web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america"

Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry

HOUSTON — Many in the construction industry say Trump’s immigration proposal could help an industry struggling to find workers.

Industry insiders said construction has taken a hit because of low interest in the job market. Now, there is a nationwide labor shortage as the number of construction projects grows.

“We talk about 20,000 jobs here in Houston in the industrial sector, but nationwide, there are 440,000 approximate open construction jobs right now,” said Brandon Mabile, chairman of the board of directors for Associated Builders and Contractors in Greater Houston.

TRUMP UNVEILS PLAN TO ‘TRANSFORM’ AMERICA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM, FOCUS ON HIGH-SKILLED WORKERS

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-06-05-at-11.19.54-PM Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry Madeleine Rivera fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/us fnc article 9c796bbf-fbdd-51bb-8142-026fc5746f34

The Associated Builders and Contractors in Greater Houston says there are currently more than 400,000 open construction projects across the country.  (Fox News)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Last month, the president released a merit-based immigration proposal that increases the number of highly skilled workers from 12 percent to 57 percent. Mabile says the plan could help them recruit more foreign workers.

“Frankly, there just aren’t enough people interested in doing this type of work in the U.S.,” said Mabile.

According to the Associated General Contractors of America, Houston added 24,000 construction jobs last year, the most out of any metropolitan area in the country. The need is building, especially in the Texas Gulf Coast, according to Mabile.

“We’re seeing a large need for skilled craft workers throughout the industry and all sectors,” said Mabile.

However, not everyone agrees the strategy would solve the labor shortage.

TRUMP’S IMMIGRATION PLAN: WHICH INDUSTRIES NEED HIGH-SKILLED WORKERS?

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-06-05-at-11.22.32-PM Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry Madeleine Rivera fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/us fnc article 9c796bbf-fbdd-51bb-8142-026fc5746f34

According to the Associated General Contractors of America, Houston added 24,000 construction jobs last year, the most out of any metropolitan area in the country. (Fox News)

“It is not a policy that is rooted or based in the economic realities of the industry but rather it’s based in, quite frankly, what are our racist notions about immigration,” said Jose Garza, executive director of the Worker Defense Project, a non-profit organization that empowers low-income workers.

The Workers Defense Project states that nearly half of the Lone Star State’s construction workers are undocumented. Garza says the president’s proposal would hurt more than help.

“Even with a significant portion of the workforce being filled by undocumented labor, there are still shortages in the workforce up and down the sector,” said Garza.

Garza adds the policy won’t fix what he sees as the real challenges in the industry.

Westlake Legal Group FS_home_construction_3 Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry Madeleine Rivera fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/us fnc article 9c796bbf-fbdd-51bb-8142-026fc5746f34

The Workers Defense Project says nearly half of the Lone Star State’s construction workers are undocumented.  (AP)

“The industry has failed to invest in their workforce. They have failed to make construction jobs good, safe jobs that people want to work in. So, this approach, which focuses on a tiny sliver of the workforce, isn’t going to address the overall problems facing the industry,” said Garza.

The president’s plan hasn’t been submitted as a bill to Congress and, instead, will likely be used by Trump as a campaign issue in his 2020 re-election fight. It also doesn’t address recipients of DACA, an Obama-era policy that protected undocumented immigrants who came into the country as children.

Mabile and Garza have expressed support for them.

MAHER DEFENDS TRUMP’S MERIT-BASED IMMIGRATION PLAN: SOUNDS ‘NORMAL REPUBLICAN’

“Those people make up about 100,000 construction workers. And so we want to see those people treated fairly and given a path to continue to assist the construction industry,” said Mabile.

“A good place to start is a policy that has a path to citizenship for the workforce that exists for the construction industry right now,” said Garza.

Westlake Legal Group FS_CONSTRUCTION_WORKER-1 Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry Madeleine Rivera fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/us fnc article 9c796bbf-fbdd-51bb-8142-026fc5746f34   Westlake Legal Group FS_CONSTRUCTION_WORKER-1 Construction chiefs say Trump’s merit-based immigration plan could boost industry Madeleine Rivera fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/us fnc article 9c796bbf-fbdd-51bb-8142-026fc5746f34

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chris Spear: Will infrastructure be Trump’s next big win? Here’s what America’s truckers want

Westlake Legal Group blue-truck-istock Chris Spear: Will infrastructure be Trump’s next big win? Here's what America's truckers want fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chris Spear article 918629d4-b8a4-5297-aa88-372a8367733c

It is encouraging that President Trump’s meeting with Democratic congressional leaders at the White House last week ended in agreement on a “big and bold” vision to revitalize American infrastructure, with a target investment of $2 trillion. America’s truckers know full well that the dire condition of our nation’s roads and bridges has surpassed crisis levels. Without action from Washington, the costs to the motoring public and economy will rise exponentially as conditions only grow worse.

The meeting participants agreed to soon meet again to discuss funding sources for that $2 trillion price tag, which would cover a wide array of infrastructure needs, including broadband and mass transit systems. But when it comes to surface transportation – the roads and bridges that Americans use every day in the course of their lives – there is one funding mechanism, available today and ready in place, which completely pays for itself and won’t add a dime to the federal deficit.

