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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Fred Lucas"

National debt disappears as 2020 campaign issue – but it keeps growing

Almost a decade after out-of-control spending and borrowing fueled the Tea Party revolution in a historic midterm election, no major presidential candidates from either party seem interested in the national debt that now stands at more than $23 trillion, leaving every American citizen owing almost $70,000.

Meanwhile, the federal deficit—or the annual budget shortfall—is more than $1 trillion.

TRUMP SIGNS $1.4T SPENDING BILL THAT INCLUDES SPACE FORCE, AVOIDS SHUTDOWN

With Democrats proposing ever-more spending in the form of massive government-funded benefit programs, and the Trump administration endorsing spending packages that further swell the deficit, budget hawks aren’t sure when and whether the situation could stabilize.

“Democrats don’t care about budget deficits and the national debt, and it’s an incredibly frightening problem,” said Jason Pye, vice president for legislative affairs at FreedomWorks, a major player in rallying the Tea Party movement of the 2010 election. “The president has said it’s a fifth-year priority, but that’s assuming he’s re-elected. He’s already signed two budgets that increase discretionary spending. Republicans have abandoned any pretense of fiscal responsibility. Not being the Democrats is not good enough.”

In a June report, the Congressional Budget Office forecast that by the end of 2019, debt held by the public would be 78 percent of the gross domestic product—the highest level since right after World War II. Within 15 years, the debt will be larger than the economy and, by 2049, will almost double to 144 percent of the GDP—with entitlements projected to make up about three-fourths of the debt in 30 years, according to the CBO.

Interest on the debt is the fastest-growing part of the federal budget and will total more than $6 trillion over the next decade, according to the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, a nonpartisan group advocating fiscal restraint. The foundation projects that interest on the debt will crowd out future spending on education, highway spending, and research and development.

“Unless Congress acts, with some presidential buy-in, we are going to be growing at the rate of a European welfare state,” Pye told Fox News. “Trump has been great on the deregulation and tax side, but spending is the ultimate issue.”

Pye added the Tea Party election of 2010 had some positive results, with about 65 to 70 House members persistently voting against big-spending budgets, aided by senators like Rand Paul of Kentucky and Mike Lee of Utah. But, he added, Republicans gave away their major victory from the Budget Control Act of 2011.

Democrats generally blame the Trump tax cuts for the rising budget deficit. But both parties have gone along with more spending.

Just last week, Congress passed and Trump signed a $1.4 trillion budget package that boosts spending levels and is expected to add hundreds of billions to the debt over the next decade. In July, the Democratic House and Republican Senate passed, and Trump signed, a budget to temporarily suspend the debt ceiling and hike federal spending by $300 million.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, in a longshot challenge to Trump for the Republican nomination, has attacked Trump’s fiscal record. Weld backs “zero baseline budgeting,” meaning that Congress wouldn’t automatically fund every federal program at or above the same level as the previous year, requiring each program to justify its budget.

Weld noted he was on the campaign trail talking about fiscal responsibility back in 2010.

“In 2010, Republicans fought against spending. I was campaigning for [former Massachusetts Sen.] Scott Brown that year when he won,” Weld told Fox News. “Both parties are asleep on the issue. The national debt is a generational issue, just like climate change. I’ve been talking to millennials about it and they get it. I’ve told them unless you take action now, you can forget about Social Security.”

“Change has to come to Washington. Republicans have to get their act together,” Weld said. “I’m the opposite of most Democrats that are just proposing throwing more money at everything.”

On the Democratic side, debt and deficits rarely are mentioned on the debate stage or on the stump. Instead, candidates like Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are pitching sprawling programs like “Medicare-for-all” and free college.

Democratic support for budget-busting plans like the Green New Deal marks a departure from a decade ago when Democrats at least acknowledged the problem of deficits, said Jenny Beth Martin, founder of the Tea Party Patriots, one of the key organizations in the 2010 elections.

“By and large, Democrats have abdicated even a pretense of caring about fiscal responsibility,” Martin told Fox News. “At the same time, the reason Democratic candidates like Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg have attacked Liz Warren and Bernie Sanders is because Medicare for All would add $20 trillion to the national debt.”

