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How much money are people really making in Northern Virginia?

Westlake Legal Group stack-of-dollar-bills How much money are people really making in Northern Virginia? salary salaries issue salaries professions News & Updates money jobs december cover story december Culture Features Culture cultural features careers
Photo by Sharon McCutcheon

Admit it. You’re curious. But no one will ever come out and ask that gauche, direct question. (Although, the popular cocktail-party question in the region, “What do you do?,” is considered acceptable—and is essentially the same thing).

So we asked for you. Northern Virginia Magazine ran an anonymous poll asking readers to share their salaries, along with where they live, their gender and age.

Read on to see what the average Northern Virginian is making across an array of professions.

Education

Teacher Assistant
$28,000
Lives in: Ashburn
Female/ Age: 31

Teacher
$89,000
Lives in: Springfield
Female/ Age: 43

Admin/Faculty, Higher Education
$37,500
Lives in: Fairfax
Female/ Age: 30

Math Teacher
$65,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 30

Art Teacher
$97,000
Lives in: Lorton
Female/ Age: 68

Elementary School Teacher
$60,248
Lives in: Annandale
Female/ Age: 39

Nanny
$18 per hour (50-hour weeks)
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 22

Tech/IT/Engineering

Geographic Information Systems Analyst
$106,000
Lives in: Reston
Female/ Age: 32

Senior Manager Cloud Operations
$162,000
Lives in: Manassas
Male/ Age: 60

Business Systems Analyst
$67,907
Lives in: Aldie
Male/ Age: 34

Field Engineer
$74,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Male/ Age: 23

Solution Architect
$175,000
Lives in: Reston
Female/ Age: 49

Global Services Director, Telecom
$250,000
Lives in: Chantilly
Male/ Age: 40

Program Director, Cybersecurity (Government Agency)
$156,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Male/ Age: 47

Application Support Analyst, Telecom
$91,000
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 52

Configuration Administrator, IT/Tech
$85,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 47

IT Program Manager, Government Contracting
$153,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Female/ Age: 36

Vice President, Hospitality Technology
$161,600
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 36

Community Development Manager, Digital Marketing
$57,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 32

Vice President, Tech
$400,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 40

Systems Administrator, Tech
$103,000
Lives in: Centreville
Male/ Age: 30

Solution Architect, Software Consulting
$175,000
Lives in: Reston
Female/ Age: 49

Nonprofit

Digital Organizer, Climate Change Nonprofit
$45,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 22

Director of Advocacy
$106,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 37

Director of Finance and Administration, Arts & Culture Nonprofit
$166,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 50

Senior Digital Strategist, NGO
$115,000
Lives in: Arlington
Male/ Age: 28

Executive Director, Nonprofit
$145,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 43

Director of Annual Giving, Fundraising
$82,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 28

Executive Assistant, Nonprofit
$79,000
Lives in: Springfield
Female/ Age: 46

CFO, Nonprofit Association
$200,000
Lives in: Ashburn
Female/ Age: 43

Medical/Science

Pharmacy Sales Rep
$47,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 22

Cytotechnologist (A lab professional who studies cells)
$83,200
Lives in: Bristow
Didn’t share

Hospital Manager
$53,000
Lives in: Manassas
Female/ Age: 32

Plastic Surgery Scheduler
$75,000
Lives in: Springfield
Female/ Age: 33

Behavioral Health Specialist
$66,000
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 34

Pediatric Surgeon
$560,000
Lives in: Vienna
Male/ Age: 39

Research Physicist
$160,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 48

Forensic Scientist Supervisor
$110,000
Lives in: Manassas
Female/ Age: 42

Clinical Social Worker
$55,824
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 22

Medical Receptionist, Orthopedic Medicine
$30,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 28

Physician’s Assistant
$95,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Female/ Age: 25

Military/First Responders

Military Officer
$148,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Female/ Age: 40

Security Manager
$125,000
Lives in: Chantilly
Female/ Age: 35

Police Officer
$81,000
Lives in: Loudoun
Male/ Age: 33

Communications/Media/Marketing

Marketing Manager
$122,000
Lives in: Aldie
Female/ Age: 36

Senior Staff Reporter, Media Company
$72,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 38

Director of Customer Marketing
$175,000
Lives in: Leesburg
Female/ Age: 42

Marketing Manager, Nonprofit
$65,000
Lives in: Chantilly
Female/ Age: 35

Production Assistant, Cable News
$44,500
Lives: Arlington
Female/ Age: 23

Reporter, Media Company
$85,000
Lives in: Centreville
Male/ Age: 44

Consulting/Business

Business Advisory Consultant, Professional Services Consulting Firm
$70,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 22