It’s been more than 25 years since an increase in the fuel-user fee has been enacted into law, shortchanging our nation’s roads and bridges of critical funding as they’ve endured the wear from decades of weather and usage. By raising it merely five cents per gallon, each year over the next four years, it would generate $340 billion in new revenue over the first 10 years. This money would begin flowing immediately into the Highway Trust Fund for road and bridge maintenance, as the administrative apparatus already exists and is in operation. That means no new federal bureaucracy, no new government programs.

INFRASTRUCTURE COULD MOVE TO THE BIG LEAGUES IF DEMS, GOP WORK TOGETHER

Ronald Reagan twice oversaw increases in the user fee during his presidency, because it works, and because it is the most fiscally conservative option available. Collected at the wholesale terminal and baked into the price of gasoline and diesel at the pump, the overhead costs are virtually non-existent.  Ninety-nine cents of every dollar collected go to their intended purpose of road and bridge maintenance. Compare that to other funding mechanisms, like tolling, where as much as 33 cents on the dollar is wasted on overhead costs like construction and enforcement, according to the National Academy of Sciences.

Truckers know how critical sound infrastructure is to maintaining our growing economy, which is why we put our money where our mouths are. While we account for only four percent of the vehicles on the road, we pay nearly half the user fee revenue that goes into the Highway Trust Fund – and we’re willing to pay more to get this job done. That’s because, every year, our industry loses 1.2 billion hours of productivity to traffic congestion – the equivalent of 425,533 truck drivers sitting idle for the entire year. This places enormous strain on the entire supply chain, resulting in higher prices at the store for consumers.

Ordinary Americans are hit just as hard. The typical commuter spends 42 hours stuck in traffic each year. The vehicle damage wasted gas and lost wages due to failing infrastructure cost the average motorist $1,600 annually.  And, in 53 percent of highway fatalities, the condition of the roadway contributed to the accident. Potholes and traffic congestion don’t discriminate by political party, and they hit low and middle-income working Americans the hardest. But with smart, sensible and strategic investment in our roads and bridges, these costs of inaction will come down exponentially.

Truckers know how critical sound infrastructure is to maintaining our growing economy, which is why we put our money where our mouths are. While we account for only four percent of the vehicles on the road, we pay nearly half the user fee revenue that goes into the Highway Trust Fund – and we’re willing to pay more to get this job done. 

This problem won’t be solved by divisive political ideology, partisan think tanks, or myopic mega-donors. Their only solution is more of the same. The cost of inaction is real and measurable. The solution requires real money – not the fake funding seen in fanciful proposals like nationwide tolling or “asset recycling” jargon. Given his background in building and construction, President Trump knows that no issue is more primed to rev America’s economic engine and create tens of thousands of good, working-class jobs across the heartland. And he knows what it takes to get the job done.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Following the productive meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer last week, President Trump now has an opportunity to make history. By seizing this moment, he can build a lasting legacy that the American people will see, use and feel for decades to come. America’s truckers hope he does, and we will have his back the entire way.

With big and bold leadership, he can pave the road to a great American future.

Westlake Legal Group blue-truck-istock Chris Spear: Will infrastructure be Trump’s next big win? Here's what America's truckers want fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chris Spear article 918629d4-b8a4-5297-aa88-372a8367733c   Westlake Legal Group blue-truck-istock Chris Spear: Will infrastructure be Trump’s next big win? Here's what America's truckers want fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chris Spear article 918629d4-b8a4-5297-aa88-372a8367733c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt

Westlake Legal Group david-ditch-yes-to-infrastructure-but-not-if-it-means-2-trillion-in-new-debt David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250

Washington never seems to run out of big-spending promises. And when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., huddled with President Trump on Tuesday, they came up with a doozy.

Schumer emerged from the meeting to announce that the president wants Congress to come up with a bill that would spend $2 trillion on infrastructure — including roads, bridges, water systems and broadband.

Now, $2 trillion is a lot of loot. It’s almost twice as much money as is currently in circulation in the U.S. It’s also somewhere between two and 10 times as much as the administration talked about spending last year.

DOUG SCHOEN: TRUMP, PELOSI AND SCHUMER SHOW BIPARTISANSHIP POSSIBLE ON $2 TRILLION INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN

In 2018, the administration proposed putting up $200 billion in federal matching funds to generate $1 trillion in new investments. Previous proposals from Democrats, such as 2017’s $2 trillion 21st Century New Deal for Jobs, have relied exclusively on increasing federal spending.

It seems that this week’s s talks never got around to figuring out where to get the money to make good on this latest promise. But one thing we do know for sure is that the feds already spend too much on infrastructure projects that are not proper national priorities. State highways, metro transit systems, and local initiatives should be paid for by the people who use them and the taxpayers of the state and local jurisdictions who benefit from them.

The federal government has a long history of blowing federal taxpayer dollars on projects that should be funded either by state or local governments, the private sector or, in some cases, not funded at all. From Alaska’s infamous “Bridge to Nowhere,” to California’s disastrous high-speed rail project, to protecting ritzy golf courses in New York, politicians from both parties have shown a willingness to waste billions of dollars in the name of “investments.”

Consider the federal gasoline tax. It’s supposed to be a user fee, paid by motorists, to go toward interstate highway maintenance and repair. Yet 28 cents of every dollar of gas taxes collected are diverted to other purposes: heavily subsidized urban transit systems, bike paths, even ferry boat terminals. While some of these may be worthy projects, they have no national significance and should not be funded by Washington.

