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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Garcia, Sylvia R."

Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address

WASHINGTON — In the uncertain turmoil of American politics, there is reassurance in the predictable pomp of the State of the Union.

Iowa bungled its Democratic caucus results on Monday night. But the trusty man in the yellow rain gear was still out before dawn in Washington on Tuesday, power-washing the sidewalk outside the Capitol.

The impeachment trial of President Trump is still in its final stage ahead of the vote on Wednesday, yet most senators intend to walk across the Rotunda to the chamber of the House of Representatives on Tuesday night to hear the annual address by the defendant — as they did in 1999 during the trial of former President Bill Clinton.

The high rituals of statecraft cannot be ignored.

A mean cleaning outside the Capitol Tuesday morning.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times The Capitol dome’s reflection after a rainy start of the day.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168381711_aa218253-bfec-4afa-ae7c-c709a8c59886-articleLarge Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J State of the Union Message (US) Shaheen, Jeanne Senate Primaries and Caucuses impeachment House of Representatives Garcia, Sylvia R. Cassidy, Bill (1957- ) Capitol Building (Washington, DC) Bennet, Michael Farrand

George Buss, an Abraham Lincoln impersonator, walking through the Senate office buildings.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

“Does anybody imagine that they know what the president’s going to do?” said Senator Bill Cassidy, Republican of Louisiana. “Not me!”

Senators took turns on Tuesday delivering lonely speeches to explain their upcoming votes on the impeachment of the president they would welcome in a matter of hours.

“I come to the floor this afternoon to express my profound disappointment,” said Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat of New Hampshire. “This is a sad moment in our nation’s history.”

Outside the House chambers, one of the Democratic impeachment managers, Representative Sylvia R. Garcia of Texas, tried to do a live television interview, only to be interrupted by the rattle of a cart carrying embroidered linens for the evening festivities.

Engineers setting up lights inside of Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times Placards for media positions were placed on the walls.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In Statuary Hall, after tour groups of Navy officers in uniform and teenagers in headphones were gone for the day, crews set up hot lights and scaffolding for cameras.

Velvet ropes went up in corridors. Trash cans were emptied, the detritus of the regular day tossed to make way for the crush to come. Workers even restocked emergency escape hoods, the masks that protect against smoke and fire.

Lights were set up in Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A tour guide speaking to a group tour.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
Caterers preparing desserts for a reception ahead of the State of the Union.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Food and drinks were set up, as well.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In some ways, it was business as usual. In the basement hallways of a Senate office building, a man dressed as Abraham Lincoln, top hat and all, strolled by the lunch crowd at the cafeteria. George Buss, the Lincoln look-alike, said he was en route to visit lawmakers about the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.

But then there was Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party and an apparent State of the Union attendee, roaming the building. Senator Michael Bennet, Democrat of Colorado and a presidential candidate, drew a gaggle of reporters who asked not about impeachment, but about the botched Iowa caucus results.

“Wait,” asked a Senate aide grabbing utensils for lunch as she paused to look up at the cable news screens, eager for the latest updates from beyond Capitol Hill. “What’s happening with Iowa?”

Tourists in the Capitol rotunda.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A television reporter waiting to go on air.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

Catie Edmondson and Erin Schaff contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address

WASHINGTON — In the uncertain turmoil of American politics, there is reassurance in the predictable pomp of the State of the Union.

Iowa bungled its Democratic caucus results on Monday night. But the trusty man in the yellow rain gear was still out before dawn in Washington on Tuesday, power-washing the sidewalk outside the Capitol.

The impeachment trial of President Trump is still in its final stage ahead of the vote on Wednesday, yet most senators intend to walk across the Rotunda to the chamber of the House of Representatives on Tuesday night to hear the annual address by the defendant — as they did in 1999 during the trial of former President Bill Clinton.

The high rituals of statecraft cannot be ignored.

