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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/us/immigration/mexico"

Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent’s death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest

Westlake Legal Group mexican-drug-lord-wanted-in-us-agents-death-is-pleading-poverty-in-hopes-of-avoiding-arrest Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent's death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest Greg Norman fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox news fnc/world fnc c5d9acbc-dfed-57e8-b51d-ea245204a3b0 article

Mexican drug lord and fugitive on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list is now trying to present himself as poor in a bid to avoid arrest.

Rafael Caro-Quintero, who is accused of having a role in the 1985 abduction, torture and murder of DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension.

The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro-Quintero’s lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States. After spending years in prison in Mexico, Caro-Quintero was freed in 2013, a decision that angered Washington.

“The plaintiff argues insolvency, because he says he is more than 60 years old, is neither retired nor has a pension, and given the fact that he is a fugitive from the law, cannot work or perform any activity to earn money,” read the papers, according to The Associated Press.

Westlake Legal Group Rafael-Caro-Quintero Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent's death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest Greg Norman fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox news fnc/world fnc c5d9acbc-dfed-57e8-b51d-ea245204a3b0 article

Rafael Caro-Quintero, the notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most-wanted list for the murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985, is claiming he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. (FBI/AP)

US PROBING CLAIMS THAT CIA OPERATIVE, DEA OFFICIAL BETRAYAL LED TO MURDER OF AGENT, REPORT SAYS 

However, the U.S. government says Caro-Quintero and his family remain in the lucrative drug trade.

A Mexican federal court has issued a warrant for his re-arrest, but as of Thursday he remains at large.

Around the time of Camarena’s death, the DEA was utilizing a series of wiretaps to make sizeable drug busts in Mexico. One of them cost Rafael Caro-Quintero $2.5 billion.

In February 1985, as Camarena left to meet his wife for lunch outside the U.S. consulate in Guadalajara, he was surrounded by officers from the DFS, a Mexican intelligence agency that no longer exists.

The DFS agents took Camarena, blindfolded and held at gunpoint, to one of Caro-Quintero’s haciendas five miles away.

Westlake Legal Group 7a5011d1-Mexico-Drug-Lord Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent's death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest Greg Norman fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox news fnc/world fnc c5d9acbc-dfed-57e8-b51d-ea245204a3b0 article

The undated file photo distributed by the Mexican government shows Rafael Caro Quintero, considered the grandfather of Mexican drug trafficking. (AP/File)

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For more than 30 hours, Caro-Quintero and others interrogated Camarena and crushed his skull, jaw, nose and cheekbones with a tire iron. They broke his ribs, drilled a hole in his head and tortured him with a cattle prod. As Camarena lay dying, Caro-Quintero ordered a cartel doctor to keep the U.S. agent alive.

The 37-year-old’s body was found dumped on a nearby ranch about a month later. Caro-Quintero was convicted in the kidnapping and murder, but was mistakenly released from a Mexican prison in 2013.

Fox News’ William La Jeunesse and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 7a5011d1-Mexico-Drug-Lord Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent's death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest Greg Norman fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox news fnc/world fnc c5d9acbc-dfed-57e8-b51d-ea245204a3b0 article  Westlake Legal Group 7a5011d1-Mexico-Drug-Lord Mexican drug lord wanted in US agent's death is pleading poverty in hopes of avoiding arrest Greg Norman fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox news fnc/world fnc c5d9acbc-dfed-57e8-b51d-ea245204a3b0 article

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Experts find bones of dozens of mammoths in Mexico City

Westlake Legal Group experts-find-bones-of-dozens-of-mammoths-in-mexico-city Experts find bones of dozens of mammoths in Mexico City Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc cc82988f-4f12-5740-a487-e9e8003f6a90 article

Archeologists have discovered bones belonging to some 60 mammoths to the north of Mexico City, according to reports.

The site expands on an already exciting trove of a dozen skeletons and human traps discovered in the same shallow lake basin in October 2019. The National Institute of Anthropology and History is as overwhelmed by the discovery as they are excited by it.

The excavations will likely continue until the airport project is completed in 2022.

WOOLLY MAMMOTHS HAD A HORRIBLE AND MISERABLE END, STUDY SAYS

“There are too many, there are hundreds,” said archeologist Pedro Sánchez Nava.

The area, once a lake known as Xaltocan, appears to have been a wealth of food for the mammoths, who often ate 330 pounds every day.

Westlake Legal Group Mammoth-Mexico-AP Experts find bones of dozens of mammoths in Mexico City Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc cc82988f-4f12-5740-a487-e9e8003f6a90 article

In this undated photo released on May 21, 2020 by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), an archaeologist works at the site where bones of about 60 mammoths were discovered at the old Santa Lucia military airbase just north of Mexico City. Institute archaeologist Pedro Sánchez Nava said the giant herbivores had probably just got stuck in the mud of an ancient lake, once known as Xaltocan and now disappeared.  (INAH via AP)

Most of the newly-discovered mammoths likely died after being trapped by mud in the ancient lake or hunted by other animals. While the October 2019 discovery included two human-made pits that were likely used to trap mammoths – and other animals – Nava speculates that humans could have used the natural mud pools around the lake shore as traps as well.

