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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Gaetz, Matt"

Trump’s Team Celebrates Acquittal at (Where Else?) His Washington Hotel

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160323060_6043b864-8071-4a78-a222-8da120754b1c-facebookJumbo Trump’s Team Celebrates Acquittal at (Where Else?) His Washington Hotel Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Trump International Hotel (Washington, DC) Presidential Election of 2020 House of Representatives Gaetz, Matt Farage, Nigel (1964- ) Democratic Party Conway, Kellyanne Cipollone, Pat A America First Action

WASHINGTON — Well, where else were they going to go?

One mile from the scene of President Trump’s acquittal in his impeachment trial, members of his defense team, family and administration gathered Wednesday evening at the Trump International Hotel in downtown Washington. They turned its marbled lobby into something of a hive bursting with “Keep America Great” hats, well-done steaks and bottles of red wine.

“I think it’s clearly a validation of the fact that the president never committed a crime,” Corey Lewandowski, the president’s former campaign manager, said as he flashed a blue piece of paper from his wallet. It was a Senate gallery ticket; he had watched the vote as it happened.

“We’ve had a very good week,” Mr. Lewandowski said, “between the debacle in Iowa” — referring to assorted fumbles that left the Democratic results in the 2020 caucuses in a state of suspended uncertainty — “the State of the Union speech and then the acquittal of the impeachment proceedings.”

Everyone else seemed to have gotten the message. Mr. Lewandowski was only one of several current and former Trump advisers who had gathered at the hotel to mingle and drink. On Tuesday, a photograph of an airplane full of Trump campaign surrogates returning from Iowa sailed around the internet. By Wednesday, roughly half them appeared to have passed through the hotel at some point to celebrate the verdict with plenty of booze and slightly bitter undertones.

It was a mood that mirrored the one on display by Mr. Trump, who has so far reflected on his victory by hitting back at Democrats on Twitter.

While the president stewed at the White House before a speech scheduled for noon on Thursday, his brethren arrived at the family property in slick black sport utility vehicles as the weather hit a drizzle.

Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law, arrived early in the evening, ducking into a side room with members of Mr. Trump’s legal defense team, including Pat A. Cipollone and Jay Sekulow. Kellyanne Conway, the president’s counselor, came and went. “They denigrate,” she said. “We celebrate.”

Donald Trump Jr. and Kimberly Guilfoyle, the ever-present campaign road warriors, also made an appearance, as did Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman.

Past a certain hour, the drinks started flowing faster and the lobby turned into a who’s who of fixtures in Mr. Trump’s circle. At one table, Mr. Lewandowski held forth with Eric Bolling, a host for the Sinclair Broadcast Group. Mr. Bolling echoed some supporters by focusing on Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, whose vote to remove the president from office prevented Mr. Trump from being able to say his acquittal had been cast along purely party lines.

“Mitt Romney should be removed from all of his leadership roles and should consider switching parties,” Mr. Bolling declared. When asked if he believed the president would fixate on Mr. Romney’s decision, Mr. Bolling paused. “I hope not,” he said.

This is often the best way to describe the atmosphere at even the best pro-Trump bash: celebratory, but with a palpable amount of spite. Sweet and bitter — the Negroni, as it were, of Senate acquittals.

The perpetual hint of defiance that permeates a crowd like this was even more on display given that the hotel had been a regular gathering place for many of the figures involved in the impeachment proceedings. It was what Lev Parnas, a Soviet-born businessman who played an integral role in the campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate Mr. Trump’s political rivals, called “a breeding ground.”

This, of course, did little to encourage Republicans to shift their support of the president, or the family business, throughout impeachment or otherwise. The Republican National Committee has paid more than $440,000 to the hotel since Mr. Trump was elected — about 24,400 glasses of the hotel’s house white wine. America First Action, a super PAC that supports Mr. Trump’s causes, has spent $505,000 at the hotel since 2017.

As the evening unfolded, the party began to creep out into the open — or at least to the steakhouse adjacent to the lobby. Ms. Guilfoyle and the younger Mr. Trump held court with a merry band of supporters, including Representative Matt Gaetz, Republican of Florida, who has dipped in and out — and is presumably in again — of the Trump fold. Even as he socialized with the president’s family, Mr. Gaetz announced on Twitter that he had filed an ethics complaint against Speaker Nancy Pelosi for tearing up the president’s State of the Union address.

“Nobody is above the law,” he wrote. “She must be held accountable.”

Against a wall stood Nigel Farage, the former leader of the U.K. Independence Party and one of the so-called Bad Boys of Brexit whose perpetual presence at the hotel suggests he should have a punch card.

Around 11 p.m., Mr. Sekulow strode through the lobby to say goodbye, pausing to take pictures with admirers. He had no comment for a reporter on his reaction to the acquittal, but a woman approached him as he left the hotel to provide her own assessment.

“You did great,” she said.

Just behind her, another woman came outside and sniffed the air.

“Ugly night,” she remarked to no one in particular as the celebrants departed.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s Team Celebrates Acquittal at (Where Else?) His Washington Hotel

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160323060_6043b864-8071-4a78-a222-8da120754b1c-facebookJumbo Trump’s Team Celebrates Acquittal at (Where Else?) His Washington Hotel Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Trump International Hotel (Washington, DC) Presidential Election of 2020 House of Representatives Gaetz, Matt Farage, Nigel (1964- ) Democratic Party Conway, Kellyanne Cipollone, Pat A America First Action

WASHINGTON — Well, where else were they going to go?

One mile from the scene of President Trump’s acquittal in his impeachment trial, members of his defense team, family and administration gathered Wednesday evening at the Trump International Hotel in downtown Washington. They turned its marbled lobby into something of a hive bursting with “Keep America Great” hats, well-done steaks and bottles of red wine.

“I think it’s clearly a validation of the fact that the president never committed a crime,” Corey Lewandowski, the president’s former campaign manager, said as he flashed a blue piece of paper from his wallet. It was a Senate gallery ticket; he had watched the vote as it happened.

