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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american" (Page 2)

Mom shocked to find police at house – playing basketball with her sons

Westlake Legal Group mom-bbal Mom shocked to find police at house – playing basketball with her sons Janine Puhak fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 2e8f310e-bb31-523b-9695-2d25bccd6d84

Two North Carolina police officers are being hailed as all-stars for playing an impromptu game of basketball with some local boys – though the sight of a squad car initially gave the kids’ mom a scare.

On July 21, Jameka Wilcots said her “heart dropped” when she saw police outside of her home, according to Yahoo Lifestyle.

Wilcots quickly realized all was well, however, with two officers from the High Point Police Department simply shooting hoops with her young sons in the family’s driveway.

According to the outlet, the law enforcement officials had completed a traffic stop nearby and noticed Wilcots’ children, Jeremy, 15, and Jeremyah, 12, playing ball. Learning that the youngsters were playing a game of 21, the police officers asked if they could join – and the boys said yes.

MILITARY DAD SURPRISES HIS KIDS AT SUMMER CAMP BONFIRE

“Well I thought something was going on here at the house but it wasn’t, they’re out here playing basketball in front of my house!” a surprised Wilcots narrated video footage of the scene that she filmed from her car. The three-minute clip that has since been viewed over 14,000 times on Facebook.

“It’s crazy, people keep slowing down, I guess they’re surprised to see the police playing with some children,” the parent continued. “I was surprised too!”

Social media commenters declared the summertime sight as “awesome,” while Wilcots expressed her gratitude to the policemen for the community engagement.

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“I again would like to take the time to thank [the officers] for taking the time out on a very hot day to shoot hoops with my boys,” the proud mom told Yahoo.

“Our community needs more of this with our youth… This was a great and positive thing for our community,” she continued. “A very great uplift!”

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Westlake Legal Group mom-bbal Mom shocked to find police at house – playing basketball with her sons Janine Puhak fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 2e8f310e-bb31-523b-9695-2d25bccd6d84   Westlake Legal Group mom-bbal Mom shocked to find police at house – playing basketball with her sons Janine Puhak fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 2e8f310e-bb31-523b-9695-2d25bccd6d84

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Apollo 11: How ‘dumb luck’ saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed

The Apollo 11 Moon landing produced some of the most iconic photographs ever taken. However, a processing glitch in Houston when the films were returned to Earth nearly caused a “photographic catastrophe” of truly epic proportions.

“One of the 20th century’s defining moments was almost lost to posterity,” explains Zeiss, the company that provided camera lenses for Apollo 11, on its website. The Apollo 11 images, it adds, arrived in Houston shortly after the crew’s return from the Moon.

“However, before the moon photos were developed, the processing equipment was checked one more time with a test film,” Zeiss said. During this inspection the film processor suddenly started leaking ethylene oxide, destroying the test film.

APOLLO 11’S MICHAEL COLLINS RECOUNTS THE CREW’S THREE-WEEK QUARANTINE ON THEIR RETURN FROM THE MOON

“This turned out to be a blessing: thanks to this final test, the development team quickly fixed the defect and could successfully develop the images of the first Moon landing,” the lens maker explained. “The photographs taken during the moon missions were published around the world and made history.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f4b692333824a04bc621cc319728faa Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article

In this July 20, 1969 photo made available by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. (Neil Armstrong/NASA via AP)

It is not clear how many Apollo 11 photos would have been impacted if the ethylene oxide had leaked onto actual film from the mission. A vast array of photographs was captured during the historic mission. These include Neil Armstrong’s iconic shot of Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface, with the Apollo 11 mission commander reflected in Aldrin’s visor, and also the famous image of Aldrin’s boot print.

“The orbital and surface lunar photographs obtained during Apollo 11 the Apollo 11 mission were of good quality, resolution, and contrast,” explained NASA, in a report released in 1970. This included 1,359 frames of 70-mm photography and 17 pairs of lunar surface stereoscopic photographs.

APOLLO ASTRONAUT RECOUNTS MISSION CONTROL DURING MOON LANDING: ‘IT WAS TENSE, BECAUSE THIS WAS THE REAL THING NOW’

Neither NASA nor Kodak, which provided film for Apollo 11, was able to shed any light on the incident when contacted by Fox News.