Those candidates technically have plans to fund “Medicare-for-all,” though Warren has faced skepticism in claiming she could do so without raising middle-class taxes.

MARK SANFORD DROPS GOP PRIMARY CHALLENGE TO TRUMP

Meanwhile, on the Republican side, the only place where the deficit is regularly discussed is among the diminishing field of low-key primary challengers. Perhaps no moment better illustrated the dying issue of the debt than former South Carolina governor and congressman Mark Sanford showing up in New Hampshire to suspend his GOP presidential campaign, while carrying an oversized $1 trillion check representing the 2019 deficit and made out to “Burden of Future Generations.”

Westlake Legal Group 1-1-e1573579604456 National debt disappears as 2020 campaign issue – but it keeps growing Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4a5264be-fe85-54eb-9051-c63fcafe4e29

Mark Sanford holds up a fake check as he bows out of the presidential race, in New Hampshire. (Paul Steinhauser)

Since the Tea Party revolution, Martin has learned that it’s tough to get politicians to talk about spending. She sees some promise from the Trump administration, arguing that protecting the border will mean less spending in the long term.

Further, she said there is broad support behind the “penny plan,” which would take out one cent of every $1 in federal spending. Trump’s fiscal year 2020 budget proposal includes a version of the penny plan.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“What President Trump has done in his first term is reform government and cut regulation. He has begun to reduce the size and scope of government and his policies are also growing the economy,” Martin told Fox News. “The only way to get a balanced budget is to cut spending and grow the economy. He has proposed budgets that balance to Congress. Congress under Obama and Trump have ignored presidential proposed budgets.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096967815001_6096972091001-vs National debt disappears as 2020 campaign issue – but it keeps growing Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4a5264be-fe85-54eb-9051-c63fcafe4e29  Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096967815001_6096972091001-vs National debt disappears as 2020 campaign issue – but it keeps growing Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4a5264be-fe85-54eb-9051-c63fcafe4e29

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State records reveal extent of botched abortions, as GOP reps push ‘born-alive’ protection law

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6051020570001_6050909958001-vs State records reveal extent of botched abortions, as GOP reps push ‘born-alive’ protection law Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc article 32ad16c2-f889-5575-a6dc-e7c4066f51b4

At least 40 babies were born alive after botched abortions across three states since 2016, according to state health data that offers a glimpse into the extent of an issue that lawmakers have fiercely debated in recent months.

The data on babies surviving abortions is compiled on a mandatory basis by only a handful of states. What is available reflects a scenario that is rare but frequent enough to prompt proposals at the state and federal level for born-alive infant protection laws – especially in the wake of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s controversial comments on the subject earlier this year.

VA GOV FACES BACKLASH FOR COMMENTS ON 3RD-TRIMESTER ABORTION BILL

The most recent information comes from Minnesota, which reported in June that three infants were born alive in 2018 after induced termination of a pregnancy. That brings the state total to 11 since 2016. Arizona reported 10 in 2017 and Florida had 19 such instances since 2017. Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 143 cases between 2003 and 2014 of infants born after attempted abortions, though those figures may be incomplete.

Three other states—Michigan, Oklahoma and Texas—have laws requiring data on infants born after botched abortions, but either have reported no cases or have not yet begun compiling the information. Arkansas just passed such a law in 2019. In most reported cases, the babies do not survive beyond 24 hours.

But the reports offer insight into a subject that captured attention in Congress this year.

House Republicans have unsuccessfully tried with 80 separate unanimous consent requests to get a floor vote on the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, sponsored by Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo. Further, 197 Republicans and three Democrats signed on to a discharge petition to have the bill voted on by the full Democrat-controlled House. The Democratic minority also blocked a Senate version of the bill sponsored by Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb.

Two state-level developments, meanwhile, fired up the pro-life movement over the matter.

First, in January, New York state enacted legislation allowing abortion up to the point of birth. After a similar bill was proposed in the Virginia legislature, Democratic Gov. Northam was accused of advocating infanticide when he said: “The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.”

Northam, a pediatric neurologist, countered that he’s devoted his life to caring for children and said “any insinuation otherwise is shameful and disgusting,” as his office accused critics of trying to “extrapolate” his comments “in bad faith.”

But the controversy has lived on.

