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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health"

Texas teen sucked into water park drain critically injured, reports say

Westlake Legal Group Fun-Town Texas teen sucked into water park drain critically injured, reports say fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 05964a6a-ffd4-55c5-b03b-2891d3a7fd0b

A 14-year-old Texas teen is reportedly in a medically induced coma after he was allegedly sucked into a water park drain possibly in a dare-gone-wrong scenario on Saturday.

The teen, who was not identified by law enforcement to local media outlets due to his age, was at the Fun Town Water Park in Crystal Beach when tragedy struck.

The teen allegedly slipped after picking up the drain grate and was sucked in, causing major internal injuries. Galveston County Sheriff Henry Trochesset, who described the teen to KTRK.com as 5 feet 11 inches, said that it may have been a possible dare and that someone was able to quickly shut the pipes off enabling him to escape, but it wasn’t enough to prevent injury.

CIGARETTE PACKAGES WOULD FEATURE COLOR IMAGES, NEW HEALTH WARNINGS UNDER FDA PROPOSAL

“Even after they turned the pump off, there was still a suction keeping him down,” Trochesset told KHOU 11.

He reportedly told the news outlet that the teen was conscious at the time of the incident and apologized to his father, who is a volunteer fireman.

“He told his dad, ‘I love you, sorry it happened,” Trochesset told the news outlet. “He was able to stand up. They walked him away from the area to the gurney to get into the ambulance.”

UK WOMAN SUFFERS FACIAL BURNS AFTER EGGS ‘EXPLODED’ IN HER FACE: ‘IT FELT LIKE MY SKIN WAS BEING RIPPED OFF’

The teen was taken to University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston where he remains in critical condition, according to local outlets.

Troschesset, who was not immediately available to comment to Fox News, described the incident to local outlets as “tragic” for the family and said, “prayers are going to be needed.”

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A vigil was held in the teen’s honor, and several fundraisers, as well as a GoFundMe, have been set up to help keep supporters updated.

Fun Town Water Park’s owner, Harold LeBlanc, told Fox News he couldn’t comment on the incident.

Westlake Legal Group Fun-Town Texas teen sucked into water park drain critically injured, reports say fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 05964a6a-ffd4-55c5-b03b-2891d3a7fd0b   Westlake Legal Group Fun-Town Texas teen sucked into water park drain critically injured, reports say fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 05964a6a-ffd4-55c5-b03b-2891d3a7fd0b

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Dozens of Midwest teens who reported vaping hospitalized with ‘severe lung injury,’ breathing problems

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6069845556001_6069852589001-vs Dozens of Midwest teens who reported vaping hospitalized with 'severe lung injury,' breathing problems Madeline Farber fox-news/health/respiratory-health/stop-smoking fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc f60954cb-e750-5ed1-b985-12b30db3baf3 article

More than a dozen teens in the Midwest who reported vaping have been hospitalized with lung issues, stumping doctors who are searching for what exactly is sickening them.

The Minnesota Department of Health announced Tuesday four cases of young people at Children’s Minnesota with “severe lung injury” possibly tied to vaping. The cases were announced days after Illinois health officials reported six cases and at least 12 were confirmed in Wisconsin, state health officials said. There are more under investigation.

“These cases are similar to lung disease cases recently reported in Wisconsin and Illinois, though it is too early to say whether they are connected,” the Minnesota Department of Health said.

SEIZURES AFTER VAPING? FDA INVESTIGATING 127 REPORTS OF THE NEUROLOGICAL CONDITION FOLLOWING E-CIG USE

Patients are reporting similar symptoms – shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and vomiting in some cases – and some have been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Teens across states reported using vaping devices for both nicotine and THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that produces the “high” sensation, prior to their hospitalization.

In Minnesota, specifically, doctors at first thought the teens had some sort of respiratory infection – possibly pneumonia – but ruled this out after they failed to improve with treatment. In fact, according to NBC News, many of the teens treated for a respiratory infection got worse, not better.

“We are deeply concerned by the severe cases of lung injury associated with vaping that we are currently seeing,” said Dr. Emily Chapman, chief medical officer at Children’s Minnesota, said in a news release. “These cases are extremely complex to diagnose, as symptoms can mimic a common infection yet can lead to severe complications and extended hospitalization. Medical attention is essential; respiratory conditions can continue to decline without proper treatment.”

In Wisconsin, Dr. David D. Gummin, medical director of the Wisconsin Poison Center, and professor and chief of medical toxicology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, told The New York Times officials “have no leads” to a specific substance that’s causing respiratory issues “other than those that are associated with smoking or vaping,” he said.

