web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Foreclosures"

Racing to Head Off Evictions and Foreclosures

Westlake Legal Group 18virus-housing2-facebookJumbo Racing to Head Off Evictions and Foreclosures Renting and Leasing (Real Estate) Real Estate and Housing (Residential) Mortgages Housing and Urban Development Department Foreclosures Federal National Mortgage Assn (Fannie Mae) Federal Housing Finance Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp (Freddie Mac) Evictions

The financial shock from the coronavirus pandemic threatens the housing security of millions of Americans, prompting federal, state and local officials — and even judges and the police — to move quickly to ward off foreclosures and evictions.

On Wednesday, the federal agency overseeing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the giant government-run finance firms that back the mortgages of 28 million homeowners, ordered a suspension of foreclosures and foreclosure-related evictions for at least two months. The move is meant to keep people in their homes and avoid a housing squeeze like the one that followed the mortgage-fueled financial crisis of 2008.

And over the past week, there has been a groundswell across the country to protect renters as well. The Miami-Dade police in Florida said they wouldn’t carry out evictions during the health crisis. A high-ranking New York State judge declared that the courts would consider no eviction cases until further notice. Gov. Gavin Newsom of California issued an executive order allowing cities to impose eviction moratoriums.

There have been so many announcements that the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a nonprofit advocacy group in Washington, set up a website to track them.

“The very least policymakers can do during a national health emergency is ensure that more people are not pushed into homelessness through evictions or foreclosures, particularly when our collective protection against the spread of the illness depends on our ability to self-isolate at home,” Diane Yentel, the group’s chief executive, said in an interview.

“Now more than ever,” she added, “housing is health care.”

The two main trade groups for the apartment industry, the National Multifamily Housing Council and the National Apartment Association, sent a letter to members of Congress calling for rental assistance for tenants and income support for property owners to be part of any coronavirus aid package.

“Hundreds of thousands of workers are being furloughed right how; we are all concerned about their ability to meet any kind of payment,” said Douglas M. Bibby, president of the National Multifamily Housing Council, in an interview. “That’s why we’re working with lawmakers to get emergency assistance for renters.”

A reprieve for some renters may be in the works at the federal level. President Trump suggested Wednesday that the Department of Housing and Urban Development would suspend evictions of those in public housing for 60 days, though Housing Secretary Ben Carson said later on Twitter that it was a goal being discussed with Congress.

About 44 million American households rent their homes, and many were struggling long before the new coronavirus emerged. In 2018, close to half of renters spent more than a third of their income on rent, while a quarter spent more than half, according to a report released in January by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies.

Anticipating a wave of late payments, Jason Hill, chief executive of R.G. Hill & Company, which owns and manages about 1,000 apartments in Northern California, said his company was already preparing to waive late fees and halt evictions for lack of payment. For now, he said, it’s not clear what the extent of the damage will be because the most severe economic fallout happened last week, in the middle of the month, though he assumes it could be bad.

“The vast majority of people in society live paycheck to paycheck, regardless of socioeconomic class, and the economy has come to a complete halt,” he said.

For renters like Ian Browning and his wife, the question isn’t when they will fall behind on their rent but what happens — and where they go — when they do. Mr. Browning, who lives in Brooklyn, manages a restaurant that is closing indefinitely. His wife, a hairdresser, is also gearing up for months with little or no income.

They have two small children, pay $1,900 a month in rent and have a savings account that will cover one month of bills. The couple are in deep trouble — for which Mr. Browning used an unprintable term — “and have no idea what will happen,” he said.

A pronounced slowdown in rent and mortgage payments will have a cascading effect on apartment companies, employees like building superintendents and janitors, and finally state and local government revenues: Money that renters pay landlords goes to mortgage payments and property taxes, along with utilities and other public services.

Members of the Mortgage Bankers Association, a trade group, and other housing-industry figures began telling White House officials this week that the home lending system was on the verge of a crisis that the government needed to head off. They said many homeowners couldn’t miss one or two paychecks before defaulting on their mortgages, according to two people familiar with the talks.

