web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder"

Serial killer who targeted gay men executed in Florida after eating hearty last meal

A mass murderer known as the “I-95 killer,” who spent the majority of 1994 targeting gay men — including a Navy World War II veteran — ate three burgers, fries and bacon before he was executed late Thursday in Florida.

Gary Ray Bowles, 57, was pronounced dead at 10:58 p.m. Thursday evening after receiving a lethal injection at Florida State Prison in Starke, the office of Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, said. Bowles had already eaten his last meal by 3 p.m. that afternoon, prison officials told WJXT.

EXECUTION OF ‘I-95 KILLER,’ WHO TARGETED GAY MEN ALONG BUSY CORRIDOR, DELAYED AS LAWYERS APPEAL

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected a last-minute appeal filed by Bowles’ attorneys earlier Thursday that argued their client was not mentally fit to receive the death penalty, clearing the way for his execution to proceed as planned.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a82f5de0f0ef453cb89be57f8f6e88b1 Serial killer who targeted gay men executed in Florida after eating hearty last meal fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a74428f8-d00f-5160-b1e0-e543256a546c

In this undated photo provided by the Florida Department of Corrections, Gary Ray Bowles is shown. Bowles, a serial killer who preyed on older gay men during an eight-month spree in 1994 that left six dead, was executed by lethal injection Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, at Florida State prison. (Florida Department of Corrections via AP)

Bowles was condemned to die for his murder conviction in the 1994 slaying of Walter Hinton, a 42-year-old who was strangled and had his head smashed with a concrete block, in Jacksonville Beach, Fla. That was one of the six known killings that terrorized the Interstate 95 corridor that year and earned him the nickname of the “I-95 killer.” In each case, Bowles had a signature: He stuffed the victims’ throats with objects, including rags, toilet paper, dirt, leaves — even a sex toy.

Police were on Bowles’ trail after his first killing in 1994 in Daytona Beach. Bowles left investigators a slew of evidence, including a probation document left at the scene and ATM footage showing him trying to withdraw money from the victim, John Hardy Roberts,’ bank account.

Milton Bradley, a Navy World War II veteran, was living in Savannah when he met the serial killer in May 1994 at a now-closed gay bar in the Georgia city’s historic district, a former police detective told the Associated Press. His body was found bludgeoned at a golf course with leaves and dirt stuffed down his throat.

DEATH ROW INMATE EVOKES CHRIST AT EXECUTION

Bowles maintained he was heterosexual but has acknowledged letting gay men perform sex acts on him for money. Prosecutors said it was how the self-described hustler survived: often using his targets for money or a place to stay, but eventually snapping and killing them.

The mass murderer was raised in West Virginia, where he experienced drugs and violence at a young age. His father was a coal miner who died of black lung disease before he was born. His mother remarried multiple times, and his first two stepfathers were abusive, according to court records.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

His mother and brother have testified that Bowles began drinking, smoking marijuana and huffing glue when he was 11. When he was 13, he fought back against his second stepfather, smashing a rock into his head and nearly killing him, The Associated Press reported, citing court records.

He also had a history of violence against women. Bowles was convicted of beating and raping his girlfriend while living in Tampa in 1982 and sentenced to eight years in prison. The victim reportedly sustained severe injuries.

Fox News’ Greg Norman, Vandana Rambaran and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a82f5de0f0ef453cb89be57f8f6e88b1 Serial killer who targeted gay men executed in Florida after eating hearty last meal fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a74428f8-d00f-5160-b1e0-e543256a546c   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a82f5de0f0ef453cb89be57f8f6e88b1 Serial killer who targeted gay men executed in Florida after eating hearty last meal fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a74428f8-d00f-5160-b1e0-e543256a546c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized

Soon after a man buried his longtime partner in a funeral attended by hundreds of strangers last week — in the wake of the massacre inside an El Paso, Texas, Walmart — it emerged that her SUV had been stolen and vandalized.

Antonio Basco, 61, of El Paso, made headlines when he invited the public to attend the funeral of Margie Reckard, 63, because they didn’t have nearby relatives.

Reckard was one of 22 people shot and killed inside the Walmart on Aug. 22. The killer said he targeted Mexicans and warned of a “Hispanic invasion” of Texas.

HERE’S HOW TO HELP THE MASS SHOOTING VICTIMS IN EL PASO AND DAYTON

Westlake Legal Group AP19229063849456 SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 6325d537-620a-54b8-8253-a61fb80a4ad3

People offering condolences to Antonio Basco, lower right, at her funeral at La Paz Faith Memorial and Spiritual Center in El Paso this past Friday. (AP Photo/Jorge Salgado)

This past Friday morning, hundreds of people from all over the country – including from Dayton, Ohio, the site of a mass shooting shortly after the attack in El Paso – filled up the La Paz Faith Memorial & Spiritual Center. A line snaked around the church and on the blocks beyond. Hundreds of flower arrangements were also sent.

