web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "gchq"

Hugo de Burgh: We owe it to future generations of Brits to work with China

Professor Hugo de Burgh is Director of the China Media Centre. He is the author of China’s Media in the Emerging World Order, has held office in three Conservative associations, and stood in unwinnable seats several times.

China is our third largest market and the one with the greatest potential. China is the country with which we must work if we are to have any impact on the resolution of global problems from environment to nuclear proliferation. China can accelerate the development of African and Central Asian economies, mitigating the risks to Europe that come from population explosion there without adequate economic growth. China is the largest economy in the world and already influential in a majority of countries.

For all these reasons, it is patriotic and reasonable for British leaders to find a way to work with China, which they will only do if they understand China as it is. Among other eminent Brits who started with a morbid suspicion of China, I have accompanied Boris Johnson and Jeremy Paxman on extended visits, and watched the scales fall from their eyes as they understood the enormity of the challenges facing Chinese government and the absurdity of imagining that its leaders wasted a moment thinking about conquering the world.

The reverse is the case. They are determined not to be conquered by the world. In the past, China built a Great Wall to keep out foreigners; today China is initiating the Belt and Road initiative to secure their back as they restore their civilisation, threatened from the east.

Fantasising about regime change in China, some US politicians make outlandish accusations. Had they talked to a few Chinese punters, followed social media or watched chat shows on TV, they could not possibly claim that China is a totalitarian country. Had they read Pew’s surveys of public opinion they would realise that the Chinese are, overall, more satisfied with their governance than European citizens, to say nothing of the USA. And are you surprised? While Europe and the USA are beset by economic and political troubles, Chinese people see ahead of them only more wealth, health and social mobility.

We need to recognise that demonisation of China is a weapon with which some US politicians deflect attention from their own failings and reflect their commercial jealousy. Both our National Cyber Security Centre and GCHQ have maintained until now that Huawei’s involvement in the UK poses no security risk that cannot be managed. Otherwise why would the US trade Department last week reauthorize US companies to work with Huawei, even as Donald Trump bullies other countries not to?

Robert Zoellick, a US former Deputy Secretary of State, is among the calmer heads to remind us just how positive a collaborator China is: that it recognises climate change issues, is in the forefront of environment innovation and has worked hard on endangered species; cooperates with the IMF over stimulation; provides more UN peacekeepers than the other members of the Security Council combined.

He points out that between 2000 and 2018 China supported 182 of the 190 Security Council resolutions imposing sanctions on nations which violated international rules or norms; China collaborated on the Iran and North Korea proliferation treaties.

Zoellick is not given to dire warnings about how dysfunctional it will be if the West really manages to ‘cut China off’, but they are implied in his general remarks about China, restated at a recent Henry Jackson webinar. China, he reminds us, is the biggest contributor to global growth; the fastest growing market for United States products; no longer manipulates the exchange rate; and, in response to our pleas, has improved its legal system. All in all, Zoellick tells us that cooperation with China “does produce results” but we should not take China’s cooperation for granted, “it could be very different”.

At home in Blighty, those calling for “a reckoning with China”, demanding a COBRA-like committee to mull over retaliation, wanting to “hold China to account” should ask themselves whether our businesses, for many of whom China is their most important market, want matters to become “very different”.

As to Hong Kong, the whole world must be astounded at the descendants of nineteenth century imperialists sending out paper gunboats commanding that China order its affairs according to our desires. A long time ago as a student, I demonstrated against colonial rule and police corruption in Hong Kong, and can still feel the truncheon on my back. In the face of much more vicious violence than anything we democracy activists attempted, Beijing has been restrained. In Northern Ireland, when security deteriorated, the UK imposed direct rule and fiercely rejected US interference on the IRA side. Over Hong Kong, we should try to see how interfering former imperialists look to most Asians, let alone to Chinese.

There are aspects of Chinese policies that we do not like, just as there are aspects of US policies that we abhor. The China Research Group is right to be concerned about cyber security and human rights. The way forward is to deal with China as a partner in the solution of common issues, such as terrorism in Xinjiang and Afghanistan. We have always worked with regimes with different standards when it suits our national interest. And respecting and being respected by China is in our national interest.

In the words of Kevin Rudd, the former Australian Prime Minister: Over 30 years China has pulled off the ‘the English industrial revolution and the global information revolution combusting simultaneously and compressed into not 300 years but 30’. There is a lot to learn and if we are to develop and prosper in the world ahead, we must be part of this. We should also celebrate that China’s rise is bringing better nourishment, greater life expectancy, education and security to hundreds of millions around the world.

