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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals"

More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village

A village in Russia’s Far North has been overrun by more than 50 polar bears.

All public activities have reportedly been called off in Ryrkaypiy, in the Chukotka region, and schools are being guarded so that the bears don’t wander inside.

Tatyana Minenko, head of Ryrkaypiy’s bear patrol program, told Ria Novosti, a Russian state news agency, that they had counted 56 polar bears in the village.

The animals were “both adult and young… there were females with cubs of different ages,” she said, adding that almost all of them appeared to be thin.

FROTHY, TOXIC FOAM COVERS FAMOUS BEACH

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

Conservationists counted at least 50 polar bears. (World Wildlife Fund)

OCEANS CONTAIN A MILLION TIMES MORE MICROPLASTIC THAN WE REALIZED, STUDY CLAIMS

Although the polar bears normally reside on Cape Schmidy, about 1.4 miles away, a World Wildlife Fund conservationist said the area has been experiencing warmer than typical weather.

“If the ice were strong enough the bears, or at least some of them, would have already gone to sea, where they could hunt for seals or sea hares,” he told BBC News.

EMACIATED POLAR BEAR SPOTTED IN RUSSIAN CITY, FAR FROM USUAL HABITAT

Earlier this week, video footage showing a polar bear in the same area spray-painted with “T-34” — the name of a famous World War II Russian tank — went viral.

That video was posted to Facebook by a World Wildlife Fund employee, as Fox News previously reported, and it sparked outrage online.

Anatoly Kochnev reportedly told Tass news agency that polar bear visits are increasingly frequent and that five years ago, only about five bears got close to the village.

RUSSIAN POLAR BEAR SPRAY-PAINTED WITH ‘T-34’ SPARKS OUTRAGE FROM WILDLIFE EXPERTS

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bears-2 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

The polar bears have traveled close to the village. (World Wildlife Fund)

“I as a scientist believe [Ryrkaypiy village] should not remain there,” he told Tass. “We try to control the situation, but nobody would want to think what may happen there in three to five years.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The BBC reported that Russian media has speculated that the spray-painted bear may be linked to local anger over the animals entering communities in Arctic Russia. An investigation has been launched to find out where the footage was captured, it reported.

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757   Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village

A village in Russia’s Far North has been overrun by more than 50 polar bears.

All public activities have reportedly been called off in Ryrkaypiy, in the Chukotka region, and schools are being guarded so that the bears don’t wander inside.

Tatyana Minenko, head of Ryrkaypiy’s bear patrol program, told Ria Novosti, a Russian state news agency, that they had counted 56 polar bears in the village.

The animals were “both adult and young… there were females with cubs of different ages,” she said, adding that almost all of them appeared to be thin.

FROTHY, TOXIC FOAM COVERS FAMOUS BEACH

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article

Conservationists counted at least 50 polar bears. (World Wildlife Fund)

OCEANS CONTAIN A MILLION TIMES MORE MICROPLASTIC THAN WE REALIZED, STUDY CLAIMS

Although the polar bears normally reside on Cape Schmidy, about 1.4 miles away, a World Wildlife Fund conservationist said the area has been experiencing warmer than typical weather.

“If the ice were strong enough the bears, or at least some of them, would have already gone to sea, where they could hunt for seals or sea hares,” he told BBC News.

EMACIATED POLAR BEAR SPOTTED IN RUSSIAN CITY, FAR FROM USUAL HABITAT

Earlier this week, video footage showing a polar bear in the same area spray-painted with “T-34” — the name of a famous World War II Russian tank — went viral.

That video was posted to Facebook by a World Wildlife Fund employee, as Fox News previously reported, and it sparked outrage online.

Anatoly Kochnev reportedly told Tass news agency that polar bear visits are increasingly frequent and that five years ago, only about five bears got close to the village.