Westlake Legal Group NASAAldrinFootprint Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article

Buzz Aldrin’s footprint on the lunar surface. (NASA)

However, in Billy Watkins’ book “Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes,” Richard Underwood, NASA’s chief of photography during the Apollo 11 mission, described how the ethylene oxide had leaked onto the test film and melted it.

“The spacecraft was about to splashdown, and we were running through one final test on the film processor, which had been checked hundreds of times before,” he said.

50 YEARS AFTER APOLLO 11, NEIL ARMSTRONG’S SONS DESCRIBE THE DAY THEIR DAD WALKED ON THE MOON

“It was just pure dumb luck that we decided to do one more test on that processor. Had Armstrong’s film been put in there without that last test, it would’ve eaten it up,” Underwood added. “It would’ve been the greatest photographic catastrophe in the history of the planet.”

A stainless steel cover, he explained, was built to prevent any future leaks on the precious film.

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July 20, 2019 marked the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f4b692333824a04bc621cc319728faa Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f4b692333824a04bc621cc319728faa Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article

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College student finds 65-million-year-old fossil of Triceratops skull in North Dakota badlands

A California college student majoring in biology just found something rare and special.

In the badlands of North Dakota the fifth-year student from the University of California, Merced found the 65-million-year-old fossil of a partial Triceratops skull among plant fossils from the Cretaceous period.

ACTRESS WHO ALLEGEDLY CAUGHT ENDANGERED CLAMS ON TV SHOW COULD FACE PRISON TIME: REPORTS

“I can’t quite express my excitement in the moment when we uncovered the skull,” the student, Harrison Duran, said in his school’s release. “I’ve been obsessed with dinosaurs since I was a kid, so it was a pretty big deal.”

Westlake Legal Group Duran-Child College student finds 65-million-year-old fossil of Triceratops skull in North Dakota badlands Frank Miles fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox news fnc/science fnc article 2a6c5e3c-2e4f-5545-8f33-d826042f9a26

Harrison Duran said, “I’ve been obsessed with dinosaurs since I was a kid.” (University of California, Merced)

USA Today reported that the dino skull was found in the Hell’s Creek formation, which spans Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming, where dinosaurs roamed anywhere from 100.5 to 23 million years ago.

Duran found the fossil with “experienced excavator” Michael Kjelland, a biology professor at Mayville State University in North Dakota.

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There is already discussions about where the find can be exhibited.

“The goal is to use this find as an educational opportunity, not just reserve [it] in a private collection somewhere so only a handful of people can see her,” Kjelland said.

Westlake Legal Group Harrison-Duran College student finds 65-million-year-old fossil of Triceratops skull in North Dakota badlands Frank Miles fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox news fnc/science fnc article 2a6c5e3c-2e4f-5545-8f33-d826042f9a26   Westlake Legal Group Harrison-Duran College student finds 65-million-year-old fossil of Triceratops skull in North Dakota badlands Frank Miles fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox news fnc/science fnc article 2a6c5e3c-2e4f-5545-8f33-d826042f9a26

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95

Behind America’s late leap into orbit and triumphant small step on the moon was the agile mind and guts-of-steel of Chris Kraft, making split-second decisions that propelled the nation to once unimaginable heights.

Kraft, the creator and longtime leader of NASA’s Mission Control, died Monday in Houston, just two days after the 50th anniversary of what was his and NASA’s crowning achievement: Apollo 11’s moon landing. He was 95.

Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr. never flew in space, but “held the success or failure of American human spaceflight in his hands,” Neil Armstrong, the first man-on-the-moon, told The Associated Press in 2011.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735-e1563847709902 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Christopher Kraft, flight director during Project Mercury, working at his console inside the Flight Control area at Mercury Mission Control in Houston, in an undated photo. (NASA via AP, File)

Kraft founded Mission Control and created the job of flight director — later comparing it to an orchestra conductor — and established how flights would be run as the space race between the U.S. and Soviets heated up. The legendary engineer served as flight director for all of the one-man Mercury flights and seven of the two-man Gemini flights, helped design the Apollo missions that took 12 Americans to the moon from 1969 to 1972 and later served as director of the Johnson Space Center until 1982, overseeing the beginning of the era of the space shuttle.

Armstrong once called him “the man who was the `Control’ in Mission Control.”

