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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea"

Late Seoul mayor said he felt ‘sorry to all people’ in apologetic will left behind

Westlake Legal Group late-seoul-mayor-said-he-felt-sorry-to-all-people-in-apologetic-will-left-behind Late Seoul mayor said he felt ‘sorry to all people’ in apologetic will left behind New York Post fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fnc/world fnc article 6e9a852c-3981-578b-8d70-f3533870d904

Late Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon left behind an apologetic will before his death.

Park, 64, was found dead early Friday in a wooded hill of northern Seoul hours after he vanished amid sexual harassment allegations. Police said there were no signs of criminality at the site but declined to disclose a cause of death.

Park in his letter said he felt “sorry to all people” and asked to be cremated.

MISSING SEOUL MAYOR’S BODY FOUND AFTER MASSIVE SEARCH

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Late Seoul mayor said he felt ‘sorry to all people’ in apologetic will left behind New York Post fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fnc/world fnc article 6e9a852c-3981-578b-8d70-f3533870d904

Park Won-soon (pictured in 2014) was found dead early Friday in a wooded hill of northern Seoul hours after he vanished amid sexual harassment allegations. (AP)

“I feel sorry to all people. I thank everyone who has been with me in my life,” he said in the note released by the South Korean government. “I am always sorry to my family because I’ve given them only pains. Please cremate my body and scatter around the graves of my parents.”

The mayor built his name as a civic activist before he was elected mayor in 2011.

SEOUL MAYOR REPORTED MISSING, SEARCH UNDERWAY

He was viewed as was a rising star in President Moon Jae-in’s liberal Democratic Party and had been viewed a possible presidential candidate in 2022 elections.

His daughter alerted police on Thursday that Park had left a “will-like” audio message before leaving their residence for the last time, triggering a massive search involving hundreds of police and fire officials, drones and tracking dogs.

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The Seoul-based SBS TV network reported that one of the mayor’s secretaries had filed a complaint with police a day earlier over alleged sexual harassment such as unwanted physical contact that dated back to 2017.

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Late Seoul mayor said he felt ‘sorry to all people’ in apologetic will left behind New York Post fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fnc/world fnc article 6e9a852c-3981-578b-8d70-f3533870d904  Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Late Seoul mayor said he felt ‘sorry to all people’ in apologetic will left behind New York Post fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fnc/world fnc article 6e9a852c-3981-578b-8d70-f3533870d904

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Missing Seoul mayor’s body found after massive search

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1

Local police said the body of the missing mayor of South Korea’s capital, Seoul, has been found.

Mayor Park Won-soon’s body was discovered in hills in northern Seoul early Friday, more than seven hours after local authorities launched a massive search for him.

His daughter called police on Thursday afternoon to report him missing, saying he had given her a “will-like” message before leaving home. News reports claim one of Park’s secretaries had lodged a complaint with police on Wednesday night over alleged sexual harassment.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1  Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1

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Missing Seoul mayor’s body found after massive search

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1

Local police said the body of the missing mayor of South Korea’s capital, Seoul, has been found.

Mayor Park Won-soon’s body was discovered in hills in northern Seoul early Friday, more than seven hours after local authorities launched a massive search for him.

His daughter called police on Thursday afternoon to report him missing, saying he had given her a “will-like” message before leaving home. News reports claim one of Park’s secretaries had lodged a complaint with police on Wednesday night over alleged sexual harassment.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1  Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Missing Seoul mayor's body found after massive search fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 39a337fd-6b9f-5c58-bf7d-32fce87b14a1

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Seoul mayor reported missing, search underway, South Korean police say

Westlake Legal Group seoul-mayor-reported-missing-search-underway-south-korean-police-say Seoul mayor reported missing, search underway, South Korean police say HYUNG-JIN KIM fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/topic/missing-persons fnc/world fnc e1fe433a-53ba-5762-ab98-996c04767ca1 Associated Press article

The mayor of South Korean capital Seoul has been reported missing and search operations are underway on Thursday, police said.

Police officers said they are looking for Mayor Park Won-sun at Seoul’s Sungbuk neighborhood where his mobile phone signal was last detected.

His daughter called police earlier Thursday and said her father has been unaccounted for, the police officers said, requesting anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to media on the matter.

US ENVOY ARRIVES IN SOUTH KOREA AS NORTH SAYS IT HAS ‘NO INTENTION’ TO RESUME NUCLEAR TALKS 

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Seoul mayor reported missing, search underway, South Korean police say HYUNG-JIN KIM fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/topic/missing-persons fnc/world fnc e1fe433a-53ba-5762-ab98-996c04767ca1 Associated Press article

FILE – In this June 5, 2014, file photo, Park Won-soon, then candidate for Seoul city mayor of the main opposition party New Politics Alliance for Democracy celebrates his victory in the Seoul mayoral election at his office in Seoul, South Korea. Police say on Thursday, July 9, 2020, Park, the current mayor of South Korean capital Seoul, has been reported missing and search operations are underway.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

Kim Ji-hyeong, an official from the Seoul Metropolitan Government, confirmed that Park did not show up for work on Thursday because of unspecified reasons and canceled all his schedules, including a meeting with a presidential official at his Seoul City Hall office.