A mean cleaning outside the Capitol Tuesday morning.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times The Capitol dome’s reflection after a rainy start of the day.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168381711_aa218253-bfec-4afa-ae7c-c709a8c59886-articleLarge Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J State of the Union Message (US) Shaheen, Jeanne Senate Primaries and Caucuses impeachment House of Representatives Garcia, Sylvia R. Cassidy, Bill (1957- ) Capitol Building (Washington, DC) Bennet, Michael Farrand

George Buss, an Abraham Lincoln impersonator, walking through the Senate office buildings.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

“Does anybody imagine that they know what the president’s going to do?” said Senator Bill Cassidy, Republican of Louisiana. “Not me!”

Senators took turns on Tuesday delivering lonely speeches to explain their upcoming votes on the impeachment of the president they would welcome in a matter of hours.

“I come to the floor this afternoon to express my profound disappointment,” said Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat of New Hampshire. “This is a sad moment in our nation’s history.”

Outside the House chambers, one of the Democratic impeachment managers, Representative Sylvia R. Garcia of Texas, tried to do a live television interview, only to be interrupted by the rattle of a cart carrying embroidered linens for the evening festivities.

Engineers setting up lights inside of Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times Placards for media positions were placed on the walls.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In Statuary Hall, after tour groups of Navy officers in uniform and teenagers in headphones were gone for the day, crews set up hot lights and scaffolding for cameras.

Velvet ropes went up in corridors. Trash cans were emptied, the detritus of the regular day tossed to make way for the crush to come. Workers even restocked emergency escape hoods, the masks that protect against smoke and fire.

Lights were set up in Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A tour guide speaking to a group tour.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
Caterers preparing desserts for a reception ahead of the State of the Union.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Food and drinks were set up, as well.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In some ways, it was business as usual. In the basement hallways of a Senate office building, a man dressed as Abraham Lincoln, top hat and all, strolled by the lunch crowd at the cafeteria. George Buss, the Lincoln look-alike, said he was en route to visit lawmakers about the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.

But then there was Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party and an apparent State of the Union attendee, roaming the building. Senator Michael Bennet, Democrat of Colorado and a presidential candidate, drew a gaggle of reporters who asked not about impeachment, but about the botched Iowa caucus results.

“Wait,” asked a Senate aide grabbing utensils for lunch as she paused to look up at the cable news screens, eager for the latest updates from beyond Capitol Hill. “What’s happening with Iowa?”

Tourists in the Capitol rotunda.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A television reporter waiting to go on air.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

Catie Edmondson and Erin Schaff contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address

WASHINGTON — In the uncertain turmoil of American politics, there is reassurance in the predictable pomp of the State of the Union.

Iowa bungled its Democratic caucus results on Monday night. But the trusty man in the yellow rain gear was still out before dawn in Washington on Tuesday, power-washing the sidewalk outside the Capitol.

The impeachment trial of President Trump is still in its final stage ahead of the vote on Wednesday, yet most senators intend to walk across the Rotunda to the chamber of the House of Representatives on Tuesday night to hear the annual address by the defendant — as they did in 1999 during the trial of former President Bill Clinton.

The high rituals of statecraft cannot be ignored.

A mean cleaning outside the Capitol Tuesday morning.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times The Capitol dome’s reflection after a rainy start of the day.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168381711_aa218253-bfec-4afa-ae7c-c709a8c59886-articleLarge Set Change on Capitol Hill: An Impeachment Trial to a Presidential Address United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J State of the Union Message (US) Shaheen, Jeanne Senate Primaries and Caucuses impeachment House of Representatives Garcia, Sylvia R. Cassidy, Bill (1957- ) Capitol Building (Washington, DC) Bennet, Michael Farrand

George Buss, an Abraham Lincoln impersonator, walking through the Senate office buildings.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

“Does anybody imagine that they know what the president’s going to do?” said Senator Bill Cassidy, Republican of Louisiana. “Not me!”

Senators took turns on Tuesday delivering lonely speeches to explain their upcoming votes on the impeachment of the president they would welcome in a matter of hours.