Action to shield those with federally backed mortgages came on two fronts Wednesday: from the Federal Housing Finance Agency — the main regulator for Fannie and Freddie, which effectively guarantee most mortgages given by banks and nonbank lenders — and from HUD, which acts as a guarantor for other mortgages under the Federal Housing Administration’s home loan program.

Mark A. Calabria, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, said the foreclosure and eviction suspension would allow most homeowners “to stay in their homes during this national emergency.”

The agency’s move will provide immediate relief to about 180,000 homeowners with Fannie- and Freddie-backed mortgages who are delinquent in payment and in danger of foreclosure.

For any mortgage backed by Fannie or Freddie, the agency is telling mortgage servicers — the banks and other companies that collect payments from borrowers and pass them on to whoever owns the mortgage — to give borrowers facing financial difficulty a break by allowing them to miss monthly payments.

Mr. Calabria said he hoped that servicers accepting payments from borrowers with home loans not backed by a government agency would also suspend foreclosure activities.

“We do hope that by setting up frameworks in place that others will decide this makes sense,” he said. “We hope that there will be an alignment of interests.”

He added that forbearance for borrowers could last up until a year in some cases. But he said borrowers who could make payments should do so. The program is really intended to help those who have lost jobs or lost income because of the virus.

And the mortgage industry sees Wednesday’s action as the first of several that will be required to avoid overwhelming the home-lending system. Servicers will need cash. Banks will need flexibility from their regulators to make riskier loans to the servicers to keep them afloat.

“The immediate financing needs of advancing these missed mortgage payments to investors will likely be larger than the private sector alone can handle,” Robert D. Broeksmit, the chief executive of the Mortgage Bankers Association, said in a statement on the group’s website. “We will need public support to get us through the worst of the crisis.”

Ted Tozer, a mortgage industry consultant and former head of Ginnie Mae, which provides a backstop for mortgage-backed securities, called the current circumstances “mind-boggling.”

“It’s tough to figure out how to respond,” he said. “We’ve seen on the health care side how they’ve been having a tough time dealing with it. It’s no different on the financial side.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

$146 Million Default by Nursing Home Chain Leaves U.S. on the Hook

The cracks in the foundation of a Chicago nursing-home business began to appear almost immediately.

The owners stopped making mortgage payments on their crown jewel, the Rosewood Care Centers, barely a year after buying it in 2013. Paperwork about the chain’s finances was never filed with the government. Some money meant for the 13 nursing homes and assisted-living facilities went to prop up another investment.

In the end, the business defaulted last year on $146 million in government-backed mortgages — the biggest collapse in the history of a little-known loan-guarantee program run by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The Rosewood debacle demonstrates the problems plaguing the HUD program, which helps nursing homes obtain affordable loans and has become a linchpin of the American elder-care system.

By the government’s own admission, the federal agency’s stewardship of the program has been haphazard. Its oversight of nursing homes has been weak. When HUD officials have spotted problems, they often have been slow to respond. Sometimes it has taken years to intervene, allowing the finances at certain facilities to unravel to such an extent that the quality of care was undermined.

HUD officials described Rosewood as an outlier, saying that only 1 percent of the guaranteed loans end up defaulting. “Mortgage defaults in this program are exceedingly rare, yet reaching an acceptable resolution requires an owner’s willingness and ability to work on behalf of their residents,” the department said in a statement.

But the program — run by a department better known for fostering affordable housing — is a vulnerability for the federal agency. The nursing home industry is increasingly being run by for-profit operators facing dwindling margins. Some homes — especially those in rural areas — are struggling to stay open, with operators blaming low occupancy and insufficient payments from Medicaid and Medicare.

At the Rosewood chain, which houses more than 1,100 people, the housing department has been forced to take control of the 13 facilities in Illinois and Missouri. It is paying a million dollars a month to keep them afloat.

When the program was created in 1959, its goal was to help ensure that Americans had access to affordable nursing homes by bankrolling the construction of new facilities. The program has evolved, and it now provides financial guarantees on loans that banks make to elder-care facilities. By making the loans less risky for banks, lenders could charge lower interest rates, thus reducing the fees that the nursing homes needed to charge patients.