“It’s possible they may have chased them into the mud,” he noted, adding, “They (ancient humans) had a very structured and organized division of labor” for getting mammoth meat.

WOOLLY MAMMOTH CELLS BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE IN SCHOCKING SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENT

The huge number of mammoths being discovered may also change scientists’ views of how frequently mammoth turned up on the dinner menu of our ancestors.

“They used to think it was very chance, sporadic,” Sánchez Nava said of a mammoth meal. “In fact, it may have been part of their daily diet.”

The great number of mammoths gives scientists a rare chance to study possible causes of the decline of mammoths, which occurred around 10,000 years ago. Human hunting and genetic inbreeding are believed to be the main causes of extinction.

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Sánchez Nava said nothing had been found that would require halting work on the airport project, in which an old military base is being converted into a civilian terminal.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Mammoth-Mexico-AP Experts find bones of dozens of mammoths in Mexico City Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc cc82988f-4f12-5740-a487-e9e8003f6a90 article  Westlake Legal Group Mammoth-Mexico-AP Experts find bones of dozens of mammoths in Mexico City Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc cc82988f-4f12-5740-a487-e9e8003f6a90 article

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Brazil surpasses Italy, Spain as coronavirus cases surge in Latin America

Westlake Legal Group brazil-surpasses-italy-spain-as-coronavirus-cases-surge-in-latin-america Brazil surpasses Italy, Spain as coronavirus cases surge in Latin America Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/brazil fox-news/world fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38af8767-98d2-5c33-94e6-7f40bdbb3c26
Westlake Legal Group brazil-covit9-Reuters Brazil surpasses Italy, Spain as coronavirus cases surge in Latin America Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/brazil fox-news/world fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38af8767-98d2-5c33-94e6-7f40bdbb3c26

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Brazil has now overtaken Spain and Italy in total confirmed coronavirus cases to become the world’s fourth hardest-hit country during the pandemic.

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Brazil’s Health Ministry announced 14,919 new confirmed cases on Saturday, bringing its total to 233,142 – fourth-most after the United States, Russia and the United Kingdom.

Nationwide testing in Brazil lags far behind Europe, meaning the virus could be more widespread than what the numbers actually represent. Brazil had processed nearly 338,000 tests by the start of last week, with another 145,000 under analysis.

By comparison, Spain and Italy have each run roughly 1.9 million tests.

Cases are also surging in Mexico and Peru as Latin America grapples with the rapidly growing outbreak. Mexico registered 278 new deaths on Saturday – the most of any country in the world on that day.

BOLSONARO EFFECT? MORE BRAZILIANS SEEN DEFYING CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS

With Brazil overtaking Spain and Italy – once considered the hotspots of the pandemic in Europe – President Jair Bolsonaro will face renewed criticism for his handling of the pandemic.

British medical journal The Lancet published an editorial earlier this month in which it labeled Bolsonaro as “the biggest threat” to Brazil’s efforts to fight the pandemic.

Brazil state governors have pushed for strict social isolation and quarantine measures, including closures of shops and restaurants. Bolsonaro has defied such efforts, arguing that the toll on the economy far outweighs quarantine efforts.

On April 20, he joined a protest calling to end social distancing and revive military dictatorship-era decrees.

After the resignation of a second health minister, Bolsonaro tweeted  “Unemployment, hunger and misery will be the future of those who support the tyranny of total isolation.” Nelson Teich resigned after only a month in charge, protesting against Bolsonaro’s handling of the pandemic.

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Recently, a journalist asked him about the rapid spread of coronavirus in Brazil, to which the far-right president responded: “So what? What do you want me to do?”

Rio de Janeiro Gov. Wilson Witzel, a former ally of Bolsonaro, said “no one can do serious work with interference in ministries.” “That is why governors and mayors need to lead the pandemic crisis, and not you, Mr. President,” Witzel said on Twitter.

Westlake Legal Group brazil-covit9-Reuters Brazil surpasses Italy, Spain as coronavirus cases surge in Latin America Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/brazil fox-news/world fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38af8767-98d2-5c33-94e6-7f40bdbb3c26  Westlake Legal Group brazil-covit9-Reuters Brazil surpasses Italy, Spain as coronavirus cases surge in Latin America Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/spain fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/brazil fox-news/world fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38af8767-98d2-5c33-94e6-7f40bdbb3c26

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Texas paralegal in US Attorney’s Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI

Westlake Legal Group texas-paralegal-in-us-attorneys-office-helped-tip-off-mexican-drug-cartel-associates-of-investigation-fbi Texas paralegal in US Attorney's Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/us fnc article 77b2c203-8e67-5620-b2e7-8592762627d1

A paralegal specialist working for a U.S. Attorney’s Office in Texas has been accused of helping a Mexican drug cartel smuggle large amounts of cocaine, heroin, and meth into the U.S.