“We’ve had a very good week,” Mr. Lewandowski said, “between the debacle in Iowa” — referring to assorted fumbles that left the Democratic results in the 2020 caucuses in a state of suspended uncertainty — “the State of the Union speech and then the acquittal of the impeachment proceedings.”

Everyone else seemed to have gotten the message. Mr. Lewandowski was only one of several current and former Trump advisers who had gathered at the hotel to mingle and drink. On Tuesday, a photograph of an airplane full of Trump campaign surrogates returning from Iowa sailed around the internet. By Wednesday, roughly half them appeared to have passed through the hotel at some point to celebrate the verdict with plenty of booze and slightly bitter undertones.

It was a mood that mirrored the one on display by Mr. Trump, who has so far reflected on his victory by hitting back at Democrats on Twitter.

While the president stewed at the White House before a speech scheduled for noon on Thursday, his brethren arrived at the family property in slick black sport utility vehicles as the weather hit a drizzle.

Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law, arrived early in the evening, ducking into a side room with members of Mr. Trump’s legal defense team, including Pat A. Cipollone and Jay Sekulow. Kellyanne Conway, the president’s counselor, came and went. “They denigrate,” she said. “We celebrate.”

Donald Trump Jr. and Kimberly Guilfoyle, the ever-present campaign road warriors, also made an appearance, as did Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman.

Past a certain hour, the drinks started flowing faster and the lobby turned into a who’s who of fixtures in Mr. Trump’s circle. At one table, Mr. Lewandowski held forth with Eric Bolling, a host for the Sinclair Broadcast Group. Mr. Bolling echoed some supporters by focusing on Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, whose vote to remove the president from office prevented Mr. Trump from being able to say his acquittal had been cast along purely party lines.

“Mitt Romney should be removed from all of his leadership roles and should consider switching parties,” Mr. Bolling declared. When asked if he believed the president would fixate on Mr. Romney’s decision, Mr. Bolling paused. “I hope not,” he said.

This is often the best way to describe the atmosphere at even the best pro-Trump bash: celebratory, but with a palpable amount of spite. Sweet and bitter — the Negroni, as it were, of Senate acquittals.

The perpetual hint of defiance that permeates a crowd like this was even more on display given that the hotel had been a regular gathering place for many of the figures involved in the impeachment proceedings. It was what Lev Parnas, a Soviet-born businessman who played an integral role in the campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate Mr. Trump’s political rivals, called “a breeding ground.”

This, of course, did little to encourage Republicans to shift their support of the president, or the family business, throughout impeachment or otherwise. The Republican National Committee has paid more than $440,000 to the hotel since Mr. Trump was elected — about 24,400 glasses of the hotel’s house white wine. America First Action, a super PAC that supports Mr. Trump’s causes, has spent $505,000 at the hotel since 2017.

As the evening unfolded, the party began to creep out into the open — or at least to the steakhouse adjacent to the lobby. Ms. Guilfoyle and the younger Mr. Trump held court with a merry band of supporters, including Representative Matt Gaetz, Republican of Florida, who has dipped in and out — and is presumably in again — of the Trump fold. Even as he socialized with the president’s family, Mr. Gaetz announced on Twitter that he had filed an ethics complaint against Speaker Nancy Pelosi for tearing up the president’s State of the Union address.

“Nobody is above the law,” he wrote. “She must be held accountable.”

Against a wall stood Nigel Farage, the former leader of the U.K. Independence Party and one of the so-called Bad Boys of Brexit whose perpetual presence at the hotel suggests he should have a punch card.

Around 11 p.m., Mr. Sekulow strode through the lobby to say goodbye, pausing to take pictures with admirers. He had no comment for a reporter on his reaction to the acquittal, but a woman approached him as he left the hotel to provide her own assessment.

“You did great,” she said.

Just behind her, another woman came outside and sniffed the air.

“Ugly night,” she remarked to no one in particular as the celebrants departed.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies

Westlake Legal Group 27donaldjr-2-facebookJumbo Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies United States Politics and Government Turning Point USA Trump, Donald J Jr Trump, Donald J Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us (Book) Republican Party Republican National Committee Presidential Election of 2020 National Republican Senatorial Committee National Republican Campaign Committee McCarthy, Kevin (1965- ) Kirk, Charlie (1993- ) Hachette Book Group Guilfoyle, Kimberly Gaetz, Matt Conservatism (US Politics) Citizens United Books and Literature Book Trade and Publishing America First Policies Amazon.com Inc

Boxes began arriving in early November at the Phoenix headquarters of Turning Point USA, a conservative student group with ties to the Trump family.

They contained copies of the new book by Donald Trump Jr., “Triggered,” according to a person who works in the building. The stockpile grew to roughly 2,000 copies, stored in an underused second-floor office under a poster bearing a slogan: “Capitalism Not Cronyism.”

Turning Point is not the only conservative group making bulk purchases to aid Mr. Trump’s new career as an author. At least nine Republican organizations, G.O.P. candidates or advocacy groups are selling “Triggered” or promoting Mr. Trump’s book tour, according to emails obtained by The New York Times, interviews and disclosures filed with the Federal Election Commission.

The president’s son has emerged over the past few years as a political star in his own right, often said to be considering a run for office. It is neither illegal nor uncommon for candidates and political organizations to use books in fund-raising drives: The National Republican Campaign Committee, for example, has also sold its donors titles by the former speakers Newt Gingrich and Paul Ryan.

But the breadth of the Republican establishment’s effort behind Mr. Trump is striking for a noncandidate whose most significant claim to fame remains his parentage, and who has sought to deflect criticism of his recent attacks on impeachment witnesses by asserting that he is merely a “private citizen.” And it underscores the unusual cross-pollination between the Trump family’s political ambitions, its business ventures and the party President Trump now leads.

Some groups are harnessing the younger Mr. Trump’s popularity to raise political donations while also driving his sales. The N.R.C.C. bought $75,000 worth of books in November, a spokesman said, in a promotion that took in almost $200,000 in contributions. The National Republican Senatorial Committee ordered about 2,500 copies, which it said sold almost immediately.