However, Vanessa Kondow revealed on Facebook that somebody had stolen and wrecked Reckard’s Ford Escape, perhaps as recently as Saturday night, the day after the funeral. Kondow said she and her husband, who both work at a towing company, towed the damaged vehicle to Basco’s home after it was found.

“WTF is wrong with people!? He just buried his wife yesterday and now this s—,” Kondow wrote. “He told my husband that whoever took it also stole a pressure washing machine from a small trailer he used to use for mobile car washing. Share the s— out of this post to find the m—— who would do this.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19229064093460 SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 6325d537-620a-54b8-8253-a61fb80a4ad3

Antonio Basco, center, at her funeral Friday. (AP Photo/Jorge Salgado)

Kondow did not immediately respond to a Fox News request for comment.

Angel Gomez with Operation Hope, which coordinated many of the funerals for the victims, confirmed to Fox News that Reckard’s Ford Escape had been stolen and trashed.

He said he spoke with Basco about the incident and expected to speak with him again about getting him a new car or repairing the existing vehicle. Casa Ford in El Paso confirmed to KVIA-TV that it would help to get Basco a replacement vehicle.

Westlake Legal Group AP19229062328067 SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 6325d537-620a-54b8-8253-a61fb80a4ad3

Supporters greeting Antonio Basco, center right, outside his partner’s funeral. (AP Photo/Jorge Salgado)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Some commenters on Kondow’s post offered to help Basco get a new car.

“Just so you all know. Mr. Basco does not want a new vehicle. The Ford Escape was his wife’s and he’s always wanted to keep it. He has a vehicle of his own. If anyone wants to help, he most likely just wants the Escape to be repaired so he has that memory of his wife, Margie,” Kondow posted.

Fox News’ Lucia I. Suarez Sang contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group ab3532b9-AP19229068264622 SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 6325d537-620a-54b8-8253-a61fb80a4ad3   Westlake Legal Group ab3532b9-AP19229068264622 SUV belonging to El Paso woman killed in massacre is stolen, vandalized Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 6325d537-620a-54b8-8253-a61fb80a4ad3

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral

Hundreds of strangers braved 100-degree Texas heat on Friday to pay respects to a woman they had never met, but had died tragically in the El Paso shooting, leaving behind only her longtime companion.

Margie Reckard, 63, was one of the 22 victims who were killed during the Walmart shooting earlier this month.

Her heartbroken partner of 22 years, Antonio Basco, invited the public to her funeral services, saying he had no direct relatives or family members.

Westlake Legal Group AP19229015653028 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77

Mourners wait in line, Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, for the memorial services in El Paso, Texas, of Margie Reckard, 63, who was killed by a gunman who opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso earlier in the month.  (AP)

HERE’S HOW TO HELP THE MASS SHOOTING VICTIMS IN EL PASO AND DAYTON

The response to the invitation was unimaginable.

On Friday morning, hundreds of people from all over the country – including from Dayton, Ohio, the site of a mass shooting less than a day after the attack in El Paso – filled up the La Paz Faith Memorial & Spiritual Center. A line snaked around the church and on the blocks beyond.

“I arrived here this morning,” Jordan Ballard, a 38-year-old Los Angeles resident who bought a plane ticket after learning of the Texas man’s invitation. “His story moved me.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19229063641982 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77

Antonio Basco, companion of Margie Reckard, sits next to a wreath honoring her during her funeral at La Paz Faith Memorial & Spiritual Center, Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, in El Paso, Texas.  (AP)

Alicia Solomon Clark, a professional singer from Santa Fe, N.M., drove six hours and stood in the visitation line for two hours because she had a message for Basco.

“I am here to tell Mr. Basco for every crazy but there are thousands of us that love him,” the 61-year-old told the New York Times.

VICTIMS OF EL PASO SHOOTING INVOLVED MOTHER SHIELDING SON FROM BULLETS, TEEN ABOUT TO START SOPHOMORE YEAR

Buzzfeed reporter tweeted that there were more than 700 people in attendance.

<img src="https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2019/08/640/320/AP19229068264622.jpg?ve=1&tl=1" alt="When Basco arrived, people shouted blessings in English and Spanish. Before entering the funeral home, someone gave him a gift that appeared to be an El Paso t-shirt.
“>

When Basco arrived, people shouted blessings in English and Spanish. Before entering the funeral home, someone gave him a gift that appeared to be an El Paso t-shirt.<br data-cke-eol=”1″> (AP)

When Basco arrived, people shouted blessings in English and Spanish. Before entering the funeral home, someone gave him a gift that appeared to be an El Paso t-shirt.