By focusing on further regulatory reforms that reduce the federal government’s wasteful interference, America can have better infrastructure while avoiding higher taxes and a bigger debt.

A better alternative would be to reduce the federal gas tax and devolve much of the feds’ current infrastructure activity to the private sector and to state and local governments. They are much closer to the people than Washington bureaucrats and therefore more knowledgeable about — and responsive to — local infrastructure needs.

Even when the federal government does spend money on a worthwhile project, it often causes significant delays and cost increases due to red tape that is inevitably entangled with federal funding.

The process of applying for federal grants, and the necessary oversight by federal agencies that comes along with federal dollars, always means that projects take longer to complete.

Rules that artificially increase labor costs, such as the Davis-Bacon Act, and make inputs more expensive, such as “Buy American” rules, mean that federally funded projects give taxpayers less bang for their buck.

Private infrastructure projects similarly suffer from onerous and unnecessary regulation.

That is why an infrastructure package focusing on reducing regulation and streamlining the environmental review process rather than just shoveling cash at states and localities could deliver hundreds of billions of dollars in added value.

One other key consideration: there is no good way to cover the cost of a federally financed $2 trillion infrastructure package. Tax increases would reduce the flow of economic investment that is now driving the American economy to new highs.

A dangerous temptation for elected officials would be to avoid paying for the cost of new infrastructure spending altogether. This would be reckless.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

With the federal debt in excess of $22 trillion, and a strong economy, now is the time to rein in the debt rather than add to it. Putting the cost of infrastructure on the national credit card would mean passing the bill to our children and grandchildren. That would be profoundly unfair.

President Trump’s greatest policy successes have been in deregulation and the implementation of a pro-growth tax policy. By focusing on further regulatory reforms that reduce the federal government’s wasteful interference, America can have better infrastructure while avoiding higher taxes and a bigger debt.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250

Washington never seems to run out of big-spending promises. And when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., huddled with President Trump on Tuesday, they came up with a doozy.

Schumer emerged from the meeting to announce that the president wants Congress to come up with a bill that would spend $2 trillion on infrastructure — including roads, bridges, water systems and broadband.

Now, $2 trillion is a lot of loot. It’s almost twice as much money as is currently in circulation in the U.S. It’s also somewhere between two and 10 times as much as the administration talked about spending last year.

DOUG SCHOEN: TRUMP, PELOSI AND SCHUMER SHOW BIPARTISANSHIP POSSIBLE ON $2 TRILLION INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN

In 2018, the administration proposed putting up $200 billion in federal matching funds to generate $1 trillion in new investments. Previous proposals from Democrats, such as 2017’s $2 trillion 21st Century New Deal for Jobs, have relied exclusively on increasing federal spending.

It seems that this week’s s talks never got around to figuring out where to get the money to make good on this latest promise. But one thing we do know for sure is that the feds already spend too much on infrastructure projects that are not proper national priorities. State highways, metro transit systems, and local initiatives should be paid for by the people who use them and the taxpayers of the state and local jurisdictions who benefit from them.

The federal government has a long history of blowing federal taxpayer dollars on projects that should be funded either by state or local governments, the private sector or, in some cases, not funded at all. From Alaska’s infamous “Bridge to Nowhere,” to California’s disastrous high-speed rail project, to protecting ritzy golf courses in New York, politicians from both parties have shown a willingness to waste billions of dollars in the name of “investments.”

Consider the federal gasoline tax. It’s supposed to be a user fee, paid by motorists, to go toward interstate highway maintenance and repair. Yet 28 cents of every dollar of gas taxes collected are diverted to other purposes: heavily subsidized urban transit systems, bike paths, even ferry boat terminals. While some of these may be worthy projects, they have no national significance and should not be funded by Washington.

By focusing on further regulatory reforms that reduce the federal government’s wasteful interference, America can have better infrastructure while avoiding higher taxes and a bigger debt.

A better alternative would be to reduce the federal gas tax and devolve much of the feds’ current infrastructure activity to the private sector and to state and local governments. They are much closer to the people than Washington bureaucrats and therefore more knowledgeable about — and responsive to — local infrastructure needs.

Even when the federal government does spend money on a worthwhile project, it often causes significant delays and cost increases due to red tape that is inevitably entangled with federal funding.

The process of applying for federal grants, and the necessary oversight by federal agencies that comes along with federal dollars, always means that projects take longer to complete.

Rules that artificially increase labor costs, such as the Davis-Bacon Act, and make inputs more expensive, such as “Buy American” rules, mean that federally funded projects give taxpayers less bang for their buck.

Private infrastructure projects similarly suffer from onerous and unnecessary regulation.

That is why an infrastructure package focusing on reducing regulation and streamlining the environmental review process rather than just shoveling cash at states and localities could deliver hundreds of billions of dollars in added value.

One other key consideration: there is no good way to cover the cost of a federally financed $2 trillion infrastructure package. Tax increases would reduce the flow of economic investment that is now driving the American economy to new highs.

A dangerous temptation for elected officials would be to avoid paying for the cost of new infrastructure spending altogether. This would be reckless.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

With the federal debt in excess of $22 trillion, and a strong economy, now is the time to rein in the debt rather than add to it. Putting the cost of infrastructure on the national credit card would mean passing the bill to our children and grandchildren. That would be profoundly unfair.