The Republican National Committee and Citizens United, a conservative activist group run by a former deputy campaign manager to the president, are also offering the book to donors.

Earlier this month, the R.N.C. denied making large bulk purchases of the book, a practice that some best-seller lists, including that of The Times, may penalize authors for when ranking sales. But F.E.C. records released last week showed that it spent almost $100,000 on copies on Oct. 29, a transaction the committee acknowledged was part of its “Triggered” promotion.

Turning Point declined to discuss exactly how many copies the group had bought. But in a statement, a spokesman noted that Mr. Trump would be a featured speaker at the group’s student summit in Florida in December.

“When an author headlines a Turning Point USA event, we regularly purchase the author’s latest work for the students in our chapters who attend,” the spokesman said. “As one of our most requested speakers, Don is headlining our student-leadership conference in Florida this December, and so we purchased copies for some of the students, chapter leaders and V.I.P.s.”

Politicians closely allied with the president are also promoting his son’s book. Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida used his campaign list to promote a ticketed event on Mr. Trump’s book tour where the two men appeared together. The campaign committee for Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the House minority leader, has offered copies to those who donate $35.

“Leader McCarthy shares a close relationship with Donald Trump Jr. and was thrilled to offer ‘Triggered’ to his campaign supporters,” said Drew Florio, a spokesman.

State Republican parties are also pushing the book, framing Mr. Trump’s tour as a campaign effort on his father’s behalf. The G.O.P. organizations in Arizona and Texas advertised tour stops in emails to supporters. The Times obtained copies of the promotions from CounterAction, a digital intelligence firm.

In Texas, where Mr. Trump headlined various fund-raisers, the party bought copies of “Triggered” to give “as a gift to each of the attendees,” according to the communications director for the state party.

“Kimberly and I chose Texas as one of our early stops because we know how important it is for 2020,” Mr. Trump wrote in a message distributed to Texas Republicans, referring to his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle. “Democrats have their eyes on the Lone Star State and are willing to stop at nothing to silence conservatives and turn Texas blue.”

Party committees and candidates generally must report disbursements made to purchase books for donors, as the R.N.C. did. If no fund-raising is involved, they must obtain fair market value if someone uses the lists to promote their private business interests.

Bulk purchasing — some of it deliberately covert — is fairly common but still controversial in the publishing industry. Best-seller lists, like that of The Times, try to police the practice.

The Times, for instance, uses a dagger symbol to indicate bulk purchases. When “Triggered” debuted at No. 1 on the Times list, some observers were quick to point out that it was marked with a dagger.

And on occasion, The Times has removed a title from its best-seller list when evidence emerged that sales did not meet its standards for inclusion. A Times spokeswoman said there were no plans to reassess the presence of “Triggered” on the list.

A spokesman for Mr. Trump, Andy Surabian, said in a statement that any bulk buys were irrelevant to the book’s position on the list.

“In its opening week, ‘Triggered’ outsold its closest competition by roughly 40,000 copies and clearly would have been number one on the N.Y.T. list without the copies sold thru the R.N.C. and other G.O.P.-aligned organizations,” Mr. Surabian said. “Don is proud of the fact that the demand for ‘Triggered’ has been so high that it has allowed groups like the R.N.C., N.R.S.C. and the N.R.C.C. to net hundreds of thousands of dollars through their marketing of the book.”

When asked about big orders of “Triggered,” Mr. Trump’s publisher, Hachette Book Group, acknowledged that it had made sales to some non-retail organizations and noted that outlets might have sold the book in bulk. But it said it had no record of direct purchases by Turning Point.

Pictures provided to The Times, however, showed dozens of boxes of “Triggered” stacked in Turning Point’s office. At least some had shipped from a Hachette distribution center in Indiana.

There is little question Mr. Trump enjoys a substantial natural audience for “Triggered,” an extended screed against the American left. The book argues that liberals suffer from a victim complex and attacks undocumented immigrants among others.

Data shows that during the first two weeks of November, he sold tens of thousands of copies in areas where he made tour stops, including at Trump properties in Las Vegas and Washington.

Given his prominence on the national stage and Hachette’s significant promotional campaign, the book would almost certainly have reached the best-seller lists even without bulk sales.

“Triggered” sold 115,067 copies through the week ending on Nov. 16, the most recent for which figures are available, according to NPD BookScan. The book also hit No. 1 on The Washington Post’s nonfiction best-seller list and appeared in the top 10 of Amazon’s.

Mr. Trump appears to have been closely attuned to the public-relations coup of notching the top spot on the best-seller lists of newspapers his family routinely attacks.

“Can you imagine the Editor of The Failing New York Times, waking up one morning, having to put ‘Triggered’ by Donald Trump Jr. as the NUMBER ONE BOOK IN AMERICA?” Mr. Trump wrote in one marketing email.

That is not how the process works. Instead, The Times’s lists draw on sales data provided by a range of retailers.

Some publishing executives argue that authors who benefit from bulk purchases have an unfair advantage over writers who rely on organic sales. The visibility that comes with the best-seller list can have a huge impact on an author’s royalties, speaking fees and future publishing advances.

“The fact that it is preventing other authors from getting the recognition that they should rightfully be receiving is a bit unfair,” said Morgan Entrekin, publisher and chief executive of Grove Atlantic.

The purchase by Turning Point is an example of the mutually beneficial relationship between Mr. Trump and political allies he and his father have attracted.

Once a relatively minor organization, Turning Point has had a surge in prominence in recent years, bolstered by a close relationship with the Trumps. The group’s founder, Charlie Kirk, worked for the younger Mr. Trump during the 2016 campaign. Last year, the group received $50,000 from America First Policies, a pro-Trump organization where Ms. Guilfoyle has served as a vice chairwoman.

Mr. Trump has appeared at several Turning Point events. At one in California, he and Ms. Guilfoyle left early after being shouted down — not by liberals, but by far-right supporters who were angry he would not take questions, according to The Guardian.

In the latest Times best-seller list, released on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump lost the top spot, dropping to No. 2 among nonfiction books.