“I love y’all, man,” he said, before breaking down.

Westlake Legal Group AP19229069502232 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77

Tyler Reckard is comforted during funeral services for his grandmother Margie Reckard, who was killed in a mass shooting earlier in the month, at La Paz Faith Memorial &amp; Spiritual Center Friday. (AP)

MIKE HUCKABEE: IN RESPONDING TO MASS MURDERS, THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS ARE INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT

As the line continued to swell, Basco came back out to thank attendees personally for coming. He appeared overwhelmed that strangers were running toward him to show love and offer condolences.

“This is amazing,” he said, according to the Times.

Moments later, mariachis walked through the crowd singing “Amor Eterno,” the 1984 ballad by the late Juan Gabriel, which has become an anthem for El Paso following the shooting. Some attendees sang along. Others sobbed and got out of line.

Westlake Legal Group AP19229217568479 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77

People gather at La Paz Faith Memorial &amp; Spiritual Center, to offer condolences to the family of Margie Reckard during her funeral Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, in El Paso, Texas. Reckard was killed during the mass shooting on Aug. 3.(AP Photo/Jorge Salgado)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Reckard had children from a previous marriage who traveled from out of town to the funeral with their children.

Her oldest son, Dean, 48, described her as loving and kind.

“She would have been overwhelmed to see all the love El Paso showed her,” he told the New York Times.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19229068264622 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77   Westlake Legal Group AP19229068264622 Partner of El Paso shooting victim overwhelmed by hundreds of strangers at funeral Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3417c540-766e-5cd5-81b3-d008bfa69c77

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano

When tragedy strikes, as it did in two mass killings this month, there is always the urge to pressure the government do something.

Governments are animated by the belief that doing something — any demonstrable overt behavior — will show that they are in control. I understand the natural fears that good folks have that an El Paso or a Dayton episode might happen again, but doing something for the sake of appearance can be dangerous to personal liberty.

When the Constitution was written, the idea of owning arms and keeping them in the home was widespread. The colonists had just defeated the armies of King George III. The colonial weapon of choice was the Kentucky long rifle, while British soldiers used their army-issued version of Brown Bessies.

TRUMP NEGOTIATING WITH SENATE DEMS ON GUNS

Each rifle had its advantages, but the Kentucky (it was actually a German design, perfected and manufactured in Pennsylvania) was able to strike a British soldier at 200 yards, a startlingly long distance at the time. The Bessies were good for only about 80 yards.

Put aside the advantages we had of the passionate defense of freedom and homeland, to say nothing of superior leadership. It doesn’t take any advanced understanding of mathematics or ballistics to appreciate why we won the Revolution.

It is a matter of historical fact that the colonists won the war largely by superior firepower.

Six years after the war was over, delegates met in Philadelphia in secret and drafted what was to become the Constitution. The document, largely written in James Madison’s hand, was then submitted to Congress and to the states, which began the process of ratification.

More from Judge Andrew Napolitano

By then, Americans had already formed two basic political parties. The Federalists wanted a muscular central government and the Anti-Federalists wanted a loose confederation of states.

The concept of a “red flag” law — which permits the confiscation of lawfully owned weapons from a person because of what the person might do — violates both the presumption of innocence and the due process requirement of proof of criminal behavior before liberty can be infringed.

Yet the memory of a Parliament that behaved as if it could write any law, tax any event and impair any liberty, coupled with the fear that the new government here might drift toward tyranny, gave birth to the first 10 amendments to the Constitution — the Bill of Rights.

The debate over the Bill of Rights was not about rights; that debate had been resolved in 1776 when the Declaration of Independence declared our basic human rights to be inalienable. The Bill of Rights debates were about whether the federal government needed restraints imposed upon it in the Constitution itself.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

The Federalists thought the Bill of Rights was superfluous because they argued that no American government would knowingly restrict freedom. The Anti-Federalists thought constitutional restraints were vital to the preservation of personal liberty because no government can be trusted to preserve personal liberty.

Second among the personal liberties preserved in the Bill of Rights from impairment by the government was the right to self-defense. Thomas Jefferson called that the right to self-preservation.

Fast-forward to today, and we see the widespread and decidedly un-American reaction to the tragedies of El Paso and Dayton. Both mass murders were animated by hatred and planned by madness. But because both were carried out using weapons that look like those issued by the military, Democrats have called for the outright confiscation of these weapons.

Where is the constitutional authority for that? In a word: nowhere.