“I come to the floor this afternoon to express my profound disappointment,” said Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat of New Hampshire. “This is a sad moment in our nation’s history.”

Outside the House chambers, one of the Democratic impeachment managers, Representative Sylvia R. Garcia of Texas, tried to do a live television interview, only to be interrupted by the rattle of a cart carrying embroidered linens for the evening festivities.

Engineers setting up lights inside of Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times Placards for media positions were placed on the walls.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In Statuary Hall, after tour groups of Navy officers in uniform and teenagers in headphones were gone for the day, crews set up hot lights and scaffolding for cameras.

Velvet ropes went up in corridors. Trash cans were emptied, the detritus of the regular day tossed to make way for the crush to come. Workers even restocked emergency escape hoods, the masks that protect against smoke and fire.

Lights were set up in Statuary Hall.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A tour guide speaking to a group tour.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times
Caterers preparing desserts for a reception ahead of the State of the Union.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Food and drinks were set up, as well.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

In some ways, it was business as usual. In the basement hallways of a Senate office building, a man dressed as Abraham Lincoln, top hat and all, strolled by the lunch crowd at the cafeteria. George Buss, the Lincoln look-alike, said he was en route to visit lawmakers about the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area.

But then there was Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party and an apparent State of the Union attendee, roaming the building. Senator Michael Bennet, Democrat of Colorado and a presidential candidate, drew a gaggle of reporters who asked not about impeachment, but about the botched Iowa caucus results.

“Wait,” asked a Senate aide grabbing utensils for lunch as she paused to look up at the cable news screens, eager for the latest updates from beyond Capitol Hill. “What’s happening with Iowa?”

Tourists in the Capitol rotunda.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times A television reporter waiting to go on air.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York Times

Catie Edmondson and Erin Schaff contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams

WASHINGTON — A former police chief, a prosecutor who won the conviction of an F.B.I. agent and one of Texas’ first Latina representatives. A constitutional law professor who once defended O.J. Simpson against a murder charge, a former special prosecutor who pursued the impeachment of President Bill Clinton and a litigator for the Christian right.

For the third time in American history, the Senate has convened as a court of impeachment to consider whether to remove a sitting president, and two teams of lawyers are facing off in a confrontation with heavy political and constitutional consequences.

The seven House Democratic impeachment managers, handpicked by Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, have argued that President Trump abused his power by pressuring Ukraine to help smear his political rivals and obstructed Congress to conceal his actions. Mr. Trump’s defense team — drawn from the White House counsel’s office and outside lawyers, including a few who frequently appear on television — has argued that the president did nothing wrong and accused Democrats of using impeachment as a tool to remove an opponent they could not defeat at the ballot box.

Here is a look at the opposing legal teams and how they see impeachment, in their own words.  

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-05-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“No Constitution can protect us if right doesn’t matter anymore, and you know you can’t trust this president to do what’s right for this country. You can trust he will do what’s right for Donald Trump.”

Representative Adam B. Schiff — Democrat of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee and the lead impeachment manager

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“We need to hold him accountable because no one is above the law. Nadie está encima de la ley.”

Representative Sylvia R. Garcia — Democrat of Texas and one of the first two Latina women to represent the state

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-03-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“We are here, sir, to follow the facts, apply the law, be guided by the Constitution and present the truth to the American people. That is why we are here.”

Representative Hakeem Jeffries — Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Democratic caucus

In the prior two presidential impeachment trials, all 20 members of the House selected to prosecute the cases — seven for Andrew Johnson in 1868 and 13 for Bill Clinton in 1999 — were white men. But the group chosen by Ms. Pelosi includes two African-Americans, a Latina and three women.

Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the lead impeachment manager, spoke for as long as the six other managers combined, according to C-SPAN. He spent hours building the House’s case by laying out the central themes and then delivering impassioned closing statements that drew grudging praise even from Republicans who disagreed — along with his share of criticism from those who said they were insulted by his sharp assertions.