The week’s top seller was another title from Hachette: “A Warning,” by an anonymous senior Trump administration official who depicts the president as unfit for office.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies

Westlake Legal Group 27donaldjr-2-facebookJumbo Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies United States Politics and Government Turning Point USA Trump, Donald J Jr Trump, Donald J Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us (Book) Republican Party Republican National Committee Presidential Election of 2020 National Republican Senatorial Committee National Republican Campaign Committee McCarthy, Kevin (1965- ) Kirk, Charlie (1993- ) Hachette Book Group Guilfoyle, Kimberly Gaetz, Matt Conservatism (US Politics) Citizens United Books and Literature Book Trade and Publishing America First Policies Amazon.com Inc

Boxes began arriving in early November at the Phoenix headquarters of Turning Point USA, a conservative student group with ties to the Trump family.

They contained copies of the new book by Donald Trump Jr., “Triggered,” according to a person who works in the building. The stockpile grew to roughly 2,000 copies, stored in an underused second-floor office under a poster bearing a slogan: “Capitalism Not Cronyism.”

Turning Point is not the only conservative group making bulk purchases to aid Mr. Trump’s new career as an author. At least nine Republican organizations, G.O.P. candidates or advocacy groups are selling “Triggered” or promoting Mr. Trump’s book tour, according to emails obtained by The New York Times, interviews and disclosures filed with the Federal Election Commission.

The president’s son has emerged over the past few years as a political star in his own right, often said to be considering a run for office. It is neither illegal nor uncommon for candidates and political organizations to use books in fund-raising drives: The National Republican Campaign Committee, for example, has also sold its donors titles by the former speakers Newt Gingrich and Paul Ryan.

But the breadth of the Republican establishment’s effort behind Mr. Trump is striking for a noncandidate whose most significant claim to fame remains his parentage, and who has sought to deflect criticism of his recent attacks on impeachment witnesses by asserting that he is merely a “private citizen.” And it underscores the unusual cross-pollination between the Trump family’s political ambitions, its business ventures and the party President Trump now leads.

Some groups are harnessing the younger Mr. Trump’s popularity to raise political donations while also driving his sales. The N.R.C.C. bought $75,000 worth of books in November, a spokesman said, in a promotion that took in almost $200,000 in contributions. The National Republican Senatorial Committee ordered about 2,500 copies, which it said sold almost immediately.

The Republican National Committee and Citizens United, a conservative activist group run by a former deputy campaign manager to the president, are also offering the book to donors.

Earlier this month, the R.N.C. denied making large bulk purchases of the book, a practice that some best-seller lists, including that of The Times, may penalize authors for when ranking sales. But F.E.C. records released last week showed that it spent almost $100,000 on copies on Oct. 29, a transaction the committee acknowledged was part of its “Triggered” promotion.

Turning Point declined to discuss exactly how many copies the group had bought. But in a statement, a spokesman noted that Mr. Trump would be a featured speaker at the group’s student summit in Florida in December.

“When an author headlines a Turning Point USA event, we regularly purchase the author’s latest work for the students in our chapters who attend,” the spokesman said. “As one of our most requested speakers, Don is headlining our student-leadership conference in Florida this December, and so we purchased copies for some of the students, chapter leaders and V.I.P.s.”

Politicians closely allied with the president are also promoting his son’s book. Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida used his campaign list to promote a ticketed event on Mr. Trump’s book tour where the two men appeared together. The campaign committee for Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the House minority leader, has offered copies to those who donate $35.

“Leader McCarthy shares a close relationship with Donald Trump Jr. and was thrilled to offer ‘Triggered’ to his campaign supporters,” said Drew Florio, a spokesman.

State Republican parties are also pushing the book, framing Mr. Trump’s tour as a campaign effort on his father’s behalf. The G.O.P. organizations in Arizona and Texas advertised tour stops in emails to supporters. The Times obtained copies of the promotions from CounterAction, a digital intelligence firm.

In Texas, where Mr. Trump headlined various fund-raisers, the party bought copies of “Triggered” to give “as a gift to each of the attendees,” according to the communications director for the state party.

“Kimberly and I chose Texas as one of our early stops because we know how important it is for 2020,” Mr. Trump wrote in a message distributed to Texas Republicans, referring to his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle. “Democrats have their eyes on the Lone Star State and are willing to stop at nothing to silence conservatives and turn Texas blue.”

Party committees and candidates generally must report disbursements made to purchase books for donors, as the R.N.C. did. If no fund-raising is involved, they must obtain fair market value if someone uses the lists to promote their private business interests.

Bulk purchasing — some of it deliberately covert — is fairly common but still controversial in the publishing industry. Best-seller lists, like that of The Times, try to police the practice.

The Times, for instance, uses a dagger symbol to indicate bulk purchases. When “Triggered” debuted at No. 1 on the Times list, some observers were quick to point out that it was marked with a dagger.

And on occasion, The Times has removed a title from its best-seller list when evidence emerged that sales did not meet its standards for inclusion. A Times spokeswoman said there were no plans to reassess the presence of “Triggered” on the list.

A spokesman for Mr. Trump, Andy Surabian, said in a statement that any bulk buys were irrelevant to the book’s position on the list.

“In its opening week, ‘Triggered’ outsold its closest competition by roughly 40,000 copies and clearly would have been number one on the N.Y.T. list without the copies sold thru the R.N.C. and other G.O.P.-aligned organizations,” Mr. Surabian said. “Don is proud of the fact that the demand for ‘Triggered’ has been so high that it has allowed groups like the R.N.C., N.R.S.C. and the N.R.C.C. to net hundreds of thousands of dollars through their marketing of the book.”

When asked about big orders of “Triggered,” Mr. Trump’s publisher, Hachette Book Group, acknowledged that it had made sales to some non-retail organizations and noted that outlets might have sold the book in bulk. But it said it had no record of direct purchases by Turning Point.

Pictures provided to The Times, however, showed dozens of boxes of “Triggered” stacked in Turning Point’s office. At least some had shipped from a Hachette distribution center in Indiana.

There is little question Mr. Trump enjoys a substantial natural audience for “Triggered,” an extended screed against the American left. The book argues that liberals suffer from a victim complex and attacks undocumented immigrants among others.