A longtime civic activist and human rights lawyer, Park was elected Seoul mayor in 2011 and voted into his third and last term in June last year.

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A member of President Moon Jae-in’s liberal Democratic Party, Park had been considered a potential presidential hopeful for the liberals in the 2022 elections.

Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Seoul mayor reported missing, search underway, South Korean police say HYUNG-JIN KIM fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/topic/missing-persons fnc/world fnc e1fe433a-53ba-5762-ab98-996c04767ca1 Associated Press article  Westlake Legal Group AP20191358708904 Seoul mayor reported missing, search underway, South Korean police say HYUNG-JIN KIM fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/topic/missing-persons fnc/world fnc e1fe433a-53ba-5762-ab98-996c04767ca1 Associated Press article

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US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has ‘no intention’ to resume nuclear talks

Westlake Legal Group us-envoy-arrives-in-south-korea-as-north-says-it-has-no-intention-to-resume-nuclear-talks US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has 'no intention' to resume nuclear talks Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/news-events/us-north-korea-summit fox news fnc/world fnc article 2001b706-2c3b-5754-8131-0aa282a86eba

An American envoy landed in South Korea on Tuesday for discussions on stalled nuclear diplomacy hours after the North issued a statement vowing it has “no intention to sit face to face with the U.S.”

Deputy Secretary of State and Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Biegun is set to meet with South Korean and Japanese officials over the next few days to discuss issues including “the final, fully verified denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” the State Department says.

Yet, hours before Biegun arrived at a U.S. air base near Seoul, North Korea issued a statement suggesting it wouldn’t budge on the topic.

UK ANNOUNCES ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AGAINST NORTH KOREA 

Westlake Legal Group kim_trump US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has 'no intention' to resume nuclear talks Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/news-events/us-north-korea-summit fox news fnc/world fnc article 2001b706-2c3b-5754-8131-0aa282a86eba

In this 2019 photo, Trump meets with Kim Jong Un at the North Korean side of the border at the village of Panmunjom in Demilitarized Zone. (AP)

“It is just the time for [South Korea] to stop meddling in others’ affairs but it seems there is no cure or prescription for its bad habit,” said Kwon Jong Gun, director-general for U.S. affairs at North Korea’s foreign ministry.

“Explicitly speaking once again, we have no intention to sit face to face with the U.S.,” he added.

Kwon’s statement came days after North Korean First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Sun Hui, whom Biegun has described as his potential counterpart when talks resume, insisted the North won’t resume negotiations unless Washington discards what it describes as “hostile” policies. She criticized the Trump administration for considering diplomacy with the North as “nothing more than a tool for grappling its political crisis.”

Without naming him outright, Kwon also took a jab at South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who in a video conference with European leaders last week expressed hope that President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un would meet again before the U.S. elections in November.

KIM JONG UN REPEATS CLAIM THAST NORTH KOREA HAS NO CORONAVIRUS CASES 

Westlake Legal Group trump-kim-3-AP US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has 'no intention' to resume nuclear talks Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/news-events/us-north-korea-summit fox news fnc/world fnc article 2001b706-2c3b-5754-8131-0aa282a86eba

President Trump shakes hands with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore in 2018. (AP)

“[Choe’s] statement also mentioned the meddlesome man who had again indicated his intention to arbitrate between the DPRK and the U.S.,” Kwon said.

Trump and Kim have met three times since embarking on high-stakes nuclear diplomacy in 2018. But negotiations have faltered since their second summit in February last year in Vietnam, where the Americans rejected North Korean demands for major sanctions relief in exchange for a partial surrender of its nuclear capability.

Amid the stalemate in talks, North Korea has repeatedly said in recent months that it would no longer give Trump the gift of high-profile meetings he could boast of as foreign policy achievements unless it gets something substantial in return.

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North Korea has also been dialing up the pressure on the South, cutting off virtually all cooperation and blowing up an inter-Korean liaison office in its territory last month, following months of frustration over Seoul’s unwillingness to defy U.S.-led sanctions and restart joint economic projects that would help the North’s broken economy.

Biegun last week said there is still time for both sides to re-engage and “make substantial progress”, although an in-person summit would be difficult to arrange because of the threat of the coronavirus, according to Reuters.