VAPING AMONG ILLINOIS TEENS POSSIBLY TIED TO INCREASE IN HOSPITALIZATIONS, HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY

The negative health effects associated with cigarette and cigar use have long been documented, leading to a decline in both among teens in the U.S. in recent years.

In 2018, for example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported roughly 1 in 50 – about 1.8 percent – of middle school students said they smoked cigarettes in the past  30 days, down from 4.3 percent in 2011 and a drastic decrease from 36.4 percent in 1997 when rates “peaked after increasing throughout the first half of the 1990s,” according to the American Lung Association. 

But the same is not true for e-cigarette use. In 2018, nearly 1 of every 20 middle school students (4.9 percent) reported using electronic cigarettes in the past 30 days. That’s an increase from less than 1 percent in 2011.

“These cases are extremely complex to diagnose, as symptoms can mimic a common infection yet can lead to severe complications and extended hospitalization.”

— Dr. Emily Chapman, chief medical officer for Children’s Minnesota

The steady increase led Jermone Adams, the Surgeon General of the United States, last year to call vaping among American teens an “epidemic.”

“This is an unprecedented challenge,” Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in response at the time. 

The health issues – both short and long term – of e-cigarette use are not well understood, and the U.S. Food and Drug and Administration (FDA) does not require the manufacturers of e-cigarette devices to list all the ingredients in them.

“The risk here is that if people are presenting to hospital emergency rooms or urgent cares, they either may not think of vaping as something that is threatening and may not include it in their history,” Chapman told The New York Times. “Or if asked directly, they may not be comfortable sharing that.”

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A study from Yale University and Duke University found the e-cigarette liquid in Juul devices contained chemicals known as acetals. Acetals, according to the researchers, could cause lung irritation.

Separately, the FDA announced last week it’s investigating 127 reports of seizures occurring after electronic cigarette use.

“The truth of the matter is, we have so little experience with vaping, relative to the experience we have with cigarettes and cigars. Recall how long it took us to figure out that cigarettes were linked to lung cancer,” Chapman added. “There is so much we don’t know.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6069845556001_6069852589001-vs Dozens of Midwest teens who reported vaping hospitalized with 'severe lung injury,' breathing problems Madeline Farber fox-news/health/respiratory-health/stop-smoking fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc f60954cb-e750-5ed1-b985-12b30db3baf3 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6069845556001_6069852589001-vs Dozens of Midwest teens who reported vaping hospitalized with 'severe lung injury,' breathing problems Madeline Farber fox-news/health/respiratory-health/stop-smoking fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc f60954cb-e750-5ed1-b985-12b30db3baf3 article

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Boy’s rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says

Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa

A 6-year-old boy’s family is pinning their hope on a bone marrow transplant as a possible cure for a disease so rare that it took five years for doctors to find a diagnosis for him. Cohen Bramlee, the youngest of his family’s five siblings, first landed in the hospital at 4 months old, according to PEOPLE.

DOG IN TEXAS DIES FROM TOXIC ALGAE FOUND IN RIVER, OWNER CLAIMS: ‘I BLAME MYSELF’

His puzzling symptoms included food intolerance that would sometimes send his body into shock and required him to receive his meals and nutrients entirely through a central line catheter. He spent much of his young life in and out of the hospital, but doctors couldn’t nail down the underlying cause until researchers at the Undiagnosed Diseases Network at Duke University got a hold of his case. They determined that Cohen had a variance in an immune system gene, which was confirmed by Dr. Stella Davies at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to be the cause of his ailments, PEOPLE reported.

From there, his medical team determined that a bone marrow transplant may be the cure he needs. Two of Cohen’s siblings were found to be matches for a bone marrow transplant, with 16-year-old Todd Christopher chosen as the donor.

TENNESSEE COUPLE’S METH ADDICTION, RECOVERY PHOTOS GO VIRAL: ‘IT GETS BETTER’

“It was the first time that we really had hope that this was going to have a cure,” Carrie Bramlee, Cohen’s mother, told PEOPLE. “He’s been very sick and we came close to losing him several times, so now knowing that there is a chance for him to not only be healthier but be cured is unimaginable.”

The family has kept their supporters updated through the “Super Cohen’s Crusade” Facebook page, which includes snapshots of his everyday life. He is currently making his way through a pre-bone marrow transplant bucket list which includes a visit to Build-A-Bear and a fishing trip. According to the page, the transplant is tentatively scheduled for the second week of September.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Our superhero might be medically fragile but make no mistake about it, he is a strong, brave and an amazing little guy that brings so much joy to all who know him,” a blog post on the page reads. “We are blessed to call him our son. I pray his strength inspires all who hear his story!”

Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa   Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa

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Bride carries her premature baby down the aisle at hospital wedding

One North Carolina bride was thrilled to carry a bundle of joy much more precious than any bouquet down the aisle at her recent hospital wedding – her newborn son, born two months premature.

Though newlyweds Amanda and Edwin Acevedo initially planned to tie the knot in a beachfront wedding, fate had other plans when their baby son, Oliver, was born early on June 14 – long before his August due date, Southern Living reports. The infant arrived in the world at 30 weeks, weighing 3 pounds, 14.6 ounces and measuring 17 inches long.

According to ABC 11, the Wake County-area couple then decided courthouse nuptials would be their best option, before a staffer at WakeMed Hospital in Raleigh offered an even better idea.

Westlake Legal Group Amanda-Edwin-Acevedo-1-WakeMed-Hospitals Bride carries her premature baby down the aisle at hospital wedding Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 39f6d4cd-1095-5df9-9f59-65d0037df734

Though newlyweds Amanda and Edwin Acevedo initially planned to tie the knot in a beachfront wedding, fate had other plans when their baby son Oliver was born early on June 14. (Courtesy of WakeMed Hospitals)

TEXAS COUPLE WEDS AT HOSPITAL SO GROOM’S 100-YEAR-OLD GRANDMOTHER CAN WATCH

Mallory Magelli McKeown, a WakeMed Family Navigator, suggested that the couple get married at the hospital so that little Oliver, who remained in the NICU, could attend.

Westlake Legal Group Amanda-Edwin-Acevedo-3-WakeMed-Hospitals Bride carries her premature baby down the aisle at hospital wedding Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 39f6d4cd-1095-5df9-9f59-65d0037df734

The bride and groom looked sharp for the big day, with Oliver dressed up in a miniature suit-style outfit.  (Courtesy of WakeMed Hospitals)

The Acevedos loved the idea and gathered family and doctors, plus Oliver’s doctors, nurses and nurse practitioners for their special Aug. 6 wedding ceremony, as per ABC.

The new family looked sharp for the big day, with Oliver dressed up in a miniature suit-style outfit. McKeown even officiated the ceremony, ABC reports.

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In lieu of a traditional bouquet, the proud mom carried her baby down the aisle as her “flowers,” reps for the hospital wrote on Instagram in a post that has since been liked over 350 times.

“There was not a dry eye in the chapel, and the room was filled with love and celebration for Amanda, Edwin and Oliver,” a spokesperson for WakeMed told Southern Living.

According to the outlet, the baby weighed almost 8 pounds at 37 weeks on the wedding day. Though Oliver remains in the NICU, he is reportedly “on track to go home very soon.”

“Could not have asked for a more special or memorable wedding, surrounded by family and the wonderful people taking care of my baby!” the happy bride wrote on Facebook. “Thank you WakeMed Children’s for letting Oliver be a part of our day and everything else you do.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group Amanda-Edwin-Acevedo-1-WakeMed-Hospitals Bride carries her premature baby down the aisle at hospital wedding Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 39f6d4cd-1095-5df9-9f59-65d0037df734   Westlake Legal Group Amanda-Edwin-Acevedo-1-WakeMed-Hospitals Bride carries her premature baby down the aisle at hospital wedding Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 39f6d4cd-1095-5df9-9f59-65d0037df734

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Why we don’t know more about rare polio-like illness

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5852873242001_5852865318001-vs Why we don't know more about rare polio-like illness Healthline.com Gigen Mammoser fox-news/health/respiratory-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article a09177b0-f334-509f-8af0-04b70c2ac274

A rare and mysterious illness capable of causing paralysis in young children is growing in the United States, and doctors say the clock is ticking until it strikes again.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, specifically the gray matter of the spinal cord. It can weaken and ultimately paralyze the limbs of the body by damaging the cells in the spine that process signals related to motor control and movement.

According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), published this month, 233 confirmed cases of AFM occurred in the United States in 2018 — the most ever reported since the CDC began surveillance of the disease in 2014.

AFM first appeared on the radar in a big way in 2014 with 120 confirmed cases across 34 states.

Since then, the illness has followed a biannual trend — spiking every two years — with the overall number of cases growing with each outbreak as well as the number of states affected.

Doctors believe that the next major outbreak is set to occur in 2020, and they want to be ready for it.

There is a problem, however: Although AFM can be diagnosed, it’s still unclear what actually causes it.