“From the moment the mission starts until the moment the crew is safe on board a recovery ship, I’m in charge,” Kraft wrote in his 2002 book “Flight: My Life in Mission Control.”

“No one can overrule me. … They can fire me after it’s over. But while the mission is under way, I’m Flight. And Flight is God.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19203856337631 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Then-President Ronald Reagan being briefed by Kraft in Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center in Houston, in November 1981. (NASA via AP, File)

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine Monday called Kraft “a national treasure,” saying “We stand on his shoulders as we reach deeper into the solar system, and he will always be with us on those journeys.”

Kraft became known as “the father of Mission Control” and in 2011 NASA returned the favor by naming the Houston building that houses the nerve center after Kraft.

“It’s where the heart of the mission is,” Kraft said in an April 2010 AP interview. “It’s where decisions are made every day, small and large … We realized that the people that had the moxie, that had the knowledge, were there and could make the decisions.”

That’s what Chris Kraft’s Mission Control was about: smart people with knowledge discussing options quickly and the flight director making a quick, informed decision, said former Smithsonian Institution space historian Roger Launius. It’s the place that held its collective breath as Neil Armstrong was guiding the Eagle lunar lander on the moon while fuel was running out. And it’s the place that improvised a last-minute rescue of Apollo 13 — a dramatic scenario that later made the unsung engineers heroes in a popular movie.

Soon it became more than NASA’s Mission Control. Hurricane forecasting centers, city crisis centers, even the Russian space center are all modeled after the Mission Control that Kraft created, Launius said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203833876667 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Chris Kraft at the old Mission Control at Johnson Space Center in Houston, in July 2011. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Leading up to the first launch to put an American, John Glenn, in orbit, a reporter asked Kraft about the odds of success and he replied: “If I thought about the odds at all, we’d never go to the pad.”

“It was a wonderful life. I can’t think of anything that an aeronautical engineer would get more out of, than what we were asked to do in the space program, in the `60s,” Kraft said on NASA’s website marking the 50th anniversary of the agency in 2008.

In the early days of Mercury at Florida’s Cape Canaveral, before Mission Control moved to Houston in 1965, there were no computer displays, “all you had was grease pencils,” Kraft recalled. The average age of the flight control team was 26; Kraft was 38.

“We didn’t know a damn thing about putting a man into space,” Kraft wrote in his autobiography. “We had no idea how much it should or would cost. And at best, we were engineers trained to do, not business experts trained to manage.”

NASA trailed the Soviet space program and suffered through many failed launches in the early days, before the manned flights began in 1961. Kraft later recalled thinking President John F. Kennedy “had lost his mind” when in May 1961 he set as a goal a manned trip to the moon “before this decade is out.”

“We had a total of 15 minutes of manned spaceflight experience, we hadn’t flown Mercury in orbit yet, and here’s a guy telling me we’re going to fly to the moon. … Doing it was one thing, but doing it in this decade was to me too risky,” Kraft told AP in 1989.

“Frankly it scared the hell out of me,” he said at a 2009 lecture at the Smithsonian.

APOLLO 11 HERO MICHAEL COLLINS RECALLS CREW’S RETURN FROM MOON

One of the most dramatic moments came during Scott Carpenter’s May 1962 mission as the second American to orbit the earth. Carpenter landed 288 miles off target because of low fuel and other problems. He was eventually found safely floating in his life raft.  Kraft blamed Carpenter for making poor decisions. Tom Wolfe’s book “The Right Stuff” said Kraft angrily vowed that Carpenter “will never fly for me again!” But Carpenter said he did the best he could when the machinery malfunctioned.

After the two-man Gemini flights, Kraft moved up NASA management to be in charge of manned spaceflight and was stunned by the Apollo 1 training fire that killed three astronauts.

Gene Kranz, who later would become NASA’s flight director for the Apollo mission that took man to the moon, said Kraft did not at first impress him as a leader. But Kranz eventually saw Kraft as similar to a judo instructor, allowing his student to grow in skills, then stepping aside.

“Chris Kraft had pioneered Mission Control and fought the battles in Mercury and Gemini, serving as the role model of the flight director. He proved the need for real-time leadership,” Kranz wrote in his book, “Failure Is Not An Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond.”

Born in 1924, Kraft grew up in Phoebus, Virginia, now part of Hampton, about 75 miles southeast of Richmond. In his autobiography, Kraft said with the name Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr., “some of my life’s direction was settled from the start.”