Director of Finance Operations
$98,500
Lives in: Leesburg
Female/ Age: 38

Senior Staff Accountant
$105,000
Lives in: Herndon
Female/ Age: 53

General Ledger Manager
$118,371
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 40

Capture Manager, Business Development
$190,000
Lives in: Sterling
Male/ Age: 46

Office Manager
$39,000
Lives in: Vienna
Female/ Age: 57

Business Analyst, Consulting
$57,500
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 23

Financial Professional, Professional Services
$120,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 24

Senior Consultant, Management Consulting
$124,000
Lives in: Falls Church
Female/ Age: 35

Director, Survey Research
$72,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 39

Managing Scientist, Consulting
$112,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 34

Consultant, Professional Services
$210,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 32

Management Consultant
$155,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 55

Senior Accounting Coordinator, Real Estate
$47,800
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 34

Vice President of Marketing, Consulting Firm
$53,000
Lives in: Manassas
Female/ Age: 38

HR Director, Consulting
$138,000
Lives in: South Riding
Female/ Age: 50

Human Resources Manager, Retail/Distribution
$89,200
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 32

HR Association (Onboarding Logistics)
$60,000
Lives in Arlington
Female/ Age: 25

Lighting Quotation Manager, Electrical Distributor
$120,000
Lives in: Fairfax
Female/ Age: 55

Real Estate

Realtor
$73,000 (average)
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age 33

Vice President, Data Science, Real Estate
$221,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Male/ Age: 37

Administrator, Property Management
$33,000
Lives in: Centreville
Female/ Age: 30

Politics/Government/Government Contracting

Media Buyer, Political Advertising
$82,500
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 30

Policy Advisor, Government
$135,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 35

Government Analyst
$132,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 43

Government Relations Professional, Defense industry
$103,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 32

Data Analytics Chief, Government
$140,000
Lives in: Arlington
Male/ Age: 37

Government Lawyer
$140,000
Lives in: Herndon
Female/ Age: 57

Aeronautical Information Specialist, Government
$153,000
Lives in: Leesburg
Female/ Age: 50

Contracts Manager, Defense Industry
$110,000
Lives in: Ashburn
Female/ Age: 51

Senior Director, Federal Systems Integrator
$270,000
Lives in: Potomac Falls
Male/ Age: 50

Transportation Planner
$102,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 32

Law

Deputy Clerk of the Court
$41,000
Lives in: Woodbridge
Female/ Age: 38

Law Clerk (Attorney), Federal Court
$136,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 42

Paralegal
$62,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 35

Director of Legal, Tech
$206,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 36

Policy Attorney, Nonprofit Legal Services
$53,000
Lives in: Manassas
Female/ Age: 34

Attorney
$120,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 31

Attorney
$165,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 44

Miscellaneous

Travel Agent (Team Lead)
$68,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 53

Landscape Architect
$45,000
Lives in: Alexandria
Female/ Age: 35

Licensed Massage Therapist
$75,000
Lives in: Arlington
Female/ Age: 47

This post originally appeared in our December 2019 issue, as part of “The State of the Salary” cover story. For more great reads, subscribe to our newsletters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ryan Bourne: Thatcher and Cameron made us happier

Ryan Bourne is Chair in Public Understanding of Economics at the Cato Institute.

Perhaps David Cameron had better foresight than he’s given credit for. At a Google conference in 2006, the then leader of the opposition declared “It’s time we admitted that there’s more to life than money, and it’s time we focused not just on GDP, but on GWB – general well-being.” With the financial crash ravaging the public finances through 2010 and conventional economic indicators in the doldrums, he risked opprobrium by tasking the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to measure wellbeing for the first time.

Well, his desire to be judged on such metrics now looks incredibly prescient. Never mind sluggish GDP growth throughout and after his premiership. Forget the polarisation of Brexit. The ONS’s latest wellbeing stats, released last week, show that the British people are significantly happier and more satisfied than back in 2011.

It really is remarkable. Every self-reported measure of wellbeing has improved near continuously in the past eight years. Asked on a 1-10 scale whether they are satisfied with their lives (0 being “not at all” to 10 “completely”), the public’s mean score has risen from 7.11 to 7.42, with the proportion answering 7 or above rising from 76 percent to 82 percent. This isn’t some anomaly either. How worthwhile we perceive our lives and self-reported happiness have been ever rising too, on average. Anxiety, meanwhile, has fallen, albeit having levelled out recently. If Cameron had convinced us of wellbeing’s central importance, we’d now be celebrating his wonderful legacy.