A search for the cause of AFM

The leading candidate, according to experts in the field, is known as enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68), although the link between the virus and AFM hasn’t been conclusively established.

“That will be the one that most folks expect might be the culprit, but we don’t know yet for sure,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee.

“We’re kind of where we were years ago with Legionnaires’ disease: For the longest time we could define the illness, but we didn’t have the cause. That turned out to take a little bit longer before the laboratory gave us that answer,” he added.

The presentation and severity of AFM also has researchers looking at another deadly virus, one already eradicated in the United States: poliovirus. In fact, read anything about AFM and chances are you’ll see it described as a “polio-like” illness.

Polio is a highly infectious neurologic disease transmitted by the poliovirus that can cause limb weakness and paralysis.

Before the advent of the polio vaccine in 1955, polio was responsible for more than 15,000 cases of paralysis annually in the United States alone.

Given the similarities between polio and AFM, researchers looked to see if the poliovirus was the culprit. It wasn’t.

The data remains inconclusive, but further research should uncover whether EV-D68 is the real culprit.

“The reality is that at this time we don’t have a way to determine which children may be at an elevated risk for developing AFM, or the underlying explanation that predisposes them to develop AFM in the first place. The search for a biomarker from the blood or cerebrospinal fluid would be helpful to identify those at elevated risk,” said Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital, NYC.

Who’s at risk?

The risk of AFM remains very low, but there is still important information that parents should be aware of.

AFM can affect people of all ages, but it occurs most frequently among children, similar to polio. According to the CDC, among those confirmed to have contracted AFM in 2018, the median age was around 5 years old.

Also just like polio, EV-D68 is an intestinal (enteric) virus that is primarily spread through fecal bacteria coming in contact with the mouth. So good hygiene, including frequent handwashing, is a practical measure for keeping you and your family healthy.

“Young children are less hygienic than older persons, and these enteric germs obviously spread more readily among children because they spread it easily among each other,” said Schaffner.

What are the signs of AFM?

Symptoms of AFM may not be immediately obvious, and can resemble a mild respiratory infection at first. More severe symptoms, which include muscle weakness, facial drooping, difficulty swallowing, and slurred speech, need to be taken seriously. AFM can result in paralysis, but the severity of its effects may differ from one individual to the next.

“The long-term effects of AFM are unclear at this time. While some patients have recovered rapidly, others have remained paralyzed and require a high level of ongoing care to support their breathing and monitor for neurological deterioration,” said Glatter.

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There is no specific treatment for AFM, but basic preventative measures should be taken by parents and children alike.

“It’s important to adhere to standard precautions and steps to reduce the risk of developing AFM by staying up-to-date on vaccinations, washing your hands thoroughly, and taking precautions to reduce the risk of mosquito bites,” said Glatter.

This article first appeared on HealthLine.com.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5852873242001_5852865318001-vs Why we don't know more about rare polio-like illness Healthline.com Gigen Mammoser fox-news/health/respiratory-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article a09177b0-f334-509f-8af0-04b70c2ac274   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5852873242001_5852865318001-vs Why we don't know more about rare polio-like illness Healthline.com Gigen Mammoser fox-news/health/respiratory-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article a09177b0-f334-509f-8af0-04b70c2ac274

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UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse

When doctors first saw the bruises covering now 2-year-old Jack Fearns’ body, they were concerned the young boy was a victim of abuse.

Jack, of Widnes, England, was just 6 months old when his parents, Tom and Darryl-Anne Fearns, noticed their second child would develop bruises for seemingly no reason. Concerned, the couple sought medical help.

 VAPING LINKED TO 8 TEENS TREATED FOR BREATHING ISSUES, CHEST PAIN, HOSPITAL SAYS

They claim doctors questioned if they had been hurting their son, who, within 48 hours, would be diagnosed with hemophilia, a rare blood condition that affects the blood’s ability to properly clot. Those with the condition are either missing or low on a clotting protein called factor VIII, or FVIII. Large, deep bruises, pain or swelling in joints and unexplained or excessive bleeding are common signs.

Westlake Legal Group jack-bruise-2 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

Jack Fearns, now 2, has a rare blood condition called hemophilia. (Tom Fearns)

“It made us feel very upset. We already felt extremely anxious with concern for Jack but to have people think of you as someone potentially harming your child added a lot of unnecessary stress to an already stressful situation,” Tom Fearns, 29, told Fox News.

A blood test confirmed Jack’s diagnosis of hemophilia A, his father, who declined to say where Jack was treated, said.

When Jack received the diagnosis, Fearns said he and his wife, Darryl-Anne Fearns, 27, were “very relieved” before becoming engulfed in worry.