After graduating from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1944, Kraft took a job with aircraft manufacturer Chance Vought to build warplanes, but he quickly realized it wasn’t for him. He returned to Virginia where he accepted a job with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, not far from Phoebus.

Kraft’s first job was to figure out what happens to airplanes as they approach the speed of sound.

After his retirement, Kraft served as an aerospace consultant and was chairman of a panel in the mid-1990s looking for a cheaper way to manage the shuttle program.

Later, as the space shuttle program was being phased out after 30 years, Kraft blasted as foolish the decision to retire the shuttles, which he called “the safest machines ever built.”

Kraft said he considered himself fortunate to be part of the team that sent Americans to space and called it a sad day when the shuttles stopped flying.

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“The people of Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo are blossoms on the moon. Their spirits will live there forever,” he wrote. “I was part of that crowd, then part of the leadership that opened space travel to human beings. We threw a narrow flash of light across our nation’s history. I was there at the best of times.”

Kraft and his wife, Betty Anne, were married in 1950. They had a son, Gordon, and a daughter, Kristi-Anne.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48   Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

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On Apollo 11 anniversary, US astronaut blasts off to the space station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft

NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan blasted off to the International Space Station from Kazakhstan Saturday, on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

Morgan, Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard a Russian Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft.

FOR MORE APOLLO 11 5OTH ANNIVERSARY COVERAGE CLICK HERE

Westlake Legal Group russia-space On Apollo 11 anniversary, US astronaut blasts off to the space station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox news fnc/science fnc article 1cfd6722-18c5-52c3-8234-38538b0374ad

The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-13 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Saturday, July 20, 2019. The Russian rocket U.S. astronaut Andrew Morgan, Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Selected by NASA in 2013, Morgan is making his first trip to space. A U.S. Army emergency physician, Morgan served in special operations units worldwide prior to becoming an astronaut. He will spend nine months on the orbiting space lab.

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Morgan’s spacecraft is expected to dock with the space station on Saturday evening.

“The trio’s arrival will return the orbiting laboratory’s population to six, including three NASA astronauts,” explains NASA, on its website. “The Expedition 60 crew will continue work on hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science aboard humanity’s only permanently occupied microgravity laboratory.”

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group russia-space On Apollo 11 anniversary, US astronaut blasts off to the space station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox news fnc/science fnc article 1cfd6722-18c5-52c3-8234-38538b0374ad   Westlake Legal Group russia-space On Apollo 11 anniversary, US astronaut blasts off to the space station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox news fnc/science fnc article 1cfd6722-18c5-52c3-8234-38538b0374ad

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WATCH: Veteran climbs flag pole, fixes American flag at Navy SEAL monument

A veteran has captured the hearts of social media users after he climbed a flag pole at the Navy SEAL monument in Virginia to fix a loose American flag.

Dom Raso, a former SEAL himself, says he was on his morning run Thursday in Virginia Beach when he spotted the flag out of place and broken off the pole.

Video posted on Facebook shows Raso climbing up the pole and then clipping the flag’s loose end to the pole, before sliding back down.

AMERICAN SOLDIER GETS SURPRISE FROM HIS PARENTS FOLLOWING EMOTIONAL HOMECOMING

“This was my fourth attempt at trying to get up and fix the flag,” Raso said. “I couldn’t go by this flag this morning and not give it everything I had. The gold stars on this monument and the sacrifice that has been made for us all was something I wasn’t just going to pass by. This flag pole climb reminded me about EVERYTHING in life.”

Westlake Legal Group FS_American_Flag WATCH: Veteran climbs flag pole, fixes American flag at Navy SEAL monument Keith Harden fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc e61aae01-8efc-5906-9d19-9ba627f6fba8 article

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In another post, Raso encourages his fellow Americans to continue to “step up and do what is right.”

“It doesn’t take many, it just takes a determined and convicted few,” he said. “I believe with all my heart and soul there is a wave of patriots in this country growing in strength and confidence each day. While we watch parts of our country fall to mainstream confusion, complacency, and ignorance, there is a few that are willing to climb or stand or do whatever it takes.”