The government’s job is to preserve personal liberty. Does it do its job when it weakens personal liberty instead? Stated differently, how does confiscating weapons from the law-abiding conceivably reduce the ability of madmen to get those weapons? When did madmen begin obeying gun laws?

These arguments against confiscation have largely resonated with Republicans. Yet — because they feel they must do something — they have fallen for the concept of limited confiscation, known by the euphemism of “red flag” laws.

The concept of a “red flag” law — which permits the confiscation of lawfully owned weapons from a person because of what the person might do — violates both the presumption of innocence and the due process requirement of proof of criminal behavior before liberty can be infringed.

The presumption of innocence puts the burden for proving a case on the government. Because the case to be proven — might the gun owner be dangerous? — if proven, will result in the loss of a fundamental liberty, the presumption of innocence also mandates that the case be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

The Republican proposal lowers the standard of proof to a preponderance of the evidence — “a more likely than not” standard. That was done because it is impossible to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that an event might happen. This is exactly why the “might happen standard” is unconstitutional and alien to our jurisprudence.

In 2008 Justice Antonin Scalia wrote for the Supreme Court that the right to keep and bear arms in the home is an individual pre-political right. Due process demands that this level of right — we are not talking about the privilege of a driving a car on a government street — can only be taken away after a jury conviction or a guilty plea to a felony.

The “might happen” standard of “red flag” laws violates this basic principle. The same Supreme Court case also reflects the Kentucky long gun lesson. The people are entitled to own and possess the same arms as the government; for the same reason as the colonists did — to fight off tyrants should they seize liberty or property.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

If the government can impair Second Amendment-protected liberties on the basis of what a person might do — as opposed to what a person actually did do — to show that it is doing something in response to a public clamor, then no liberty in America is safe.

Which liberty will the government infringe upon next?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano

When tragedy strikes, as it did in two mass killings this month, there is always the urge to pressure the government do something.

Governments are animated by the belief that doing something — any demonstrable overt behavior — will show that they are in control. I understand the natural fears that good folks have that an El Paso or a Dayton episode might happen again, but doing something for the sake of appearance can be dangerous to personal liberty.

When the Constitution was written, the idea of owning arms and keeping them in the home was widespread. The colonists had just defeated the armies of King George III. The colonial weapon of choice was the Kentucky long rifle, while British soldiers used their army-issued version of Brown Bessies.

TRUMP NEGOTIATING WITH SENATE DEMS ON GUNS

Each rifle had its advantages, but the Kentucky (it was actually a German design, perfected and manufactured in Pennsylvania) was able to strike a British soldier at 200 yards, a startlingly long distance at the time. The Bessies were good for only about 80 yards.

Put aside the advantages we had of the passionate defense of freedom and homeland, to say nothing of superior leadership. It doesn’t take any advanced understanding of mathematics or ballistics to appreciate why we won the Revolution.

It is a matter of historical fact that the colonists won the war largely by superior firepower.

Six years after the war was over, delegates met in Philadelphia in secret and drafted what was to become the Constitution. The document, largely written in James Madison’s hand, was then submitted to Congress and to the states, which began the process of ratification.

More from Judge Andrew Napolitano

By then, Americans had already formed two basic political parties. The Federalists wanted a muscular central government and the Anti-Federalists wanted a loose confederation of states.

The concept of a “red flag” law — which permits the confiscation of lawfully owned weapons from a person because of what the person might do — violates both the presumption of innocence and the due process requirement of proof of criminal behavior before liberty can be infringed.

Yet the memory of a Parliament that behaved as if it could write any law, tax any event and impair any liberty, coupled with the fear that the new government here might drift toward tyranny, gave birth to the first 10 amendments to the Constitution — the Bill of Rights.

The debate over the Bill of Rights was not about rights; that debate had been resolved in 1776 when the Declaration of Independence declared our basic human rights to be inalienable. The Bill of Rights debates were about whether the federal government needed restraints imposed upon it in the Constitution itself.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

The Federalists thought the Bill of Rights was superfluous because they argued that no American government would knowingly restrict freedom. The Anti-Federalists thought constitutional restraints were vital to the preservation of personal liberty because no government can be trusted to preserve personal liberty.

Second among the personal liberties preserved in the Bill of Rights from impairment by the government was the right to self-defense. Thomas Jefferson called that the right to self-preservation.

Fast-forward to today, and we see the widespread and decidedly un-American reaction to the tragedies of El Paso and Dayton. Both mass murders were animated by hatred and planned by madness. But because both were carried out using weapons that look like those issued by the military, Democrats have called for the outright confiscation of these weapons.

Where is the constitutional authority for that? In a word: nowhere.