Representatives Jerrold Nadler of New York and Zoe Lofgren of California, both veterans of the Clinton impeachment, drew on historic precedents from the proceedings against him and Johnson. Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York recounted the July 25 phone call at the heart of the Democratic case and worked in at least one hip-hop reference — a signature flourish — telling senators after he made the case to subpoena Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff: “And if you don’t know, now you know.” (The line is from “Juicy,” a 1994 hit by the Notorious B.I.G.)

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-06-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“This moment is about ensuring that every voter — whether a maid or a janitor, whether a nurse, a teacher, or a truck driver, whether a doctor or a mechanic — that their vote matters and that American elections are decided by the American people.”

Representative Val B. Demings — Democrat of Florida and the first female police chief of Orlando, Fla.

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-07-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“I remember what it feels like to not have the equipment you need when you need it. Real people’s lives are at stake. That’s why this matters.”

Representative Jason Crow — Democrat of Colorado, a lawyer and a former Army Ranger

Representatives Val B. Demings, Jason Crow and Sylvia R. Garcia, all comparatively newer lawmakers, often sought to connect the charges facing Mr. Trump to their own backgrounds. Ms. Demings drew from her experience as a police chief in Florida. Ms. Garcia recalled her time as a judge. And Mr. Crow reflected on his time as an Army Ranger dependent on military resources.

Over the allotted three days of presentation — and another day spent unsuccessfully pushing for subpoenas for additional documents and witnesses — the seven lawmakers argued that Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign against Ukraine warranted his removal from office, pointing to what they said was a dangerous pattern of putting his own interests above those of the country.

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-02-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“The impeachment clause exists to protect our freedom and our democracy in between elections. It exists to remind presidents that they serve the public, not the other way around.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler — Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-managerphotos-04-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“President Trump’s obstruction of Congress is not merely unprecedented and wrong, it’s also a high crime and misdemeanor as the framers used and understood that phrase.”

Representative Zoe Lofgren — Democrat of California and a veteran of three impeachment inquiries

Mr. Trump’s defense team includes well-known veteran prosectors from the Clinton era, including Ken Starr, the independent counsel whose report led to the impeachment of Mr. Clinton, and Robert W. Ray, Mr. Starr’s successor.

Other members include fixtures on Fox News like Alan M. Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer who defended Mr. Simpson, Claus von Bülow, Mike Tyson and Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who was accused of sex trafficking and killed himself last year in jail.

Led by the president’s personal lawyer Jay Sekulow and Pat A. Cipollone, the White House counsel, the defense has argued that the House Democrats rushed through the process of impeachment in their zeal to overturn the results of an election they disagreed with, and that there was no evidence in the House case beyond hearsay that Mr. Trump had sought to tie the investigations to release of the security aid.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167735706_97b340c8-323f-4833-833d-21e4340566b2-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“We live in a constitutional republic where you have deep policy concerns and deep differences. That should not be the basis of an impeachment.”

Jay Sekulow — The president’s personal lawyer

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167735691_48e010cd-2919-4128-b46c-da70dbc4de2f-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“They’re asking you to tear up all of the ballots across this country on your own initiative, take that decision away from the American people.”

Pat A. Cipollone — The White House counsel

Mr. Cipollone and Mr. Sekulow have been the president’s most frequent defenders on the Senate floor, providing most of the arguments against the Democratic effort to vote on subpoenas for documents and witnesses ahead of the team arguments. The crux of their argument is that Mr. Trump is accused of no crime and thus cannot be impeached, a legal theory that is rejected by most constitutional scholars. They also argue that Democrats are seeking to remove the president for policy judgments with which they disagree, thus nullifying the will of voters nine months before the next election.

In a remarkable twist, Mr. Starr, known for his aggressive pursuit of Mr. Clinton’s impeachment for lying about an affair with a White House intern, told the Senate on Monday that the use of the constitutional remedy should be rare, and that Mr. Trump’s actions did not rise to it.

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-managerphotos-wh-02-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“Instead of a once-in-a-century phenomenon, which it had been, presidential impeachment has become a weapon to be wielded against one’s political opponent.”