Westlake Legal Group FS_American_Flag WATCH: Veteran climbs flag pole, fixes American flag at Navy SEAL monument Keith Harden fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc e61aae01-8efc-5906-9d19-9ba627f6fba8 article   Westlake Legal Group FS_American_Flag WATCH: Veteran climbs flag pole, fixes American flag at Navy SEAL monument Keith Harden fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc e61aae01-8efc-5906-9d19-9ba627f6fba8 article

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Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts’ ‘amazing’ return with President Nixon

On July 24, 1969, Dick Powers was a 23-year-old Navy lieutenant on the Apollo 11 Recovery ship USS Hornet. Picked by the carrier’s captain to serve as the aide to President Nixon, Powers recounts the events of the remarkable day when the Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth.

“Our ship, the USS Hornet, had just got back from Vietnam – we had been back for about a month and we got picked to do Apollo 11,” he told Fox News. “We all started to realize the magnitude of what it was, everybody got into it.”

Powers, who had been in the Navy for about three years, was the ship’s Chief Financial Officer at the time of the recovery mission off Samoa. Nixon, he explained, arrived on the ship early on the morning of July 24 and stayed on the Admiral’s bridge for most of the day.

“There was a lot going on, we’re getting in position, we were waiting for the capsule to come down,” he said.

APOLLO 11’S MICHAEL COLLINS REFLECTS ON HISTORIC MOON LANDING: ‘WE WERE JUST REGULAR ASTRONAUTS

“I was standing next to President Nixon, who was standing next to [NASA Administrator] Thomas Paine, watching the capsule come out of the sky,” Powers added. “It was a fireball – we could see it tracing right across the horizon, it was amazing.”

Westlake Legal Group 492c2d7d-ApolloPowers4Rotate Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

Dick Powers, who at the time was a 23-year-old U.S. Navy lieutenant, pictured wearing a baseball cap that was to be presented to the Apollo 11 astronauts. (Dick Powers)

“We were looking out into the gray sky as it tracked this beautiful arc across the horizon – it was absolutely incredible, when you think about it, how few people see that,” he added. “There I was, a 23-year-old kid, with President Nixon, watching.”

The President, according to Powers, was “getting really anxious” watching the astronauts make their dramatic return to Earth.

Apollo 11 splashed down 13 miles from the USS Hornet, according to NASA, which notes that the original landing point was changed as a result of bad weather in the target area.

APOLLO 11: BUZZ ALDRIN RECALLS THE MOON’S ‘MAGNIFICENT DESOLATION’

The USS Hornet was racing to the area where the Apollo 11 capsule splashed down. “The helicopters were already there, they had dropped the swimmers into the water [once the capsule splashed down],” Powers explained. “They had to jump in the water, then very quickly get the floatation gear around the capsule.”

Westlake Legal Group Apollo11RecoveryGetty1969 Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

The Apollo 11 spacecraft floats in the Pacific after successful splashdown, as frogmen prepare to open hatch and remove astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins July 24, 1969. (Bettmann/Contributor/Getty)

After opening the capsule’s hatch, the swimmers carefully helped Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins into rubber rafts. “It was very dicey, those waves were five or six feet tall,” said Powers. “By the time we got there, everything was taken care of.”

The splashdown miles away from the USS Hornet was not the only issue the ship’s crew had to deal with during the recovery mission. “8 pm the night before, all our communications went down – think about that, we’re in the middle of the Pacific,” Powers explained. “We had a lot of challenges during that period of time.”

The next day’s recovery, however, went off without any hitches and a helicopter brought the astronauts back to the Hornet’s flight deck, where they received a rapturous reception from the assembled crewmembers and NASA personnel.

50 YEARS AFTER APOLLO 11, NEIL ARMSTRONG’S SONS DESCRIBE THE DAY THEIR DAD WALKED ON THE MOON

“We saw them come out of the helicopters, it was amazing to see the three of them,” Powers recalled.

Westlake Legal Group NASAApollo11Recovery Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

The Apollo 11 crew await pickup by a helicopter from the USS Hornet – all four men pictured are wearing biological isolation garments. (NASA)

Scientists were concerned that Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins may have brought pathogens back from the Moon with them, so they quickly entered a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF), a converted Airstream trailer.

Powers, however, had a few stressful moments just before Nixon went down to speak to the Apollo 11 crew in their quarantine unit.