RUSSIAN POLAR BEAR SPRAY-PAINTED WITH ‘T-34’ SPARKS OUTRAGE FROM WILDLIFE EXPERTS

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bears-2 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article

The polar bears have traveled close to the village. (World Wildlife Fund)

“I as a scientist believe [Ryrkaypiy village] should not remain there,” he told Tass. “We try to control the situation, but nobody would want to think what may happen there in three to five years.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The BBC reported that Russian media has speculated that the spray-painted bear may be linked to local anger over the animals entering communities in Arctic Russia. An investigation has been launched to find out where the footage was captured, it reported.

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article   Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village

A village in Russia’s Far North has been overrun by more than 50 polar bears.

All public activities have reportedly been called off in Ryrkaypiy, in the Chukotka region, and schools are being guarded so that the bears don’t wander inside.

Tatyana Minenko, head of Ryrkaypiy’s bear patrol program, told Ria Novosti, a Russian state news agency, that they had counted 56 polar bears in the village.

The animals were “both adult and young… there were females with cubs of different ages,” she said, adding that almost all of them appeared to be thin.

FROTHY, TOXIC FOAM COVERS FAMOUS BEACH

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

Conservationists counted at least 50 polar bears. (World Wildlife Fund)

OCEANS CONTAIN A MILLION TIMES MORE MICROPLASTIC THAN WE REALIZED, STUDY CLAIMS

Although the polar bears normally reside on Cape Schmidy, about 1.4 miles away, a World Wildlife Fund conservationist said the area has been experiencing warmer than typical weather.

“If the ice were strong enough the bears, or at least some of them, would have already gone to sea, where they could hunt for seals or sea hares,” he told BBC News.

EMACIATED POLAR BEAR SPOTTED IN RUSSIAN CITY, FAR FROM USUAL HABITAT

Earlier this week, video footage showing a polar bear in the same area spray-painted with “T-34” — the name of a famous World War II Russian tank — went viral.

That video was posted to Facebook by a World Wildlife Fund employee, as Fox News previously reported, and it sparked outrage online.

Anatoly Kochnev reportedly told Tass news agency that polar bear visits are increasingly frequent and that five years ago, only about five bears got close to the village.

RUSSIAN POLAR BEAR SPRAY-PAINTED WITH ‘T-34’ SPARKS OUTRAGE FROM WILDLIFE EXPERTS

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bears-2 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

The polar bears have traveled close to the village. (World Wildlife Fund)

“I as a scientist believe [Ryrkaypiy village] should not remain there,” he told Tass. “We try to control the situation, but nobody would want to think what may happen there in three to five years.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The BBC reported that Russian media has speculated that the spray-painted bear may be linked to local anger over the animals entering communities in Arctic Russia. An investigation has been launched to find out where the footage was captured, it reported.

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757   Westlake Legal Group wwf-polar-bear-1 More than 50 polar bears overrun far-north Russian village fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 23f9237c-f9ae-5256-92ea-0ae980e86757

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Baby porpoises are being poisoned by a ‘cocktail of chemicals’

Baby porpoises in the U.K. are being poisoned by what’s described as a “cocktail of chemicals” stemming from pollutants in their mother’s milk.

The researchers found that the chemicals, which include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are passed on from the mother to their calves. The longer they remain in the mothers’ bodies, the more toxic they are to their offspring, the researchers noted.

“It’s a tragic irony that juvenile porpoises are being exposed to a toxic cocktail of chemicals during feeding – when all they’re supposed to be getting are the vital nutrients they need for the crucial developmental stage of their life,” the study’s lead author, Rosie Williams, said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group porpoise-england Baby porpoises are being poisoned by a 'cocktail of chemicals' fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/endangered fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 02b5c21b-17bd-5132-9f0a-5251a3eaa45b

This is a harbor porpoise at Seaford. (Rob Deaville)

COCAINE FOUND IN SHRIMP, SHOCKING STUDY REVEALS

According to the BBC, PCBs were used in plastics and paints and have long been banned, but remnants of them still exist.