The result now is that the agency manages a portfolio of loans that are at risk of going bad. HUD, and therefore taxpayers, could be on the hook for money-losing facilities around the United States — just as waves of aging baby boomers are likely to prompt a surge in America’s nursing-home population.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00nursing8-articleLarge $146 Million Default by Nursing Home Chain Leaves U.S. on the Hook Nursing Homes Mortgages Housing and Urban Development Department Foreclosures Elderly

Rosewood’s nursing home in Decatur, Ill., was forced to close in 2017 as the ownership group ran into financial trouble.CreditJustin L. Fowler for The New York Times

Today, the program guarantees $20 billion in mortgages to more than 2,300 nursing homes — about 15 percent of the country’s total, up from about 5 percent a quarter-century ago. Most of the nursing homes it backs are private, for-profit enterprises.

The problems with the program go back decades.

A report from the Government Accountability Office in 1995, when the program supported about 800 nursing homes, found that loan-management staff members “generally do not focus attention on nursing home loans unless financial trouble appears imminent or a default occurs.” The report said this left a gap in oversight, because other state and federal regulators focus on the quality of care and not on the homes’ financial viability.

Reports by the HUD inspector general last year found similar issues. An audit of 18 “financially challenged” nursing homes concluded that the housing department “did not always identify and address the root causes of a nursing home’s financial or operational challenges” and failed to “penalize operators that did not submit accurate and complete data in a timely manner.”

Another 2018 report focused on the agency’s lack of oversight of the homes’ physical conditions to ensure they would remain viable over the course of the federally backed loan. The inspector general said some facilities “were neglected and generally run down.”

Edward Golding, a former top official with HUD during the Obama administration, defended the loan-guarantee program as essential to helping nursing homes and assisted-living facilities get access to credit.

But, he said, the program “could benefit from more transparency and public awareness.”

The housing department took Rosewood to court last summer, but it had known early on that the chain was struggling to pay its bills and possibly mismanaging the program’s money.

Rosewood never filed the financial statements required by the program. Because HUD had insured the loans, it had to sign off when Rosewood was bought in December 2013 by a group of investors led by Zvi Feiner. Mr. Feiner, 48, a rabbi with a business degree, found most of his investors in the Chicago-area Orthodox Jewish community.

Mr. Feiner’s firm, Feiner Investment, is in the same office building in Skokie, Ill., as Bais Medrash Binyan Olam, the congregation where he presided over weekday prayer services. He was also president of a Jewish elementary school and served for several years as a mayoral appointee to a neighborhood business improvement district in Chicago.

Mr. Feiner raised tens of millions of dollars from investors, including a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor and several teachers at a Jewish day school. Mr. Feiner also bought nursing-home companies in Illinois, New Jersey and Indiana.

The Rosewood nursing homes were part of a network of elder-care centers run out of the Wi-Fi Building in Skokie, Ill.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times Rabbi Zvi Feiner, whose Feiner Investment Group is still on the sign, used to operate his business and preside over a synagogue in Suite 100 of the building.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times

Rosewood’s financial problems were compounded by legal battles over its debts, including money it owed vendors. Investors sued in state, federal and religious courts contending that Mr. Feiner misappropriated millions of dollars, an allegation his lawyer disputed. Last year, a rabbinical court in Chicago awarded one investor $13 million.

By 2015, Mr. Feiner and his partners were missing mortgage payments and had improperly diverted $7 million of federally insured funds to at least one other nursing home, according to court documents.

Ariel Weissberg, a lawyer for Mr. Feiner, said Rosewood’s financial woes stemmed in part from disputes with business partners.

“Zvi is trying to get back on his feet,” Mr. Weissberg said. “He’s trying to pay these people back.”

Even as Mr. Feiner’s investors and vendors sued, HUD mostly remained on the sidelines. The agency was aware in 2015 of Rosewood’s mounting monetary problems, including the diversion of funds, according to court filings. But the housing department did not force the facility to shore up its finances or press Mr. Feiner and his partners to sell to a stronger operator.

Last August, Rosewood’s corporate parents defaulted on $146 million of mortgage loans, which meant the housing department’s insurance fund had to pay that amount to Rosewood’s lender. The agency filed a lawsuit seeking to appoint a receiver to run the nursing homes. In court filings, HUD described a toxic brew of litigation, infighting and financial mismanagement that “contributed to an environment of uncertainty and risk for the patients at the Rosewood facilities.”