As it happens, of course, this “good news” got about as much coverage last week as a positive Brexit business story. Remainer demands for a new Brexit impact assessment show that pounds and pence are still king in UK politics (at least until there’s an EU regulation the same Remainers want us to follow). We free-marketeers were fearful, when subjective happiness metrics were introduced, that they’d become active targets of policy. We needn’t have worried. Political leftists’ attachment to them proved skin deep, falling away as soon as they suggested Britain was not hell on earth under the Tories.

But was classical liberals’ fear of such metrics misguided? Perhaps. Consider a new paper from researchers at the University of Warwick. Reviewing eight million publications digitized through Google Books, the study aims to construct longer-run indices of wellbeing from 1820 through to 2009. Its findings are even more jarring than the ONS stats.

Here’s how their index is put together. Use of positive words in published books, such as “cheerful,” “happy,” and “joyful,” are considered proxies for better subjective wellbeing. Negative words such as “sad” or “miserable,” are tallied up as measuring worse wellbeing. In short, the academics assume that in a happier world, more “happy words” would be written in published tomes.

Now, I was sceptical of that methodology. But they check their results against life satisfaction data over recent decades from Eurobarometer and the UN, finding strong correlations in the numbers. Emotive positive/negative language does appear to proxy well for self-reported wellbeing since the 1970s, when both sets of data are available. Having satisfied themselves of the methodology, the retrospective application to earlier periods produces fascinating results.

Wellbeing was consistently high in the UK in the 19th century, fell around the time of World War One, before then recovering. Unsurprisingly, it plunged again during World War Two, before rebounding to a lower peak. But the post-war phase is most striking, splitting clear into two obvious periods. From the 1950s to 1980 there was a sustained fall in wellbeing. After 1980, there was a dramatic rebound, fitting with Eurobarometer data showing a sustained improvement in life satisfaction in the UK over the past 40 years. Britain’s life satisfaction index since 1950 is therefore distinctly V-shaped.

What might explain this dramatic inflection circa 1980? Social trends would surely be a slower burner. People had been getting better off between 1950 and 1980 too, so this is about more than rising wealth. No, there’s one rather obvious explanation fitting the time trend: the UK’s abandonment of its quasi-socialist economic model and embrace of Thatcherism.

Such a thesis is supported by the fact the US experienced a near identical V-trend in its index centred around the launch of Reaganism. Germany, in contrast, saw wellbeing completely flatline from the 1950s onwards. Neoliberalism’s birth, it seems, facilitated sustained rises in wellbeing.

These findings dunk all over accepted truths. Claims from the Spirit Levellers that inequality and marketisation made us miserable are dismissed. If anything, the exact opposite appears true: the post-war period saw socialist equality beget misery. Life satisfaction rose with inequality through the 1980s and continued to rise once inequality settled at a higher level.

Nor can GDP or the labour market adequately explain the trends. Rising GDP per capita, other things given, would be expected to improve life satisfaction, and Britain’s economy did perform well relative to other countries after 1980. But growth was stronger in previous decades, when life satisfaction was falling. Wellbeing does not appear to have fallen after the financial crash either. Sure, tightening labour markets might explain some of the rise in wellbeing since 2011, but Britain had very high unemployment in the 1980s, just as life satisfaction took off.

No, the absence of clear outcomes-based economic explanations suggests that my friend Terence Kealey may be right. What might explain the reversal from 1980 is simply that we Anglo-Saxons value our economic freedom, above and beyond its GDP or employment impact. Economic liberty makes us happier.

The post-war period saw high tax rates, capital controls, Keynesian demand management, nationalisations, price and income controls, and high inflation. Afterwards we shifted towards freer trade and migration, lower taxes, lighter touch regulation, and free movements of capital. Of course, we’re not near libertopia; if anything the Thatcher and Reagan revolutions proved a brake on a longer-term government juggernaut. But there was a paradigm shift on economic freedom. We Brits, and our American cousins, found it deeply satisfying.

For a libertarian, this isn’t surprising. Our worldview is centred on the belief that individuals know best how to live their lives to improve wellbeing. Thatcher, of course, claimed her economic liberalisation agenda was in tune with the true instincts of the British people. All this suggests she may well have been right.

David Cameron had no such ideological inclinations. In fact, he probably advocated happiness metrics, in part, to distance himself from the supposed economics-obsessed “libertarian” wing of his party. How ironic then that the sorts of wellbeing measures he championed took off when classical liberals turned the tide on socialism, and strengthened through the “age of austerity.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Neil O’Brien: How we can win support from younger voters – and turn our present strength into an enduring majority

Neil O’Brien is MP for Harborough.