PCBs have also been discovered in whales and dolphins, the BBC added, which cited a recent study that noted dolphins in the English Channel were exposed to a ‘cocktail of pollutants.’

“Previously, scientists tended to monitor PCB concentrations by grouping them together and treating them as one chemical, but as we know, they’re a group of chemicals with different toxicity levels so it was a bit like trying to measure how much caffeine someone’s had — without knowing whether they drank three cans of red bull or three cups of tea,” Williams added. “Our study has highlighted the need to change our approach to monitoring PCBs, to look at the composition of individual chemicals, so that we can get a better understanding of the risk posed by these chemicals to our marine wildlife.”

In 2018, traces of cocaine and illegal pesticides were found inside freshwater shrimp across 15 different locations across Suffolk, England.

SHARK WOUNDS ARE KEPT ‘INFECTION FREE’ THANKS TO THIS SHOCKING DISCOVERY

Williams said that studying PCB exposure in species that have abundant populations can help aid in those where the population numbers are dwindling, including orcas, where there are only eight remaining in the U.K.

“As top predators, killer whales are exposed to some of the highest levels of PCBs, because there is an accumulative effect of PCBs as you go up the food chain,” Williams added. “It’s obvious that marine mammals are still experiencing the lingering impacts of PCBs, so identifying the sources and pathways they’re entering our oceans is a vital next step to preventing further pollution.”

One of the study’s co-authors, Susan Jobling, said the research allows scientists to further understand how prevalent PCBs are and how they impact the environment as well as the animals in the area.

“This research helps further our understanding of these legacy industrial chemical pollutants and the effects that different levels of exposure, in complex mixtures, may have,” Jobling said. “Learning more about PCB exposure in juvenile animals is vital, so that we can try to mitigate the impact of these dangerous chemicals on populations and help protect the future status of marine mammals in U.K. waters.”

The research is published in the scientific journal Science of the Total Environment.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group porpoise-england Baby porpoises are being poisoned by a 'cocktail of chemicals' fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/endangered fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 02b5c21b-17bd-5132-9f0a-5251a3eaa45b   Westlake Legal Group porpoise-england Baby porpoises are being poisoned by a 'cocktail of chemicals' fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/endangered fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 02b5c21b-17bd-5132-9f0a-5251a3eaa45b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Toxic fog blamed for dangerously high mercury levels in mountain lions

A surprising culprit has been fingered for very high mercury levels found in mountain lions living near the California coast — marine fog.

According to research published this week in Scientific Reports, pumas living in the so-called “fog belt” of the Santa Cruz Mountains have three times the amount of mercury in their systems as those living outside of the fog zone.

The study, which was led by environmental toxicologist Peter Weiss-Penzias, collected and analyzed fur and whisker samples from 94 coastal mountain lions and 18 noncoastal lions. Scientists found that mercury concentrations in the coastal samples averaged about 1,500 parts per billion (ppb), compared to nearly 500 ppb in the noncoastal group. In addition, at least one lion had mercury levels known to be toxic to species like mink and otters, while two others had “sublethal” levels that reduce fertility and reproductive success.

“Lichen don’t have any roots so the presence of elevated methylmercury in lichen must come from the atmosphere,” said Weiss-Penzias in a statement. “Mercury becomes increasingly concentrated in organisms higher up the food chain.”

BLUE WHALE HAS HEARTBEAT MEASURED FOR THE FIRST TIME AND RESULTS SURPRISE SCIENTISTS

Westlake Legal Group mountain-lion-getty Toxic fog blamed for dangerously high mercury levels in mountain lions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1c3cd489-8497-51de-9446-df8dd6818ea5

Mountain Lions in the mountains of Montana, United States (Getty Images)

RUSSIAN COWS GET VR GOGGLES

The elevated mercury levels are an additional threat to the predator, which is already battling habitat loss and other risks from humans, according to researchers.