In October, the agency filed a complaint against Mr. Feiner seeking nearly $1 million in penalties for failing to file required financial reports. Mr. Feiner’s lawyer said they had agreed to settle the case.

In a statement, the agency said its “foremost concern is always the health and safety of the residents.” It added, “Following a number of time-consuming and exhaustive attempts to resolve these defaults, foreclosure could not be avoided.”

The federal department is now stuck running the Rosewood properties. About half are losing money, and several have problems with mold and faulty sprinkler systems, according to court papers.

The shuttered Lincoln Manor Nursing Home in Decatur used to be part of the Feiner nursing-home business.CreditJustin L. Fowler for The New York Times

The agency plans to auction them off, with bids due on Friday. If they don’t sell, HUD will have to run them until a buyer can be found.

Since August, HUD has spent more than $15 million to keep the facilities open — plus the $146 million it dispensed to Rosewood’s lender. The agency estimates that the facilities are worth no more than $95 million, according to public documents soliciting bids.

Substantial losses are common when loans in the program fail. The department has incurred an average loss of 80 percent on defaulted mortgages in recent years, according to government documents.

A nursing home’s financial woes risk hurting residents.

“Nursing homes’ financial difficulties almost inevitably impact resident care,” said David Stevenson, a professor of health policy at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He said agencies like HUD needed to “figure out ways to act before people are harmed.”

At Rosewood, health and safety problems developed soon after Mr. Feiner’s group took over.

Between 2014 and 2018, the Illinois Department of Public Health imposed $213,000 in fines against the facilities — more than five times the amount levied in the last five full years under the previous owner. And six of the Rosewood nursing homes, including those in Moline, Ill., and Inverness, Ill., had one- or two-star ratings on the federal Medicare website, which rates them on health and safety on a five-star scale.

It is part of a broader pattern at HUD-supported facilities. A New York Times analysis indicated that HUD-backed homes were more likely to receive one-or-two-star ratings from Medicare than other nursing homes. More than 850 nursing homes supported by HUD, about 43 percent of the 1,982 for which a Medicare rating could be determined, received the low ratings, the analysis found.

There are nearly three dozen still-active personal injury lawsuits, including a number of wrongful death actions, filed by families of Rosewood patients. Lawyers for the estate of a 93-year-old dementia patient, Dorothy Dainty, said she died of complications from a fall at the facility in Rockford, Ill., because staff members failed to properly supervise her.

At another nursing facility that Mr. Feiner ran in Decatur, Ill., regulators imposed about $280,000 in fines after a patient died of an untreated wound. That home has since closed.

The Inverness facility and 12 other Rosewood properties are being sold by HUD. If they don’t sell at auction this month, the department will have to find another buyer.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times

Sean Murray, whose law firm is representing Ms. Dainty’s estate, said she had fallen out of bed and broken her hip because some workers had been pulling double shifts.

“For-profit homes are understaffing their facilities,” said Mr. Murray, whose firm is also representing the estates of two other Rosewood residents.

Robert Gebeloff contributed reporting. Alain Delaquérière contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A Nursing Home Chain’s Collapse Leaves the Government on the Hook

The cracks in the foundation of a Chicago nursing-home business began to appear almost immediately.

The owners stopped making mortgage payments on their crown jewel, the Rosewood Care Centers, barely a year after buying it in 2013. Paperwork about the chain’s finances was never filed with the government. Some money meant for the 13 nursing homes and assisted-living facilities went to prop up another investment.

In the end, the business defaulted last year on $146 million in government-backed mortgages — the biggest collapse in the history of a little-known loan-guarantee program run by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The Rosewood debacle demonstrates the problems plaguing the HUD program, which helps nursing homes obtain affordable loans and has become a linchpin of the American elder-care system.

By the government’s own admission, the federal agency’s stewardship of the program has been haphazard. Its oversight of nursing homes has been weak. When HUD officials have spotted problems, they often have been slow to respond. Sometimes it has taken years to intervene, allowing the finances at certain facilities to unravel to such an extent that the quality of care was undermined.