It’s time to look to the future. Brexit isn’t quite over yet, but the Prime Minister has landed a great deal, and he has got off to a fantastic start, with a blistering series of popular announcements on the police, schools and hospitals. We’ve soared in the polls, while Corbyn deflates like a sad balloon

But let’s not stop now. Let’s work to turn our present strength into an enduring majority. In particular, let’s think about how we do better among younger voters.

In elections between 1950 and 2010, the Conservatives were on average eight per cent behind Labour among younger voters, but nine per cent ahead among older voters. But in the last election, we are were 35 points behind among the young (18 to 24-year-olds) and 36 points ahead among over-65s.

For me, the most concerning thing wasn’t being behind among the very young, but being behind among everyone under age 47. That meant we were behind among people with jobs, kids, bills… responsibilities – all things which tended to make people Conservative during previous years.

Doing better among younger voters isn’t about gimmicks: it’s about having answers to the big issues facing young people and young families.

Some of this is about action on issues younger voters care about. For example, we have a great record on the environment. We have the lowest emissions since 1888, and are one of the first countries in the world to set deadlines to end coal use, to go to all electric cars and net zero emissions.

But a lot of it is about doing things that will benefit young people directly.

Let’s start with housing. Declining homeownership explains a big chunk of the age gap in voting that has opened up. Looking at middle income people aged 25-34, the home ownership rate fell from two thirds in 1996, to just a quarter by 2016.

I’ve written elsewhere about the long term action we need on both supply and demand to drive up home ownership: building upwards and regenerating brownfield sites in our cities; rebalancing the economy to spread growth beyond the south east; getting away from the kind of piecemeal, tacked-on development in our towns and villages which maximises opposition to new housing; and making sure developers pay for the cost of the new infrastructure that’s needed with new housing.

But it’s also about building the tax reforms we’ve made since 2015. Those rebalancing tax reforms have led to the first sustained period for some time in which we have seen growth in home ownership, not just growth in the private rented sector.

But a plan to fix the housing problem over the coming decades isn’t enough. As well as a long-term solution, we need to provide immediate help. Many young people feel they’re on a cruel treadmill, unable to save because they are paying high rents. There are many who could afford a repayment mortgage (in fact it would be cheaper than renting), but they can’t save up for a deposit. So let’s create deposit loans: like Help to Buy, the government would take a repayable stake. But unlike Help to Buy, the purchaser would not have to provide a deposit up front.

There are a further group of people who might be able to save up a deposit over time, if only their existing rental costs were lower. They are the sorts of people who would have been helped by council housing in earlier generations – but (perversely) wouldn’t get it today, precisely because they’re working, so don’t qualify.

We could fund the creation of a huge number of cheap rented homes for young working people by transferring the remaining local authority housing stock into charitable housing associations, unlocking huge value.

Another part of our offer to younger people has to be about the cost of education. We have to be bold, not tinker.

Let’s cut the cost of going to university in half. And let’s pay for it by driving down the number of low value, mickey mouse courses which aren’t good value, either for students or the taxpayer. At present, one in ten graduates isn’t earning enough to pay back a single penny of their loan even ten years after graduation. And thanks to the LEO dataset, we now have a good idea of which courses they are, at which universities.

We need to build up technical education and apprenticeships. In Germany 20 per cent of the workforce has a higher technical qualification, but in Britain it’s just four per cent, while we rely heavily on importing electricians, plumbers, technicians and engineers from the rest of the world.

Tony Blair set a target for 50 per cent young people to go to university, but no such target for technical education.
We spend six times more per person on university students than technical students. We should become the champions for the 50 per cent who choose not to go to university too. We are introducing the new T levels, have brought in the Apprenticeship Levy, and are driving up number of Higher Apprenticeships. But there is much more to do.

But if we are serious about winning over younger voters we also need to talk about the pressures of life with a young family. Childcare costs are a huge worry for many.

Successive governments have built up a rather a confusing array of policies: the 15 and 30 free hours offers, Tax Free Childcare, the Childcare Element of Universal Credit, not to mention other benefits for children like Child Benefit and Child Tax Credit. Each has complex rules on eligibility and requires a certain amount of bureaucracy to claim.

We could be incremental, and refine and build on existing policies. For example, one frustration with using the 30 free hours for working families is that it only covers 38 weeks a year, following school terms. So how much you pay yo-yos up and down wildly each month. We could make it year-round, so it is more generous and predictable.

Or we could think more radically. As Conservatives we think people are best placed to make their own decisions. For example, when two police women were prosecuted for looking after each others’ children in 2009, conservatives saw it was an example of socialist meddling gone mad.