“These mercury levels might compound the impacts of trying to make it in an environment like the Santa Cruz Mountains, where there is already so much human influence, but we don’t really know,” said senior author Chris Wilmers, a professor of environmental studies and the director of the Puma Project. “Levels will be higher 100 years from now, when the Earth’s mercury budget is higher because of all the coal we’re pumping into the atmosphere.”

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In a press release accompanying the study, scientists note that high levels of methylmercury can cause neurological damage, including memory loss and reduced motor coordination.

“We need to protect the top predators in the environment,” explained Weiss-Penzias. “They’re keystone species. They perform ecosystem services. When you change one thing, it has cascading effects through the system.”

Westlake Legal Group mountain-lion-getty Toxic fog blamed for dangerously high mercury levels in mountain lions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1c3cd489-8497-51de-9446-df8dd6818ea5   Westlake Legal Group mountain-lion-getty Toxic fog blamed for dangerously high mercury levels in mountain lions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1c3cd489-8497-51de-9446-df8dd6818ea5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Palmerston, British Foreign Office’s resident cat, returns after 6-month recovery for weight gain, stress

This is one government fat cat the public is happy to see back at work.

Palmerston, the beloved feline residing in the United Kingdom’s Foreign Office, has returned after a six-month hiatus used to recover from stress after he was, apparently, overloved by government employees who fed him too many treats.

DOWNING STREET ‘CHIEF MOUSER’ LARRY THE CAT STAGES SIT-IN UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP’S LIMO

“I am happy to announce that I will be returning to my Chief Mouser duties at the @foreignoffice this week!” read a tweet from Palmerston’s personal Twitter account Monday that also announced the introduction of the “Palmerston Protocols” that will be used to ensure the cat remains in good health.

‘BRITAIN’S FATTEST CAT’ FINALLY FINDS A HOME AFTER BEING RETURNED TO SHELTER 4 TIMES

Per the “Protocols,” only the cat’s caretaker will be allowed to feed him food or treats, and “everyone should respect my personal space and allow me to lead interactions.”

Palmerston will be kept in “Palmerston HQ,” or the “Palmerston Zone,” a smaller area of the building that houses British diplomat Sir Simon McDonald’s office, that will be designated for the cat to hang out, as the “FCO is a very big, old building and I was finding it difficult to maintain a territory so large.”

Westlake Legal Group palmerston-1-AP Palmerston, British Foreign Office's resident cat, returns after 6-month recovery for weight gain, stress Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/world fnc dfcf8191-36d1-526f-a8b8-0ba02b6fd862 article

Palmerston returned to the United Kingdom’s Foreign Office on Monday after a six-month hiatus used to recover from weight gain and stress. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

The purring public servant had been removed from the Foreign Office in July and taken in by McDonald’s private secretary to recover from stress, The Telegraph reported. The “Chief Mouser” was overweight and suffered from significant anxiety, manifesting in Palmerston having “groomed all of the hair off his front legs.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

McDonald, who is in charge of Palmerston, on Monday issued a memo to staff warning them to take better care of Palmerston — or else he’d be retired from the Foreign Office for good.

“He is happy, healthy and full of energy,” the letter read, per The Telegraph. “His pelt is glossy and mostly grown back (over-grooming is, I’m told, a similar habit to human’s nail-biting; the habit can take a while to kick). His diet is regulated and free of Dreamies. We need now to keep him that way!”

Palmerston reportedly has not yet commented about his return.

Westlake Legal Group palmerston-1-AP Palmerston, British Foreign Office's resident cat, returns after 6-month recovery for weight gain, stress Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/world fnc dfcf8191-36d1-526f-a8b8-0ba02b6fd862 article   Westlake Legal Group palmerston-1-AP Palmerston, British Foreign Office's resident cat, returns after 6-month recovery for weight gain, stress Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/world fnc dfcf8191-36d1-526f-a8b8-0ba02b6fd862 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A blue whale had his heartbeat taken for the first time ever — and scientists are shocked

When the largest animals on Earth grab a snack, their hearts skip a beat — or sometimes 30.