Ken Starr — The independent counsel whose report led to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-managerphotos-wh-jumbo Framing the Impeachment Case: An Inside Look at Opposing Legal Teams United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Starr, Kenneth W Senate Sekulow, Jay Alan Schiff, Adam B Ray, Robert W Photography Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Johnson, Andrew Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Herschmann, Eric D Garcia, Sylvia R. Dershowitz, Alan M Demings, Val Clinton, Bill Cipollone, Pat A  Credit…

“You cannot turn conduct that is not impeachable into impeachable conduct simply by using words like ‘quid pro quo’ and ‘personal benefit.’”

Alan M. Dershowitz — Professor emeritus at Harvard Law School

Other lawyers on the president’s trial team include Pam Bondi, the former Florida attorney general; Eric D. Herschmann; Michael Purpura and Patrick Philbin, deputy White House counsels; and Jane Serene Raskin, who helped defend Mr. Trump during the investigation by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel who investigated Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and ties with the Trump campaign.

On Monday, Mr. Dershowitz was the only one of the group to directly address the revelations by John R. Bolton in an unpublished manuscript that Mr. Trump directly tied aid to Ukraine aid to investigations of his political rivals. Even if true, Mr. Dershowitz said, it was not impeachable.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Who Are The House Impeachment Managers?

One was an Army Ranger. Another, a police chief. Still another, a corporate lawyer. Together, seven House Democrats will serve as managers of the impeachment trial in the Senate and press the case that President Trump abused the power of his office and obstructed Congress.

Chosen by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the seven House impeachment managers vary in age and experience and reflect the geographic and demographic diversity of the Democratic caucus, with three women, two African-Americans and one Latina.

Here is a look at the legislators who will prosecute the president.

Colorado

Image<img alt="

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers8/21xp-managers8-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers8/21xp-managers8-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers8/21xp-managers8-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers8/21xp-managers8-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1495w” sizes=”50vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers8/21xp-managers8-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Credit…Julio Cortez/Associated Press

Representative Jason Crow is the only impeachment manager who does not serve on any of the committees that led the impeachment inquiry. But as a former Army Ranger who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, he brings military credentials that could play a critical role in the trial as Democrats make the case that Mr. Trump withheld $391 million in military aid in an effort to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political rivals. Mr. Crow was one of seven freshmen from conservative-leaning districts — all military veterans or former intelligence analysts — who wrote an op-ed in September urging Congress to impeach Mr. Trump if the accusations involving military aid were true. Many saw the piece as a crucial development that showed that Democratic lawmakers had enough backing — including among their politically vulnerable colleagues — to press ahead and open an impeachment inquiry into the president. Mr. Crow, who is 40 and a lawyer, flipped a Republican-held seat in 2018.

[Read more about Mr. Crow.]

Florida

Image<img alt="

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers2/21xp-managers2-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers2/21xp-managers2-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers2/21xp-managers2-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers2/21xp-managers2-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 2048w” sizes=”50vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers2/21xp-managers2-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Credit…J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

Representative Val B. Demings’s law enforcement background; her questioning of Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, in July; and her experience on both the Intelligence and Judiciary Committees helped propel her into a role as an impeachment manager in only her second term in Congress. Elected in 2016, Ms. Demings, 62, had a 27-year career in the Orlando Police Department and made history in 2007 as the department’s first female police chief. The youngest of seven children, she grew up in a two-room home in Jacksonville, Fla. Her mother, Elouise, was a maid and her father, James, a janitor. Ms. Demings attended segregated schools and was the first in her family to graduate from college, obtaining a criminology degree from Florida State University.

[Read more about Ms. Demings.]