Fulminating at China’s internal affairs and rejecting Chinese investment in order to please its commercial rivals will have no effect beyond signalling our impotence and arrogance; they are of no benefit to Britain and have no place in a long-term plan for Britain to prosper in the Asian century. Our government must develop a strategic approach to China. We owe it to future generations of Brits to work with China.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Interview with Chris Patten: We must stand up to the Communists in Beijing who hate freedom in Hong Kong

Chinese people love freedom, but the Chinese Communists hate it. Chris Patten, who served from 1992-97 as the last Governor of Hong Kong, argues in this interview that we must therefore stand up to the latter, who have become worse under the dictatorship of Xi Jinping:

“Hong Kong represents all the things that they hate. And it’s interesting that it’s not outsiders who got millions to march last year, in a protest against the destruction of the firewall between the rule of law in Hong Kong and what passes for Communist law on the mainland. 

“The idea that nowadays we have the ability to do that – we can barely organise a traffic jam in Kent, let alone a million people on the streets of Hong Kong. 

“They just can’t face the fact that Chinese people – look at Taiwan as well – love freedom, love a government that is accountable to some extent, love due process and the rule of law, love all those things as much as anybody else, so human rights really, really are universally valid.”

Patten adds that the Leninists who run the show in Beijing benefit from the help of “useful idiots” who “always make an excuse for China whatever it does”.

He thinks George Osborne made a serious error in 2015 by hailing a new “golden age” in Sino-British relations:

“I’m not sure what we have to show for this golden age except a Chinese ambassador in London who blags and bullies at every opportunity.”

From 1979-92, when he lost his seat to the Liberal Democrats, Patten was MP for Bath, serving from November 1990 as Conservative Party Chairman under John Major.

At the end of this interview, he expresses “a degree of contempt” for recent developments in the party:

“That the Conservative Party should turn itself into an organisation which whips up sentiment against Parliament, or those who are regarded as the elite, is a complete contradiction of what the Conservative Party has normally stood for.

“It’s turning the Conservative Party not into the party of Burke but into the party of Robespierre.”

ConHome: “When did you begin to think China was a menace?”

Patten: “Looking at the telegram sent by Sir Alan Donald [British ambassador in Beijing] on 5th June 1989 describing what had happened in Tiananmen Square, I recalled thinking at the time how much those events, that massacre, reflected the absolute determination of part of the leadership of the Communist Party to stay in power, even if it meant getting part of the army to shoot their own people.

“So I was never under any illusions when I went to Hong Kong as to why people in Hong Kong were nervous about the future.

“But while it made me determined to do what we could within the terms of the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law to try to secure Hong Kong’s freedoms, I also began the period after 1997 not without hope.

“By and large, for the first 12 or 13 years it didn’t go too badly. I think what changed everything was the arrival of Xi Jinping, who was chosen I think partly because of what they thought was an attempted coup by Bo Xilai.

“And he reflected also a sense that things were starting to drift and the party was in danger of losing control.

“And really ever since he came in in 2012, 2013, the Communist leadership have cracked down everywhere, on dissidents, in Xinjiang with probably well over a million people locked up in what are in effect concentration camps, breaking their word in the South China Sea with the militarisation of atolls and bases, and behaviour towards Hong Kong.

“And I think a document which everyone should be aware of, and it’s had I think too little attention from people when looking at China, is a document called in a rather Orwellian way Communiqué Number Nine, sent out in 2013, not long after Xi Jinping became dictator, to warn the party and the government against the devils of liberal democracy.

“Anybody who says ‘We don’t want a cold war with China, we don’t want to regard China as an enemy’, I understand that sentiment, but the trouble is that China regards us an an enemy.

“China regards all the things we stand for as hostile to the continuance in power of the Chinese Communist regime. It’s not the people of China that are the problem. It’s Xi Jinping and his apparatchiks.

“So I think ever since 2013 I’ve become more nervous and I’ve said so.

“And I think what’s happened recently, the way in which the Xi Jinping dictatorship has taken advantage of the fact that the rest of the world is understandably obsessed with fighting the Coronavirus – which of course has got so much worse because of the initial cover-up by China – in order to flex their muscles, whether in relation to Taiwan, or fishing vessels in the South China Sea, and to try to turn the screws on Hong Kong.

“Hong Kong represents all the things that they hate. And it’s interesting that it’s not outsiders who got millions to march last year, in a protest against the destruction of the firewall between the rule of law in Hong Kong and what passes for Communist law on the mainland.