The government’s job is to preserve personal liberty. Does it do its job when it weakens personal liberty instead? Stated differently, how does confiscating weapons from the law-abiding conceivably reduce the ability of madmen to get those weapons? When did madmen begin obeying gun laws?

These arguments against confiscation have largely resonated with Republicans. Yet — because they feel they must do something — they have fallen for the concept of limited confiscation, known by the euphemism of “red flag” laws.

The concept of a “red flag” law — which permits the confiscation of lawfully owned weapons from a person because of what the person might do — violates both the presumption of innocence and the due process requirement of proof of criminal behavior before liberty can be infringed.

The presumption of innocence puts the burden for proving a case on the government. Because the case to be proven — might the gun owner be dangerous? — if proven, will result in the loss of a fundamental liberty, the presumption of innocence also mandates that the case be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

The Republican proposal lowers the standard of proof to a preponderance of the evidence — “a more likely than not” standard. That was done because it is impossible to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that an event might happen. This is exactly why the “might happen standard” is unconstitutional and alien to our jurisprudence.

In 2008 Justice Antonin Scalia wrote for the Supreme Court that the right to keep and bear arms in the home is an individual pre-political right. Due process demands that this level of right — we are not talking about the privilege of a driving a car on a government street — can only be taken away after a jury conviction or a guilty plea to a felony.

The “might happen” standard of “red flag” laws violates this basic principle. The same Supreme Court case also reflects the Kentucky long gun lesson. The people are entitled to own and possess the same arms as the government; for the same reason as the colonists did — to fight off tyrants should they seize liberty or property.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

If the government can impair Second Amendment-protected liberties on the basis of what a person might do — as opposed to what a person actually did do — to show that it is doing something in response to a public clamor, then no liberty in America is safe.

Which liberty will the government infringe upon next?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072921449001_6072879108001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Gun confiscation under “red flag” laws is unconstitutional fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ef4925dc-7525-5336-b144-b1b2cbc96f6d article Andrew Napolitano

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dayton gunman spent half-hour inside bar before returning for rampage, police chief says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072486327001_6072478930001-vs Dayton gunman spent half-hour inside bar before returning for rampage, police chief says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio be9fd3a8-3c17-5ed3-9b06-991b0d9f6bac article

The gunman who killed nine people, including his sister, in a 32-second rampage Aug. 4 in Dayton, Ohio, seems to have planned the attack “well before” arriving at the city’s Oregon District, the city’s police chief said Tuesday.

The attacker, who was killed by police less than a minute after firing his first shot, spent nearly a half-hour inside a bar he apparently targeted before returning wearing an ill-fitting bulletproof vest and carrying a rifle, the chief said, suggesting he had been “casing” the location.

EL PASO AND DAYTON SHOOTINGS STIR GUN DEBATE, WILL DC REACT OR IS CYCLE REPEATING?

But police Chief Richard Biehl stressed that the shooter was already well familiar with Ned Peppers and other bars in the area, according to the Dayton Daily News.

“This was not a place he did not know,” the chief said during an hour-long news conference, according to the report.

The chief added that 17 people were injured, not 14, as police previously reported.

Still unknown, however, the chief said, was whether the gunman intended to kill his younger sister, Megan Betts, with whom he had traveled to the Oregon District, along with a friend who survived the attack.

But the chief confirmed that the killer knew his sister and the friend were near Blind Bob’s, because text messages show the siblings were communicating during the time that the gunman was away, returning to their car to get his rifle and other gear.

Biehl said the friend, Chace Beard, sent the shooter a text message seven minutes before the shooting, saying where he and the sister would be – and that’s where they were eventually shot.

“It’s an interesting question,” the chief said about whether the sister was an intended target. “We have radically different views in that regard. … We may get a better insight through historical data looking back, but based on the evidence from that night, I don’t think we can make that call.”

The chief also said that investigators believe the sister had no knowledge that the shooter had a rifle and other gear in the trunk of the vehicle they rode in together.

Meanwhile, Biehl also said investigators had gathered enough evidence to reveal a “clear picture” of the killer’s frame of mind: that he was obsessed with violence, and that he expressed interest in committing a massacre, the Daily News reported.

But what made the shooter choose Aug. 4 and the Oregon District remained unclear, the chief said.

According to the chief, a timeline shows the gunman, sister and friend arrived in the area shortly after 11 p.m. They visited Blind Bob’s for a little more than an hour, then the gunman went across the street, alone to Ned Peppers, where he stayed for about a half-hour.

He then walked back to their car, passing a police vehicle, and spent about eight minutes gathering his weapon and other gear.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Police believe he assembled the gun behind Blind Bob’s, in an area not covered by a security camera. Then he came down an alley alongside the bar and began opening fire in a patio area around 1:05 a.m. and was fatally shot by police less than a minute later.