One way to simplify this alphabet soup of complex policies would be to bring back the tax allowances for children which Labour abolished in the 1970s. Tax allowances for children existed between 1909 and 1977, and gave a higher personal allowance for people with children, on the conservative principle that you should be able to provide for your own family before you pay tax. Rather than taking money off people, and then getting them to jump through hoops to claim it back, we could go back to just leaving it with people in the first place.

There are lots of other things we could do. But as we move into the post-Brexit era, it’s time to look to the future.
Let’s make sure that in our next manifesto, we think big for younger people.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Target Workers Get a Predictable Rude Awakening After Company Implements Minimum Wage Increase

Westlake Legal Group seattle-minimum-wage-620x319 Target Workers Get a Predictable Rude Awakening After Company Implements Minimum Wage Increase target raise the wage progressives Politics North Carolina minimum wage Media journalism jobs Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Economy democrats Culture Capitalism Business & Economy Allow Media Exception #FightFor15

As I’ve written before, the “Fight for $15” campaign may have had its share of victories in a handful of blue states like New York, but studies have shown that over time these “wins” are largely symbolic and ultimately end up hurting workers.

They hurt them in an number of ways, and one of them is in how companies – in response to these campaigns – start exploring different ways to save money to offset rising labor costs.

Though not bound by any mandate, Target decided to get woke a couple of years ago by announcing they would raise their minimum wage to $15/hour by 2020.

In a shocking display of actual journalism, CNN recently interviewed over 20 current and former Target employees who say that the gradual wage hike (their minimum is now $13) brought along with it less hours and, of course, less take-home pay. Why? Because Target started to look for ways to cut corners:

But some store workers say the wage increases are not helping because their hours are falling, making it difficult to keep their health insurance and in some cases to pay their bills.
[…]
“I got that dollar raise but I’m getting $200 less in my paycheck,” said one, Heather, who started in November at a Florida store working around 40 hours a week. She’s now below 20 some weeks, she said. “I have no idea how I’m going to pay rent or buy food.”
[…]
Beyond just a drop in earnings that Target workers who spoke with CNN Business have experienced, employees who average fewer than 30 hours of work a week during the year aren’t eligible to qualify for health insurance benefits through the company during annual enrollment season in the spring.
[…]
Target workers who say their hours have dropped have been given a variety of reasons why by their supervisors, including that there were not hours available or that their managers couldn’t fit additional hours in their budgets. Others said they received no explanation for why their hours fell.

One former store director in Ohio who oversaw around 130 employees said hours dropped at the store in the past year for several reasons, including the introduction of self-checkout and elimination of backroom shifts.

It’s almost as if this had been predicted or something.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Target Workers Get a Predictable Rude Awakening After Company Implements Minimum Wage Increase appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group seattle-minimum-wage-300x154 Target Workers Get a Predictable Rude Awakening After Company Implements Minimum Wage Increase target raise the wage progressives Politics North Carolina minimum wage Media journalism jobs Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Economy democrats Culture Capitalism Business & Economy Allow Media Exception #FightFor15   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Watch: Dan Crenshaw Wrecks the Left’s “Income Inequality” Narrative

Westlake Legal Group RepDanCrenshaw-620x317 Watch: Dan Crenshaw Wrecks the Left’s “Income Inequality” Narrative socialism republicans Poverty Politics Middle class jobs Income Inequality Front Page Stories Economy Dan Crenshaw Business American Enterprise Institute Allow Media Exception

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, left, listens as Office of Management and Budget Acting Director Russell Vought testifies before the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019, during a hearing on the fiscal year 2020 budget. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

During a House Committee on the Budget hearing titled “Solutions to Rising Economic Inequality,” Rep. Dan Crenshaw totaled the idea that income inequality is not only a worsening problem in our society, he destroyed the idea that it’s a problem at all.

Speaking to Romesh Ponnuru of the American Enterprise Institute, Crenshaw started off by pointing out the two different ways we tend to look at financial prosperity, opportunities, and the economy which are usually defined by the left and the right’s views on wealth:

So, on the one hand, you have a deep and persistent focus on inequality – it’s defined as the gap between the rich and the poor – and at first glance, that seems pretty reasonable. But in reality, it means you’re dividing your attention. Half your attention is focused on protesting the wealthy – and these days that seems actually where most of the attention is – and that leaves only a small amount of focus on the real issue, which is people in poverty and their ability to move up the economic ladder. This is the kind of backwards thinking that leads to ideas like Andrew Yang’s, where we raise taxes on the rich only to give it right back to them in the form of universal basic income. It’s hard to imagine a more inefficient and ineffective way to reduce poverty.

As a conservative, our approach is different. Instead of creating resentment against success, we focus on who actually needs our help, which is the people who are having trouble moving up the economic ladder. After all, the fact that there’s a much wealthier person down the street from you is not the problem.