Data shows that during the first two weeks of November, he sold tens of thousands of copies in areas where he made tour stops, including at Trump properties in Las Vegas and Washington.

Given his prominence on the national stage and Hachette’s significant promotional campaign, the book would almost certainly have reached the best-seller lists even without bulk sales.

“Triggered” sold 115,067 copies through the week ending on Nov. 16, the most recent for which figures are available, according to NPD BookScan. The book also hit No. 1 on The Washington Post’s nonfiction best-seller list and appeared in the top 10 of Amazon’s.

Mr. Trump appears to have been closely attuned to the public-relations coup of notching the top spot on the best-seller lists of newspapers his family routinely attacks.

“Can you imagine the Editor of The Failing New York Times, waking up one morning, having to put ‘Triggered’ by Donald Trump Jr. as the NUMBER ONE BOOK IN AMERICA?” Mr. Trump wrote in one marketing email.

That is not how the process works. Instead, The Times’s lists draw on sales data provided by a range of retailers.

Some publishing executives argue that authors who benefit from bulk purchases have an unfair advantage over writers who rely on organic sales. The visibility that comes with the best-seller list can have a huge impact on an author’s royalties, speaking fees and future publishing advances.

“The fact that it is preventing other authors from getting the recognition that they should rightfully be receiving is a bit unfair,” said Morgan Entrekin, publisher and chief executive of Grove Atlantic.

The purchase by Turning Point is an example of the mutually beneficial relationship between Mr. Trump and political allies he and his father have attracted.

Once a relatively minor organization, Turning Point has had a surge in prominence in recent years, bolstered by a close relationship with the Trumps. The group’s founder, Charlie Kirk, worked for the younger Mr. Trump during the 2016 campaign. Last year, the group received $50,000 from America First Policies, a pro-Trump organization where Ms. Guilfoyle has served as a vice chairwoman.

Mr. Trump has appeared at several Turning Point events. At one in California, he and Ms. Guilfoyle left early after being shouted down — not by liberals, but by far-right supporters who were angry he would not take questions, according to The Guardian.

In the latest Times best-seller list, released on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump lost the top spot, dropping to No. 2 among nonfiction books.

The week’s top seller was another title from Hachette: “A Warning,” by an anonymous senior Trump administration official who depicts the president as unfit for office.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies

Westlake Legal Group 27donaldjr-2-facebookJumbo Donald Trump Jr., Debut Author, Sees Sales Bolstered by G.O.P. Allies United States Politics and Government Turning Point USA Trump, Donald J Jr Trump, Donald J Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us (Book) Republican Party Republican National Committee Presidential Election of 2020 National Republican Senatorial Committee National Republican Campaign Committee McCarthy, Kevin (1965- ) Kirk, Charlie (1993- ) Hachette Book Group Guilfoyle, Kimberly Gaetz, Matt Conservatism (US Politics) Citizens United Books and Literature Book Trade and Publishing America First Policies Amazon.com Inc

Boxes began arriving in early November at the Phoenix headquarters of Turning Point USA, a conservative student group with ties to the Trump family.

They contained copies of the new book by Donald Trump Jr., “Triggered,” according to a person who works in the building. The stockpile grew to roughly 2,000 copies, stored in an underused second-floor office under a poster bearing a slogan: “Capitalism Not Cronyism.”

Turning Point is not the only conservative group making bulk purchases to aid Mr. Trump’s new career as an author. At least nine Republican organizations, G.O.P. candidates or advocacy groups are selling “Triggered” or promoting Mr. Trump’s book tour, according to emails obtained by The New York Times, interviews and disclosures filed with the Federal Election Commission.

The president’s son has emerged over the past few years as a political star in his own right, often said to be considering a run for office. It is neither illegal nor uncommon for candidates and political organizations to use books in fund-raising drives: The National Republican Campaign Committee, for example, has also sold its donors titles by the former speakers Newt Gingrich and Paul Ryan.

But the breadth of the Republican establishment’s effort behind Mr. Trump is striking for a noncandidate whose most significant claim to fame remains his parentage, and who has sought to deflect criticism of his recent attacks on impeachment witnesses by asserting that he is merely a “private citizen.” And it underscores the unusual cross-pollination between the Trump family’s political ambitions, its business ventures and the party President Trump now leads.

Some groups are harnessing the younger Mr. Trump’s popularity to raise political donations while also driving his sales. The N.R.C.C. bought $75,000 worth of books in November, a spokesman said, in a promotion that took in almost $200,000 in contributions. The National Republican Senatorial Committee ordered about 2,500 copies, which it said sold almost immediately.

The Republican National Committee and Citizens United, a conservative activist group run by a former deputy campaign manager to the president, are also offering the book to donors.

Earlier this month, the R.N.C. denied making large bulk purchases of the book, a practice that some best-seller lists, including that of The Times, may penalize authors for when ranking sales. But F.E.C. records released last week showed that it spent almost $100,000 on copies on Oct. 29, a transaction the committee acknowledged was part of its “Triggered” promotion.

Turning Point declined to discuss exactly how many copies the group had bought. But in a statement, a spokesman noted that Mr. Trump would be a featured speaker at the group’s student summit in Florida in December.

“When an author headlines a Turning Point USA event, we regularly purchase the author’s latest work for the students in our chapters who attend,” the spokesman said. “As one of our most requested speakers, Don is headlining our student-leadership conference in Florida this December, and so we purchased copies for some of the students, chapter leaders and V.I.P.s.”

Politicians closely allied with the president are also promoting his son’s book. Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida used his campaign list to promote a ticketed event on Mr. Trump’s book tour where the two men appeared together. The campaign committee for Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the House minority leader, has offered copies to those who donate $35.

“Leader McCarthy shares a close relationship with Donald Trump Jr. and was thrilled to offer ‘Triggered’ to his campaign supporters,” said Drew Florio, a spokesman.

State Republican parties are also pushing the book, framing Mr. Trump’s tour as a campaign effort on his father’s behalf. The G.O.P. organizations in Arizona and Texas advertised tour stops in emails to supporters. The Times obtained copies of the promotions from CounterAction, a digital intelligence firm.