Westlake Legal Group jack-1 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

The young boy receives at-home treatment for the rare disorder every 72 hours. (Tom Fearns)

“It felt like a weight had been lifted to talk to people who understood what was happening and why,” he said. “But that’s when we realized we were faced with the reality of having a child with a bleeding disorder. It was suddenly very overwhelming, especially as we didn’t know anything about hemophilia.”

Jack likely inherited the condition from his mother, who later found out she was unknowingly a carrier of the disorder.

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Hemophilia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “is caused by a mutation or change, in one of the genes, that provides instructions for making the clotting factor proteins needed to form a blood clot.” It’s rare; roughly 400 babies are born with hemophilia A each year in the U.S.

Westlake Legal Group jack-bruise-3 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

A baby Jack is seen here with a large bruise on his arm. (Tom Fearns)

Women who carry (either knowingly or not) an affected X chromosome can pass the disorder down to their children, even if they themselves do not have any symptoms of hemophilia, per the CDC. Sons of female carriers have a 50/50 chance of inheriting the disorder, while daughters have the same odds of being a carrier.

Following Jack’s diagnosis, Darryl-Anne Fearns learned she was a carrier, and that she inherited the gene from her mother, she told the Daily Mail. 

“She has bruised easily her whole life and never knew why,” Darryl-Anne Fearns told the U.K.-based outlet of her mother.

Westlake Legal Group jakc-bruise-1 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

“It felt like a weight had been lifted to talk to people who understood what was happening and why,” Tom Fearns said. (Tom Fearns)

Though there is no cure for the blood disorder, treatment is available. Tom Fearns said Jack receives clotting factor concentrates intravenously to replace the blood clotting factor missing from his body. He receives an injection every 72 hours.

While the young boy has “good and bad days,” his father said, he’s doing well.

“I think for the first time since his diagnosis we finally feel like his condition and treatment are comfortably part of our everyday routines,” he said. “Jack takes everything in his stride and his resilience has made this experience much more positive than we could have ever imagined.”

Westlake Legal Group jack-2 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

Jack’s parents now accustomed to helping their son manage his condition. (Tom Fearns)

That said, Jack will not be able to play contact sports as he gets older, and his parents worry when he roughhouses with his older brother, 5-year-old Thomas.

While the couple “understands and absolutely supports safeguarding,” it is important “to run tests to rule out medical conditions before jumping to conclusions” in certain situations, they said, referring to when there were allegedly concerns they were physically abusing Jack.

MAINE RESIDENT CONTRACTS RARE TICK-BORNE ILLNESS THAT CAN CAUSE BRAIN INFECTIONS, DEATH, STATE CDC SAYS

“It felt like a weight had been lifted to talk to people who understood what was happening and why.”

— Tom Fearns

Looking back, Tom Fearns said he and his wife wish they had known “everything will be OK.”

“Since Jack’s diagnosis we have faced a lot of roadblocks in terms of medical complications and we have been in situations we thought we would never get through. But of course, we did. Nothing is ever final,” he said. “You do eventually adapt to life with hemophilia and, although it takes time, life becomes pretty normal.”

Westlake Legal Group jack-bruise-2 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2   Westlake Legal Group jack-bruise-2 UK boy with severe, unexplained bruising diagnosed with rare blood disorder after parents accused of abuse Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 95937a17-1190-51f2-ab60-96fcb571efc2

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Photos of drug user’s home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: ‘It felt normal’

One photo shows needles and syringes resting on a windowsill mere inches away from an unsuspecting infant. Another shows dirty laundry and trash littering the floor as a toddler peers over an unmade bed. This was home life for Davidlee Richardson, Jaralee Metcalf, Danika Richardson and Brynlee Richardson — four siblings who were living with a mother in the depths of addiction.

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

This is the original photo that Brynlee posted to a Reddit forum, which she said was taken by an older half-sibling who showed it to his teacher. (Courtesy of Richardson family)

Some of their earliest memories revolve around their mother, who was always sleeping, and a much older father who died in a car accident early in their childhood, and was already a dad to nine kids by the time they were born. Their maternal grandmother made sure the kids had enough food to survive.

A PEEK INTO OPIOID USERS’ BRAINS AS THEY TRY TO QUIT

“We grew up on Fruity Pebbles and SpaghettiOs,” Jaralee, now 23 and living in Idaho Falls, told Fox News. “When we moved to Tennessee, I just remember knowing that I had watched my dad do it a billion times — just boil pasta, throw sauce over it and throw it together.”