Jennifer Loya worked at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas in San Antonio since March 2017. According to federal court records, Loya’s sister, Kimberly, is married to Roland Gustamante, an associate to the leader of the Cartel del Noreste.

Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Loya Texas paralegal in US Attorney's Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/us fnc article 77b2c203-8e67-5620-b2e7-8592762627d1

Jennifer Loya is accused of using her access to sensitive information at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas to tip-off members of a Mexican drug cartel about investigations. (Guadalupe County Jail)

Loyo is accused of using her access to electronic surveillance information through her job to tip-off Gustamante, her sister, and their associates of various DEA investigations into drug cartel operations in San Antonio.

‘CORONAVIRUS’ HEROIN SEIZED IN NEW YORK CITY DRUG BUST

The FBI says Fernandez-Vasquez, who was deported from the U.S. in May 2018, is purportedly the “leader of a sophisticated drug trafficking operation” based in Monterrey, Mexico, with strong ties to the San Antonio area.

An investigation uncovered that Gustamente and his associates allegedly run drugs through the Texas city and then funnel the money back to Fernandez-Vazquez. His wife, Kimberly Loya, also moved the drugs between Mexico and the U.S. using a vehicle registered to her sister.

FBI agents said the vehicle crossed the U.S.-Mexico border at least 21 times from May 2019 to January 2020.

Jennifer Loya is suspected of helping her sister, brother-in-law, and their associates by disclosing sensitive law enforcement information pertaining to active DEA investigations into the activities of drug trafficking operations in San Antonio.

WANTED FUGITIVE CAPTURED IN MEXICO, BROUGHT BACK TO TEXAS, OFFICIALS SAY

FBI investigations pinned her as a person of interest after an arrested suspect said he knew the agent was coming after him and it “appeared the drugs had been moved overnight.”

Other members of the operation told agents that Gustamente was working with some in the U.S. government who provided him with information pertaining to the investigations.

Westlake Legal Group Kimberly-Loya Texas paralegal in US Attorney's Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/us fnc article 77b2c203-8e67-5620-b2e7-8592762627d1

Kimberly Loya was arrested as part of an investigation into drug cartel operations in San Antonio, Texas. (Guadalupe County Jail)

Court records said Jennifer Loya allegedly printed out documents relating to these investigations while at work, despite not having a reason to do so.

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Jennifer Loya is now facing charges of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of a mixture or substance containing meth; obstruction of justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice.

Kimberly Loya, who was also detained, told law enforcement that her sister warned her of steering clear of Gustamente’s associates as there were investigations against them. Charges against her were not immediately clear.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in San Antonio has not released a statement regarding the arrest.

Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Loya Texas paralegal in US Attorney's Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/us fnc article 77b2c203-8e67-5620-b2e7-8592762627d1  Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Loya Texas paralegal in US Attorney's Office helped tip off Mexican drug cartel associates of investigation: FBI Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/us fnc article 77b2c203-8e67-5620-b2e7-8592762627d1

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Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn

Westlake Legal Group rising-coronavirus-cases-coming-from-mexico-threaten-a-relapse-in-southern-california-health-officials-warn Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825

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As California begins to open its economy after almost two months in lockdown, an inflow of coronavirus cases south of the border – where the illness is yet to reach a climax –  is becoming a growing cause for concern.

In the San Diego border city of Chula Vista, hospitals are fast becoming swarmed with COVID-19 patients who have traveled north from Tijuana, one of Mexico’s hardest-hit cities.

“San Diego County and Baja California, Mexico, have long enjoyed a strong cultural and economic relationship treasured by both. Tens of thousands of people legally cross back and forth across our border every day, among them, some of the 250,000 American citizens who live in Mexico,” a representative for Scripps Health, which operates the Scripps Mercy Hospital in Chula Vista, told Fox News on Monday. “We are not suggesting the border be closed, but that we institute health screens in both directions to protect the United States and Mexico, as this virus does not recognize borders. And we need to ensure the hospitals at the borders receive sufficient medical, pharmaceutical and laboratory testing supplies.”

Scripps top brass are hopeful that federal authorities will begin scanning for high temperatures at the U.S. port of entry, and impose mandatory quarantines of those suspected of having contracted coronavirus.

Westlake Legal Group AP19252651641435 Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825

FILE – In this July 25, 2019 file photo, Mexican officials and United States Border Patrol officers return a group of migrants back to the Mexico side of the border as Mexican immigration officials check the list, in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. A federal judge in California has reinstated a nationwide halt on the Trump administration’s plan to prevent most migrants from seeking asylum on the U.S.-Mexico border. U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar on Monday, Sept. 9 ruled that an injunction blocking the administration’s policy from taking effect should apply nationwide. (AP Photo/Salvador Gonzalez, File)

According to the Wall Street Journal, San Diego County has the third-highest number of coronavirus cases in California, behind only Los Angeles and its neighbor Riverside County. And inside the ranks of San Diego County, Chula Vista and nearby communities “have the highest rate of infections per 100,000 people,” and that figure has been rapidly ascending.