In Texas, where Mr. Trump headlined various fund-raisers, the party bought copies of “Triggered” to give “as a gift to each of the attendees,” according to the communications director for the state party.

“Kimberly and I chose Texas as one of our early stops because we know how important it is for 2020,” Mr. Trump wrote in a message distributed to Texas Republicans, referring to his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle. “Democrats have their eyes on the Lone Star State and are willing to stop at nothing to silence conservatives and turn Texas blue.”

Party committees and candidates generally must report disbursements made to purchase books for donors, as the R.N.C. did. If no fund-raising is involved, they must obtain fair market value if someone uses the lists to promote their private business interests.

Bulk purchasing — some of it deliberately covert — is fairly common but still controversial in the publishing industry. Best-seller lists, like that of The Times, try to police the practice.

The Times, for instance, uses a dagger symbol to indicate bulk purchases. When “Triggered” debuted at No. 1 on the Times list, some observers were quick to point out that it was marked with a dagger.

And on occasion, The Times has removed a title from its best-seller list when evidence emerged that sales did not meet its standards for inclusion. A Times spokeswoman said there were no plans to reassess the presence of “Triggered” on the list.

A spokesman for Mr. Trump, Andy Surabian, said in a statement that any bulk buys were irrelevant to the book’s position on the list.

“In its opening week, ‘Triggered’ outsold its closest competition by roughly 40,000 copies and clearly would have been number one on the N.Y.T. list without the copies sold thru the R.N.C. and other G.O.P.-aligned organizations,” Mr. Surabian said. “Don is proud of the fact that the demand for ‘Triggered’ has been so high that it has allowed groups like the R.N.C., N.R.S.C. and the N.R.C.C. to net hundreds of thousands of dollars through their marketing of the book.”

When asked about big orders of “Triggered,” Mr. Trump’s publisher, Hachette Book Group, acknowledged that it had made sales to some non-retail organizations and noted that outlets might have sold the book in bulk. But it said it had no record of direct purchases by Turning Point.

Pictures provided to The Times, however, showed dozens of boxes of “Triggered” stacked in Turning Point’s office. At least some had shipped from a Hachette distribution center in Indiana.

There is little question Mr. Trump enjoys a substantial natural audience for “Triggered,” an extended screed against the American left. The book argues that liberals suffer from a victim complex and attacks undocumented immigrants among others.

Data shows that during the first two weeks of November, he sold tens of thousands of copies in areas where he made tour stops, including at Trump properties in Las Vegas and Washington.

Given his prominence on the national stage and Hachette’s significant promotional campaign, the book would almost certainly have reached the best-seller lists even without bulk sales.

“Triggered” sold 115,067 copies through the week ending on Nov. 16, the most recent for which figures are available, according to NPD BookScan. The book also hit No. 1 on The Washington Post’s nonfiction best-seller list and appeared in the top 10 of Amazon’s.

Mr. Trump appears to have been closely attuned to the public-relations coup of notching the top spot on the best-seller lists of newspapers his family routinely attacks.

“Can you imagine the Editor of The Failing New York Times, waking up one morning, having to put ‘Triggered’ by Donald Trump Jr. as the NUMBER ONE BOOK IN AMERICA?” Mr. Trump wrote in one marketing email.

That is not how the process works. Instead, The Times’s lists draw on sales data provided by a range of retailers.

Some publishing executives argue that authors who benefit from bulk purchases have an unfair advantage over writers who rely on organic sales. The visibility that comes with the best-seller list can have a huge impact on an author’s royalties, speaking fees and future publishing advances.

“The fact that it is preventing other authors from getting the recognition that they should rightfully be receiving is a bit unfair,” said Morgan Entrekin, publisher and chief executive of Grove Atlantic.

The purchase by Turning Point is an example of the mutually beneficial relationship between Mr. Trump and political allies he and his father have attracted.

Once a relatively minor organization, Turning Point has had a surge in prominence in recent years, bolstered by a close relationship with the Trumps. The group’s founder, Charlie Kirk, worked for the younger Mr. Trump during the 2016 campaign. Last year, the group received $50,000 from America First Policies, a pro-Trump organization where Ms. Guilfoyle has served as a vice chairwoman.

Mr. Trump has appeared at several Turning Point events. At one in California, he and Ms. Guilfoyle left early after being shouted down — not by liberals, but by far-right supporters who were angry he would not take questions, according to The Guardian.

In the latest Times best-seller list, released on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump lost the top spot, dropping to No. 2 among nonfiction books.

The week’s top seller was another title from Hachette: “A Warning,” by an anonymous senior Trump administration official who depicts the president as unfit for office.

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Republicans Grind Impeachment Inquiry to Halt as Evidence Mounts Against Trump

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-impeach-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Republicans Grind Impeachment Inquiry to Halt as Evidence Mounts Against Trump United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Schiff, Adam B Scalise, Steve Republican Party House of Representatives House Committee on Intelligence Gaetz, Matt Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — House Republicans ground the impeachment inquiry to a halt for hours on Wednesday, staging an attention-grabbing protest at the Capitol that sowed chaos and delayed a crucial deposition as they sought to insulate President Trump against mounting evidence of misconduct.

The day after the most damning testimony yet about Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign to enlist Ukraine to smear his political rivals, House Republicans stormed into the secure office suite where impeachment investigators have been conducting private interviews that have painted a damaging picture of the president’s behavior — and refused to leave.

Chanting “Let us in! Let us in!” about two dozen Republican lawmakers — most of whom are not on the committees conducting the inquiry and are therefore not entitled to attend their hearings — pushed past Capitol Police officers to enter the secure rooms of the House Intelligence Committee, which is leading the investigation. Republicans who are on the committees have been in on the hearings from the start and have had the chance to hear from all the witnesses.

After several contentious hours marked by shouting matches between Republican and Democratic lawmakers and an appearance by the sergeant-at-arms, the top law enforcement official in the Capitol, Wednesday’s witness began testifying. Laura K. Cooper, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia, answered questions for more than three hours before the panel wrapped up its work for the day.