Fox News’ Rich Edson, Ben Evansky, and the Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group trump-kim-3-AP US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has 'no intention' to resume nuclear talks Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/news-events/us-north-korea-summit fox news fnc/world fnc article 2001b706-2c3b-5754-8131-0aa282a86eba  Westlake Legal Group trump-kim-3-AP US envoy arrives in South Korea as North says it has 'no intention' to resume nuclear talks Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/news-events/us-north-korea-summit fox news fnc/world fnc article 2001b706-2c3b-5754-8131-0aa282a86eba

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With restrictions, fans set to return to SKorean baseball

Westlake Legal Group with-restrictions-fans-set-to-return-to-skorean-baseball With restrictions, fans set to return to SKorean baseball fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/sports fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a5336ca5-b476-5bb8-b101-b169d892dfbf
Westlake Legal Group KBO-fans With restrictions, fans set to return to SKorean baseball fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/sports fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a5336ca5-b476-5bb8-b101-b169d892dfbf

South Korea’s professional baseball league says it will require fans to wear masks and to sit at least a seat apart as it prepares to bring back spectators in the coming weeks amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Korea Baseball Organization on Tuesday said fans will also not be allowed to eat food in the stands. Teams will be initially allowed to sell only 30% of the seats for each game, a figure that could be expanded to as much as 50% depending on the progress in the country’s anti-virus efforts, according to the league’s plans.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Fans will also be screened for fevers and discouraged from excessive shouting, singing and cheering during the game to prevent contact or dispersion of droplets, the KBO said. And perhaps as a means of discouraging any boisterous behavior, beer will also be banned and fans will only be allowed to drink water or non-alcoholic beverages.

They will be able to buy tickets only with credit cards so that health authorities could easily locate them when needed. South Korea has been actively tracing the contacts of virus carriers using credit-card information, cellphone location data and surveillance camera footage.

The KBO is also considering requiring fans to register themselves with smartphone QR codes, a technology that has been enforced at businesses such as nightclubs, karaoke rooms and gyms to track customers when transmissions occur.

If a fan is confirmed as a COVID-19 patient during a game, the KBO will immediately suspend play and shut down the stadium for sanitation as health authorities trace the person’s contacts. Players or team staff will be tested if needed.

If players or other team members get infected, the league will close the facilities they visited for a minimum two days but continue with the games if possible. However, if the virus carriers had contacted more than six people, or there are other risks of further transmissions, the KBO could hold an emergency board meeting to determine whether to shut down the league for a minimum 21 days.

The KBO became one of the world’s first major sports competitions to return to action in May, but without fans in the stands. Seats have been covered with cheering banners, dolls or pictures of fans as teams tried to mimic a festive atmosphere.

Health authorities and sports ministry officials have been discussing preventative measures as they try to schedule a return of fans in baseball, soccer, golf and other sports. The plans could be announced as early as this week.

“It would be important foremost to reduce the density of the crowd, so our plan is to minimize the size of the crowd at first,” Jeong Eun-kyeong, director of South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a briefing.

“We need to require (fans) to wear masks, have them refrain from cheering activities that involve shouting and minimize any activity that would require taking off masks, such as consuming food.”

South Korea’s moves to re-admit fans in sporting events come despite a resurgence of the coronavirus in the Seoul metropolitan area, which is home to about half of the country’s 51 million population. Despite the steady rise in infections, government officials have been reluctant to enforce stronger social distancing guidelines out of concerns of further hurting a fragile economy, which policymakers project would shrink for the first time in 22 years.

Westlake Legal Group KBO-fans With restrictions, fans set to return to SKorean baseball fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/sports fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a5336ca5-b476-5bb8-b101-b169d892dfbf  Westlake Legal Group KBO-fans With restrictions, fans set to return to SKorean baseball fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/sports fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a5336ca5-b476-5bb8-b101-b169d892dfbf

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South Korea struggles with new spikes, but WHO disputes claim of ‘second wave’

Westlake Legal Group south-korea-struggles-with-new-spikes-but-who-disputes-claim-of-second-wave South Korea struggles with new spikes, but WHO disputes claim of 'second wave' Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-health-organization fox-news/world fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38291c06-e321-5c2c-9b5f-c5381fe7a89f
Westlake Legal Group seoul-1 South Korea struggles with new spikes, but WHO disputes claim of 'second wave' Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-health-organization fox-news/world fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38291c06-e321-5c2c-9b5f-c5381fe7a89f

South Korea has confirmed dozens of new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours as it continues to struggle with a spike in new cases, but world health officials dispute the claim of a “second wave.”

As the world crossed 10 million cases of COVID-19, South Korea has seen spikes over the past few weeks. The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 62 new cases, 22 of which it claims were from overseas.