Crenshaw then asked Ponnuru whether or not income inequality is worse than ever, especially given all the welfare benefits and inflation. Ponnuru let everyone in the room know that we’ve actually never looked better economically:

No, it does not appear to be true. The Congressional Budget Office’s reports on the distribution of income suggest that income inequality peaked in 2007, that it has been falling since then, and so, we are, I think to some extent, looking at a problem in the rearview mirror. Of course that could change. Maybe next year’s numbers will be different, but the trends over the last decade or so have been toward shrinking inequality.

Crenshaw later dropped some statistics that back up the claim that Americans are more economically prosperous than the left lets on.

“It also turns out that 56% of Americans will at some point in their lives be in the top 10% of earners. 73% of Americans will be in the top 20% of earners in their lifetime. It’s an amazing statistic,” said Crenshaw.

Crenshaw pointed out that this means that the left is right, and the middle class is shrinking, but not because people are becoming impoverished, it’s because they’re moving up in the income brackets. Therefore, the narrative that income inequality is worse than ever is actually wildly inaccurate.

“This is all good news – doesn’t mean we can’t improve – the point is that the rhetoric about inequality is not only inaccurate, but it’s just flat-out unhelpful to the people we are actually trying to help,” said Crenshaw.

Crenshaw’s point was clear. The left gets too preoccupied with income inequality to the point where they actually set up roadblocks for people to become wealthy, or even come up with inane solutions that only make the problem worse like “universal basic income.”

They are effectively relying on socialism, which is a provenly failed method of economic governance, to fix problems that we’re not even having in the first place. At least not on a scale nearly so bad as the left is claiming.

The Daily Wire even backed up Crenshaw’s point by referring to various sources that showed America has been improving for years when it comes to upward economic mobility:

According to AEI’s Mark Perry, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, from 1967 to 2017, the percentage of high-income households in the United States increased from 9% to 29.2%. Meanwhile, the percentage of low-income households decreased from 37.2% to 29.5%. The share of middle-income households did shrink (from 53.8% to 41.3%), but many moved upward.

A 2018 publication from Pew Research states: “From 1971 to 2011, the share of adults in the middle class fell by 10 percentage points. But that shift was not all down the economic ladder. Indeed, the increase in the share of adults who are upper income was greater than the increase in the share who are lower income over that period, a sign of economic progress overall.”

While Crenshaw is right, and we can always improve, we need to begin looking at ways to use positive solutions for the economy instead of continuously resorting to solutions to “even the playing field.” The goal isn’t to be even, the goal is to get ahead. Onward and upward.

 

The post Watch: Dan Crenshaw Wrecks the Left’s “Income Inequality” Narrative appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group RepDanCrenshaw-300x153 Watch: Dan Crenshaw Wrecks the Left’s “Income Inequality” Narrative socialism republicans Poverty Politics Middle class jobs Income Inequality Front Page Stories Economy Dan Crenshaw Business American Enterprise Institute Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

NYC Sees Thousands of Jobs Disappear Thanks to Wage Hike as Leftist Pretend It’s Not Happening

Westlake Legal Group Minimum-wage-protest-New-York-620x414 NYC Sees Thousands of Jobs Disappear Thanks to Wage Hike as Leftist Pretend It’s Not Happening Wage hike Unemployment raise the wage Politics New York City New York jobs Front Page Stories Fight for 15 Featured Story Economy Allow Media Exception

At this point, it’s undeniable that hiking the minimum wage hurts businesses and the employees who work there. Protesters think they’re securing more money for lower-income workers, but there is no magic in economics. While some workers were fortunate enough to keep their jobs with $15 an hour, they were also likely to have their hours cut back while everyone else lost their jobs due to forced cutbacks.

It’s happened pretty much everywhere it’s been tried, especially in New York City where over 75 percent of restaurants had to cut back on staff thanks to wage hikes, and the problem only continued to worsen as time went on.

Now, as the New York Post reveals, the problem is getting to a point where long standing New York restaurants are closing down and even more staff are losing their jobs:

Big Apple restaurants are feeling the heat from minimum-wage hikes, cutting staff hours and even closing kitchens as they struggle to shoulder the extra payroll costs.

Gabriela’s Restaurant and Tequila Bar, a margarita and taco staple on the Upper West Side for the past 25 years, is closing at the end of September — and it has been a long, painful road downhill, according to its mom-and-pop owners.

Since the $15-an-hour minimum wage hit New York City in December, Liz and Nat Milner say, they’ve been forced to slash their full- and part-time staff to 45 people from 60. Quality has suffered, they admit, and customers have noticed: They’re not coming in like they used to, and when they do, they’re spending less.