Across the Capitol, leading Republican senators who have become resigned to the prospect of serving as jurors in the impeachment trial of their own party’s president were struggling to cope with the revelations about Mr. Trump.

“The picture coming out of it, based on the reporting that we’ve seen, I would say is not a good one,” Senator John Thune of South Dakota, the No. 2 Republican, told CNN. “But I would say also that until we have a process that allows for everybody to see this in full transparency, it’s pretty hard to draw any hard and fast conclusions.”

His comments came a day after Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, denied a claim by Mr. Trump that the senator had told the president that a telephone call he had with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, which has become a crucial focus of the inquiry, was “perfect” and “innocent.” Mr. McConnell said he could recall no such conversation.

In the House, Republicans were rushing to Mr. Trump’s defense as the president has publicly demanded, as they protested the inquiry and insisted on access.

“This is a Soviet-style process,” declared Representative Steve Scalise, the second-ranking House Republican. “It should not be allowed in the United States of America. Every member of Congress ought to be allowed in that room. The press ought to be allowed in that room.”

Some of the Republicans brought their cellphones into the secure room, which is not permitted and considered a security breach. The sergeant-at-arms, the top law enforcement officer in the Capitol, was called in to handle the situation as Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, attempted to intervene.

The standoff stretched into the afternoon as protesting Republicans ordered pizza and fast food for the throng of reporters assembled to witness their spectacle. It came the day after the explosive testimony of William B. Taylor Jr., the top American diplomat in Ukraine, who effectively confirmed Democrats’ main accusation against Mr. Trump: that the president withheld military aid from Ukraine in a quid pro quo effort to pressure that country’s leader to incriminate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and smear other Democrats.

Democrats said the timing was no coincidence, and characterized the Republican disruption — “sit-in, stand-in, call it whatever you want,” said Representative Harley Rouda, Democrat of California — as a desperate attempt to deflect attention from the damaging testimony.

At the White House, Mr. Trump took to Twitter to assail Mr. Taylor and his lawyer John Bellinger — and to offer encouragement to Republican protesters.

“Never Trumper Republican John Bellinger, represents Never Trumper Diplomat Bill Taylor (who I don’t know), in testimony before Congress!” the president wrote. “Do Nothing Democrats allow Republicans Zero Representation, Zero due process, and Zero Transparency.”

For weeks now, lawmakers on three House committees — Intelligence, Oversight and Reform, and Foreign Affairs — have been conducting private question-and-answer sessions, which have produced a stream of compelling testimony from government witnesses, much of it confirming and expanding on the intelligence whistle-blower complaint that touched off the impeachment inquiry.

Those sessions are attended by both Democrats and Republicans, and both have an opportunity to question witnesses; more than 100 of the 435 members of the House are eligible to participate. Democrats have said that they plan to hold open hearings after the committees finish deposing witnesses, and that they intend to make public complete transcripts of witness testimony after they have been reviewed for classified material.

But amid a drip-drip-drip of news accounts from the closed sessions, Republicans have grown increasingly frustrated, complaining that Democrats are controlling the narrative.

On Wednesday morning, Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida led a parade of his colleagues to the bowels of the Capitol, where Ms. Cooper was to be deposed in the secure room, known as a SCIF, for Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility.

Also on Wednesday, House impeachment investigators leveled new demands of the State Department, requesting access to a relatively narrow set of communications, notes and memorandums related to American policy toward Ukraine that could bolster damning witness testimony.

Among the documents in question are summaries of key executive branch meetings, diplomatic cables about Mr. Trump’s decision to freeze $391 million in security assistance for Ukraine, text and email messages among key figures in the inquiry, and other records created as Mr. Trump and his allies sought to pressure Ukraine into undertaking investigations into his political rivals.

“These documents include information central to the inquiry’s core area of investigation: the president’s efforts to press Ukraine to initiate investigations that would benefit his personal and political interests, and not the national interest,” wrote three Democratic committee leaders guiding the inquiry, Mr. Schiff; Representative Eliot L. Engel of New York, the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee; and Representative Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, the acting chairwoman of the Oversight and Reform Committee.

In keeping with confidentiality rules around the investigation, the three Democrats did not specifically identify the documents in question, but they appeared to match descriptions of records referenced in recent days by key witnesses.

On Tuesday, Mr. Taylor told the committees that he kept detailed notes of his time in Kiev that allowed him to recreate a damning portrait of events in his testimony. He referred to memos, including a June 30 account of his conversation with the Ukrainian president, that could provide new and potentially explosive avenues of investigation for Democrats if they get their hands on them. He also discussed a late-August cable he composed “describing the ‘folly’ I saw in withholding military aid to Ukraine at a time when hostilities were still active.”

A lawyer for Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union, indicated before his deposition with investigators that the ambassador had produced communications and other records to the State Department that he hoped would be handed over to investigators. They were not.

And another former State Department official told investigators that one of his former colleagues, George P. Kent, had written a memo documenting an early October meeting with a State Department lawyer about how to respond to the impeachment inquiry that had alarmed him.

The Democrats did not put a due date on their request, and for now have chosen not to issue a subpoena. The State Department defied an earlier, broader subpoena for a swath of potential records related to the case. It may be considerably more difficult for the department to justify not handing over documents matching the latest request, though, given the political pressure created by the testimony from Mr. Taylor, Mr. Sondland and others.

Nicholas Fandos, Emily Cochrane and Michael D. Shear contributed reporting.

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Republicans Grind Impeachment Inquiry to Halt as Picture Darkens for Trump

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-impeach-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Republicans Grind Impeachment Inquiry to Halt as Picture Darkens for Trump United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Schiff, Adam B Scalise, Steve Republican Party House of Representatives House Committee on Intelligence Gaetz, Matt Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — House Republicans ground the impeachment inquiry to a halt on Wednesday, staging an attention-grabbing protest at the Capitol that sowed chaos and derailed a crucial deposition as they sought to insulate President Trump against mounting evidence of misconduct.