Texas

Image<img alt="

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers10/21xp-managers10-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers10/21xp-managers10-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers10/21xp-managers10-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers10/21xp-managers10-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1903w” sizes=”50vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/01/21/reader-center/21xp-managers10/21xp-managers10-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Credit…Susan Walsh/Associated Press

A freshman Democrat and one of the first two Latina congresswomen from Texas, Representative Sylvia R. Garcia will bring to the impeachment trial experience as a lawyer and former presiding judge of the Houston municipal court system. A former Houston city controller and Texas state senator, Ms. Garcia, 69, was elected to Congress in 2018 and serves on the Judiciary Committee, which released a report in December outlining the legal and historical case for impeaching Mr. Trump. Born in a South Texas farming community, the eighth of 10 children, she graduated from Texas Woman’s University and obtained her law degree from Texas Southern University.

[Read more about Ms. Garcia.]

New York

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Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

A former litigator and the No. 5 Democrat in the House, Representative Hakeem Jeffries is the highest-ranking member of the party leadership on the impeachment team. Many Democrats believe he is poised to become the first black speaker of the House. During the impeachment process, he has emerged as one of the Democrats’ top messaging lieutenants, deploying punchy declarations of resolve to hold Mr. Trump accountable and icy rebukes of Republicans who have scorned the effort as a partisan ploy. A former litigator at an elite corporate law firm in New York, Mr. Jeffries, 49, once defended CBS in a lawsuit over Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl. He won his first political race in 2006, securing a seat in the New York State Assembly after two unsuccessful attempts. He was elected to Congress in 2012.

[Read more about Mr. Jeffries.]

California

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Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Representative Zoe Lofgren will enter the Senate trial having played a role in two previous impeachment inquiries. She served on the House Judiciary Committee in 1998, when it approved articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton for lying about an affair with a White House intern. And as a young law student in 1974, she helped the committee draft Watergate charges against President Richard M. Nixon. Ms. Lofgren, 72, served as a member of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors and worked for her predecessor, Representative Don Edwards, before she was elected to the House in 1994. The daughter of a truck driver and a cafeteria cook, she holds degrees from Stanford University and Santa Clara University School of Law.

[Read more about Ms. Lofgren.]

New York

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Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

As chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Representative Jerrold Nadler helped draft and approve the two articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump in December. Campaigning for the committee chairmanship in 2017, Mr. Nadler pitched himself as a lifelong fighter for civil rights and civil liberties as well as an expert in constitutional law who was the “strongest member to lead a potential impeachment.” In the Senate, he is likely to work alongside the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee to make the case for why Mr. Trump should be removed from office. The son of a chicken farmer, Mr. Nadler, 72, was elected to Congress in 1992 after serving in the New York State Assembly.

[Read more about Mr. Nadler.]

California

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Credit…Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Representative Adam B. Schiff was chosen to be the lead House manager of the impeachment trial after emerging as one of the most prominent Democrats spearheading the inquiry into Mr. Trump’s conduct. A former federal prosecutor who serves as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, he began digging into the accusations that gave rise to the impeachment inquiry when he pushed for the disclosure to Congress of a whistle-blower complaint alleging a scheme by the president to enlist Ukraine to help him in the 2020 election. Mr. Schiff’s high-profile role has made him a favorite target of Republicans, including Mr. Trump, who calls him “Little Pencil Neck” and “Shifty Schiff.” Mr. Schiff, 59, graduated from Stanford University and Harvard Law School and was elected to Congress in 2000 after serving as a California state lawmaker.

[Read more about Mr. Schiff.]

Reporting was contributed by Catie Edmondson, Emily Cochrane, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Michael D. Shear and Nicholas Fandos.

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What We Learned After The House Vote on Impeachment Articles

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-impeach-live-facebookJumbo What We Learned After The House Vote on Impeachment Articles United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Schiff, Adam B Roberts, John G Jr Politics and Government Pelosi, Nancy Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe impeachment House of Representatives Garcia, Sylvia R. Crow, Jason

Here’s what you need to know:

Just after 5:30 p.m., the seven House Democrats named as impeachment managers solemnly walked across the Capitol, from the House chamber to the Senate, to deliver two articles of impeachment against President Trump.

