The video’s gotten over 4 million views so far.

Lee explained his technique to YOLOtek (See the YouTube interview below):

“It put its head back out of the water and with my right hand I put my hand literally right in his mouth and then I pinned it against my face. I knew because I immediately had a scratch on my face. When I got in the water, I didn’t let go of that fish until I knew I had a good grip and I knew I was starting to come up.”

The only person I’ve seen have similar luck fishing is Donald Trump — thanks to the wackiness of the Left, voters glommed onto him like fish jumping into the boat.

-Alex

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: here.

See 3 more pieces from me:

GRAPHIC VIDEO: Oklahoma Man Tries To Enter His Friend’s Home, Gets Bitten In The Face By A Huge Snake

WATCH: Viral Road Rage Video Shows Man Damaging Another Driver’s Door. Then His Own Car Gets Karma’d

The Left Ratchets Up…To Murder?

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. For iPhone instructions, see the bottom of this page.



 

 

If you have an iPhone and want to comment, select the box with the upward arrow at the bottom of your screen; swipe left and choose “Request Desktop Site.” If it fails to automatically refresh, manually reload the page. Scroll down to the red horizontal bar that says “Show Comments.”

The post A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group lee-sandt-fishing-dives-in-SCREENSHOT-300x148 A MUST-WATCH: Man’s Fishing Line Breaks, So He Dives into the Freezing Water to Catch the Fish By Hand YOLOtek Uncategorized Sports Not Today Internet lee sandt Front Page Stories fishing Featured Story donald trump d-i-y Allow Media Exception  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

9 fishing tournaments to compete in this spring and summer

Westlake Legal Group 9-fishing-tournaments-to-compete-in-this-spring-and-summer 9 fishing tournaments to compete in this spring and summer Things to Do Features Things to Do parks & rec parks fishing tournaments fishing Events
Westlake Legal Group boy-fishing 9 fishing tournaments to compete in this spring and summer Things to Do Features Things to Do parks & rec parks fishing tournaments fishing Events
Photo by Clark Young

With the weather getting warmer and trees and flowers blooming, spring is finally here. That means it’s time to grab your fishing pole and get out on the water. Whether you are new to the hobby or have been competing for years, here are a few tournaments to get you ready for the summer season.

Open to the public

 Fourth Annual Crappie Fishing Tournament
April 28, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Spend the afternoon at Izaak Walton League Pond with all the crappies, bass trout and bluegill fish you can imagine. The top three anglers who catch the most crappies will win gift cards worth up to $50. Advanced registration is required. // Izaak Walton League of America – Loudoun County Chapter: 19237 Mountain Spring Lane, Leesburg; free

 Kids’ Fishing Tournament
May 4 & June 1, 9-11 a.m.
It’s never too early to learn how to fish. Have your youngsters bring their own gear or borrow some from the park. Fishers ages 2 to 15 are welcome to participate. // Leesylvania State Park: 2001 Daniel K. Ludwig Drive, Woodbridge; free

 2019 Kickin’ Bass Tournament for Special Olympics Virginia
May 17, 6 a.m.
Hook up your boat and drive down to Leesylvania State Park as the Prince William County Sheriff’s Office holds its annual Kickin’ Bass Tournament. Don’t miss out on this 100%-payback tournament. Proceeds benefit the year-round programs of Special Olympics Virginia. // Leesylvania State Park: 2001 Daniel K. Ludwig Drive, Woodbridge; $100-$140

 Friday Night Bass Tournament
Fridays from May 31 through October, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Relax after a long week at work with the weekly Friday-night fishing tournaments on Lake Anna. Cash prizes will be awarded to the team who catches the heaviest haul. All fish are released back into the lake. // Lake Anna State Park: 6800 Lawyers Road, Spotsylvania Courthouse; $40 per team

 2019 Youth Fishing Derby
June 2, 8 a.m.-noon
Have your kids try their hand at fishing before the start of summer with the Potomac Bassmasters. Members will be on hand to help new fishers who need assistance. While all participants will receive a gift to take home, trophies and prizes will be awarded to the fisher with the heaviest creels. // Burke Lake Park: 7315 Ox Road, Fairfax Station; free

 Father’s Day Fish-a-Rama
June 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Make Father’s Day extra special this year by competing in a fishing tournament with your child. Prizes are at stake for the team that hooks the largest fish and most fish during the final hour of competition. Worms will be available for sale, but participants must bring their own equipment. // Great Country Farms: 18780 Foggy Bottom Road, Bluemont; $10 for adults, $8 for kids

Member-only competitions

 2019 Dakota Lithium KBF Trail
April 27, 6 a.m.-2 p.m.
Leave the boat at home and grab the kayak for this fishing competition. The top 10 finishers will be awarded cash prizes with the winner collecting the $2,000 jackpot. Participants must be a member of Kayak Bass Fishing in order to compete. // Lake Anna State Park: 6800 Lawyers Road, Spotsylvania Courthouse; $75

 VA Top 100
May 3 & June 7
If you’re looking for big payouts, this amateur contest is for you. With a full field of competitors, winners can receive up to $40,000 for the largest creel. All registrants must be a member of Va Top 100 to compete. // Leesylvania State Park: 2001 Daniel K. Ludwig Drive, Woodbridge; $995 per team

 Extreme Bass Anglerz
May 18, 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
Spend the day out on the Potomac River with other fishing aficionados. Compete against an average of 20 teams as you try to catch the biggest fish and the cash prize that comes with it. All participants must be a member of Extreme Bass Anglerz before competing. // Leesylvania State Park: 2001 Daniel K. Ludwig Drive, Woodbridge; $60

Keep up with all the things to do in Northern Virginia by subscribing to our newsletter.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com