HUD officials described Rosewood as an outlier, saying that only 1 percent of the guaranteed loans end up defaulting. “Mortgage defaults in this program are exceedingly rare, yet reaching an acceptable resolution requires an owner’s willingness and ability to work on behalf of their residents,” the department said in a statement.

But the program — run by a department better known for fostering affordable housing — is a vulnerability for the federal agency. The nursing home industry is increasingly being run by for-profit operators facing dwindling margins. Some homes — especially those in rural areas — are struggling to stay open, with operators blaming low occupancy and insufficient payments from Medicaid and Medicare.

At the Rosewood chain, which houses more than 1,100 people, the housing department has been forced to take control of the 13 facilities in Illinois and Missouri. It is paying a million dollars a month to keep them afloat.

When the program was created in 1959, its goal was to help ensure that Americans had access to affordable nursing homes by bankrolling the construction of new facilities. The program has evolved, and it now provides financial guarantees on loans that banks make to elder-care facilities. By making the loans less risky for banks, lenders could charge lower interest rates, thus reducing the fees that the nursing homes needed to charge patients.

The result now is that the agency manages a portfolio of loans that are at risk of going bad. HUD, and therefore taxpayers, could be on the hook for money-losing facilities around the United States — just as waves of aging baby boomers are likely to prompt a surge in America’s nursing-home population.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00nursing8-articleLarge A Nursing Home Chain’s Collapse Leaves the Government on the Hook Nursing Homes Mortgages Housing and Urban Development Department Foreclosures Elderly

Rosewood’s nursing home in Decatur, Ill., was forced to close in 2017 as the ownership group ran into financial trouble.CreditJustin L. Fowler for The New York Times

Today, the program guarantees $20 billion in mortgages to more than 2,300 nursing homes — about 15 percent of the country’s total, up from about 5 percent a quarter-century ago. Most of the nursing homes it backs are private, for-profit enterprises.

The problems with the program go back decades.

A report from the Government Accountability Office in 1995, when the program supported about 800 nursing homes, found that loan-management staff members “generally do not focus attention on nursing home loans unless financial trouble appears imminent or a default occurs.” The report said this left a gap in oversight, because other state and federal regulators focus on the quality of care and not on the homes’ financial viability.

Reports by the HUD inspector general last year found similar issues. An audit of 18 “financially challenged” nursing homes concluded that the housing department “did not always identify and address the root causes of a nursing home’s financial or operational challenges” and failed to “penalize operators that did not submit accurate and complete data in a timely manner.”

Another 2018 report focused on the agency’s lack of oversight of the homes’ physical conditions to ensure they would remain viable over the course of the federally backed loan. The inspector general said some facilities “were neglected and generally run down.”

Edward Golding, a former top official with HUD during the Obama administration, defended the loan-guarantee program as essential to helping nursing homes and assisted-living facilities get access to credit.

But, he said, the program “could benefit from more transparency and public awareness.”

The housing department took Rosewood to court last summer, but it had known early on that the chain was struggling to pay its bills and possibly mismanaging the program’s money.

Rosewood never filed the financial statements required by the program. Because HUD had insured the loans, it had to sign off when Rosewood was bought in December 2013 by a group of investors led by Zvi Feiner. Mr. Feiner, 48, a rabbi with a business degree, found most of his investors in the Chicago-area Orthodox Jewish community.

Mr. Feiner’s firm, Feiner Investment, is in the same office building in Skokie, Ill., as Bais Medrash Binyan Olam, the congregation where he presided over weekday prayer services. He was also president of a Jewish elementary school and served for several years as a mayoral appointee to a neighborhood business improvement district in Chicago.

Mr. Feiner raised tens of millions of dollars from investors, including a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor and several teachers at a Jewish day school. Mr. Feiner also bought nursing-home companies in Illinois, New Jersey and Indiana.

The Rosewood nursing homes were part of a network of elder-care centers run out of the Wi-Fi Building in Skokie, Ill.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times Rabbi Zvi Feiner, whose Feiner Investment Group is still on the sign, used to operate his business and preside over a synagogue in Suite 100 of the building.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times

Rosewood’s financial problems were compounded by legal battles over its debts, including money it owed vendors. Investors sued in state, federal and religious courts contending that Mr. Feiner misappropriated millions of dollars, an allegation his lawyer disputed. Last year, a rabbinical court in Chicago awarded one investor $13 million.