Meanwhile. A friend of the gunman was expected to appear in court Wednesday afternoon after being accused of buying the body armor and helping assemble the weapon used in the Dayton attack.

Investigators say no evidence suggests that Ethan Kollie, of Kettering, knew what the gunman was planning, but they say Kollie lied on a federal firearms form while buying a pistol that was not used in the attack.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072486327001_6072478930001-vs Dayton gunman spent half-hour inside bar before returning for rampage, police chief says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio be9fd3a8-3c17-5ed3-9b06-991b0d9f6bac article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072486327001_6072478930001-vs Dayton gunman spent half-hour inside bar before returning for rampage, police chief says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio be9fd3a8-3c17-5ed3-9b06-991b0d9f6bac article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dayton gunman shot 26 people in 32 seconds before police killed him, officials say

The gunman who carried out the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio spent nearly two hours in the area before he opened fire, killing nine people and injuring 17 more, according to newly released surveillance footage pieced together from several local businesses.

Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said Tuesday that 24-year-old Connor Betts shot 26 people in the span of 32 seconds before responding officers fatally shot him outside of Blind Bob’s bar. Previously, police and hospital officials said at least 14 injured people suffered gunshots wounds. Overall, 15 of the people shot that night were female and 11 were male.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-94dfef22b7a84b33b03720f78844bfe1-1 Dayton gunman shot 26 people in 32 seconds before police killed him, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc c95a1d27-bd51-5507-b03f-50172784f026 article

Shoes are piled outside the scene of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

PROSECUTORS SAY FRIEND OF OHIO SHOOTER BOUGH HIM ARMOR, FIREARM

Betts was first caught on camera in the area at 11:04 p.m. when he parked his car and walked to Blind Bob’s with his sister Megan and another companion.

Police said the footage “strongly suggests that his [the siblings’] companion,” who was wounded in the rampage, “had no idea what he [Betts] was gonna do nor did he have any knowledge of the weapons that were in the trunk of that vehicle.”

All three of them went to Blind Bob’s, where they remained until 12:13 a.m. Betts left the bar alone and went across the street to another bar, Ned Peppers, staying there until 12:42 a.m.

Betts, dressed in a t-shirt and shorts, then left Ned Peppers and headed back in the direction of the parking lot, crossing paths with a police cruiser that was in the area, Lt. Paul Saunders said during a press conference.

Biehl said there is a “strong probability” that Betts went into Ned Peppers to case it but added, “he was very familiar with the Oregon district so this was not a place that he did not know.”

“This was a plan well before he got to the Oregon district,” Biehl said noting that its unlikely that anything happened inside of the bars that made the shooter decide to carry out his rampage.

Police say the shooter went back to his car and spent eight minutes changing into a long sleeve dark hoodie and “gathering content out of the trunk of that vehicle,” which included a “very heavy backpack.”

Authorities say Betts spent about nine minutes making his way from the parking lot towards the strip of bars again, through an alley connecting the two and used that time to load his AR-15 style gun before he emerged from behind the alley and opened fire near Blind Bob’s at 1:04 a.m.

Westlake Legal Group Gun Dayton gunman shot 26 people in 32 seconds before police killed him, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc c95a1d27-bd51-5507-b03f-50172784f026 article

The gun used in the Dayton mass shooting. (Dayton Police Department via AP)

Police confirmed that the shooter’s sister, Megan Betts, was one of the first three fatalities, but Biehl conceded that law enforcement officials had “radically different views” about whether the shooter intentionally killed his sister first.

Biehl revealed that phone evidence from that night showed that the shooter texted back and forth with his sister and their companion as soon as seven minutes before the shooting began and that the companion told Betts that they were at a taco stand near Blind Bob’s.

Biehl said Betts “did know where they were at because they were communicating during this hour back and forth.”

Biehl also said that Betts and his sister spoke on the phone before the shooting, although it is unclear the content of the phone call. Despite knowing their whereabouts, police said they could not conclusively say whether the shooter could see his sister and her companion from his vantage point across from Blind Bob’s, as they may have been obscured by the decor of the bar, which included umbrellas on the patio.

“By our best resources that we have at our fingertips, we believe that the shooting started at approximately 1:05 and 35 seconds. We believe it ended at 1:06 and 7 seconds; that’s 32 seconds” Saunders said.

Biehl’s said that although Betts was wearing body armor throughout the shooting, the armor was “vulnerable,” allowing responding officers to shoot and kill him.

“He had (ballistic) plates but that’s all,” Biehl’s said.