WHY FARMERS DUMP FOOD AND CROPS WHILE GROCERY STORES RUN DRY AND AMERICANS STRUGGLE

The influx became so drastic in recent weeks that Scripps Mercy was forced to turn away arriving patients, the WSJ reported.

The growing desperation comes on the heels of a letter penned late last month by Scripps Health President and CEO Chris Van Gorder and COVID‐19 Strategic Response Executive Consultant Daniel Gross for Sharp HealthCare, which owns the largest hospital in Chula Vista. The letter, addressed to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf requested “urgent action on behalf of health care providers along the United States/Mexico border,” and underscored that the lack of testing resources in the neighboring Mexican state of Baja California, “poses a very real threat to San Diego.”

The letter also pointed out that “pre‐pandemic, an average of 90,000 people crossed the Tijuana‐San Ysidro border daily, but when the ‘non-essential travel ban’ went into effect on March 21, border crossings dropped significantly.”

“However, crossings have increased steadily in recent weeks. On April 26, 2020, border crossings exceeded 42,000,” the letter continued. “Today, coronavirus cases are increasing at rates exceedingly faster among border communities compared to the rest of San Diego County.”

As the letter underscores, there are hundreds of thousands of American expatriates, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries or have commercial health care coverage with American health plans and who therefore rely upon medical care in the United States. The San Diego-based health care professionals have thus vowed that it’s a “misconception” that the virus curve has been flattened in either southern California or Mexico.

While restrictions were put in place late March, they do not apply to international trade, U.S. citizens, legal permanent residents and those with work visas. Experts are thus quick to note that whatever happens in Mexico, will ultimately have a direct impact on coronavirus numbers in California and could potentially ignite a second wave.

The pleas did not go unnoticed by President Trump, who subsequently tweeted that the largely sanctuary state suddenly wants tighter borders as a result of the global public health crisis.

“While I do not expect normal trade and border crossings to resume to normal anytime soon, I do hope that this pandemic will help accelerate a much-needed transformation at the border,” noted María Fernanda Pérez Arguello, a Latin America specialist at the Atlantic Council. “The pandemic is an opportunity for the U.S. and Mexico to creatively think of ways to harness technology to increase border efficiency, secure routine border crossings and make sure that trade and supply chains are shielded from future global disruptions, whatever they may look like.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20126843421818-1 Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825

A hospital worker calls out a name from the gate, as relatives of hospitalized patients wait outside in hopes of receiving news of their loved ones, at a public hospital in the Iztapalapa district of Mexico City, Tuesday, May 5, 2020. Iztapalapa has the most confirmed cases of the new coronavirus within Mexico’s densely populated capital, itself one of the hardest hit areas of the country with thousands of confirmed cases and around 500 deaths.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

But for now, the situation south or the border remains grim. Across Mexico, the coronavirus spread is drastically multiplying. After a slow start in testing after the first confirmed case in late February, over this past weekend alone, the country of more than 130 million reported more than 3,500 new infections.

To date, coronavirus has infected more than 35,000 Mexicans and claimed the lives of some 3,500. More than a quarter of confirmed cases have come from Mexico City. According to health officials, the number of cases is expected to peak later this week. In preparation and in a last-ditch effort to encourage social distancing, the government has erected a number of “careful high contagion area” warning signs in almost 90 locations around Mexico City, mainly high transit areas such as public markets and bus and metro stations where large groups cluster.

Yet several reports on Monday contend that cases in the capital are already dangerously close to maxing out the already fragile health care system.

“Mexico City has been the hardest hit with Baja California Norte, which borders California also being struck. Cancun area has also been hit hard whilst Yucatan for its low population is in the top two or three,” observed Manuel Holden-Ayala, a Yucatan-based political writer. “A problem that we have in Mexico is some of the highest obesity and diabetes rates in all the world, so a lot of people are falling ill quickly.”

Some have accused the government of dismissing the novel pathogen as being no more lethal than a typical flu outbreak during the first critical couple of months of its North American onslaught, pointing to the notion that President Andres Manuel Obrador routinely downplayed the threat and  was “shaking hands and kissing people up until about three weeks ago.”

“The second problem is that the federal government has told the state governments that they have to pay for the crises whilst state governments then say the federation should help out. So at the start of this, there was a Mexican standoff,” Holden-Ayala said. “The president doesn’t want to release any money because he knows that him releasing money will probably mean that one of his three flagship projects – the Mayan train, The Dos Bocas gas refinery, and an airport – won’t be (affordable).”

Mexico’s Deputy Health Minister Hugo Lopez-Gatelli has also remained skeptical of the virus’s morbidity, insisting that more evidence was needed to reach conclusions with regards to death rates.