Most of the domestic cases were detected in Seoul, the densely populated capital city. The new cases throughout the month have been tied to religious gatherings, nightclubs and warehouse workers.

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Early in May, Korea confirmed an initial outbreak of 35 new cases following the decision to lift social distancing restrictions.

New cases continued to appear in clusters, with the largest spikes occurring in Bucheon, just west of Seoul, last week when a warehouse run by e-commerce leader Coupang recorded 138 new cases, and Itaewon, a Seoul nightlife area, recording around 277 new cases.

The continued development of new clusters led KCDC director Jeong Eun-kyeong last week to declare the nation was suffering a “second wave” of infections. The country has recorded 12,715 total cases, with around 280 deaths.

“In the metropolitan area, we believe that the first wave was from March to April as well as February to March,” Jeong said. “Then we see that the second wave, which was triggered by the May holiday, has been going on.”

“We originally predicted that the second wave would emerge in fall or winter. Our forecast turned out to be wrong. As long as people have close contact with others, we believe that infections will continue.”

GLOBAL CORONAVIRUS INFECTIONS PASS 10M MARK, DATA SHOW

Despite Korea’s pronouncement, the World Health Organization disputed the claim. Epidemiologist and technical lead Maria Van Kerkhove instead speculated that the success that nations have managed in suppressing transmission has made any increase in cases appear more significant.

“Any opportunity that the virus has to take hold, it will,” she said, urging countries to “put everything they can” into isolating such cases to prevent renewed community transmission.

Areas such as Italy – once deemed the hot spot of the pandemic in Europe – have indeed continued to see a downtrend in numbers. For the first time since the early days of the outbreak, fewer than 100 infected patients were occupying ICU beds nationwide.

As a show that the pandemic is receding and the people are feeling confident, inter-regional travel resumed on June 3, and Italy is preparing to reopen its borders.

US CORONAVIRUS CASES TOP 2.5 MILLION: HERE ARE THE STATES SEEING NEW SPIKES

Britain’s government, meanwhile, is expected to scrap a 14-day quarantine requirement that forced people to self-isolate upon returning home from abroad.

Not all countries have managed to keep the numbers low: South America has seen several countries spiral out of control, with Brazil now the second-hardest hit country in the world after the United States.

On June 22, Brazil became the second country to pass 50,000 deaths. President Jair Bolsonaro has consistently opposed measures to fight the spread of the pandemic, including lockdowns, in order to focus on maintaining the economy.

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The move has proved incredibly divisive, with two health ministers leaving their posts as deaths and infections surged.

Westlake Legal Group seoul-1 South Korea struggles with new spikes, but WHO disputes claim of 'second wave' Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-health-organization fox-news/world fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38291c06-e321-5c2c-9b5f-c5381fe7a89f  Westlake Legal Group seoul-1 South Korea struggles with new spikes, but WHO disputes claim of 'second wave' Peter Aitken fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-health-organization fox-news/world fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/world fnc article 38291c06-e321-5c2c-9b5f-c5381fe7a89f

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Harry Kazianis: Korean War began exactly 70 years ago – can Trump get a peace treaty to officially end it?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118255137001_6118250217001-vs Harry Kazianis: Korean War began exactly 70 years ago – can Trump get a peace treaty to officially end it? Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 875338e6-7237-5c45-8fe5-b498b1ae6ec9

The Korean War – a horrific conflict that started exactly 70 years ago on June 25, 1950 – has become a seemingly forever war. While fighting no longer rages, no peace treaty has ever been signed. Instead, fighting ended on July 27, 1953 with an armistice – a tense truce. Technically, the war is still going on.

No one knows how many people were killed in what is sometimes called “the forgotten war,” which was overshadowed by World War II that ended just five years before the Korean War began. But estimates are that at as many as 5 million North and South Koreans, Chinese, Americans and troops from other nations died in the conflict. This includes nearly 34,000 American troops. Most of the dead were North and South Korean civilians.

Soldiers from other nations joined the U.S. and South Korea one side of the conflict as a United Nations force, facing off against North Korea and its allies China and the Soviet Union.

KIM JONG UN SUSPENDS PLANNED MILITARY RETALIATION AGAINST SOUTH KOREA

While tensions on the Korean Peninsula seem to endlessly repeat the same sad state of ups and downs – all carrying the risk of a potential nuclear war – there is an opportunity for President Trump to not only end the Korean War once and for all but to create a lasting peace.

In fact, considering his unique brand of personal diplomacy and willingness to take risks, Trump might be the only U.S. president who can make a peace treaty ending the Korean War a reality.

More from Opinion

But why should Trump try? Why bother risking any sort of political capital knowing that every U.S. president who has attempted to recalibrate relations with North Korea has failed? A few important reasons come to mind.