Although authorities could not confirm the shooter’s motive, Biehl’s said Betts had a “history of obsession with violence and violence ideations, the discussion of interests in mass shootings and the expression of desire to carry out a mass shooting.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Biehl’s said Betts was in the Oregon District the night before the shooting, adding you “certainly have to consider there was some thought being given to it at that time.”

Police found some evidence of drug paraphernalia “on his person” but whether Betts was intoxicated or under the influence of drugs remains uncertain pending toxicology reports, Biehl said.

Authorities have said there was nothing in Betts’ background to prevent him from buying the gun, stating that the weapon was purchased online from a dealer in Texas and shipped to another firearms dealer in the Dayton area.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19220689610941 Dayton gunman shot 26 people in 32 seconds before police killed him, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc c95a1d27-bd51-5507-b03f-50172784f026 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19220689610941 Dayton gunman shot 26 people in 32 seconds before police killed him, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc c95a1d27-bd51-5507-b03f-50172784f026 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Jose mayor proposes first-in-nation insurance requirement for guns following mass shootings

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697260001_6065694257001-vs San Jose mayor proposes first-in-nation insurance requirement for guns following mass shootings fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc ff3b80fb-7e2f-5372-a87f-e3a6d1ee0744 article Andrew O'Reilly

In the wake of three mass shootings in two weeks across the country, the mayor of San Jose, Calif., on Monday proposed what is being called a first-in-the-nation move to require all gun owners to carry liability insurance for their weapons.

Under the proposal by Mayor Sam Liccardo, the insurance would cover any accidental discharge of a firearm and any intentional acts carried out by a person who has stolen or borrowed the gun. It would not cover the policyholder for any intentional discharge that he or she carries out.

Liccardo is also exploring a possible ballot measure that, if passed, would tax all ammunition and firearm purchases in San Jose.

GILROY GARLIC FESTIVAL SHOOTER SHOULD ‘ROT IN HELL,’ SAYS NEVADA BUSINESSMAN WHO REPORTEDLY SOLD GUN TO KILLER

“A mayor doesn’t have the luxury of just offering ‘thoughts and prayers,'” Liccardo said, according to local media. “We have to solve problems. While this is far from a complete solution, it is something we can do to reduce the harms of firearms, without waiting for Congress to take action.”

The House has passed two bills that would tighten up background checks, but they have stalled in the Senate, which is on recess until September.

Liccardo’s moves come two weeks after a 19-year-old gunman opened fire at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Gilroy, Calif., resulting in four deaths and 13 injuries. Keyla Salazar, 13, and Stephen Romero, 6, both of San Jose, were killed in the shooting, along with 25-year-old Trevor Irby before the gunman, Santino Legan, took his own life.

Liccardo said that his plan is based on similar laws in California that make it illegal to drive a vehicle without insurance.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We require motorists to carry automobile insurance, and the insurance industry appropriately encourages and rewards safe driver behavior,” he said. “We tax tobacco consumption both to discourage risky behavior and to make sure non-smokers are not forced to subsidize the substantial public health costs generated by smoking-related illnesses and deaths. These successful public health models inspire a similar ‘harm reduction’ approach for firearms.”

Liccardo added that he is reaching out to other cities in California and throughout the country to encourage them to pass similar legislation.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697260001_6065694257001-vs San Jose mayor proposes first-in-nation insurance requirement for guns following mass shootings fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc ff3b80fb-7e2f-5372-a87f-e3a6d1ee0744 article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697260001_6065694257001-vs San Jose mayor proposes first-in-nation insurance requirement for guns following mass shootings fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc ff3b80fb-7e2f-5372-a87f-e3a6d1ee0744 article Andrew O'Reilly

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Deroy Murdock: Don’t ignore Trump’s unifying, anti-racist rhetoric

Not even the “paper of record” could resist the left’s big lie: Donald J. Trump is America’s “racist-in-chief.”

After last weekend’s deadly mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Democrats and other Trump haters demanded that the president denounce white nationalism, which apparently propelled the alleged Texas gunman. President Trump did exactly that.

“The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate,” Trump said Monday. “In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart, and devours the soul.”