Frustrated residents also told Fox News that despite murky messages from the top, seeing news reports of how badly coronavirus was ravishing much of the world led many to “self-quarantining” even before government-mandated stay-home guidelines were put in place, leading to a spluttering of the economy and enhanced struggle for many to put food on the table.

And while some have accused the government of covering up the real statistics, others have indicated that the death toll is likely to be far higher due mostly to antiquated record systems. One Mexico City-based former intelligence official told Fox News that there is an “inconsistency issue in statistical information on deaths,” and may not be known for at least 17 months.

“This is because of the lack of technology, the deficient personnel training, the absence of capture and validation processes, as well as the insufficient budget in all areas of the country,” affirmed Lee Oughton, founding partner of Mexico City-based security firm, Fortress Risk Management, adding that the spread became so vast so quickly due to loose regulations. “In Mexico, confinement measures are not entirely stringent. It is observed throughout the country, but some economic sectors continue to work with some normality because there have been cases in which employers have asked to work in night shifts to avoid inspections of STPS (Secretary for Labor and Social Security) personnel.”

MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS STRUGGLE DURING CORONAVIRUS, HIKE PRICES AS LAB SUPPLIES FROM CHINA DRY UP

Compounding an already dire situation, a rash of rumors that front-line health care workers themselves are to blame for the disease spread has led to an uptick in violence against medical staff in some hot spots.

“There have been many attacks on health workers as people here in Yucatan think that they carry the disease,” Holden-Ayala continued. “Many taxis refuse to pick them up; they get kicked off buses, one got coffee thrown at them. Kind of sad.”

Westlake Legal Group 08_AP20121087705858 Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825

Aurora Guadalupe Azamar reacts after learning that her mother died, probably of COVID-19 disease, outside of a public hospital at Iztapalapa, Mexico City, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. At hospitals across the capital where coronavirus patients are being treated, family members of the sick crowd the sidewalk outside, with most saying they have no other way of getting information about their loved ones isolated inside. Mexico’s coronavirus cases have begun rising more rapidly, with experts predicting a peak around the second week in May. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

Meanwhile, the infamous Mexican cartels from Sinaloa and Sonora to Jalisco and Tamaulipas are said to be exploiting the pandemic with a “Robin Hood” type strategy in impoverished communities, distributing aid, interest-free cash loans, transportation, food and medical supplies to those suffering amid lockdown orders.

“The cartels are getting involved trying to mandate the shutdowns,” explained one Tijuana-based security expert, who requested anonymity. “And then they are all in it to give out aid to win over locals wherever they operate. Between that and a pro-Maduro government, it is a dangerous combination.”

Photographs splashed across social media on the weekend show the various narco-traffickers delivering food boxes to low-income residences with the explicit name of the cartel emblazoned across the box to ensure that the recipients know the goods did not come from the government.

“It makes us question,” one Sinaloa resident bemoaned. “Where is our government? How else do we survive?”

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Javier Treviño, a former deputy foreign minister of Mexico, is the public policy director at the Mexican Business Council. He contended to Fox News that swift and laudable action is being taken to manage the unprecedented pandemic.

“Mexico entered, late April, what the government calls Phase Three of the spread of the new coronavirus, the most serious stage, as the transmission of the virus was intensifying,” he said. “The focus of Phase Three has been to further reduce movement of people in public spaces to prevent the country’s health system from being overwhelmed. The government has a plan, and they are making progress.”

Treviño stressed that what has been extremely important is the help from private companies and non-governmental organizations at the level of State Governments of the Provinces.

“Collaboration between private and public organizations has been a key element to face the challenge. Mexico has extended government restrictions to contain the coronavirus until May 30 but plans to begin easing up restrictions from June 1 onwards if the current measures are successful,” he added. “As long as the U.S. border states economies return to normality, we will see a quick reaction on the Mexican side, and the government will take responsibility to reopen activities accordingly.”

Westlake Legal Group image Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825  Westlake Legal Group image Rising coronavirus cases coming from Mexico threaten a relapse in southern California, health officials warn Hollie McKay fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 97a72a31-b987-5747-8ea2-6994a5b7d825

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Feared Mexican gang leader dies of coronavirus in prison

Westlake Legal Group feared-mexican-gang-leader-dies-of-coronavirus-in-prison Feared Mexican gang leader dies of coronavirus in prison fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 5f87c32e-6ce2-5460-b6db-20cdfdb3cff7

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The once notorious leader of a feared Mexican drug cartel has died in state prison from the novel coronavirus, according to a report.

Moisés Escamilla May, 45, had been serving a 37-year sentence at the Puente Grande maximum-security prison in Jalisco state, BBC reported on Monday.

Westlake Legal Group Puente-Grande-Prison-Reuters Feared Mexican gang leader dies of coronavirus in prison fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 5f87c32e-6ce2-5460-b6db-20cdfdb3cff7

A Mexican Federal Police officer guards the access road to Puente Grande federal prison near Guadalajara which houses some of the country’s most dangerous criminals.