“The idea that nowadays we have the ability to do that – we can barely organise a traffic jam in Kent, let alone a million people on the streets of Hong Kong.

“They just can’t face the fact that Chinese people – look at Taiwan as well – love freedom, love a government that is accountable to some extent, love due process and the rule of law, love all those things as much as anybody else, so human rights really, really are universally valid.”

ConHome: “Given that things started going wrong in 2013, where does that leave George Osborne with his idea in 2015 of ‘a golden age’ in Sino-British relations?”

Patten: “Well it’s a golden age for Chinese bullying, that’s for sure. Look, there is no question that even though we have to have, with others, a much tougher approach to China, I don’t believe we would ever try to cut off all relationships with China.

“But there’s a difference between that and getting all sort of mushy and romantic and soft-headed about what China stands for.

“Why have the Germans now perfectly understandably got really nervous about predatory investment by China? In for example the robotics industry. Could a British or a German firm take over a robotics firm in China? Of course not.

“So George, who is otherwise a perfectly rational human being, George is persuaded during that visit to go to Urumqi, to go to Xinjiang.

“How much British trade is there in Urumqi? He went to Urumqi in order to please the Chinese, so that they could continue with the fiction that they were looking after Uighur Muslims.

“We were promised, as a result of this golden age, a huge amount of investment in the Northern Powerhouse, a billion in Sheffield for example. The last leader of Sheffield Council said last year, ‘Where did it go?’ It was like candyfloss. It never appeared.

“So I’m not sure what we have to show for this golden age except a Chinese ambassador in London who blags and bullies at every opportunity.”

ConHome: “Where does it come from, the Chinese regime’s contempt for human rights, the gross maltreatment which you’ve already referred to of the Uighurs, many other cases. Is it Leninist Communism or is it some other factor?”

Patten: “I think it’s Leninist Communism. After all, you can’t say it’s a cultural factor. Taiwan is a Chinese community, Hong Kong is a Chinese community, and in both of those people believe passionately in freedom.

“What you’ve got is Leninism complete with what I think Lenin called useful idiots.”

ConHome: “Who are the useful idiots?”

Patten: “People who can always make an excuse for China whatever it does. If the PLA [People’s Liberation Army] were marching up Colchester High Street someone would say that’s quite close to China so maybe we should understand they’ve just adjusted the border a bit.”

ConHome: “Apropos that, on the Huawei deal, GCHQ and so on were saying it’s all right.”

Patten: “Well can I just say one thing about our security services. I think they’re pretty good on their China, I think they’re fairly clear-headed.

“I don’t mean by that they’re hostile to China. I’m not hostile to China. I’m just very wary about this Chinese Communist regime.

“I think China is a fantastic civilisation. I’ve read huge amounts of Chinese history. One of the greatest novelists today is a Chinese, Ma Jian, who lives in London, and his book Beijing Coma  is one of the great works of the last part of the last century.

“I’m very, very positive about China, but I’m very, very negative about the Chinese Communist Party.”

ConHome: “And what should the British Government be doing now?”

Patten: “What I think the British Government should be doing now is pretty well what Tom Tugendhat and a group of Conservatives right across the board, and people from other parties, have been doing.

“Because it’s very important that it’s not just a Conservative Party issue. I think we should be looking at our relationship with China in every sector.

“Trade, education, investment, security, and seeing where they bend the rules, where we need to be absolutely clear about supply chains, about the independence of strategic industries, and act accordingly.

“But we need to do it across the board and we then need to discuss with our colleagues and friends where we can match things with them.

“For example, at the moment we allow friends and allies to be picked off. When the Australians asked for a full and open inquiry into where the Coronavirus arose and how it could then best be fought by knowing more about its origins, when they suggested that and the Chinese responded by saying ‘Huh!  We won’t buy your beef, we won’t buy your barley any more if you do that’, we should have made a fuss about it.”

ConHome: “Could we end on British politics. Is it conceivable that we could ever join the European Union?”

Patten: “I slightly doubt it. My children’s generation think we will. But it may be a rather different European Union, and would need to be as things move on.

“At the moment what concerns me about this is two things. First of all, I accept that we’re leaving the European Union, I mean we plainly are.

“I don’t like it, I think it’s shooting ourselves in both feet, but we’re doing it.

“But I want us to do it in the most sensible way for Britain, and I think the refusal to accept an extension so we can negotiate a better deal is another of those triumphs, which is so deeply unconservative, of ideology over reason and political good sense.