Jazz Shaw of Hot Air reported on this and further added that some 4,000 jobs have been lost in New York thanks to the wage hike:

It’s not just the loss of local watering holes and eateries that are the problem. All of the jobs they support are going away too. As of August, the restaurant industry in the Big Apple has shed a shocking 4,000 jobs this year.

You’d think that this kind of loss of livliehood would make people stop and reassess their beliefs about what is and isn’t the correct course of action. Instead, it caused people to lash out at Shaw for daring to come to the conclusion that these loss of jobs were the result of their activism.

As you can see below, they put up every barrier they can to make it seem like Shaw was telling a blatant lie.

And so on, and so on.

The city of New York contains some 8 million people and has over 25,000 places to eat at. If a shop closes down, it’s not at all difficult to find something else close by. So what seems to be happening is that many are still being served their food and drink without interruption, and as such are calling the entire trouble with New York’s minimum wage causing job losses a lie.

This is quite possibly one of the most first-world spoiled positions a person can take. The data that people are losing their jobs due to wage hikes aren’t just coming from right-wing reporters and commentators, this is information being given to us by business owners and publications like the Wall Street Journal.

If that doesn’t do it for you, then perhaps the fact that 74 percent of economists called the wage hike a bad idea and predicted this very thing would happen.

Just because they don’t notice it happening in New York due to its volume, doesn’t mean it’s not happening. But it’s worse than just mistaking surface level experience with facts. Those who are in support of raising the minimum wage are purposely turning a blind eye to the trouble their positions are causing in the face of mounting evidence.

This could be because they refuse to face the fact that their actions meant to help people are actually having the opposite effect, and that their take about how economics work has been wrong all along. That their opponents were right.

Instead of backing off, they’re more than willing to let the destruction continue and people lose their livelihoods so that they can keep on believing that they’re right. If a restaurant closes down, they’ll find an excuse for it and go to a different one. If that one closes down they’ll repeat the process. As things stagnate they’ll find something to blame for it like the policies of those pesky Republicans and that filthy pro-capitalist sentiment.

This is some head in the sand nonsense, and it’s actually hurting people.

The post NYC Sees Thousands of Jobs Disappear Thanks to Wage Hike as Leftist Pretend It’s Not Happening appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group Minimum-wage-protest-New-York-300x200 NYC Sees Thousands of Jobs Disappear Thanks to Wage Hike as Leftist Pretend It’s Not Happening Wage hike Unemployment raise the wage Politics New York City New York jobs Front Page Stories Fight for 15 Featured Story Economy Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sheer Brilliance: AOC Points Out That Raising the Poverty Line Would Show That More Americans Live in Poverty

Westlake Legal Group media.townhall-2-4-620x317 Sheer Brilliance: AOC Points Out That Raising the Poverty Line Would Show That More Americans Live in Poverty washington D.C. Social Media Poverty Politics North Carolina New York Media jobs Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Economy democrats Congress Business & Economy AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., addresses The Road to the Green New Deal Tour final event at Howard University in Washington, Monday, May 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) says she’s on a mission to tackle poverty in America, but that to understand the full scope of what we’re dealing with some big changes in the poverty line must be made.

In an interview she did Wednesday on CNN, the freshman Congresswoman was asked by Prime Time host Chris Cuomo about a new legislative package of six bills she introduced earlier this week. The bills, she asserted in a statement at the time, will help us “once again recognize the breadth and consequences of poverty in this country and work together to ensure a path forward to economic freedom for everyone.”

She told Cuomo on Wednesday that when it came to poverty, it was time to “push the bounds” (and, of course, to forcibly share prosperity):

And we have to establish an advanced society here in the United States of America. What that means is that we have to push the bounds. We have to start treating housing as a right. We need to start protecting renters. We need to start updating the federal poverty line.

Our last – our – our calculation for the federal poverty line is based on 1955 spending habits that assumes one income earner, a stay-at-home mom, and that’s why we don’t talk about child care. That’s why we don’t talk about geographic differences in cost of living.

So, we need to update our poverty line. We need to address the housing crisis in this country. We need to stop treating people who duly paid their debt to society, the formerly incarcerated, as – as – as outcasts for the rest of their lives.

The problem we have here in America, according to AOC, is that people are making a lot of money but not enough of it is cascading down to everyone else. In fact, she suggests the problem is so bad that if we raised the poverty line, it would actually show that even more people were living in poverty (really!):

The problem is that America is at its wealthiest point that we’ve ever been. And yet, we’ve – we are at one of our most unequal points that we’ve ever been. You would not know that our country is posting record profits because 40 million Americans are living in poverty right now.