President Trump brought up the Northam comments at a rally Thursday in Manchester, N.H.

“Virtually every top Democrat also now supports late-term abortion, ripping babies straight from the mother’s womb, right up until the moment of birth, and, in the case of the Virginia governor—he’s having a rough, rough time,” Trump said. “The doctor talks to the mother. The baby is now born … and then they decide whether or not to execute the baby. That is why I have asked Congress to prohibit extreme late-term abortion, is because Republicans believe that every child is a sacred gift of God.”

Arizona had the largest number in the shortest amount of time, with the state’s Department of Health Services reporting: “From August 2017 to December 2017, 10 abortion reports involving fetus or embryo delivered alive were submitted to ADHS along with the physician’s statement documenting the measures taken to preserve the life of the fetus or embryo.”

Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration reported two infants born alive after an induced termination of pregnancy so far in 2019. The state reported six cases in 2018 and 11 cases in 2017.

The Minnesota Department of Health data shows three cases of “abortion procedures resulting in a born-alive infant were reported” in both 2017 and 2018, and five in 2016.

DEMS BLOCK ‘BORN-ALIVE’ BILL

Michigan has reported zero so far. Oklahoma is unclear. Its report earlier this year on the “number of abortions resulting in an infant born alive” has information left blank, but says, “Cell is suppressed to maintain confidentiality of surrounding entries.”

The Texas Department of Health and Human Services reported zero cases of infants born after an attempted abortion. Texas’ reports, however, are associated only with health complications with the mother, said Connor Semelsberger, legislative assistant with the pro-life Family Research Council.

“These numbers are in just three states, which means it’s a lot higher than we’d ever suspect,” Semelsberger told Fox News. “Arizona is the outlier. They’ve had good reporting. This is a state that takes this seriously. Arizona really is enforcing the laws on the books.”

Semelsberger noted that legislation protecting babies born alive passed with strong bipartisan support in battleground states such as Minnesota and Michigan, which “shows real contrast with the Democratic Party at the national level and at the state level.”

Dr. Diane Horvath, a fellow at Physicians for Reproductive Health, argued that anti-abortion figures are “manipulating” the complexities of abortion.

“These data are likely reflecting cases in which a woman has a wanted pregnancy but is unable to continue it, where she makes the decision with her doctor to end the pregnancy through induction of labor,” Horvath told Fox News in a written statement. “Examples may include a woman who has life-threatening bleeding before her baby is viable, who was in a car accident and has severe injuries that would require labor to be induced, or who received a fetal diagnosis that was incompatible with life.”

The CDC began requesting information from the states as a result of a 2002 law, when a bipartisan majority passed a version of the Born-Alive Infants Protection Act that President George W. Bush signed into law, defining a baby who survives a botched abortion as a human being that must be cared for accordingly under the law. However, the law carries no punishment for violations. The GOP proposals this year would put teeth behind the law, including potential prison time.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The CDC’s information is based on requested voluntary information from states, and the CDC report states, “it is possible that this number (143) underestimates the total number of deaths involving induced termination.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6051020570001_6050909958001-vs State records reveal extent of botched abortions, as GOP reps push ‘born-alive’ protection law Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc article 32ad16c2-f889-5575-a6dc-e7c4066f51b4  Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6051020570001_6050909958001-vs State records reveal extent of botched abortions, as GOP reps push ‘born-alive’ protection law Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc article 32ad16c2-f889-5575-a6dc-e7c4066f51b4

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Weld could face scrutiny on party loyalty, lobbying, more amid Trump primary challenge

Westlake Legal Group weld-could-face-scrutiny-on-party-loyalty-lobbying-more-amid-trump-primary-challenge Weld could face scrutiny on party loyalty, lobbying, more amid Trump primary challenge Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4129960c-d225-5e9a-abb6-9aa813d1bb4a
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027248421001_6027249480001-vs Weld could face scrutiny on party loyalty, lobbying, more amid Trump primary challenge Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4129960c-d225-5e9a-abb6-9aa813d1bb4a

Bill Weld, the former Massachusetts governor making a longshot challenge for the 2020 Republican presidential nod, has aggressively gone after President Trump since his campaign launch — calling him a “one-man crime wave” and even suggesting Attorney General Bill Barr “erred” by not indicting the commander-in-chief.