“And it’s infused of course as well with something which I regard with a degree of contempt. That the Conservative Party should turn itself into an organisation which whips up sentiment against Parliament, or those who are regarded as the elite, is a complete contradiction of what the Conservative Party has normally stood for.

“It’s turning the Conservative Party not into the party of Burke but into the party of Robespierre.”

ConHome: “Oh God! And what role does the present Prime Minister play in this?”

Patten: “Well I’m not sure that he does play a role in it. But inevitably, you whip up public against Parliament, public against experts, and then when you’re the elite, you behave worse than the elite did before. Which is I think where the Prime Minister’s principal adviser comes in.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

British Intelligence Doth Protest Too Much On Charges It Spied On the Trump Campaign

Westlake Legal Group british-intelligence-doth-protest-too-much-on-charges-it-spied-on-the-trump-campaign British Intelligence Doth Protest Too Much On Charges It Spied On the Trump Campaign stefan halper Steele dossier Politics John Brennan International Affairs gchq Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Christopher Steele Allow Media Exception alexander downer
Westlake Legal Group ap-trump-pointing-620x419 British Intelligence Doth Protest Too Much On Charges It Spied On the Trump Campaign stefan halper Steele dossier Politics John Brennan International Affairs gchq Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Christopher Steele Allow Media Exception alexander downer

President Donald Trump points to a member of the media while speaking in the lobby of Trump Tower, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017 in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

As we learn more, it becomes more and more likely that the intelligence services of some of the “Five Eyes“–the US, UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand–were actively involved in attempting to create the impression that Russian intelligence was influencing the Trump campaign. Stefan Halper, who struck up an out of the blue friendship with Carter Page and spread rumors of Mike Flynn having an affair with a Russian grad student, was an asset of both British Intelligence and the FBI. Christopher Steele, the author of the Steele Dossier which drove this entire hoax investigation, was a retired British intelligence agent and an FBI asset. Alexander Downer, the guy who says George Papadopoulos told him the Russians had Hillary Clinton’s missing emails, is an Australian diplomat and more likely than not has intelligence contacts. From what we know of sources, some of the people under surveillance seem to have been subjected to signals surveillance which would have been illegal for a US intelligence agency. The implication is that the surveillance was done by someone.

Former CIA analyst Larry Johnson was on OANN earlier today and made the claim that the UK had spied on the Trump campaign at the behest of the Obama administration. Johnson has issues with going out on a limb on his analysis, but no more so than the clowns who claim to be intelligence experts who appear on MSNBC and CNN. CNN uses one woman who was in the FBI less than two years as their expert on counterintelligence investigations. At that stage of her career, she wasn’t allowed to go to Starbucks without an escort. What Johnson said was less important that what President Trump said:

The main British signals intelligence organization, Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), issued a denial

As we have previously stated, the allegations that GCHQ was asked to conduct ‘wire tapping’ against the then-president elect are nonsense. They are utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.

Right.

This is just too cute by half.

No one said anything about GCHQ, the claim was about MI5, MI6, and GCHQ. And no one said anything about “wire tapping,” the charge is “spying.” It would have been easier and more pointed to deny Johnson’s allegations, but they didn’t. Instead they are obfuscating the issue by trying to change the discussion from “spying” to “wire tapping.”

This is a classic example of the non-denial denial.

The significant thing here, I believe, is that after two years of this nonsense, Trump undoubtedly knows a great deal of what happened. He’s going to London for a state visit in June and even Trump isn’t so gauche as to call out the Brits for their complicity in the collusion hoax without evidence. I take the tweet of Johnson’s interview as a signal that he does know and that he will want to talk to someone about it.

In the fullness of time, we are going to find that the odious toad-man, John Brennan, was the pivot man on this particular circle jerk. It is obvious that foreign intelligence services were enlisted to keep tabs on members of the Trump campaign. They were probably enlisted as plausible deniability so the NSA couldn’t be accused of surveillance of American citizens. It is equally obvious that foreign nationals, known to be intelligence assets, were aimed at members of the Trump campaign in an effort to create facts. And it serves the best interests of neither us nor the UK to pretend that this did not happen.

=========
=========
Like what you see? Then visit my story archive.

I’m on Facebook. Drop by and join the fun there.
=========
=========

The post British Intelligence Doth Protest Too Much On Charges It Spied On the Trump Campaign appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group ap-trump-pointing-300x203 British Intelligence Doth Protest Too Much On Charges It Spied On the Trump Campaign stefan halper Steele dossier Politics John Brennan International Affairs gchq Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Christopher Steele Allow Media Exception alexander downer  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com