The formal fanfare came after an engrossment ceremony in which Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat of California, signed the articles using multiple pens. Afterward, she handed the pens to the lawmakers who surrounded her during the ceremony.

Once the representatives reached the Senate, Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, announced that the articles would be officially presented by the impeachment managers on Thursday and that the trial would begin on Tuesday.

Earlier Wednesday, House lawmakers voted to officially transmit the articles to the Senate. The 228-to-193 vote was largely along party lines, much like the House’s vote in December to impeach Mr. Trump.

After a monthslong impeachment inquiry unfolded in the House, the action will shift to the Senate on Thursday. Once the Senate signals it is ready to proceed with the trial, the impeachment managers will again walk to the Senate chamber, where they will be guided to a precise spot to read the articles of impeachment aloud.

The House also voted Wednesday to send seven Democrats as “managers” to prosecute its case before the Senate.

The team, announced by Ms. Pelosi at a morning news conference, is smaller and far more diverse than the 13 white men chosen by Republicans in 1998 to prosecute President Bill Clinton during his Senate impeachment trial. Ultimately, Ms. Pelosi said, she decided on a team heavy with “litigators.” Most of the managers have had direct experience in a courtroom.

The managers are Representatives Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee; Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee; Zoe Lofgren of California; Hakeem Jeffries of New York; Val B. Demings of Florida; Jason Crow of Colorado and Sylvia R. Garcia of Texas.

They will serve as the public face of the impeachment process for Democrats and may be the only voices for their party heard inside the Senate during the trial.

Even as the House was formally moving the impeachment of the president to the trial stage, lawmakers were still reacting to new details and documents House Democrats released a day earlier about Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine. The release included the first document that shows the president knew about and condoned the alternate foreign policy agenda with Ukraine led by his private lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

The documents also showed how Mr. Giuliani and his associate, Lev Parnas, worked to force out the American ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch, because she did not support efforts to pressure the Ukrainian president to announce investigations that would personally benefit Mr. Trump. Mr. Parnas is under federal indictment.

Democrats said the latest disclosures and other potential new testimonies should be part of the Senate’s trial. Mr. McConnell has waved off these demands as he pushes for a quick trial with little debate.

One of the managers, Mr. Schiff, predicted Wednesday morning that the Senate trial would be a “sham” under those conditions.

“And if McConnell makes this the first trial in history without witnesses, it will be exposed for what it is, and that is an effort to cover up for the president,” said Mr. Schiff, who led most of the impeachment inquiry.

Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, hit back, calling the impeachment a “sham” and accusing Ms. Pelosi of lying in describing the inquiry as “vital to national security.”

Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, said on Wednesday that she negotiated an agreement with Mr. McConnell to allow the Senate to vote on whether to subpoena witnesses or documents after both sides had presented their cases.

Mr. McConnell announced plans last week to do just that, saying he would model the trial rules on those that governed the impeachment trial of Mr. Clinton.

Senate Democrats need four Republicans to reach the 51 votes necessary to call witnesses. Along with Ms. Collins, Senators Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Mitt Romney of Utah have also indicated that they may be open to considering new witnesses and evidence.

Sometime Thursday, after the impeachment managers formally exhibit the articles of impeachment to the Senate, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is expected to be sworn in to preside over Mr. Trump’s impeachment trial.

Chief Justice Roberts will cross the street from the Supreme Court to the Senate for the official ceremony.

The Senate will then summon Mr. Trump to answer the impeachment charges against him. The chamber will most likely break for the holiday weekend and reconvene on Tuesday, when the trial will formally begin.

Senate leaders have predicted that the trial could last three to five weeks. But senior Trump administration officials said on Wednesday that they expected at most a two-week trial that would vindicate the president.

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Pelosi Taps Diverse Team of Impeachment Managers With Legal Credentials

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-managers-sub1-facebookJumbo Pelosi Taps Diverse Team of Impeachment Managers With Legal Credentials United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Schiff, Adam B Nadler, Jerrold Lofgren, Zoe Jeffries, Hakeem impeachment House of Representatives Garcia, Sylvia R. Democratic Party Demings, Val Crow, Jason

WASHINGTON — All but one of them come with legal experience, whether gleaned from evening law courses or honed while winning the conviction of an F.B.I. agent who was seduced by a Soviet spy and traded secrets for cash and gold.