That’s what a team of marine biologists found after recording a blue whale‘s heartbeat for the first time ever. After suction-cupping a pulse monitor to the back of a blue whale off the California coast, the researchers watched as the gargantuan creature dove and resurfaced nonstop for nearly 9 hours, alternately filling its lungs with air and its belly with schools of tasty fish hundreds of feet below the surface.

During these deep, grub-hunting dives, the whale’s heart rate see-sawed wildly, pumping as many as 34 times per minute at the surface and as few as just two beats per minute at the deepest depths — about 30% to 50% slower than the researchers expected.

According to a new study published yesterday (Nov. 25) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the simple act of catching a bite may push a blue whale’s heart to its physical limits — and that could explain why no creatures larger than blue whales have ever been spotted on Earth.

“Animals that are operating at physiological extremes can help us understand biological limits to size,” lead study author Jeremy Goldbogen, an assistant professor at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. In other words: If a blue whale’s heart could not possibly pump any faster to fuel its daily foraging expeditions, how could a larger animal’s heart pump even faster to fuel it with even more energy?

The biggest hearts on Earth

Blue whales are the largest animals ever known to have lived on Earth. As full-grown adults, blue whales can measure more than 100 feet (30 meters) long, or roughly the size of two school buses parked bumper-to-bumper. It takes a big heart to power a creature that size; while not actually large enough for a human to swim through, as an urban myth claims, one beached blue whale’s heart weighed in at 400 pounds (180 kilograms) in 2015 and looked to be about the size of a golf cart.

Related: 6 Strangest Hearts in the Animal Kingdom

Scientists already knew that a blue whale’s pulse must slow down at depth. When air-breathing mammals dive underwater, their bodies automatically start redistributing oxygen; hearts and brains get more O2, while muscles, skin and other organs get less. This allows animals to stay underwater longer on a single breath, and it results in a significantly lower heart rate than normal. This is as true for human landlubbers as it is for blue whales — however, given the whale’s gargantuan size and proficiency at diving more than 1,000 feet (300 m) below the surface, their hearts are pushed to limits far beyond ours.

To find out exactly how much a blue whale’s heart rate changes during a dive, the study authors followed a group of whales they’d previously studied in Monterey Bay, California, and tagged one with a special sensor mounted on the end of a 20-foot-long pole (6 m). The whale was a male first sighted 15 years ago. The sensor was a plastic, lunchbox-size shell equipped with four suction cups, two of which contained electrodes for measuring the whale’s heartbeat.

The researchers tagged the whale with the sensor on their first attempt, and there it remained for the next 8.5 hours as the whale dove down and resurfaced on dozens of food-foraging missions. Most of this time was spent underwater: The whale’s longest dive lasted 16.5 minutes and reached a maximum depth of 600 feet (184 m), while the whale never spent more than 4 minutes at the surface to refill its lungs.

Related: 15 of the Largest Animals of Their Kind

The sensor showed that, at the lowest depths of each dive, the whale’s heart was beating an average of four to eight times a minute, with a low of just two beats per minute. Between these low-tempo beats, the whale’s stretchy aortic artery slowly contracted to keep oxygenated blood slowly moving through the animal’s body, the researchers wrote.

Back at the surface, the whale’s heart rate accelerated to a blistering 25 to 37 beats per minute, rapidly charging the animal’s bloodstream with enough oxygen to support the next deep dive. During these rapid refueling stops, the whale’s heart was working close to its physical limits, the study authors wrote — it’s unlikely a whale’s heart could beat any faster than that.

This natural cardiac limit may explain why blue whales max out at a certain size, and why there have never been any known animals on Earth any larger. Because a bigger creature would require even more oxygen to sustain its long, deep dives for sustenance, its heart would need to beat even faster than a blue whale’s to refuel its body with oxygen at the surface.

According to the study authors, that doesn’t seem possible based on the current data; blue whales may have — now and forever — the hardest-working hearts on Earth.