“I knew she loved us, I just knew she made a lot of mistakes.”

— Davidlee Richardson, speaking about his mother

Danika, now 20 and living in Utah, remembers her dad always making Saturday breakfasts for them — but she also remembers that her mother was addicted to heroin, meth, alcohol, cigarettes and cannabis, and was trigged by caffeine. David, now 24 and living in Idaho, remembers one instance after his father died when he made his drunken mother angry, but he can’t remember why, and he was running down a hill away from her. His mother stumbled, fell and ended up bloodied and cut, so he turned around and went to help her back up.

The siblings don’t speak of their mother with disdain or hatred, but have learned to separate her from her addiction. Danika said she’s never held a grudge against her mom, while Brynlee, now 17 and living in Utah with Danika, said that her mother’s addiction started at 13, so it wouldn’t be fair to blame an adult for something that a teen did.

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_2 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

Jaralee said that when she was old enough, she asked a neighbor to homeschool her, so she would be more readily available to help her younger siblings.  (Courtesy of Richardson family)

“My mom was very loving, she loved us a lot,” Jaralee told Fox News. “She also had schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and she self-medicated with drugs and alcohol.”

Jaralee, who took on the maternal role for her siblings to make sure they ate, had clean clothes and attended school, said she and David would break into their mother’s room in the night to make sure she was still breathing. She also asked a neighbor to homeschool her, so she would be more readily available for her younger siblings.

ONE NURSE’S STORY OF ADDICTION AND RECOVERY

And when a half-sibling took the photos of their living situation and showed it to a teacher — which, in turn, sparked an investigation and eventual foster care — the siblings repeatedly told a judge they wanted to live with their mother because they “didn’t know any different,” Jaralee said.

“Of course we wanted to live with our mom,” Danika told Fox News. “It felt normal.”

Jaralee said her mother would also pressure them to repeat to the judge that they wanted to go home with her, and that it took her many years to realize that the living situation was unhealthy for them.

“She said a lot of times — and this really frustrated me — when we were in foster care that ‘If you loved me, you would tell the judge you want to live with me,’ and we told them all the time,” she said. “It took a long time for me to tell the judge, ‘No, we don’t want to live with her.’ Early in childhood it was just the normal, but finally I realized no, this is not normal.”

Jaralee said she remembers sometimes showing up to foster families’ homes with just the clothes on their backs at 2 a.m.

After more than 10 years of being placed in and out of foster care, the four were adopted by older half-siblings, with Danika and Brynlee being kept together while Jaralee went with another sibling and David with another. All of them have stayed away from alcohol and illicit substances for religious reasons, but they said their upbringing gave them the tools they needed to thrive today.

“Once we realized that this wasn’t something that happened to every kid, then I was able to stand up to my mom, get us away from that situation and get us adopted,” Jaralee said. “What I want people to know who are going through this situation is that it isn’t what life is like – it does get better.”

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_3 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

The siblings said they survived mostly on cereal and boiled pasta, and that their maternal grandmother played a large role in helping them make sure they had enough food to survive. (Courtesy of Richardson family.)

David said their upbringing “forced us to speak our minds” and “stand up for ourselves.” All of them have been through therapy, or are still seeing therapists. They also keep in touch with their foster families, and most plan to foster children in the future, especially older ones.  All four have either completed or are working toward college degrees, thanks in part to the college fund their maternal grandmother — who still plays a large role in their lives today — set up for them.

MILLIONS SHOULD STOP TAKING ASPIRIN FOR HEART HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

It was the youngest, Brynlee, who shared the photos on Reddit, because she said she likes hearing other people’s stories, and thought her own might be able to help someone else. She said she didn’t expect the overwhelming response she received, and while some of it has been negative and critical of their mother, many have thanked her for sharing.

They know their upbringing isn’t unheard of either. In 2016, 48.6 million Americans used illicit drugs or misused prescription drugs, and more than 63,000 drug overdose deaths in the same year involved a prescription or illicit opioid. The next year, over 15,000 Americans died from drug overdoses involving heroin, with the use of the drug skyrocketing among both men and women in recent years.

Brynlee said she spoke to her mother a few months before she died two years ago, and that her mother told her that she is “beautiful and not to let anyone tell me otherwise.”

“I knew she loved us,” David said. “I just knew she made a lot of mistakes.”

At the time of her death, the siblings were told she died of a heart attack. It was only after her funeral when they received her death certificate that they learned she had heroin in her system, and that she had died of asphyxiation after choking on a small bag.

Her children then found a Facebook tribute she had written to them in her biography. She wrote that they were “her greatest blessings,” and that they were “her most important contribution to this world and make me proud always.”