Trump— known for punching back at even the slightest slights —has thus far ignored his GOP opponent, as his campaign says they’re not concerned about the primary.

WELD CALLS ON TRUMP TO RESIGN

But as Weld hits Trump on character, the president could have a few obvious openings to hit back if he so chooses.

Trump’s easiest talking point, should he decide to engage Weld down the road, could be party loyalty.

Weld left the GOP in 2016 to run as vice president on the Libertarian Party ticket with Gary Johnson. He endorsed Barack Obama over John McCain in the 2008 presidential race, though he backed Mitt Romney in 2012 over Obama.

“Trump might try to paint him as a Massachusetts liberal – but Weld can fact check him on that,” Republican political strategist Liz Mair, a leader in the Republicans for Johnson/Weld group in 2016, told Fox News. “The Cato Institute ranked him one of the most fiscally conservative governors in the United States.”

Weld also faced a legal controversy regarding a school he ran more than a decade ago – though the school was later exonerated and more recent media accounts said the probe potentially stemmed from a vendetta against Weld.

WELD ENVISIONS MCCAIN-STYLE PATH TO PRIMARY WIN

The federal probe surrounded Decker College, a for-profit school in Louisville, Kentucky, that taught carpentry, electrical and other construction trades. Weld became the school’s CEO in January 2005, when it was already having some financial problems that he sought to turn around.

Later that year, the FBI raided the school’s Louisville offices. The Justice Department investigated whether the school misused federal student loan money. The school went bankrupt when the Department of Education blocked student aid.

In August 2005, Weld entered the race for the Republican nomination for governor of New York, with the backing of several county Republican chairman and state Republican Party chairman Stephen J. Minarik III. He also raised about $3 million for the campaign, more than any other Republican. Then in December, The New York Times ran a story headlined, “Ghost of a Shuttered College Follows Weld.” The questions slowed his momentum, and he dropped out in June 2006 before the primary.

Weld handed control of Decker College to bankruptcy trustee Robert Keats. But in 2012, a bankruptcy judge Thomas Fulton sided with officials of the closed college and, in 2016, Education Department administrative law judge Robert Layton said the accrediting agency, the Council on Occupational Education, provided “factually erroneous” information to the federal government that caused it to withdraw student aid from the college.

The council pulled the accreditation after getting a call from Federal Student Aid official Ralph LoBosco. Keats reportedly said LoBosco sought revenge against Weld. That’s because as a U.S. attorney in the 1980s, Weld prosecuted LoBosco’s former employer for fraud.

The Education Department did not respond to an inquiry for this story.

Trump, while staying out of the scrum for now, attacked Weld during the 2016 campaign, saying, “I don’t talk about his alcoholism, so why would he talk about my foolishly perceived fascism?” The Boston Globe cited reports that Weld had appeared publicly inebriated several times, which Weld has denied.

“Trump tried to call him a drunk in 2016, but it’s factually inaccurate and I think Trump was just trying to provoke him,” said Mair. “If you were a Republican governor of Massachusetts, it isn’t easy to provoke you.”

Mair supports Weld’s candidacy now, but isn’t committed until the GOP field is finalized.

In an email, the Weld campaign said it would attempt to get a response for this report, but did not respond to several follow-up requests.

Other issues, while not of a legal nature, also could emerge should Weld’s campaign gain momentum.

Weld is on the board of directors for Acreage Holdings, a cannabis company. However, it’s widely known that as a governor and as a vice presidential candidate for the Libertarian Party, Weld favored relaxed drug laws. Former Republican House Speaker John Boehner also sits on the Acreage Holdings board.

“Weld is on the board of a pot company, which might be an issue, but might actually help in New Hampshire,” Mair said, noting the libertarian bent of the “Live Free or Die” state.

The president also could note that Weld is the only federal candidate that former Special Counsel Robert Mueller contributed to, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks money in politics. Mueller donated $450 to Weld’s unsuccessful campaign against then-Sen. John Kerry in 1996.