President Trump’s greatest policy successes have been in deregulation and the implementation of a pro-growth tax policy. By focusing on further regulatory reforms that reduce the federal government’s wasteful interference, America can have better infrastructure while avoiding higher taxes and a bigger debt.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs David Ditch: Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/economy fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/growing-the-debt fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Ditch article 71357e65-ac6e-51d7-a1d0-d8dea3d94250

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Infrastructure could move to the big leagues if Dems, GOP work together

Westlake Legal Group infrastructure-could-move-to-the-big-leagues-if-dems-gop-work-together Infrastructure could move to the big leagues if Dems, GOP work together fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article 5d0dfa99-b0ad-5cf5-aef9-d208d46f8c35
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs Infrastructure could move to the big leagues if Dems, GOP work together fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article 5d0dfa99-b0ad-5cf5-aef9-d208d46f8c35

Few professional sports teams lack a draft pick which didn’t work out. A heralded athlete who just never performed or lived up to expectations. Was oversold, underdeveloped and likely both. Someone who stumbled in the minors. Tore up a knee. A rotator cuff. Shredded an elbow. Couldn’t just pick up the pro game after a beastly performance in college. Maybe just had bad luck.

One of the more interesting misses is Chad Mottola.

The Cincinnati Reds expended their first-round pick of the 1992 draft on Mottola. Mottola was number five in the draft behind Phil Nevin, Paul Shuey, BJ Wallace and Jeffrey Hammonds. Nevin and Hammonds made all-star teams. Shuey played in the majors for 13 seasons. Wallace, drafted by the Montreal Expos, never made it to the show.

But who came before Cincinnati chose Mottola in 1992 is not nearly as intriguing as who followed Mottola. Mottola did play in the Big Leagues. Fifty-nine games with the Reds, the Blue Jays, the Orioles and the Marlins. Four home runs and a career batting average of .200, right at the Mendoza Line.

What’s fascinating is the player the Reds passed on to get Mottola.

Few people have heard of Chad Mottola. But everyone knows Derek Jeter.

The New York Yankees took Jeter with the sixth pick in the ’96 draft.

The rest is history.

TRUMP CALLS ON PARTIES TO ‘COME TOGETHER’ AFTER ‘COSTLY & TIME CONSUMING INVESTIGATIONS’

We’ve heard about an “infrastructure bill” for years in Congress.

It’s been down in the minors. Big promise. Lots of upside. A “five-tool player.” But it’s never made it to the show. That’s why it’s so fascinating that President Trump and top congressional leaders may be game to move an infrastructure package soon. There’s hope it will serve as the bipartisan, political salve for the political divides.

The president talked about it before he took office. Democrats were hopeful the president would pivot to infrastructure. It never happened.

It wasn’t long until “infrastructure week” devolved into a bad joke on Capitol Hill.

Both sides were quickly mired in fights over various cabinet secretaries. A battle over two Supreme Court justices – culminating in the imbroglio over the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. Three government shutdowns. Endless encounters over a border wall, DACA and immigration. Arguments over health care. Scrapes over the Russian investigation, the Mueller report, inquests about documents and general distrust.

Now nearly two dozen Democrats are vying to defeat the president next year.

So working together might seem impossible.

But, here’s what happening:

President Trump hosted House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., at the White House this week to discuss a bipartisan infrastructure package. There is supposedly an accord to spend $2 trillion on fixing roads, bridges, highways and updating the nation’s transportation system – though few know how they’ll pay for it.

It’s notable that Schumer declared that there was “goodwill in this meeting and it was different than some of the other meetings, we’ve had – which is a very good thing.”

We’ll see how long this all lasts.

Remember, they have to deal later this summer with raising the debt ceiling and avoiding a fourth government shutdown in October. We haven’t even talked about Congress approving one of the Trump administration’s marquee items: a new trade pact with Canada and Mexico to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). And one wonders if any modicum of trust will erode as Democrats dig deeper into avenues revealed in the Mueller report.

Keep in mind that a bipartisan win looks good for Trump going into 2020. Pelosi knows that she needs to give freshman Democrats several big wins between now and the election. So the sides could be ready to deal – and it may all come down to timing.

The key to an infrastructure deal could hinge on noise-canceling headphones. The sides will have to ignore the din over the Mueller report — which ordinarily would threaten to torpedo the infrastructure deal — and actually bring a potential measure to completion.

The 2020 election could also work against the sides. It’s unclear how long everyone has before they retreat to their corners and let politics reign.

History is not on anyone’s side.

Congress really hasn’t addressed infrastructure in any form since the 2009 economic stimulus bill. Democrats passed the measure in an effort to right the economy after the 2008 financial crisis. Republicans opposed the package. They argued the plan spent too much and that many programs in the bill weren’t truly targeted toward infrastructure.

Infrastructure seems like it should be bipartisan. But it’s a far cry from that.

Democrats may attempt to push for environmental and labor interests in the pact. That could doom cooperation from many Republicans.

REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK: HOW CONGRESS COULD BE FACING NOT ONE, BUT TWO SHUTDOWNS

And no one really knows if they can trust Trump. Lawmakers of both parties are used hearing one thing from the president, another line from his staff, thinking they have an agreement in principle, and then watching it all melt away. Consider two separate experiences last year when it came to funding the government – as well as a 2017 episode when the president undercut GOP leaders in front of Pelosi and Schumer.