“I had in my possession the three baseball caps for Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins that President Nixon was going to give to them,” he told Fox News, explaining that that night before, he and some of his crewmates had their photos taken with the caps.

APOLLO 11 ASTRONAUT MICHAEL COLLINS RECALLS DRINKING COFFEE DURING ‘LONELY’ MOON LANDING ORBIT

When the astronauts were brought back to the ship, Powers went to his room to get the baseball caps. “I go down, into my stateroom, to the top of my desk, and the hats are gone!” he said. “I tear my room apart and I say to myself ‘I am holding up the President of the United States on national television because I have lost the baseball hats!’ – I cannot tell you what was going through my mind.”

Westlake Legal Group ApolloPowers1 Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

The helicopter bringing the Apollo 11 astronauts back to the USS Hornet. (Dick Powers)

“I open my door and go back upstairs and there is my room-mate laughing, saying ‘I think you’re looking for these!’”

The president, according to Powers, was thrilled with the successful end to the incredible mission. “He was jubilant,” he said. “Richard Nixon talked about the Apollo 11 Moonshot and recovery as the best week in the history of the world.”

The young lieutenant found the 37th president extremely friendly. “He was a naval officer during World War II,” he said.  “He walked on the bridge and said ‘I’m President Nixon – what’s your name and where are you from, lieutenant?’”

APOLLO ASTRONAUT REVEALS WHAT IT’S LIKE TO WALK ON THE MOON: ‘MOST BEAUTIFUL TERRAIN I’D EVER SEEN’

“He was very nice to me, amazingly down to earth and incredibly warm,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group NASAApolloNixon Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

President Nixon talks to the Apollo 11 astronauts in their Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) on the USS Hornet. (NASA)

Opting not to do a tour of the ship prior to the astronaut’s splashdown, Nixon did not want to take any attention away from Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their historic day. “It’s all about them, it’s not about me,” he said.

Powers’ active duty in the Navy ended in 1970, about a year after the Apollo 11 recovery mission and after the USS Hornet had recovered Apollo 12. After business school, he went on to enjoy a career on Wall Street.

APOLLO 11: WHAT NEIL ARMSTRONG AND BUZZ ALDRIN SAW DURING DRAMATIC MOON LANDING

Westlake Legal Group ApolloPowers2 Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

President Nixon departing the USS Hornet. (Dick Powers)

However, he recalls the events of July 24, 1969, as one of the highlights of his life. “That was the day, at the age of 23, I came to face-to-face with the definition of excellence,” he said. “[Apollo 11] represents, to me, the essence of American exceptionalism.”

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Be sure to catch the America’s News HQ Apollo 11 50th anniversary special on Fox News on Saturday, July 20 at 12 PM EDT.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group Apollo11RecoveryGetty1969 Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db   Westlake Legal Group Apollo11RecoveryGetty1969 Apollo 11: Former officer on recovery ship USS Hornet recalls watching astronauts' 'amazing' return with President Nixon James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 76e66116-a386-51b6-9300-21945412f4db

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Rick McDaniel: Let’s celebrate the greatest achievement in human history

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058544266001_6058545799001-vs Rick McDaniel: Let’s celebrate the greatest achievement in human history Rick McDaniel fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d850ab35-092e-5cd0-b56f-9561e7906951 article

Saturday we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969, at 4:18 p.m. EDT. It is not just a moment in history – it is the greatest achievement in human history. As Neil Armstrong said when he stepped onto the moon, “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

A centuries-old dream became a reality that day. It was the culmination of a quest in space, leaving Earth and stepping on the moon. For thousands of years humans had looked up in the sky and seen the moon. Now a man actually stood on its surface.

It took three days traveling at 24,000 miles an hour for Apollo 11 to get to the moon. The astronauts orbited some 70 miles above the surface of the moon for a day before Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin detached their Lunar Module Eagle to make their descent. Michael Collins, who flew Command Module Columbia, watched as the Lunar Module flew downward.

APOLLO 11: BUZZ ALDRIN RECALLS THE MOON’S ‘MAGNIFICENT DESOLATION’

The moon landing was quite a challenge. In just 12 minutes Armstrong had to bring the Lunar Module from 50,000 feet, orbiting at several thousand miles per hour, to the moon’s surface.

They astronauts overshot the landing spot by four miles so Armstrong had to hover at 9 feet per second just over the surface, looking for a suitable landing spot. But he was able to land so softly that neither astronaut felt the impact.