Weld also was a registered lobbyist from 2007 to 2011 for the international law firm McDermott, Will & Emery, and represented defense contractor Raytheon, CNX Gas Corporation, Sony Electronics and shoemaker New Balance, according to government watchdog The Center for Public Integrity. Weld advocated for issues such as cap-and-trade legislation, shoes for Armed Forces members and recycling electronics, according to CPI.

There’s nothing illegal about lobbying, a freedom protected under the First Amendment. Still, because of various excesses over the years, lobbying is among the least popular occupations. When Trump talks about the Washington “swamp,” it conjures up the cozy relationship between politicians and lobbyists.

Interestingly, McDermott, Will & Emery formerly represented Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen in the Russia probe at a time when Cohen was firmly on Trump’s side. Cohen claimed in a lawsuit the Trump Organization stopped paying the firm for his legal defense when he flipped on Trump. Stephen Ryan, who leads the firm’s government strategies practice, was formerly Cohen’s counsel before the former Trump lawyer began cooperating with prosecutors.

Weld is a member of lobbying firm ML Strategies, but isn’t listed as a lobbyist with the firm, according to CPI. The firm says Weld “provides clients with counsel related to government strategies, litigation, and general business advice.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027248421001_6027249480001-vs Weld could face scrutiny on party loyalty, lobbying, more amid Trump primary challenge Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4129960c-d225-5e9a-abb6-9aa813d1bb4a  Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027248421001_6027249480001-vs Weld could face scrutiny on party loyalty, lobbying, more amid Trump primary challenge Fred Lucas fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 4129960c-d225-5e9a-abb6-9aa813d1bb4a

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#MeToo scandal shakes up major DC lobby run by Clinton official

Westlake Legal Group metoo-scandal-shakes-up-major-dc-lobby-run-by-clinton-official #MeToo scandal shakes up major DC lobby run by Clinton official Fred Lucas fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc fb3b94a2-beaa-539a-81ec-b0d07bcc1be2 article

The nation’s largest and oldest Native American lobby is facing a major shakeup in the wake of a #MeToo scandal, with Fox News confirming that its embattled leader – who formally resigned in February amid criticism of her handling of that case – is set to leave the organization in early May.

Jacqueline Pata, the executive director of the National Congress of American Indians for 18 years, initially said she would stay on until the organization has hired a successor. The organization that advocates in Washington for treaty-recognized tribal governments across the United States said it hopes to have a CEO in place before the national mid-year conference on June 24-27 in Reno, Nevada.

BILL CLINTON DIGS IN OVER MONICA IN AWKWARD #METOO INTERVIEW

But in a statement to Fox News, the organization put a tighter timeframe on her departure saying Pata “will continue supporting the organization’s efforts and preparing for the transition to a new CEO until the end of her tenure in early May.”

She’ll land another job. Pata’s parachute is becoming president and CEO of the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority based in Juneau, Alaska, where she’ll be in charge of handling potentially millions in federal housing grants. The group called her a “recognized and well-respected leader across Alaska and throughout Indian Country” in an April 12 statement.

Pata, a member of the Tlingit and Haida Tribes in Alaska, is a former deputy assistant secretary for Housing and Urban Development during the Clinton administration — and has been a leading voice in calls for the Washington Redskins to change its name.

But her looming NCAI exit comes after many member tribes cast no-confidence votes in Pata’s leadership last year – and follows the departure of other NCAI officials including the chief financial officer, the director of operations and deputy director. Numerous women departed the organization, according to Indianz.com, a Native American news site that has extensively covered the organization’s turmoil.

The biggest controversy stemmed from allegations against John Dossett, the former general counsel for the organization. He strongly denied accusations of sexual harassment of a female NCAI employee during a 2016 NCAI conference in Spokane, Washington. But NCAI dismissed Dossett last October — and temporarily suspended Pata over questions about her handling of the claims.

Pata reportedly was informed about the allegations against Dossett within two weeks after the incident allegedly happened but didn’t take action, according to the High Country News, a magazine that covers the American West. After the allegations became public, Pata reportedly said the accuser had a substance abuse problem, the High Country News reported.

Noting that 33 employees left the organization over a three-year period, Director of Operations Nicole Hallingstad wrote in her August 2018 resignation letter that Pata was an “autocratic executive.”