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group blue-whale-getty-images A blue whale had his heartbeat taken for the first time ever — and scientists are shocked LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fnc/science fnc Brandon Specktor article 2e6b958c-d96b-56aa-bdc5-9efdb901901a   Westlake Legal Group blue-whale-getty-images A blue whale had his heartbeat taken for the first time ever — and scientists are shocked LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fnc/science fnc Brandon Specktor article 2e6b958c-d96b-56aa-bdc5-9efdb901901a

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New York police K-9 takes down suspect after he punched cop in the face

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109575267001_6109569181001-vs New York police K-9 takes down suspect after he punched cop in the face Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/us fnc article 44ebcef6-5d98-5012-b0ad-c12d3cac69eb

A New York police K-9 was filmed taking down a suspect after the man punched a police officer in the face on Sunday.

Randy Martinez, a 23-year-old man who lives in Newburgh, said he was leaving his house with a friend when a man, identified as 31-year-old Tony Mann, wandered into his driveway and threatened him with a knife.

ARIZONA POLICE K-9 KILLED BY FLEEING SUSPECT: ‘WE LOST A BROTHER LAST NIGHT’

“I rolled down the window and was going to tell him he can’t be on my property, and then he takes out his knife, and I’m just like, ‘Oh, God, no. What’s going to happen?’” Martinez told the Times Herald-Record.

Martinez said he called police because he was “so scared,” as his loved ones were still in the house, and started filming the scene when authorities arrived.

LAS VEGAS POLICE K-9 STABBED REPEATEDLY BY SUSPECT ‘DOING EXTREMELY WELL’ IN RECOVERY

In the video, a police officer is seen trying to talk to Mann, who appears to make strange movements before punching the Newburgh police officer, Roman Scuadroni, in the head. Scuadroni takes a moment before he opens his police vehicle door — letting loose his K-9 partner, Lee.

Lee quickly pounces on the suspect, chomping down on his arm, as the police officer puts his arms around Mann’s neck to try to restrain him. Mann is ultimately forced to the ground.

Another officer soon arrives on scene to help with the arrest, all while the dog is still actively pursuing Mann before he’s eventually pulled off by Scuardroni, who suffered minor cuts and injures.

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Investigators said they found a folding knife on Mann, who was transported to a hospital emergency room for intoxication and to be treated for a minor dog bite.

He was reportedly charged with trespassing, third-degree assault, resisting arrest, obstructing governmental administration and second-degree menacing.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109575267001_6109569181001-vs New York police K-9 takes down suspect after he punched cop in the face Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/us fnc article 44ebcef6-5d98-5012-b0ad-c12d3cac69eb   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109575267001_6109569181001-vs New York police K-9 takes down suspect after he punched cop in the face Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/us fnc article 44ebcef6-5d98-5012-b0ad-c12d3cac69eb

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Trump to pardon turkeys Bread and Butter ahead of Thanksgiving

President Trump on Tuesday will pardon two turkeys at the White House ahead of Thanksgiving — a decades-long tradition in which the president uses the power of the office to keep a pair of the meaty birds off holiday tables.

Bread and Butter, two male turkeys from North Carolina, are set to be pardoned during a ceremony in Washington, D.C. at 11 a.m. EST, as the two vie for the title of “National Thanksgiving Turkey.”

A LOOK AT THE WHITE HOUSE’S THANKSGIVING TRADITION OF PARDONING TURKEYS

“The Presidential Turkeys have arrived in DC! The two birds are settled in at The Willard Hotel after their trek from North Carolina and are resting up for the big ceremony on Tuesday,” the White House wrote in a Facebook post Sunday.

Westlake Legal Group wh-turkey-pardon-2-AP Trump to pardon turkeys Bread and Butter ahead of Thanksgiving Nicole Darrah fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/thanksgiving fox news fnc/us fnc article 39415ea8-915f-5f9f-83b1-8c8f9467f1e0

Bread and Butter, pictured here in their hotel room at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C., will be pardoned by President Trump on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Americans can cast their votes for which turkey – Bread or Butter – they want to name the official “National Thanksgiving Turkey.”