He was viewed as a highly dangerous inmate, having allegedly been responsible for the decapitation of 12 people in the Mexican state of Yucatán.

Widely known by his nickname, “Gordo May,” he led a group within the Los Zetas drug cartel called “Old School Zetas.”

HOSPITALS TREATING CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS IN MEXICO CITY ARE REACHING MAXIMUM CAPACITY: REPORT

At the time of his arrest in 2008, May’s group was considered the most feared criminal organization in the Cancún area.

May died in prison on Friday. His death was not officially announced until Sunday.

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As of Monday, there have been more than 35,000 cases of COVID-19 in Mexico, with some 3,465 deaths, according to the latest figures by Johns Hopkins University. Health experts say the actual numbers are likely much higher.

Westlake Legal Group Puente-Grande-Prison-Reuters Feared Mexican gang leader dies of coronavirus in prison fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 5f87c32e-6ce2-5460-b6db-20cdfdb3cff7  Westlake Legal Group Puente-Grande-Prison-Reuters Feared Mexican gang leader dies of coronavirus in prison fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 5f87c32e-6ce2-5460-b6db-20cdfdb3cff7

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Border cities worried about a spike in coronavirus cases as outbreak worsens in Mexico

Westlake Legal Group border-cities-worried-about-a-spike-in-coronavirus-cases-as-outbreak-worsens-in-mexico Border cities worried about a spike in coronavirus cases as outbreak worsens in Mexico fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/politics fnc d3779944-c55a-5435-80a5-a2d6497d94de article Andrew O'Reilly
Westlake Legal Group image Border cities worried about a spike in coronavirus cases as outbreak worsens in Mexico fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/politics fnc d3779944-c55a-5435-80a5-a2d6497d94de article Andrew O'Reilly

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Public officials and health care workers in the San Diego area are worried that the region could see a spike in COVID-19 cases tied to the daily cross-border migration.

It comes amid reports that the numbers of both infections and deaths related to the novel coronavirus are much higher in Mexico than reported, as well as the continued flow of people back-and-forth across the U.S.-Mexico border.

EL CHAPO’S SONS IMPOSE CORONAVIRUS CURFEW IN MEXICAN TOWN CONTROLLED BY CARTEL: REPORT

Health care workers at Scripps Health in Chula Vista – a city close to the U.S.-Mexico border – say they have already witnessed a surge in patients and are nearing the facility’s capacity. The city and other neighboring communities have the highest rate of infection per 100,000 in all of California – jumping from 172 per 100,000 two weeks ago to 234 per 100,000 as of last week.

San Diego County as a whole has the third-highest number of confirmed cases in the country’s most populous state – behind only Los Angeles County and nearby Riverside County.

“We’re growing because our Baja [California Norte, a Mexican state] community is coming here for testing and treatment,” Lornna Hopping, a nurse and manager of the emergency department at Scripps’ Chula Vista hospital, told the Wall Street Journal. “Whatever happens there is significantly going to have an impact on us, and vice versa.”

Hospital workers said that the spike in cases was tied to people with dual citizenship or dual residence who cross the border into San Diego County to work in “essential businesses” or to shop. There has been no link to the spread of the virus to people crossing the border illegally into the U.S.

In March, more than 531,000 pedestrians and more than 1.6 million vehicle passengers crossed the border near San Diego before U.S. officials closed the border to all nonessential travelers on March 21, but anecdotal evidence shows that people are still coming north to work and heading south to go shopping.

While Mexican officials and health care workers have reported major outbreaks of the contagion in places like Mexico City and Tijuana, they have so far downplayed the impact of the disease in the county. There are stories, however, surfacing that the coronavirus is wreaking much more havoc on the country than is actually being reported.

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As of last Thursday, Mexico had reported some 29,600 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 2,961 deaths. In a veiled admission to the lack of testing, the government in Mexico City has recently added a new statistic: deaths that might have been caused by the new coronavirus, but that number was only 245.

Instead, the cause of death of many who have likely died from the disease has been labeled as “atypical pneumonia” or “suspected COVID-19,” but not recorded as a coronavirus death.

The dearth of testing and the possibility that the contagion could cause major problem for both Mexico and their northern neighbors has been a cause for concern not just for communities along the border but also in the highest level of the federal government in Washington.

President Trump recently weighed in on the matter – where he mocked California for not wanting people entering the state from Mexico and took time to tout his border wall project.

“Mexico is sadly experiencing very big CoronaVirus problems, and now California, get this, doesn’t want people coming over the Southern Border,” Trump tweeted last week. “A Classic! They are sooo lucky that I am their President. Border is very tight and the Wall is rapidly being built!

Kristin Gaspar, San Diego County’s Third District supervisor, sent a letter to Vice President Mike Pence in April saying that medical professionals were “increasingly worried about the rapid spread of COVID-19 in northern Mexico” and that there had been “a sudden influx of critically ill patients from Mexico” in Chula Vista, Calif. Gaspar asked for senior Trump administration officials to speak with local hospital executives and medical professionals to address the issue.