If the Korean War were to ever restart, the world would collectively face a North Korea that is far more dangerous than if was in the 1950s, thanks to its growing nuclear weapons arsenal and potential ability to attack the U.S. homeland with long-range missiles.

It is no exaggeration to say that Pyongyang could kill millions of people within minutes thanks to the weapons of mass destruction now controlled by dictator Kim Jong Un.

Just recently, I led a wargame where we imagined the Korean War resumes in 2025. The results were shocking: over 10 million people died, with Los Angeles and Seattle turned into atomic ash.

No nations or groups of adversaries can truly trust one another if they can’t even end a state of war between them. For there to be a real breakthrough in inter-Korean a well as U.S.-North Korea relations, some sort of declaration ending the Korean War is essential.

If the Korean War were to ever restart, the world would collectively face a North Korea that is far more dangerous than if was in the 1950s, thanks to its growing nuclear weapons arsenal.

Officially ending the Korean War could be the first step of a long process of reconciliation and compromise that will lead to an overall lowering of tensions. If this is not realized, we will be condemned to what could be an endless cycle of crisis after crisis that could someday ignite a conflict of historic proportions.

Trump should also consider what may come after the ending of the Korean War. Trump and the leaders of North and South Korea would all benefit.

Kim Jong Un, President Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in would all be able to claim a historic win back home, doing something none of their predecessors have done. That would give all three leaders the political clout and leeway to start to negotiate some sort of agreement to lessen the North Korean nuclear threat in exchange for giving the North sanctions relief.

Does Trump have any realistic shot at convincing North Korea to end the war after all these years? Would Kim consider ending the war soon, especially considering the recent spike in tensions on the Korean Peninsula and Trump’s reelection chances being uncertain?

Just for a moment, put yourself in Kim’s shoes. South Korea’s President Moon and President Trump have gone further than any of their predecessors to try and forge a lasting peace with the North. So Kim knows they give his nation the best chance it has had in at least a generation to get meaningful sanctions relief in exchange for ending his program to produce weapons of mass destruction.

With hawkish U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton now out of the way, it might make sense for Kim and Trump to make one last push for peace. They could end the Korean War, exchanging liaison offices and trade some North Korean nuclear weapons for sanctions relief.

Trump could easily offer this and place snapback provisions in any deal so if North Korea were to violate the agreement, sanctions on the North could be quickly reinstated.

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Kim might be worried that a President Joe Biden might withdraw from such a deal. But Democrats and Republicans agree that China is the most important Asian nation for America’s foreign policy strategy. So it seems likely that Biden would have no choice but to accept a peace treaty negotiated by Trump. After all, treaties are made between nations – not individual leaders.

Biden understands that it makes more sense to take on the bigger threat of China than to be focused on North Korea. The North is a threat we can manage, but China is a truly existential challenge that will require the bulk of America’s national security resources.

But time is of the essence. President Trump should begin by putting out feelers to Kim that the U.S. is willing – as Trump has said in the past – to find a “new method” or “new calculation” to try and create a working relationship with North Korea.

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One way to do that would be to propose full North Korean denuclearization at the end of a multiyear reconciliation process that involves many steps along the way. Under this scenario, the U.S. would build trust with North Korea over time and use arms control to reduce the threat of nuclear war. This is the strategy President Ronald Reagan used in successful arms control talks with the Soviet Union.

But the only way to do any of this is to start with a bold first step, and that means ending the Korean War once and for all.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118255137001_6118250217001-vs Harry Kazianis: Korean War began exactly 70 years ago – can Trump get a peace treaty to officially end it? Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 875338e6-7237-5c45-8fe5-b498b1ae6ec9  Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118255137001_6118250217001-vs Harry Kazianis: Korean War began exactly 70 years ago – can Trump get a peace treaty to officially end it? Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 875338e6-7237-5c45-8fe5-b498b1ae6ec9

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Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start

Westlake Legal Group gene-e-herrick-korean-war-memories-from-a-93-year-old-retired-journalist-on-70th-anniversary-of-wars-start Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start Gene Herrick fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc bc021f1d-21e9-5427-82de-ecfc32cac09c article

The Korean War began exactly 70 years ago – on June 25, 1950 – and soon afterward I was there as an Associated Press photographer and war correspondent, under fire many times. There were times I thought my life was about to end – and I never dreamt I would still be writing about the war all these years later, at age 93.

“War is hell,” Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman said during the Civil War. He was right. Wars have been waged since before recorded history, but no matter how many people are killed and how much destruction takes place, wars keep breaking out and taking more lives.

The Korean War was nasty. The weather was terribly hot in summer, snowy and bitter cold in winter. I traveled with troops through rugged mountains, pouring rain and clouds of dust. And worst of all, of course, was the death all around me.