We haven’t even addressed a likely fight over the federal gas tax which is used to help pay for roadways, via the Highway Trust Fund. Motorists currently pay a tax of 18.4 cents per gallon. Lawmakers last raised the gas tax in 1993. Washington has never indexed the tax for inflation. Thus, people are paying mid-1990s tax rates for gasoline. Various proposals to amend, update or hike the gas tax in an effort to spur infrastructure development have failed.

Pelosi had an additional talk with Trump about an infrastructure bill after the Tuesday meeting.

“We’re going to be putting together what some of the acceptable pay-fors are to him,” said Pelosi.

Even a middling infrastructure bill would be a blow – since policymakers have pushed a major investment in infrastructure for so long.

If they can’t work this out, the infrastructure bill will likely linger longer in the minors. Bumpy road trips between Midland and Tulsa. Mobile and Chattanooga.

It might have a cup of coffee with the big club. But we’ve seen that before.

It was “infrastructure week” in Washington. But until Congress actually puts a measure on Trump’s desk to sign, the bill is merely a prospect, toiling in AA or AAA.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs Infrastructure could move to the big leagues if Dems, GOP work together fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article 5d0dfa99-b0ad-5cf5-aef9-d208d46f8c35   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031647916001_6031634545001-vs Infrastructure could move to the big leagues if Dems, GOP work together fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article 5d0dfa99-b0ad-5cf5-aef9-d208d46f8c35

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump calls on parties to ‘come together’ after ‘costly & time consuming investigations’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032421230001_6032427093001-vs Trump calls on parties to ‘come together’ after ‘costly & time consuming investigations’ fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-news-night fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 9df9a939-7313-5640-ae6e-6ff89595b82c

In a pair of Twitter messages late Thursday night, President Trump called for Republicans and Democrats to “get back to business” after what he described as two years of “each party trying their best to make the other party look as bad as possible.”

The president also issued a to-do list for Congress for the second half of his term, with items including immigration reform, investment in infrastructure and working to lower prices on prescription drugs.

“The Mueller Report strongly stated that there was No Collusion with Russia (of course) and, in fact, they were rebuffed … at every turn in attempts to gain access,” the president wrote.

OBAMA TOOK TRUMP’S WIN AS A PERSONAL INSULT, BOOK SAYS

“But now Republicans and Democrats must come together for the good of the American people. No more costly & time consuming investigations. Lets do Immigration (Border), Infrastructure, much lower drug prices & much more – and do it now!”

The messages came soon after a Fox News interview with President Trump — conducted by Chief Intelligence Correspondent Catherine Herridge – aired on “Fox News @ Night.”

During that interview, Trump claimed that his administration provided “total transparency” during Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation and other probes, and that it was now time for the country to move on.

“They shouldn’t be looking anymore,” Trump told Herridge, referring to congressional Democrats. “It’s done.”

But House Democrats were angered Thursday when Attorney General William Barr failed to show up to testify before the House Judiciary Committee regarding the Mueller findings.

KIMBERLEY STRASSEL: AG BARR GETS ATTACKED BECAUSE HIS PROBE ENDANGERS POWERFUL PEOPLE

“The very system of government of the United States, the system of limited power, the system of not having a president as a dictator is very much at stake,” committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said at Thursday’s hearing.

But it seems that Trump is looking past partisan bickering and working toward accomplishments he can point to with his 2020 re-election campaign looming ahead.

Just two days earlier, the president met at the White House with Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer and reportedly worked out a $2 trillion infrastructure plan. It was a far cry from the contentious meeting among the same group just four months ago – which led to a record-setting partial shutdown of the federal government.

On Tuesday, the White House said Trump plans a similar meeting with leading Democrats soon to discuss drug prices, Reuters reported.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Several drugmakers froze prices last year following criticism from the president, but price hikes resumed this year, according to the report.

In late April, the president and first lady Melania Trump attended the Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, where the president spoke of his administration’s efforts to combat the opioid epidemic and stop the flow of drugs arriving through the U.S.-Mexico border.

Also in April, special White House adviser Jared Kushner disclosed that he was preparing a merit-based immigration plan for the president that would favor immigrants with high-level job skills over those who already have family members in the U.S.

Earlier Thursday, Trump tweeted the results of a Rasmussen poll that showed his job approval rating at 51 percent among the public.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032421230001_6032427093001-vs Trump calls on parties to ‘come together’ after ‘costly & time consuming investigations’ fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-news-night fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 9df9a939-7313-5640-ae6e-6ff89595b82c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032421230001_6032427093001-vs Trump calls on parties to ‘come together’ after ‘costly & time consuming investigations’ fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-news-night fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 9df9a939-7313-5640-ae6e-6ff89595b82c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

California high-speed rail project’s estimated cost rises to $79B, report says

Westlake Legal Group california-high-speed-rail-projects-estimated-cost-rises-to-79b-report-says California high-speed rail project’s estimated cost rises to $79B, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio bfae5d1d-61ae-560a-b589-b1f27b92144b article

Critics of California’s plan to link the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas by high-speed rail have cited the estimated cost of the project – and now that cost is projected to increase by about $2 billion, according to a report.

The state’s High-Speed Rail Authority now estimates that the plan will cost about $79 billion – with the price of the Central Valley segment already under construction rising from $10.6 billion to $12.4 billion, Bloomberg reported.