Armstrong and Aldrin spent 2 hours and 36 minutes on the moon’s surface. They planted an American flag, set up experimental equipment, collected 40 pounds of moon rock and took photographs. They then had to propel from the Eagle, leaving behind one stage, to dock with the Columbia. And then fly back home. They re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on July 24 at 12:50 p.m. EDT.

One-fifth of the world’s population watched the moonwalk on television or listened on the radio. Yet, amazingly in a 1999 Gallup Poll 6 percent of Americans doubted the moon landing happened and another 5 percent were unsure. But it certainly did happen. And it changed the world.

What is most remarkable is that it was 50 years ago. Before the cell phone was invented, before there was the Internet. Martin Cooper, a Motorola engineer, made the first cellphone call in 1972. Vinton Cerf, the computer scientist who described the transmission control protocol that laid the foundation for the Internet did it in 1974.

This was the time of analog not digital, of circuit chips, not microprocessors. The amount of human intellect required to pull off such a feat is mind-boggling. Men and women using slide rules and calculators took us to the moon. They used computers but not anything we would remotely recognize today.

The Apollo Guidance Computer performed brilliantly, even though it had just 64 KB of memory and only 0.043 MHz of processing power. That was enormous at the time but nothing compared with today’s laptops that have over 320 GB of capacity. Millions of times that of the computer on which NASA staked this historic mission and the lives of three astronauts. A laptop with a 2.4 GHz processor is tens of thousands of times faster than the Apollo guidance computer.

And a computer is only as good as its software. It took 350 engineers the equivalent of 1,400 man-years to develop it before the moon landing. Part of what makes this achievement so great is the number of people who made it possible.

Besides these software engineers, there were hundreds of other engineers and scientists. It took three different teams (green, white and black) that contributed to the launch, landing and return.

The Apollo program created many items we use today. It introduced us to Velcro, freeze-dried food, memory foam and more. But most significant is the technological legacy. The silicon chip used in computers today stems from the creation of the Apollo guidance computer operating system.

Fairchild Semi-conductor – a technology startup in Palo Alto, Calif. – provided NASA with microelectronic components. Two of the scientists involved realized the future demand for miniaturized silicon chips and founded Intel. This is why that area became known as “Silicon Valley.”

Why would an inspirational author and speaker write about the Apollo 11 moon landing?  I’ve had a huge interest in space since I visited Kennedy Space Center as a child. One of my life dreams is to be the first pastor in space. But it is more than that.

The greatest human achievement inspires us. It happened 50 years ago so we are due to achieve something even greater. A manned trip to Mars would do it. Considering that Mars is 140 times farther away than the moon it would be an all-time achievement. I believe that will happen in my lifetime.

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But what else might we achieve in the meantime? If we achieved such greatness 50 years ago then what challenges today could we overcome? If we work together we can solve our biggest problems. Health care is too costly but a necessity. We are a nation of immigrants but a sovereign country. Climate change is real but addressing it is economically onerous.

I’m confident that the country that put a man on the moon 50 years ago can meet the challenges of today. We just need that same vision, passion and commitment to make it a reality

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY RICK MCDANIEL

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058544266001_6058545799001-vs Rick McDaniel: Let’s celebrate the greatest achievement in human history Rick McDaniel fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d850ab35-092e-5cd0-b56f-9561e7906951 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058544266001_6058545799001-vs Rick McDaniel: Let’s celebrate the greatest achievement in human history Rick McDaniel fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d850ab35-092e-5cd0-b56f-9561e7906951 article

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More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran

Hundreds of people showed up at a Michigan funeral Wednesday to mourn a Vietnam War veteran who passed away with no surviving family members.

Friends of Wayne Lee Wilson anticipated that only a few people would pay their respects, but the Brown Funeral Home in Niles changed that by posting Wilson’s obituary on Facebook and inviting the public to pay their respects.