RARE AND CLASSIC PHOTOS FROM THE KOREAN WAR

Growing up, our parents teach us to be peaceful and love thy neighbor. War makes troops leave those lessons behind, focusing instead on hate, killing, fear and loneliness. Hell on Earth is a good description.

Like everyone who’s been to war, I have war stories. Let me tell you a few.

Westlake Legal Group Gene-Herrick-Then-and-Now-Split Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start Gene Herrick fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc bc021f1d-21e9-5427-82de-ecfc32cac09c article

Associated Press photographer and reporter Gene Herrick in 1950 and in 2019.

I landed in Pusan, South Korea in early August 1950, just a few weeks after the start of the war. I was met by three other AP war correspondents, including Max Desfor, the photographer who took the famous picture of hundreds of North Korean refugees climbing over the Han River Bridge fleeing to the South.

Immediately, my fellow correspondents taught me some lessons of war. One was how to “scrounge,” which means to get what you need without paying. A bottle of liquor was a favorite tool we used for scrounging.

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On that first day, my colleagues drove me to the front, dumped me off in the middle of a battle and left. I was suddenly in a war for the first time in my life. I stood in the middle of a tiny dirt road and saw U.S. fighter planes bombing and strafing the enemy. Smoke rose and in the foreground as American soldiers carried a stretcher bearing a wounded fellow soldier.

“What a great picture,” I thought, as I took the photo. At the same time, I heard snapping near my ears and I saw little puffs of dirt popping up at my feet.

A nearby U.S. soldier, crouched in a ditch, shouted: “Sir, do you hear that snapping?”

“Yes,” I replied.
 
“Sir, do you see that dirt popping up at your feet?”

I said I did.

“Sir,” the soldier screamed. “Those are enemy bullets – they’re shooting at you!”

That was this young amateur’s welcome to war. It’s amazing that it wasn’t my last day alive.

Westlake Legal Group Korean-War-Gene-Herrick-1950-AP Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start Gene Herrick fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc bc021f1d-21e9-5427-82de-ecfc32cac09c article

First Lt. John R. Grimes (left), Milledgeville, Ga., and M/Sgt. George H. Trout, Richland, Pa., examine mortar shells left behind in a roadside ditch by North Koreans hastily fleeing the town of Waegwan in Korea on Sept. 27, 1950. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

From then on, I moved from one battle to another and another and another – going from the southern end of South Korea to the most northern point in North Korea, on the Chinese border.

Every morning I checked out where the worst battles were being fought that day. Then I would scrounge, beg and hitchhike my way to the front.

 “Sir,” the soldier screamed. “Those are enemy bullets – they’re shooting at you!” 

I remember one night I went to bed on a metal cot fully clothed, including my helmet. At dawn a fighter plane flew right next to where I was sleeping and fired bullets at something. I figured our building would be next. I jumped out of the cot and dove under it for protection. Then I felt like a fool as I looked up through the bed springs. What kind of protection was that?

Correspondents wore military clothing during the Korean War but we didn’t wear a war correspondent’s emblem. Too much of a target! We had to constantly scrounge for our food, transportation and a place to sleep.

One day I was pinned down by enemy shelling and machine-gun bullets in an apple orchard. I joined GIs in a ditch – knowing enough by that time not to stand in the open. Moments later I took a picture of two wounded American soldiers lying on stretchers on a jeep. They were holding hands. Very moving. I have no idea if they survived.

Leaving the orchard with our troops, we drew more enemy fire. A soldier handed me a rifle. I gave it back to him, telling him I didn’t know how to shoot it. And besides, I said, it was against the Geneva Rules of War for correspondents to carry weapons.

Moments later, we came across a big contingent of U.S. soldiers readying for another battle. A GI lying in a ditch looked up at me and said: “Sir, are you in the Army?”

“No,” I replied.

“Sir, could you go home now if you wanted to?” the young man asked.

“Yes,” I replied.

“Sir,” the soldier said, “are you crazy?”

One day I traveled to the British front near the Naktong River in South Korea. I had to walk through an open beach and across a military metal bridge to get to a small command post, where I made an acquaintance with a young British officer.

Suddenly, the radio blared that American fighter planes had attacked the British troops. The tragic mistake was caused by the British troops calling for an airstrike on North Korean troops in front of them. Big, colorful banners were placed on the ground to let the U.S. planes know where the British were located, to ensure the Americans didn’t attack our allies.

But in the heat of battle, the British had crossed over their banner to charge the enemy. The American pilots – flying jets very low and fast – didn’t know this and thought the British soldiers were North Korean forces. In a horrific case of “friendly fire,” the Americans bombed the British, killing and wounding many.