The revised cost estimates were attributed to changes in the scope of the project and planning for contingencies, the report said.

JIM BRESLO: GAVIN NEWSOM’S ‘TRAIN TO NOWHERE’ REPRESENTS A BIG PART OF THE GREEN NEW DEAL

Westlake Legal Group 40c22de1-AP19050858407598 California high-speed rail project’s estimated cost rises to $79B, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio bfae5d1d-61ae-560a-b589-b1f27b92144b article

FILE – In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, a full-scale mock-up of a high-speed train is displayed at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. (Associated Press)

In February, President Trump blasted the project’s leaders for “having spent and wasted many billions of dollars.” He added that the federal government planned to recoup federal dollars spent on the project.

“Whole project is a “green” disaster!” Trump wrote.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat who has frequently clashed with Trump, expressed his own reservations about the plan in February, announcing his preference to focus only on the Central Valley portion in the short term, saying the full project “would cost too much and take too long,” Bloomberg reported.

In March, the head of the state’s rail authority fired back against Trump’s effort to block more federal dollars from going to the California project.

At that point, the Federal Railroad Administration had given California $2.5 billion to construct a Los Angeles-to-San Francisco link, with another $929 million pledged. But federal authorities – and the president – claimed the terms of the federal grant had not been met and threatened to withhold any future payments while demanding repayment for the funds already doled out to California.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The project, long championed by Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown, is years behind schedule with the latest estimate for completion set for 2033.

Trump and Newsom have also clashed over federal funding to help California recover from deadly wildfires. Trump has blamed the wildfires on a lack of “proper Forest Management”  – and again has threatened to reconsider federal funding.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly and Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group 40c22de1-AP19050858407598 California high-speed rail project’s estimated cost rises to $79B, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio bfae5d1d-61ae-560a-b589-b1f27b92144b article   Westlake Legal Group 40c22de1-AP19050858407598 California high-speed rail project’s estimated cost rises to $79B, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio bfae5d1d-61ae-560a-b589-b1f27b92144b article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Doug Schoen: Trump, Pelosi and Schumer show bipartisanship possible on $2 trillion infrastructure plan

Westlake Legal Group doug-schoen-trump-pelosi-and-schumer-show-bipartisanship-possible-on-2-trillion-infrastructure-plan Doug Schoen: Trump, Pelosi and Schumer show bipartisanship possible on $2 trillion infrastructure plan fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Douglas Schoen article 1725dfce-8362-5516-9af4-a54a511b57ca
Westlake Legal Group AP19120579570800-e1556642348857 Doug Schoen: Trump, Pelosi and Schumer show bipartisanship possible on $2 trillion infrastructure plan fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Douglas Schoen article 1725dfce-8362-5516-9af4-a54a511b57ca

We saw a rare and welcome display of bipartisanship Tuesday when the top Democrats in Congress emerged from a meeting with President Trump to announce the president had agreed on the need to invest $2 trillion to repair and upgrade the nation’s roads, bridges, railroads and broadband.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York told reporters they plan to meet with Trump again in three weeks, when he will tell them how he proposes to fund the infrastructure plan.

America has 2.7 million miles of paved roads, 140,000 miles of rail lines, and 600 airports. Much of this infrastructure is still functional but is in need of massive investment to repair, improve and upgrade it to modern standards of stability and efficiency.

SCHUMER SAYS TRUMP AGREED TO $2T INFRASTRUCTURE PACKAGE AT WHITE HOUSE MEETING

To accomplish these goals, our leaders must embrace policies such as public-private partnerships, which localities across the nation have used in order to access private investors for the purpose of building and managing public infrastructure.

Tuesday’s White House meeting was a dramatic improvement from the last time the Democratic congressional leaders met with the president last winter. That ended in disagreement and led to a 35-day government shutdown – the longest in American history.

Fortunately, the outcome of this meeting was far different, especially given the importance that members of both parties place on investing in infrastructure.

During the 2016 Presidential campaign, both then-candidates Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., emphasized the importance of rebuilding America’s infrastructure, making it a core tenet of their budget proposals.

“We have bridges that are falling down,” Trump said. “We have many, many bridges that are in danger of falling.”

One can hope that Tuesday’s display of bipartisanship will result in a plan that is agreeable to both parties and beneficial to all Americans.

On the campaign trail, Trump called for investing between $800 billion and $1 trillion in infrastructure spending – funded with bonds rather than tax increases.

During the 2016 Democratic primaries Sanders – who wound up losing the Democratic nomination to Hillary Clinton – also called for a $1 trillion investment in infrastructure.

“In 2015, I introduced the Rebuild America Act to invest $1 trillion over five years to modernize the physical infrastructure that our economy depends on,” Sanders wrote in a Medium post. “In

January, I will reintroduce that legislation to directly invest in our roads, bridges, water systems, rail, airports, levees and dams.”

In a political climate in which reason often takes a back seat to party politics, infrastructure remains one of the only issues not plagued by partisanship.

To be sure, the need for a massive investment in modernizing our nation’s infrastructure is clear and long overdue. One can hope that Tuesday’s display of bipartisanship will result in a plan that is agreeable to both parties and beneficial to all Americans.

In my home state of New York, one of the most populous states in the nation, an investment in infrastructure is needed to rebuild trains, bridges and tunnels, all of which are essential to the state’s population and economy.