Danika said her mother wrote that they made her “life worthwhile,” and “her world go round.”

“I’m sorry you missed out on both of your parents,” her mother wrote, according to Danika. “But always know how much you are and were loved,” Danika said her mother wrote.

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Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad   Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

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Idaho high school football team attends autistic boy’s birthday party after only one classmate accepts invitation

High school football players in Idaho surprised a 9-year-old boy with autism by coming to his birthday party after only one classmate accepted his invitation.

Video taken by Lindsay Barrus Larsen at last month’s party showed the Nampa High School players giving her son Christian a football as a gift and playing with him.

NEW YORK HIGH SCHOOL GRAD WITH AUTISM HONORED WITH ‘SILENT OVATION’

Lindsay Larsen explained on Facebook in May that she passed out invitations to Christian’s class of 25 students, but only one girl responded that she would come.

“The hardest thing, is I do understand. It can be uncomfortable to try to be a friend with someone who has had outbursts and cried in class,” she wrote in the post, adding that she was “grateful” for the one girl who said she was going to attend.

In another Facebook post days later, Lindsay said that her friend reached out to Nampa High School Football Coach Dan Holtry after reading the first post about Christian’s birthday party. Nampa is located about 20 miles from Boise.

“Before I knew it, Coach Dan was reaching out to me, asking if he could come to the party with some of his best players,” Lindsay wrote, adding that she “happily accepted” the coach’s offer.

Coach Holtry told KTVB-TV he texted his team to tell them about the birthday party.

“The kids, before I could finish the text, it feels like they were like, ‘We’re in … Coach, we are in!’ They were like, ‘When do we do it? Let’s go!'” Holtry told the station.  “I was amazed how much they wanted to participate in this and take care of Christian.”

Donovan Estrada, a Nampa High School football player, said he “instantly” wanted to attend, adding that he knew his teammates did too.

“Right away we texted back, ‘Yeah, let’s do it! We’re in!'” Estrada told the station.

FIRE NEAR IDAHO’S NUCLEAR RESEARCH FACILITY PROMPTS EVACUATION

On the day of Christian’s party, the team showed up in their jerseys and chanted his name.

“I literally pretended to pass out when I saw them, it was really cool,” Christian told the television station. “I was wowed! I can’t explain it! Wowed!”

“He just looked so happy to see us,” Estrada said. “We were all so excited to be there and all.”

He added, “He just wanted to play football with us, showing the presents that he got, he wanted us to stay for cake and stuff like that.”

Westlake Legal Group HS-football-team-and-kid Idaho high school football team attends autistic boy's birthday party after only one classmate accepts invitation Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/idaho fox-news/us fox-news/newsedge/sports fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc article 4c125bb4-5f9f-5f14-bed6-9065f0a2e26b

 Christian Larsen opened a gift from Nampa High School Football players who attended his birthday party. (Lindsay Barrus Larsen)

Christian told KTVB, “This is probably the best birthday ever, I have lots of best days in my life, and this might be one of them.”

“It was truly amazing to watch them,” his mother wrote on Facebook. “Those High School seniors stayed until the end of the party.”

She said the team played games and sang “Happy Birthday” to him.

“Even my not naturally athletically inclined Christian, was running “touch downs!” Lindsay wrote.

Westlake Legal Group Football-team-Kid-1 Idaho high school football team attends autistic boy's birthday party after only one classmate accepts invitation Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/idaho fox-news/us fox-news/newsedge/sports fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc article 4c125bb4-5f9f-5f14-bed6-9065f0a2e26b

Nampa High School Football players and Christian Larsen at his birthday party. (Lindsay Barrus Larsen)

Holtry told  KTVB it was an honor for the team to be a part of Christian’s birthday party.

“It was just an opportunity to take care of a guy that was going through adversity,” Holtry said. “We’re blessed here at Nampa High School. We have a lot of great kids. We know about adversity and we have our fair share, and we know how to fight through it.”

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“There is so much good in this world,” Christian’s mom wrote on Facebook. “And when things are hard, the good shines even brighter.”

Westlake Legal Group Football-team-Kid-1 Idaho high school football team attends autistic boy's birthday party after only one classmate accepts invitation Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/idaho fox-news/us fox-news/newsedge/sports fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc article 4c125bb4-5f9f-5f14-bed6-9065f0a2e26b   Westlake Legal Group Football-team-Kid-1 Idaho high school football team attends autistic boy's birthday party after only one classmate accepts invitation Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/idaho fox-news/us fox-news/newsedge/sports fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/health fnc article 4c125bb4-5f9f-5f14-bed6-9065f0a2e26b

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Teen had shard of glass stuck in his face for a month without knowing it

A teenage boy in Spain had a knife-like shard of glass stuck in his face for a month without realizing it, after he fainted and fell into a window, according to a new report of the case.