FUNERAL FOR VIETNAM WAR VET, 77, WHO DIED ALONE, DRAWS HUNDREDS OF MOURNERS

“Dignitaries have funerals like this,” Wilson’s close friend Charlotte Andrews told the Detroit Free Press. “Who would have thought that a simple man with simple ideas and a simple way of life would have been able to have such an enormous amount of people to be able to send him off?”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

U.S. Army members carry a folded flag along with the remains of Vietnam War veteran Wayne Wilson during the memorial service in Niles Wednesday. (Emil Lippe/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP)

Wilson died May 28 with no close family members, so his friends arranged for him to be buried with military honors. Wilson served in the Army from 1971 to 1977 and was wounded during his military service.

“We found out that this particular veteran does not have any family; and as color guard, we honor every veteran,” said Petra Bernard of the Osceola American Legion Post 308. “Every veteran deserves to have their military rights, so we made sure that we came out here to pay our respects to this soldier.”

Wilson often wore his service medals, flew a flag on his motorized scooter and would place flags at the graves of deceased veterans in Silverbrook Cemetery, where he was ultimately laid to rest, according to to the Free Press. People around Niles often called him “Sarge.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199098111090 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

Flags, flowers and letters alike lie near the remains of Wayne Wilson at the conclusion of the memorial service at the Silverbrook Cemetery in Niles, Mich., Wednesday, July 17, 2019. (Emil Lippe/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP)

Mourners came from several states away to honor him.

“It said on Facebook he didn’t have any family. He does have family,” Ohio resident Kenneth Creech told WNDU-TV. “Everybody that stepped foot in Vietnam is a brother.”

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In brief remarks, Niles Mayor Nick Shelton thanked Wilson and others like him.

“General George S. Patton Jr. said it best: ‘It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather, we should thank God that such men lived,'” Shelton said. “Thank God for Wayne Wilson and thank you all for being a part of his legacy.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe   Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

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Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins disagrees with NASA’s planned Moon return: ‘We should shoot directly for Mars’

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins wants NASA to aim its sights squarely on Mars for future space exploration.

The Columbia Command Module pilot discussed the space agency’s plans to return to the Moon with Fox News’ Neil Cavuto during an interview Thursday on “Your World.”

APOLLO 11 ASTRONAUT MICHAEL COLLINS RECALLS DRINKING COFFEE DURING ‘LONELY’ MOON LANDING ORBIT

The U.S. has aimed to land the next man and the first woman on the Moon by 2024, with an eye toward sending a manned mission to Mars in the 2030s. The astronauts also would be the first humans to set foot on the Moon’s South Pole.

Westlake Legal Group MichaelCollinsGetty1969 Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins disagrees with NASA's planned Moon return: 'We should shoot directly for Mars' James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space/mars fox news fnc/science fnc article 37673465-0056-5607-938f-3ffaaedaf690

File photo – astronaut Michael Collins in his Apollo spacesuit. (Photo by Time Life Pictures/NASA/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images/Getty Images)

Collins, however, said he thought NASA should be focusing its efforts on the Red Planet. “The current plan has been well thought out, but I disagree with it, we should shoot directly for Mars,” he said. “Twenty-some years ago, I even wrote a book, a whole boring book, on a mission to Mars and I have always been a believer in Mars.”

APOLLO 11: WHAT NEIL ARMSTRONG AND BUZZ ALDRIN SAW DURING DRAMATIC MOON LANDING

He also advocated naming a future Mars mission after President John F. Kennedy, who famously vowed in 1961 that America would land a man on the Moon before the end of that decade.

“He was such a wonderful guide for us in the Apollo venture,” Collins said. “400,000 Americans, would you believe, at the time, working on that program – Kennedy’s voice expedited that whole thing.”

APOLLO ASTRONAUT REVEALS WHAT IT’S LIKE TO WALK ON THE MOON: ‘MOST BEAUTIFUL TERRAIN I’D EVER SEEN’

July 20 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

Only 12 men, all Americans, have walked on the Moon.

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Be sure to catch the “America’s News HQ” Apollo 11 50th anniversary special on Fox News on Saturday, July 20, at 12 p.m. EDT.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group MichaelCollinsGetty1969 Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins disagrees with NASA's planned Moon return: 'We should shoot directly for Mars' James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space/mars fox news fnc/science fnc article 37673465-0056-5607-938f-3ffaaedaf690   Westlake Legal Group MichaelCollinsGetty1969 Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins disagrees with NASA's planned Moon return: 'We should shoot directly for Mars' James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space/mars fox news fnc/science fnc article 37673465-0056-5607-938f-3ffaaedaf690

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