In October 2016, Hurricane Sandy completely flooded the North River Tunnels, a pair of tunnels that carry Amtrak and New Jersey Transit rail lines under the Hudson River between Manhattan and New Jersey.

The tunnels are an integral transit component of the Northeast Corridor. The Hurricane Sandy flooding resulted in damage to electrical wires, concrete walls and drainage systems. The ensuing delays in rail travel have impacted thousands of people who travel through the tunnels daily.

Neither tunnel has undergone sufficient repairs since the flooding. The damage continues to put people at risk, impede traffic and stifle the economy, because both tunnels are essential to the regional and national economy.

“If we don’t build this, and these tunnels fail, the whole economy will collapse,” Schumer said. “There will be a deep recession in the New York metropolitan area, and a recession probably in the whole country.”

“You can say this unequivocally: this is the most important public infrastructure project in America, bar none,” Schumer added.

This assertion is also bolstered by the Northeast Corridor Infrastructure and Operations Advisory Commission, which has said a single day shutdown of railroad traffic in the entire Northeast Corridor would cost our economy $100 million in congestion and reduced productivity, among other undesired results.

It is encouraging that despite their many difference, Pelosi and Schumer are able to work with the president on critical infrastructure improvements needed around the country.

Since Special Counsel Robert Mueller released his report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, President Trump has stonewalled the Democrats and bashed the party on Twitter, while a number of Democrats have called for the president’s resignation or impeachment.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Yet, on the topic of infrastructure, it seems as though an agreement might be possible. The result of the meeting between Trump, Pelosi and Schumer reveals that there is in fact a mutual desire to find common ground on this important issue.

Ultimately, the passage of a successful, bipartisan infrastructure plan would be advantageous to both parties politically and would benefit the American economy and bring much-needed modernization to communities across the nation.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM DOUG SCHOEN

Westlake Legal Group AP19120579570800-e1556642348857 Doug Schoen: Trump, Pelosi and Schumer show bipartisanship possible on $2 trillion infrastructure plan fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Douglas Schoen article 1725dfce-8362-5516-9af4-a54a511b57ca   Westlake Legal Group AP19120579570800-e1556642348857 Doug Schoen: Trump, Pelosi and Schumer show bipartisanship possible on $2 trillion infrastructure plan fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Douglas Schoen article 1725dfce-8362-5516-9af4-a54a511b57ca

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Laura Ingraham: What Tuesday’s showdown between Pelosi and Schumer and Trump is really about

Westlake Legal Group laura-ingraham-what-tuesdays-showdown-between-pelosi-and-schumer-and-trump-is-really-about Laura Ingraham: What Tuesday's showdown between Pelosi and Schumer and Trump is really about laura ingraham fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle/transcript/lauras-monologue fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4cef8589-9ca9-5fa4-9b1b-8356ce342b06
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031277512001_6031281925001-vs Laura Ingraham: What Tuesday's showdown between Pelosi and Schumer and Trump is really about laura ingraham fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle/transcript/lauras-monologue fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4cef8589-9ca9-5fa4-9b1b-8356ce342b06

On Tuesday, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer return to the White House for a meeting with President Trump. This time it’s about an infrastructure deal, but I’m going to tell you what the showdown is really all about.

On Monday, the guy who spent eight years working there, Joe Biden, tried mightily to convince you that this time, he has all the answers. But what’s in his pitch in this phenomenal Trump economy?

“I think we have to – I think we have to rethink how we define what constitutes a successful economy,” he said to supporters at a rally in Pittsburgh.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM LAURA INGRAHAM.

Well, that’s convenient, right? If you can’t beat him, as in Trump’s economic numbers, just change the way everything is scored because by traditional metrics — I’m talking GDP, wage growth, unemployment numbers and the stock market — Trump should be a lock for 2020.

Whether you like his tone or not, or his tweets, the president has beaten almost every target set by the so-called economic experts. Speaking of so-called experts, Nobel laureate Paul Krugman predicted an economic apocalypse, a global recession after Trump’s selection. Well, what happened to that? Monday’s headline in Forbes read: “The Trump 2020 economic recession isn’t happening.” Sorry, Paul.

And what can we expect under a President Biden? What will he deliver? Well, say goodbye to “America first” trade policies that are working. Biden was a big advocate of that boondoggle known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership that would’ve offshored jobs to places like Malaysia and Vietnam.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE ENTIRE EPISODE.

Bye-bye to the tariffs that have forced cheating countries to the table. And Biden would ditch all the protections for American workers-founded deals like the USMCA. So, if you’re one of the 450,000 Americans with a new manufacturing job, your future will be far from certain under Biden.

But remember, Joe pledges to bring you “dignity.” Of course, he fails to respect the tight labor market that Trump’s policies have helped create. What does that do? That helps with restoring dignity because workers’ wages are finally going up. That means more money in your pocket and more time to spend with your family.

And now those dire predictions, they all failed. Since things are going so well, Biden has to kind of throw magic reality altering dust in the air to convince you that this isn’t one of the best times ever to be an American who is willing to work –and by the way, it is.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP.

Trump, of course, has an easy response to that. “Remember, President Obama said manufacturing jobs are gone. You need a wand, a magic wand,” he said a recent rally. “We found the magic wand because they’re coming and they’re coming fast. I love the fact that wages are rising fastest for the lowest income Americans, percentage-wise. And we’re now the number one economy anywhere in the world, and it’s not even close.”