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Additionally, Scripps Health President and CEO Chris Van Gorder and Sharp HealthCare COVID 19 Strategic Response Executive Consultant Daniel Gross wrote a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf asking for help in dealing with coronavirus cases at the border.

Trump has long pushed for tightening the U.S.-Mexico border, although those calls were mainly in reference to cracking down on illegal immigration, not border crossings made by those with work visas or U.S. citizens living in Mexico. The hardline approach has been in stark contrast with the stance taken by California Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, who has endorsed sanctuary policies to protect illegal immigrants from being deported by federal authorities.

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group image Border cities worried about a spike in coronavirus cases as outbreak worsens in Mexico fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/politics fnc d3779944-c55a-5435-80a5-a2d6497d94de article Andrew O'Reilly  Westlake Legal Group image Border cities worried about a spike in coronavirus cases as outbreak worsens in Mexico fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/politics fnc d3779944-c55a-5435-80a5-a2d6497d94de article Andrew O'Reilly

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Wanted fugitive captured in Mexico, brought back to Texas, officials say

Westlake Legal Group wanted-fugitive-captured-in-mexico-brought-back-to-texas-officials-say Wanted fugitive captured in Mexico, brought back to Texas, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc article 368eba2b-5b8f-536b-bfa2-3e11885095a6

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One of America’s most wanted fugitives, on the run for the past four years over a slew of crimes, was captured Friday in Mexico and returned to the United States, police revealed.

Jeffrey Winston Forrest, 47, was wanted by the Taylor County Sheriff’s Department in Abilene, Texas, for two counts of aggravated sexual assault of a child, bail jumping and failure to appear in court.

‘CORONAVIRUS’ HEROIN SEIZED IN NEW YORK CITY DRUG BUST

According to police in the Mexican city of Zapopan, members of the State Attorney’s Office, Zapopan Police Department and the National Institute of Immigration (INM) arrested Forrest on Friday afternoon. Investigators said they spotted him in Zapopan after his presence and identity were confirmed with the existing alert in the U.S., due to a tip that was provided to “In Pursuit with John Walsh” on Investigation Discovery after the show profiled the case.

Westlake Legal Group Jeffrey-Winston-Forrest1 Wanted fugitive captured in Mexico, brought back to Texas, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc article 368eba2b-5b8f-536b-bfa2-3e11885095a6

Jeffrey Winston Forrest was arrested in Mexico on Friday.

He has been returned to Texas and was being held on $3 million bond.

Forrest, a former youth pastor, was accused in 2015 by four girls of sexually assaulting them, according to the U.S. Marshals Service in the Northern District of Texas.

The girls said their ages ranged from 8 to 15 when Forrest repeatedly assaulted them, according to investigators. They said he apparently used his position as a youth minister at several different churches to access and groom the girls.

He was arrested in April 2015 and released on bond but failed to appear for his trial in August 2016.

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Forrest was on the U.S. Marshals’ list of top 15 Most Wanted fugitives.

Investigators said they had encountered difficulties capturing him because of his knowledge of the dark web and his use of communication software such as Tor to mask his digital footprint.

Westlake Legal Group Jeffrey-Winston-Forrest1 Wanted fugitive captured in Mexico, brought back to Texas, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc article 368eba2b-5b8f-536b-bfa2-3e11885095a6  Westlake Legal Group Jeffrey-Winston-Forrest1 Wanted fugitive captured in Mexico, brought back to Texas, officials say Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc article 368eba2b-5b8f-536b-bfa2-3e11885095a6

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El Chapo’s sons impose coronavirus curfew in Mexican town controlled by cartel: report

Westlake Legal Group el-chapos-sons-impose-coronavirus-curfew-in-mexican-town-controlled-by-cartel-report El Chapo's sons impose coronavirus curfew in Mexican town controlled by cartel: report fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article 8ce77bab-4208-5df4-9f11-1824eb6f366f

The sons of Mexican drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán imposed a curfew on the residents of a town under their cartel’s control due to the coronavirus, according to a report.

Iván Archivaldo Guzmán and Jesús Alfredo Guzmán threatened violators with beatings with boards, arrest or fine, the Yucatan Times reported.

“This is no game, we’re not playing,” a member of the Sinaloa Cartel reportedly said in one of several videos circulating on social media.

MEXICO’S PRESIDENT SAYS ‘EL CHAPO’ HAD SAME POWER AS IF HE LED COUNTRY HIMSELF

“After ten o’clock at night, all the people must be inside their homes due to the coronavirus, otherwise they will be punished, these are orders “from above (from Los Chapitos),” the video said, referring to the brothers.

Iván Archivaldo Guzmán and Jesús Alfredo Guzmán are known as “los Chapitos,” or “the little Chapos,” and are believed to currently run their father’s Sinaloa Cartel together with Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada.