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Old Gray Lady’s page-one, online headline reflected these remarks: “TRUMP URGES UNITY VS. RACISM”

But those accurate words enraged Democrats. They disproved the leftist lie that Trump is a divisive bigot.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS COLUMN IN NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DEROY MURDOCK

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071544766001_6071550544001-vs Deroy Murdock: Don't ignore Trump's unifying, anti-racist rhetoric fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc fcacb3db-2687-5f4e-8775-c5693c1e5417 Deroy Murdock article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071544766001_6071550544001-vs Deroy Murdock: Don't ignore Trump's unifying, anti-racist rhetoric fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc fcacb3db-2687-5f4e-8775-c5693c1e5417 Deroy Murdock article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Robi Ludwig: El Paso, Dayton and Gen Z – So many young men feel rage and despair. Here’s how to save our kids

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6068672559001_6068680855001-vs Robi Ludwig: El Paso, Dayton and Gen Z – So many young men feel rage and despair. Here's how to save our kids Robi Ludwig fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 96a88d87-662b-5a13-8f3e-156eb89450c7

Mass killings appear to be happening with an increased and frightful frequency, and as we search for answers it is easy, perhaps even tempting, to point the finger at one single cause or a particular group.

For example, as a therapist who provides commentary on the psychological facets of crime, I am often asked, why are these mass shooters predominantly young men?

One emotional reason is that these killers often feel profoundly powerless. They have low self-esteem and grossly mismanage their intensified rage. The anger becomes more insidious over time until it becomes massively destructive.

MIKE HUCKABEE: IN RESPONDING TO MASS MURDERS, THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS ARE INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT

For them, it’s easier to feel anger than it is to feel sadness, to feel strong than it is to feel weak and to achieve infamy than it is to achieve fame. It’s easier to scapegoat and project one’s self-hatred onto innocent people than it is to feel like a dismal failure who has no chance to achieve traditional success.

So the mass murderer goes on a vengeful rampage to restore his fragile ego by seeking recognition, attention and/or infamy.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

As a society, we have not been adept at helping young men manage their feelings of hopelessness or emasculation.

We need to educate our youth and help them identify and deal with their uncomfortable emotions. We must teach them that feeling vulnerable or weak doesn’t make them failures.

These killers often feel profoundly powerless, Their anger grows over time until it becomes massively destructive.

There needs to be a way to provide emotional management to all young boys, especially the troubled ones. It is extremely important to help them identify and recognize their anger as it arises. We must help these young men handle feeling weak and desperate in a more effective and non-destructive way. We must ensure they are not fueled by hateful rhetoric and xenophobia. We also need to expand what it means to be “a man,” so the disenfranchised don’t choose killers as their idols.

After discussing these crimes with my son, he noted it’s not uncommon for his generation to feel overwhelmed and at times even hopeless when it comes to making a difference in the world.

More from Opinion

Every crime has its cultural backdrop. We live in a society that glorifies violence and guns. Movies often portray killers or criminals as brilliant or intriguing. And when media is omnipresent, and there is so much horrifying news, it can be hard for my son and his contemporaries to feel like they can create any positive change in the world. The messages society is sending are inducing a generational feeling of hopelessness. The message that each person can make a positive difference is not being driven home often enough.

News, such as we heard out of El Paso and Dayton, only adds to our kids’ already elevated stress levels. According to the American Psychological Association, members of Gen Z called mass shootings a significant source of concern. Research tells us that this generation is a nuanced, socially conscious group that celebrates and accepts differences. Many want to see our world get to a more inclusive, evolved and less violent state. Yet 68% say they feel worried.

So how do we best help our kids navigate all this pressure, especially when it comes to alarming news?

It’s important to hear what Gen Z has to say to us. It is necessary to encourage these young people to have their feelings, including self-doubt and concern about the world, and then to take the right and moral action that benefits, and does not hurt, society.

The young must curate how they process the news, especially when they feel overwhelmed by it. It’s acceptable to process the hopeful with the disheartening.

Technology properly used can be a tool to heal. It can be a way to form new positive connections, create content that matters, and be a voice for what the young aspire to and believe in; this can all be a positive strength that can be used to their advantage.

We as parents need to nurture our children’s ability to pursue what is right and ethically sound and good, so our kids can benefit.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

It is imperative to listen to what’s going on in the world with an optimistic and hopeful heart. We need to help the next generation embrace their place in the world while reminding them that, as bad as things seem in the moment, there is always hope for us to get better, do better and be better.

And on a bright note, despite our youth’s high levels of fear and frustration, 75 percent said they still feel hopeful about our country’s future. This is the idea and sentiment that we as parents must reinforce and encourage.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ROBI LUDWIG

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6068672559001_6068680855001-vs Robi Ludwig: El Paso, Dayton and Gen Z – So many young men feel rage and despair. Here's how to save our kids Robi Ludwig fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 96a88d87-662b-5a13-8f3e-156eb89450c7   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6068672559001_6068680855001-vs Robi Ludwig: El Paso, Dayton and Gen Z – So many young men feel rage and despair. Here's how to save our kids Robi Ludwig fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 96a88d87-662b-5a13-8f3e-156eb89450c7

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com