Here’s where Chuck and Nancy come in, because they’re back at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on Tuesday with a framework for a massive infrastructure package. Remember, last month at a Democrat retreat, Pelosi floated a price tag of $2 trillion.

Make no mistake. This whole routine on Tuesday is as much about setting the narrative for 2020 as it is about getting something done that is traditionally a bipartisan effort, infrastructure.

Democrats also want to expand the definition of what infrastructure is, beyond, in other words, fixing bridges roads and airports to include things like enhancing broadband, water systems, schools and housing. Why not? Why stop there? And predictably, Democrats want the cost to be borne by people — meaning you — by doing what? Raising taxes, of course.

Well, that’s a non-starter for President Trump because he believes a tax hike will slow this red hot economy and of course, betray his campaign promises to be a tax cutter. My question is this: Will there be any big kumbaya moment? It’s hard to imagine any cooperative spirit given how their last tense meetup went down.

This whole routine on Tuesday is as much about setting the narrative for 2020 as it is about getting something done that is traditionally a bipartisan effort, infrastructure. If infrastructure spending can pay for itself by stimulating the economy, creating its own revenue stream, well, I guess you can make the argument for it. But if not, we shouldn’t do that infrastructure spending, at least not right now.

Democrats and Republicans are addicted to spending your money, albeit they have different priorities. Republicans, remember, were itching to bust those Obama era spending caps to jack up military spending. They thought it was justified. And Democrats, well, they’re fine on spending money we don’t have on stuff like Green Energy, free college, free preschool, free everything.

There’s no end to this spending. And the way the national debt clock looks, it’s obscene that we’re doing to future generations. Everybody talks about modifying entitlements, changing them, reforming them. But no one ever does anything about it.

Axios reported that Chuck and Nancy are carefully preparing for this meeting on Tuesday with the president. But they want to do it in order to gain maximum political benefit. Their true aim is to set up whomever the Democratic nominee is as the defender of the working men and women against the rich executives.

And considering Biden’s performance on Monday, he needs all the help he can get.

Adapted from Laura Ingraham’s monologue from “The Ingraham Angle” on April 29, 2019.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031277512001_6031281925001-vs Laura Ingraham: What Tuesday's showdown between Pelosi and Schumer and Trump is really about laura ingraham fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle/transcript/lauras-monologue fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4cef8589-9ca9-5fa4-9b1b-8356ce342b06   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6031277512001_6031281925001-vs Laura Ingraham: What Tuesday's showdown between Pelosi and Schumer and Trump is really about laura ingraham fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle/transcript/lauras-monologue fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4cef8589-9ca9-5fa4-9b1b-8356ce342b06

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pelosi, Schumer eye ‘massive’ infrastructure package ahead of Trump sit-down

Democratic congressional leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer on Monday sent a letter to President Trump calling for a “big and bold infrastructure package” ahead of a planned meeting at the White House Tuesday between Democratic lawmakers and the president.

“America’s unmet infrastructure needs are massive, and a bipartisan infrastructure package must meet those needs with substantial, new and real revenue,” Pelosi, the House speaker, and Schumer, the Senate Democratic leader, wrote in their letter to Trump. “We look forward to hearing your ideas on how to pay for this package to ensure that it is big and bold enough to meet our country’s needs.”

TRUMP OFFICIALS CLASH WITH CONGRESS OVER HEARING DEMANDS

The president – a real estate developer before he was elected president – has long sought to do a big infrastructure deal, though he has faced some resistance from conservatives in his party.

Still, leaders of both parties have expressed a desire to pass legislation this year to boost the nation’s infrastructure. But big obstacles remain, including how to pay for it.

One of the president’s economic advisers said the White House would not be going into Tuesday’s meeting with a blueprint for an infrastructure bill.

KELLYANNE CONWAY TO DEMOCRATS: ‘ARE YOU GOING TO TALK FOR THE REST OF 2019 INTO 2020 ABOUT IMPEACHMENT OR INFRASTRUCTURE?’

“We’re going slowly on this,” said Larry Kudlow, director of the president’s National Economic Council. “We would like this to be bipartisan. We would like to work with them and come up with something both sides can agree to. It’s an important topic.”

Pelosi and Schumer said an infrastructure package should go beyond addressing roads and bridges and should also include provisions to enhance broadband, water systems, energy, schools and housing.

“To truly be a gamechanger for the American people, we should go beyond transportation and into broadband, water, energy, schools, housing and other initiatives.  We must also invest in resiliency and risk mitigation of our current infrastructure to deal with climate change,” Pelosi and Schumer wrote.

Fox News’ Blake Burman and Jason Donner and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19094583990857-e1556565313649 Pelosi, Schumer eye ‘massive’ infrastructure package ahead of Trump sit-down fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox news fnc/politics fnc article Alex Pappas ad2c8fa7-c221-5b94-b006-bbc14cc5df1e   Westlake Legal Group AP19094583990857-e1556565313649 Pelosi, Schumer eye ‘massive’ infrastructure package ahead of Trump sit-down fox-news/us/infrastructure-across-america fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox news fnc/politics fnc article Alex Pappas ad2c8fa7-c221-5b94-b006-bbc14cc5df1e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com