By 2015, Mr. Feiner and his partners were missing mortgage payments and had improperly diverted $7 million of federally insured funds to at least one other nursing home, according to court documents.

Ariel Weissberg, a lawyer for Mr. Feiner, said Rosewood’s financial woes stemmed in part from disputes with business partners.

“Zvi is trying to get back on his feet,” Mr. Weissberg said. “He’s trying to pay these people back.”

Even as Mr. Feiner’s investors and vendors sued, HUD mostly remained on the sidelines. The agency was aware in 2015 of Rosewood’s mounting monetary problems, including the diversion of funds, according to court filings. But the housing department did not force the facility to shore up its finances or press Mr. Feiner and his partners to sell to a stronger operator.

Last August, Rosewood’s corporate parents defaulted on $146 million of mortgage loans, which meant the housing department’s insurance fund had to pay that amount to Rosewood’s lender. The agency filed a lawsuit seeking to appoint a receiver to run the nursing homes. In court filings, HUD described a toxic brew of litigation, infighting and financial mismanagement that “contributed to an environment of uncertainty and risk for the patients at the Rosewood facilities.”

In October, the agency filed a complaint against Mr. Feiner seeking nearly $1 million in penalties for failing to file required financial reports. Mr. Feiner’s lawyer said they had agreed to settle the case.

In a statement, the agency said its “foremost concern is always the health and safety of the residents.” It added, “Following a number of time-consuming and exhaustive attempts to resolve these defaults, foreclosure could not be avoided.”

The federal department is now stuck running the Rosewood properties. About half are losing money, and several have problems with mold and faulty sprinkler systems, according to court papers.

The shuttered Lincoln Manor Nursing Home in Decatur used to be part of the Feiner nursing-home business.CreditJustin L. Fowler for The New York Times

The agency plans to auction them off, with bids due on Friday. If they don’t sell, HUD will have to run them until a buyer can be found.

Since August, HUD has spent more than $15 million to keep the facilities open — plus the $146 million it dispensed to Rosewood’s lender. The agency estimates that the facilities are worth no more than $95 million, according to public documents soliciting bids.

Substantial losses are common when loans in the program fail. The department has incurred an average loss of 80 percent on defaulted mortgages in recent years, according to government documents.

A nursing home’s financial woes risk hurting residents.

“Nursing homes’ financial difficulties almost inevitably impact resident care,” said David Stevenson, a professor of health policy at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He said agencies like HUD needed to “figure out ways to act before people are harmed.”

At Rosewood, health and safety problems developed soon after Mr. Feiner’s group took over.

Between 2014 and 2018, the Illinois Department of Public Health imposed $213,000 in fines against the facilities — more than five times the amount levied in the last five full years under the previous owner. And six of the Rosewood nursing homes, including those in Moline, Ill., and Inverness, Ill., had one- or two-star ratings on the federal Medicare website, which rates them on health and safety on a five-star scale.

It is part of a broader pattern at HUD-supported facilities. A New York Times analysis of all nursing homes with mortgages backed by HUD found that more than 850 facilities received one- or two-star Medicare ratings — more than one-third of the total.

There are nearly three dozen still-active personal injury lawsuits, including a number of wrongful death actions, filed by families of Rosewood patients. Lawyers for the estate of a 93-year-old dementia patient, Dorothy Dainty, said she died of complications from a fall at the facility in Rockford, Ill., because staff members failed to properly supervise her.

At another nursing facility that Mr. Feiner ran in Decatur, Ill., regulators imposed about $280,000 in fines after a patient died of an untreated wound. That home has since closed.

The Inverness facility and 12 other Rosewood properties are being sold by HUD. If they don’t sell at auction this month, the department will have to find another buyer.CreditDanielle Scruggs for The New York Times

Sean Murray, whose law firm is representing Ms. Dainty’s estate, said she had fallen out of bed and broken her hip because some workers had been pulling double shifts.

“For-profit homes are understaffing their facilities,” said Mr. Murray, whose firm is also representing the estates of two other Rosewood residents.

Rob Gebeloff contributed reporting. Alain Delaquérière contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com