The 14-year-old boy went to the emergency room after experiencing pain while chewing and trouble opening his jaw for about a month, according to the report, from doctors at the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital in Seville, and published June 21 in The Journal of Emergency Medicine.

WOMAN LOSES FINGER, ‘COULD’VE DIED’ AFTER CAT SCRATCH TRIGGERS MAJOR INFECTION

The boy said that, about four weeks earlier, he had injured his face when he crashed into a glass window after fainting. At that time, doctors at a different hospital had sutured a 1-centimeter (0.4 inch) wound on his cheek, and drained a hematoma — or a collection of blood outside a blood vessel — that was on his face.

But they may have missed something. When the ER doctors at Virgen del Rocio University Hospital ordered an X-ray, it showed a faint, rectangular object about 3.5 cm (1.4 inches) in length on the left side of the boy’s face. [12 Amazing Images in Medicine]

That led doctors to order a CT scan, and the scan revealed a foreign body “which had the shape of a knife blade” hidden behind the boy’s cheekbone, the authors wrote in their paper.

The penetration of a foreign body into this space “is a relatively rare event” because the area is well protected by the cheekbone, the authors said.

The boy needed surgery to remove the glass, which doctors extracted through his mouth from the underside of the boy’s cheek.

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After the surgery, the boy was able to move his jaw again, and he had no complications after six months of follow-up, the report said.

11 weird things people have swallowed

27 oddest medical case reports

9 weird ways kids can get hurt

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group broken_glass_window_istock Teen had shard of glass stuck in his face for a month without knowing it Rachael Rettner LiveScience fox-news/health/medical-research/surgery fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 7c989214-b675-50f0-b679-1a4a014fa305   Westlake Legal Group broken_glass_window_istock Teen had shard of glass stuck in his face for a month without knowing it Rachael Rettner LiveScience fox-news/health/medical-research/surgery fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 7c989214-b675-50f0-b679-1a4a014fa305

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Philadelphia goalie skates with 9-year-old fan recovering from partial foot amputation

Westlake Legal Group Carter-Hart-FOX29 Philadelphia goalie skates with 9-year-old fan recovering from partial foot amputation fox-news/sports fox-news/health/orthopedics/sports-medicine fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc caed8635-7bae-5408-b725-2730db8f10b6 article

Philadelphia Flyers goalie Carter Hart gave one of his biggest fans a birthday wish to remember on Wednesday when they hit the ice together.

The boy, 9-year-old Brandon Hull, was marking his return to the ice after recovering from a partial foot amputation.

Hull, who also plays goalie, lost his right foot after falling from a lawnmower a few years back and undergoing several surgeries. His goal was to get back on the ice as soon as possible and the doctors at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia did just that.

He is back on his youth hockey team and on Wednesday, as part of his birthday wish, Hull joined his favorite Flyers’ player at the team’s locker room before the pair spent some time skating laps, FOX 29 Philadelphia reported.

PHILADELPHIA FLYERS MASCOT SURPRISES 7-YEAR-OLD SUPERFAN WHO REQUESTED CUSTOM GRITTY-THEMED PROSTHETIC 

“I feel like I want to be like him when I’m older and I want to play for the Flyers just like him,” Hull said of his role model. He’s the netminder for his youth team.

Hull had a smile on his face as he met the Flyers favorite in the locker room, where they discussed the hockey, goaltending and their respective equipment. Hart also signed a cast Hull wore on his arm due to a recent kickball injury.

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“Have some fun and work hard,” Hart said to his resilient fan. “I think those are probably the two biggest things. Everyone says it, but at the NHL level, I know we’re professionals, but you gotta find time to have fun, too. The work never stops. You gotta always try to be at your best.”

Fox News’ Tyler Olson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Carter-Hart-FOX29 Philadelphia goalie skates with 9-year-old fan recovering from partial foot amputation fox-news/sports fox-news/health/orthopedics/sports-medicine fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc caed8635-7bae-5408-b725-2730db8f10b6 article   Westlake Legal Group Carter-Hart-FOX29 Philadelphia goalie skates with 9-year-old fan recovering from partial foot amputation fox-news/sports fox-news/health/orthopedics/sports-medicine fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc caed8635-7bae-5408-b725-2730db8f10b6 article

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