CLINTON ‘EXACTLY WRONG’ ON TRUMP INDICTMENT CLAIMS

“Committed staff does not lightly leave an organization they love and a mission they are passionate about fulfilling,” Hallingstad wrote. “But when they see colleagues marginalized, disciplined, punished, and even terminated for trying to address issues of poor management – or bad actors not held to account for disrespectful behavior – and the oppressive culture of silence and lack of authentic process means they cannot speak with their voices, then they will speak with their feet.”

Reached by Fox News, Hallingstad declined an interview for this report.

Pata’s suspension amid the controversy came after about 40 tribes cast a “no confidence” vote or called for her ouster.

Pata was back in the job by early 2019 – then initially announced her resignation in February.

“After having time for thought and reflection, I have decided to resign from my role as NCAI executive director. Serving NCAI and tribal nations has been one of the greatest honors of my life,” Pata said at the time. “I am proud of that service and know that I leave NCAI with a strong foundation for continued growth under new leadership.”

NCAI President Jefferson Keel praised Pata’s tenure after her February announcement. “During Jackie’s tenure, NCAI grew substantially as an organization, forged partnerships within Indian Country and among outside allies, and achieved significant successes in our advocacy with Congress, the executive branch, and in the federal courts,” Keel said. “NCAI is appreciative of the leadership Jackie has shown in her stewardship of the organization, and we wish her well in her future endeavors.”

Fast-forward to today, and the organization has set her departure for May.

“The NCAI executive committee is in the process of recruiting NCAI’s first chief executive officer, which will replace the former position of executive director, a testament to the growth of the organization over our 75-year history,” the NCAI said in a statement. “The committee anticipates that the recruitment process will be completed in time for the new CEO to be announced at or prior to the upcoming mid-year convention.”

The NCAI declined to provide a statement from Pata, but a spokesperson said she helped in crafting the organization’s statement to Fox News.

The NCAI told Fox News it is committed to addressing the concerns of members. “In a previous NCAI conference session, on February 12, 2019, President Jefferson Keel reported to our membership that the organization took immediate action in response to harassment allegations made by former NCAI employees,” the statement to Fox News said, adding that Keel announced the completion of an independent review and a separate review of the group’s employment policies.

“In addition, The Washington Media Group conducted an internal culture review that found NCAI is considered a safe place to work,” the statement said.

Pata has been visible in recent years opposing the mascot for the Washington Redskins.

She lambasted a 2016 Washington Post poll that found 90 percent of Native Americans said they were not bothered by the Redskins name. Pata responded that “anyone can create a poll on any issue. The survey doesn’t recognize the psychological impacts these racist names and imagery have on American Indian and Alaska Natives.” Pata also co-wrote op-eds for Time and for The Independent criticizing the team’s name as a racist slur.

Westlake Legal Group patanew #MeToo scandal shakes up major DC lobby run by Clinton official Fred Lucas fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc fb3b94a2-beaa-539a-81ec-b0d07bcc1be2 article  Westlake Legal Group patanew #MeToo scandal shakes up major DC lobby run by Clinton official Fred Lucas fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc fb3b94a2-beaa-539a-81ec-b0d07bcc1be2 article

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The terrorist next door: States consider sex-offender-style registries for released terror inmates

Dozens of inmates convicted of terrorism-related crimes will be released from prison over the next five years, and lawmakers in several states think local law enforcement have the right to know if they’re moving into their neighborhood.

Westlake Legal Group John-Walker-Lindh-Reuters The terrorist next door: States consider sex-offender-style registries for released terror inmates Fred Lucas fox-news/us/terror fox-news/special/2019-look-ahead fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7be3fcc8-d51f-5006-91b8-75dba4474cf4

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Dems aim to bring big-government programs to floor vote with 2019 House takeover

Expect to hear the words “free,” “guaranteed” and “for all” a whole lot more in the new year as Democrats prepare an arsenal of big-government bills that could actually see a floor vote once they take control of the House.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5858590206001_5858592320001-vs Dems aim to bring big-government programs to floor vote with 2019 House takeover Fred Lucas fox-news/special/2019-look-ahead fox news fnc/politics fnc dce5babf-644e-586c-9e20-38d92c41daa7 article

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