The day after the most damning testimony yet about Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign to enlist Ukraine to smear his political rivals, House Republicans stormed into the secure office suite where impeachment investigators have been conducting private interviews that have painted a damaging picture of the president’s behavior — and refused to leave.

Chanting “Let us in! Let us in!” about two dozen Republican lawmakers — most of whom are not on the committees conducting the inquiry and are therefore not entitled to attend their hearings — pushed past Capitol Police officers to enter the secure rooms of the House Intelligence Committee, which is leading the investigation. Republicans who are on the committees have been in on the hearings from the start and have heard all the witnesses.

“This is a Soviet-style process,” declared Representative Steve Scalise, the No. 2 Republican. “It should not be allowed in the United States of America. Every member of Congress ought to be allowed in that room. The press ought to be allowed in that room.”

Frustrated Democrats temporarily shut down the session before resuming it in the afternoon, when Laura K. Cooper, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia, began testifying.

Across the Capitol, leading Republican senators who have become resigned to the prospect of serving as jurors in the impeachment trial of their own party’s president were struggling to cope with the revelations about Mr. Trump.

“The picture coming out of it, based on the reporting that we’ve seen, I would say is not a good one,” Senator John Thune of South Dakota, the No. 2 Republican, told CNN. “But I would say also that until we have a process that allows for everybody to see this in full transparency, it’s pretty hard to draw any hard and fast conclusions.”

His comments came a day after Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, denied a claim by Mr. Trump that the senator had told the president that a telephone call he had with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, which has become a crucial focus of the inquiry, was “perfect” and “innocent.” Mr. McConnell said he could recall no such conversation.

In the House, Republicans were rushing to Mr. Trump’s defense as the president has publicly demanded, as they protested the inquiry and insisted on access. Some brought their cellphones into the secure room, which is not permitted and considered a security breach. The sergeant-at-arms, the top law enforcement officer in the Capitol, was called in to handle the situation as Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, attempted to intervene.

The standoff stretched into the afternoon as protesting Republicans ordered pizza and fast food for the throng of reporters assembled to witness their spectacle. It came the day after the explosive testimony of William B. Taylor Jr., the top American diplomat in Ukraine, who effectively confirmed Democrats’ main accusation against Mr. Trump: that the president withheld military aid from Ukraine in a quid pro quo effort to pressure that country’s leader to incriminate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and smear other Democrats.

Democrats said the timing was no coincidence, and characterized the Republican disruption — “sit-in, stand-in, call it whatever you want,” said Representative Harley Rouda, Democrat of California — as a desperate attempt to deflect attention from the damaging testimony.

At the White House, Mr. Trump took to Twitter to assail Mr. Taylor and his lawyer John Bellinger — and to offer encouragement to Republican protesters.

“Never Trumper Republican John Bellinger, represents Never Trumper Diplomat Bill Taylor (who I don’t know), in testimony before Congress!” the president wrote. “Do Nothing Democrats allow Republicans Zero Representation, Zero due process, and Zero Transparency.”

For weeks now, lawmakers on three House committees — Intelligence, Oversight and Reform, and Foreign Affairs — have been conducting private question-and-answer sessions, which have produced a stream of compelling testimony from government witnesses, much of it confirming and expanding on the intelligence whistle-blower complaint that touched off the impeachment inquiry.

Those sessions are attended by both Democrats and Republicans, and both have an opportunity to question witnesses; more than 100 of the 435 members of the House are eligible to participate. Democrats have said that they plan to hold open hearings after the committees finish deposing witnesses, and that they intend to make public complete transcripts of witness testimony after they have been reviewed for classified material.

But amid a drip-drip-drip of news accounts from the closed sessions, Republicans have grown increasingly frustrated, complaining that Democrats are controlling the narrative.

On Wednesday morning, Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida led a parade of his colleagues to the bowels of the Capitol, where Ms. Cooper was to be deposed in the secure room, known as a SCIF, for Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility.

Also on Wednesday, House impeachment investigators leveled new demands of the State Department, requesting access to a relatively narrow set of communications, notes and memorandums related to American policy toward Ukraine that could bolster damning witness testimony.

Among the documents in question are summaries of key executive branch meetings, diplomatic cables about Mr. Trump’s decision to freeze $391 million in security assistance for Ukraine, text and email messages among key figures in the inquiry, and other records created as Mr. Trump and his allies sought to pressure Ukraine into undertaking investigations into his political rivals.

“These documents include information central to the inquiry’s core area of investigation: the president’s efforts to press Ukraine to initiate investigations that would benefit his personal and political interests, and not the national interest,” wrote three Democratic committee leaders guiding the inquiry, Mr. Schiff; Representative Eliot L. Engel of New York, the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee; and Representative Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, the acting chairwoman of the Oversight and Reform Committee.

In keeping with confidentiality rules around the investigation, the three Democrats did not specifically identify the documents in question, but they appeared to match descriptions of records referenced in recent days by key witnesses.

On Tuesday, Mr. Taylor told the committees that he kept detailed notes of his time in Kiev that allowed him to recreate a damning portrait of events in his testimony. He referred to memos, including a June 30 account of his conversation with the Ukrainian president, that could provide new and potentially explosive avenues of investigation for Democrats if they get their hands on them. He also discussed a late-August cable he composed “describing the ‘folly’ I saw in withholding military aid to Ukraine at a time when hostilities were still active.”

A lawyer for Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union, indicated before his deposition with investigators that the ambassador had produced communications and other records to the State Department that he hoped would be handed over to investigators. They were not.

And another former State Department official told investigators that one of his former colleagues, George P. Kent, had written a memo documenting an early October meeting with a State Department lawyer about how to respond to the impeachment inquiry that had alarmed him.

The Democrats did not put a due date on their request, and for now have chosen not to issue a subpoena. The State Department defied an earlier, broader subpoena for a swath of potential records related to the case. It may be considerably more difficult for the department to justify not handing over documents matching the latest request, though, given the political pressure created by the testimony from Mr. Taylor, Mr. Sondland and others.

Nicholas Fandos, Emily Cochrane and Michael D. Shear contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com