I joined my new British officer friend and others to wade across and river and up a bank, just as the wounded were coming back. I found out that British forces suddenly didn’t like Americans.

One wounded soldier angrily came at me with his bayonet just inches from my chest. My officer friend grabbed the man’s hand and weapon, saving my life.

Moments later, the seriously wounded on stretchers passed us, being carried to the rear. The British were very short-handed. I had to make an instant decision. Should I, as a newsman, continue taking pictures of the evacuation? Or should I help carry a stretcher?

I grabbed one of the stretcher handles. The enemy kept bombarding us as we crossed the river on that rickety bridge. The shells whistled and we hunkered down and water splashed us. Repeat. Repeat. Finally, we raced on the sand of the beach.

We were running with our wounded soldier, who was bleeding when another shell landed so close that the explosion knocked us down. Getting up. I noticed a body lying on the sand, with the top of his head missing. I could tell it was the officer who had saved my life just minutes earlier.

Those memories of death are still haunting, even after so many years.

Today anyone can upload pictures from a cellphone or camera onto the Internet and send them anywhere in the world in an instant. But that was many decades away during the Korean War. One of the biggest challenges photographers faced was getting our film to Tokyo, where it could be processed and transmitted to newspapers, magazines, and TV networks and stations around the world.

I vividly remember covering the amphibious landing at Wonsan in North Korea, taking photos from a helicopter. I did the same when U.S. troops landed at Iwon, just north of Wonsan.

Then I went by boat with Gen. David G. Barr and Col. Herbert Powell to scope out the area. We were sitting ducks for enemy fire, but made it to the beach unscathed. I told the general I had no idea how to get my film to Tokyo and he could see I was upset.

The general turned to an aide and said: “Take his film to my pilot and have him fly them to Wonsan and put them in the courier pouch!”  The three of us became friends.

Later I was with U.S. troops as we charged into Hyesanjin in North Korea, right at the Yalu River on the border with Manchuria in China. I walked backward into the town, which was pretty much destroyed, so that I could get pictures of the American troops and tanks coming in.

I grabbed six soldiers and took them down to the frozen river. They were heavily clothed, waving their guns in the air, with Manchuria in the background. To me, that was the “victory” picture.

I immediately flew to Wonsan, caught the last plane out of Korea that night, and landed at an airbase south of Tokyo, where I had to stay overnight (still with hot film).  Next morning I gave my film to a fighter pilot going to Tokyo. The pictures were transmitted, and we had a world beat of eight hours!

Next morning, I got on a plane to Tokyo, my tour of duty in the war coming to a close. However one of the engines almost fell off before takeoff. I had made it through the war, but now came close to losing my life getting out of it.

I soon found a fighter pilot who was returning to Tokyo. He took my film and connected with our messenger, who processed, printed and transmitted the pictures around the world.  I caught a later plane to Tokyo and after several days I returned to the U.S.

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A few years later, I was assigned to cover a PGA golf tournament in Oklahoma and stopped at a roadside diner on the way. The waitress and I talked and I said something about the Korean War. She responded that her brother had fought in the war. She said she had a picture of him at the Yalu River.

I asked if the picture showed six GI’s standing in the river and waving their guns over their heads. Stunned, she asked: “How did you know?”

“I took that picture,” I replied. Small world.

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Looking back, my experiences covering the Korean War for the AP were interesting, challenging and dangerous. It’s sad that too many of the journalists and troops who were there with me never made it back home alive.

I did my job like any good war correspondent, keeping the world informed about the fighting that raged. But how I wish that the job of war correspondent could disappear, with wars ending and becoming a part of our past but not of our present or future.

Westlake Legal Group Gene-Herrick-Then-and-Now-Split Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start Gene Herrick fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc bc021f1d-21e9-5427-82de-ecfc32cac09c article  Westlake Legal Group Gene-Herrick-Then-and-Now-Split Gene E. Herrick: Korean War memories from a 93-year-old retired journalist on 70th anniversary of war’s start Gene Herrick fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc bc021f1d-21e9-5427-82de-ecfc32cac09c article

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Kim Jong Un suspends planned military retaliation against South Korea

Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-suspends-planned-military-retaliation-against-south-korea Kim Jong Un suspends planned military retaliation against South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 52a0d429-5147-54ab-b68a-c4b551c0a494

North Korea said Wednesday leader Kim Jong Un suspended a planned military retaliation against South Korea, in an apparent slowing of the pressure campaign it has waged against its rival amid stalled nuclear negotiations with the Trump administration.

Last week, the North had declared relations with the South as fully ruptured, destroyed an inter-Korean liaison office in its territory and threatened unspecified military action to censure Seoul for a lack of progress in bilateral cooperation and for activists floating anti-Pyongyang leaflets across the border.