The publication reported cartel members have been patrolling Culiacán, the state capital of Sinaloa, Mexico, in heavily armored vehicles to enforce the curfew.

Westlake Legal Group 86715276-sinaloa El Chapo's sons impose coronavirus curfew in Mexican town controlled by cartel: report fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article 8ce77bab-4208-5df4-9f11-1824eb6f366f

A street in Culiacán, Mexico.  (Google Maps. )

El  Chapo, the former leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was extradited to the U.S. in 2017 and is now serving a life sentence at ADX Florence, a prison in Colorado dubbed the “Alcatraz of the Rockies.”

El Chapo’s daughter, Alejandrina, and several Mexican cartels have been shown in videos handing out coronavirus relief packages to the poor in an apparent public relations effort, Reuters reported.

Hundreds of Mexican communities run by criminal gangs, armed groups and drug traffickers have been under curfew and quarantine for years.

“A lot of people don’t believe [the coronavirus], aren’t careful, I think because of what we’ve been through,” a woman from Tamaulipas, a northern border state long plagued by cartel violence across the Rio Grande from Texas, told the Associated Press. “They say if 10 years of war haven’t killed us, a virus isn’t going to.”

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“We’ve been living 10 years in quarantine,” the woman, who asked to remain anonymous, added. “It’s not hard to stay home anymore.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group sinaloa El Chapo's sons impose coronavirus curfew in Mexican town controlled by cartel: report fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article 8ce77bab-4208-5df4-9f11-1824eb6f366f  Westlake Legal Group sinaloa El Chapo's sons impose coronavirus curfew in Mexican town controlled by cartel: report fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article 8ce77bab-4208-5df4-9f11-1824eb6f366f

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West Virginia kidnapping suspect now charged with mishandling top-secret, national security information

Westlake Legal Group west-virginia-kidnapping-suspect-now-charged-with-mishandling-top-secret-national-security-information West Virginia kidnapping suspect now charged with mishandling top-secret, national security information fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc e0e2c669-dbe8-5995-aede-4cd6bf8c044b Danielle Wallace article

A West Virginia woman already accused of kidnapping her daughter and fleeing to Mexico was charged last week with mishandling classified government documents, leaving them in a storage unit.

In a two-count criminal information document filed in federal court in West Virginia last week, Elizabeth Jo Shirley was charged with willful retention of top-secret information from the National Security Agency. She already is facing a count of international parental kidnapping, the Associated Press reported.

The most recent court papers contain only sparse information about the allegations, but stated that Shirley had unauthorized possession of documents between 1999 and August 2019 “relating to the national defense” and “failed to deliver them to the officer or employee of the United States entitled to receive them.”

MORE THAN 70 PERCENT OF FEDERAL PRISONERS TESTED NATIONWIDE FOR CORONAVIRUS WERE POSITIVE; LA LOCKUP HAS WORST OUTBREAK 

Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Jo-Shirley-West-Virginia-Division-of-Corrections-and-Rehabilitation West Virginia kidnapping suspect now charged with mishandling top-secret, national security information fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc e0e2c669-dbe8-5995-aede-4cd6bf8c044b Danielle Wallace article

This undated photo provided by the West Virginia Division of Corrections and Rehabilitation shows Elizabeth Jo Shirley. (West Virginia Division of Corrections and Rehabilitation via AP)

Prosecutors allege Shirley kept, without authorization, a document related to “the national defense that outlines intelligence information regarding a foreign government’s military and political issues,” inside a storage unit she leased. The document was classified at the top-secret level from the National Security Agency, court papers claim without specifying the information in the document further.

It is unclear why Shirley had the documents or where she had worked previously.

Fox News has requested comment from both the State Department and the National Security Agency, the national intelligence arm of the Department of Defense, but has not received a response.

In a motion last month seeking detention, federal prosecutors claimed Shirley posed a risk of fleeing before trial, thus obstructing justice. A judge agreed to keep her in custody.

She was accused of kidnapping her 6-year-old daughter in July 2019 after she failed to return the child on the agreed-upon date to the girl’s father, the primary residential parent, and his wife in West Virginia.

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Shirley claimed that she was having car trouble and promised to make the drop-off the following day, but instead headed toward the airport and ultimately left the country, authorities said. She and her daughter were found by authorities at a hotel in Mexico City weeks later. The girl was returned to her father, and Shirley was charged with international kidnapping.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Jo-Shirley-West-Virginia-Division-of-Corrections-and-Rehabilitation West Virginia kidnapping suspect now charged with mishandling top-secret, national security information fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc e0e2c669-dbe8-5995-aede-4cd6bf8c044b Danielle Wallace article  Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Jo-Shirley-West-Virginia-Division-of-Corrections-and-Rehabilitation West Virginia kidnapping suspect now charged with mishandling top-secret, national security information fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc e0e2c669-dbe8-5995-aede-4cd6bf8c044b Danielle Wallace article

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