FLASHBACK: TRUMP GRANTS POULTRY PARDON TO TURKEYS PEAS AND CARROTS

Last year, Trump pardoned two birds named Peas (who won the coveted title) and Carrots during the traditional event. The two were raised on a farm in South Dakota, and after they were pardoned, they were sent to spend the rest of their days at Virginia Tech’s “Gobbler’s Rest,” where they are cared for by students and veterinarians.

“Even though Peas and Carrots have received a presidential pardon, I have warned them that House Democrats are likely to issue them both subpoenas,” Trump joked at the Rose Garden ceremony last year.

TRUMP PARDONS THANKSGIVING TURKEYS IN 2017: ‘DRUMSTICK HAS A BRIGHT FUTURE’

The tradition was established in 1989 by President George H.W. Bush, who spared a 50-pound bird, according to experts.

The custom of sending turkeys to the White House is an old one – dating back to the 1870s when “poultry king” Horace Vose would send his birds – but many former leaders of the free world actually ate the turkeys instead of setting them free.

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However, some presidents, including Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, spared a few fowls in their day. Harry S. Truman was rumored to have saved a few Thanksgiving turkeys, although his presidential library dispelled those claims.

Previous reporting by Fox News was used in this report.

Westlake Legal Group wh-turkey-pardon-2-AP Trump to pardon turkeys Bread and Butter ahead of Thanksgiving Nicole Darrah fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/thanksgiving fox news fnc/us fnc article 39415ea8-915f-5f9f-83b1-8c8f9467f1e0   Westlake Legal Group wh-turkey-pardon-2-AP Trump to pardon turkeys Bread and Butter ahead of Thanksgiving Nicole Darrah fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/thanksgiving fox news fnc/us fnc article 39415ea8-915f-5f9f-83b1-8c8f9467f1e0

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Amazing pictures show lemur trying to steal photographer’s camera

Maybe it just wanted to take a selfie.

A curious lemur in Madagascar tried to grab the camera from a photographer who was attempting to take its picture.

Photographer Lucas Bracali said he was “really surprised” when the lemur, a native of the African island nation, swung down from the tree it is was in and tried to grab the camera, British news agency SWNS reports.

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This is the hilarious moment a cheeky lemur hung upside down and tried to grab a camera from a photographer who was trying to take its photo. (Credit: SWNS)

HILARIOUS VIDEO SHOWS LION CUB SPOOKING HER MOM

“I was taking a photo of the lemur when all of a sudden he climbed down and tried to grab my camera,” Bracali, 54, said in comments obtained by SWNS. “He hung upside down and reached out towards my camera. I couldn’t believe it, I was really surprised!”

“I used a super wide-angle and I remained pretty close to the ground with the lens all the way up waiting for the lemur to come down,” Bracali added.

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Photographer Luca Bracali, 54, was “really surprised” when the black-and-white ruffed lemur attempted to snatch the camera from his grip.  (Credit: SWNS)

INCREDIBLE PICTURES SHOW TENDER MOMENTS BETWEEN BABY RHINO AND ITS MOTHER

The photo, taken in Andasibe National Park, shows the lemur’s hands outstretched toward the camera while hanging upside down from the tree. Bracali, who switched to wildlife photography from sports journalism, said he enjoys the unpredictability of animals.

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The funny photo which was taken in Andasibe National Park in Madagascar shows the animal staring directly down the lens while hanging upside down from a tree.  (Credit: SWNS)

“I enjoy wildlife photography so much because with the animal, it’s a real thorough game,” he added. “You cannot bribe them, you can not make any kind of agreement, it’s just a matter of patience and ‘carpe diem!'”

According to the Duke Lemur Center in North Carolina, which is home to 14 different species of lemur, the curious creatures are “the most endangered group of mammals in the world.”

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