Analysts say North Korea, after weeks deliberately raising tensions, may be pulling away just enough to make room for South Korean concessions.

If Kim does eventually opt for military action, he may resume artillery drills and other exercises in front-line areas or have vessels deliberately cross the disputed western maritime border between the Koreas, which has been the scene of bloody skirmishes in past years. However, any action is likely to be measured to prevent full-scale retaliation from South Korean and U.S. militaries.

SOUTH KOREAN ACTIVIST GROUP FLOATS ANTI-KIM LEAFLETS TO NORTH AMID RISING TENSIONS

Westlake Legal Group AP20175251264684 Kim Jong Un suspends planned military retaliation against South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 52a0d429-5147-54ab-b68a-c4b551c0a494

A banner with images of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, the late leader Kim Il Sung, center, and Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of Kim Jong Un, released by Fighters For Free North Korea, is seen in Hongcheon, South Korea, Tuesday, June 23, 2020. (Yonhap via AP)

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency said Kim presided by video conference over a meeting Tuesday of the ruling Workers’ Party’s Central Military Commission, which decided to postpone plans for military action against the South brought up by the North’s military leaders.

KCNA didn’t specify why the decision was made. It said other discussions included bolstering the country’s “war deterrent.”

Yoh Sang-key, spokesman of South Korea’s Unification Ministry, said Seoul was “closely reviewing” the North’s report but didn’t further elaborate.

Yoh also said it was the first report in state media of Kim holding a video conferencing meeting, but he didn’t provide a specific answer when asked whether that would have something to do with the coronavirus.

The North says there hasn’t been a single COVID-19 case on its territory, but the claim is questioned by outside experts.

SOUTH KOREA’S UNIFICATION MINISTER RESIGNS AMID RISING TENSIONS WITH NORTH

Westlake Legal Group AP20176112583024 Kim Jong Un suspends planned military retaliation against South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 52a0d429-5147-54ab-b68a-c4b551c0a494

A woman walks in front of a directional sign showing the distance to North Korea’s Kaesong city and South Korea’s capital Seoul near the wire fences decorated with ribbons written with messages wishing for the reunification of the two Koreas at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, June 24, 2020.  (AP)

Kim Dong-yub, an analyst from Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said it’s likely that the North is waiting for further action from the South to salvage ties from what it sees as a position of strength, rather than softening its stance on its rival.

“What’s clear is that the North said (the military action) was postponed, not canceled,” said Kim, a former South Korean military official who participated in inter-Korean military negotiations.

Other experts say the North would be seeking something major from the South, possibly a commitment to resume operations at a shuttered joint factory park in Kaesong, which was where the liaison office was located, or restart South Korean tours to the North’s Diamond Mountain resort. Those steps are prohibited by the international sanctions against the North over its nuclear weapons program.

“Now isn’t the time for anyone in Seoul or Washington to be self-congratulatory about deterring North Korea,” said Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul.

“There may be a pause in provocations or Pyongyang might temporarily deescalate in search of external concessions. But North Korea will almost certainly continue to bolster its so-called ‘deterrent.’ As long as the Kim regime refuses to denuclearize, it is likely to use Seoul as a scapegoat for its military modernization and domestic politics of economic struggle after failing to win sanctions relief.”

The public face of the North’s recent bashing of the South has been Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of leader Kim Jong Un, who has been confirmed as his top official on inter-Korean affairs. Issuing harsh statements through state media, she had said the North’s demolishing of the liaison office would be just the first in a series of retaliatory action against the “enemy” South and that she would leave it to the North’s military to come up with the next steps.

The General Staff of the North’s military has said it would send troops to the mothballed inter-Korean cooperation sites in Kaesong and Diamond Mountain and restart military drills in frontline areas. Such steps would nullify a set of deals the Koreas reached during a flurry of diplomacy in 2018 that prohibited them from taking hostile action against each other.

Also condemning the South over North Korean refugees floating anti-Pyongyang leaflets across the border, the North said Monday it printed 12 million of its own propaganda leaflets to be dropped over the South in what would be its largest ever anti-Seoul leafleting campaign.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether Kim’s decision to hold back military action would affect the country’s plans for leafleting. The North’s military had said it would open border areas on land and sea and provide protection for civilians involved in the leafleting campaigns.

The North has a history of dialing up pressure against the South when it fails to get what it wants from the United States. The North’s recent steps came after months of frustration over Seoul’s unwillingness to defy U.S.-led sanctions and restart the inter-Korean economic projects that would breathe life into its broken economy.

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Nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington largely stalled after Kim’s second summit with President Donald Trump last year in Vietnam, where the Americans rejected North Korea’s demands for major sanctions relief in exchange for a partial surrender of its nuclear capabilities.

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