Two have served in Congress for more than a quarter century, while another two have just finished their first year there.

In selecting the seven lawmakers who will serve as managers of the impeachment case against President Trump, Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California turned to a diverse team from her Democratic caucus with an array of litigation credentials. Its task, which officially began on Wednesday as the House voted to appoint them, is to prosecute the case for removal of a president in only the third such Senate trial in American history.

“The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom,” Ms. Pelosi said Wednesday at a news conference to announce her choices, hours before the House voted to ratify them. “The emphasis is making the strongest possible case to protect and defend our Constitution, to seek the truth for the American people.”

The group also reflects the historic diversity of the House Democrats, with two African-Americans, a Latina and three women.

“The gorgeous mosaic of the House Democratic caucus is represented by its racial, its gender, its regional, its ideological and its religious diversity,” said Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, who with the other managers flanked Ms. Pelosi at her news conference Wednesday morning in a studio in the Capitol. “That is what we saw onstage.”

It offered a vivid contrast with the group of managers who prosecuted President Bill Clinton during the Senate’s last impeachment trial in 1999, a team of 13 white men.

Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, which led the investigation into charges that Mr. Trump pressured Ukraine to help his re-election campaign, will be the lead prosecutor. Mr. Schiff and Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, were unsurprising choices to present the case against Mr. Trump, given their public roles in the inquiry and drafting of impeachment articles.

And on Wednesday, it fell to Mr. Nadler, who earned his law degree by attending evening courses while serving in the New York State Assembly, to oversee Wednesday’s debate on the resolution that formally approved the impeachment managers, allowing the articles of impeachment to be sent to the Senate. Behind him sat Ms. Pelosi, Mr. Schiff and the other managers: Mr. Jeffries, Representatives Val B. Demings of Florida, Jason Crow of Colorado, Zoe Lofgren of California and Sylvia R. Garcia of Texas.

Ms. Lofgren is the sole House Democrat to have participated in the past three presidential impeachment processes, having worked as a committee aide during the proceedings against Richard M. Nixon and served on the Judiciary Committee during the impeachment of Bill Clinton. And while Ms. Demings does not have a formal background as a lawyer, she was the first woman to be police chief of Orlando, Fla., and sits on both the Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, giving her a prominent perch to participate in the impeachment inquiry.

The two freshmen lawmakers named to the group, Ms. Garcia and Mr. Crow, both bring critical perspectives for the arguments to remove Mr. Trump. Ms. Garcia, one of the first two Latina women to represent Texas in Congress, was a former judge, while Mr. Crow, a former Army ranger and litigator, is considered an authority on national security matters, which are at the heart of the Democratic argument for Mr. Trump’s removal.

And Mr. Schiff, a former federal prosecutor in Los Angeles who secured the conviction against the F.B.I. agent, won his seat by defeating James E. Rogan, a Republican who had served as an impeachment manager in the 1999 Clinton trial. In a quirk of history, Mr. Rogan’s predecessor had also worked on an impeachment inquiry, into the Watergate break-in that led to Nixon’s resignation.

Ms. Pelosi began conducting individual meetings with lawmakers this month to gauge their interest in the role of manager, according to a person familiar with the meetings but not authorized to discuss them publicly. She called most of the group on Tuesday to inform them of their selection, and then met with the full group privately Wednesday morning.

“This is all about protecting the Constitution,” Ms. Demings told reporters as she left the news conference. “I’ve taken four oaths in my lifetime — two as a law enforcement officer and two here — and I take them very, very seriously.”

With only two presidential impeachment trials to serve as a guide, it is up to the group of seven to determine how they will divide the responsibilities. The group huddled behind closed doors Wednesday afternoon, but most lawmakers would not say what they discussed.

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