And if the poverty line was real, if it was at around what some people think it should be, about $38,000 a year, we will be shocked at how much the richest society on the planet is – is allowing so much of its people to live in destitute.

Watch AOC make this brilliant deduction below:

Well, um, yeah. I mean, if you raised the poverty line to $60,000 that would add even more to the poverty rolls.

Good grief.

Beyond the ridiculousness of her comment, lets take a look at a few stats:

Here are the poverty guidelines for up to a family of three (which Twitter users also pointed out):

So what AOC is proposing is to triple the poverty rate for a single person from what it is now to $38,000.

A family of two, three, four can live on $38,000 a year if they live within their means.

A family of seven is considered living in poverty in America if their household income is around $38,000, which actually makes more sense than AOC’s wild calculations:

I’d like to think AOC didn’t actually run the numbers on this before she proposed it, but I’m sure she did and went with it anyway. Because when it comes to “spreading the wealth”, no dollar amount is too high to Democrats.

—–
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Sheer Brilliance: AOC Points Out That Raising the Poverty Line Would Show That More Americans Live in Poverty appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group media.townhall-2-4-300x153 Sheer Brilliance: AOC Points Out That Raising the Poverty Line Would Show That More Americans Live in Poverty washington D.C. Social Media Poverty Politics North Carolina New York Media jobs Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Economy democrats Congress Business & Economy AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Damian Green: Labour’s dishonest attack on us this week will only work if we narrow our appeal

Damian Green is a former First Secretary of State.  He is Chair of the One Nation Caucus and MP for Ashford.

The cover of Labour’s Conference Guide this year is full of the usual upbeat (and of course impractical) promises: “More doctors and nurses”, “Free bus passes”, “Reduced class sizes”. You only have to turn the page to find what they really want to talk about-a distortion of what today’s Conservative is about.

The Welcome to Conference message contains a familiar dishonest litany. “The impact of almost ten years of Tory austerity is clear; in work poverty, Universal Credit, NHS Funding Cuts, regional inequality, and acts of malice like scrapping free TV licenses”……”We need a Government that will work for the common good, not just to reward the rich.”

Of course it’s unfair propaganda. The new element is that Corbyn’s Labour seeks constantly to make this attack personal. They want to create an atmosphere where every individual Tory must by definition be cruel and unfeeling, as well as rich and posh. From the “Never kissed a Tory” badges to Labour MPs saying they could never be friendly with Tory colleagues, the Labour attack is a calculated part of modern culture wars. The aim is not just short-term political advantage, but a long-term wish to make individuals who espouse Conservative values seem unfit for decent society. The more this attack succeeds, the more difficult it is for us to attract new supporters, particularly young supporters. So we have to refute it strongly and effectively.

As ever, the most effective argument follows the rule “show, don’t tell”. Throughout its history, the Conservative Party has been at the forefront of social reforms which have helped the poor and disadvantaged, flatly disproving the Labour thesis. Paul Goodman is writing a series of articles on ConHome this week showing this repeated phenomenon.

Modern history is equally full of evidence of this vital strain of Conservatism which seeks to bind society together by ensuring that no one is left behind. Some of the most neglected communities in the country in the early 1980s, from East London to Liverpool, have been utterly transformed by the practical energy displayed by Michael Heseltine. Where there was once dereliction and despair, there is now prosperity and hope, thanks to Conservative Governments.

The Environment is another issue where lazy or malevolent commentators assume the left must have the best tunes. In fact, the first prominent British politician to realise its central importance was Margaret Thatcher. Bringing the story more up to date, David Cameron was equally seized of its importance (at least in his younger, more idealistic days). We still remember the huskies. The current Conservative Government will certainly continue this honourable tradition, and we should all publicly proclaim it. Vote Blue Go Green should be a slogan for the ages.

We should also be relentless in pointing out how the children of poorer households have benefitted from Conservative education reforms over recent years. All of this was outweighed by the anger of teachers at the last general election over spending levels during the period of austerity, so it is very important that the extra spending that will be made in schools in the coming years is accompanied by a continuing commitment to reform. For example, Michael Gove’s Free Schools are a great innovation which would certainly be killed by a Labour Government.

Equally, for all of its teething problems we can be proud of Universal Credit. The best argument for how it is helping benefit recipients is the historically low level of unemployment. The fact that it is always better to work, and always better to work longer hours, is the biggest single change in the benefit system since Beveridge, and it is good news for those on benefits as well as for the general health of society. Work is always the best long-term route out of poverty, and we should happy to argue with the Left on this point.

So we are able to show numerous examples where practical Conservative policies are hard-headed but not remotely hard-hearted. By contrast, they are helping people who have no advantages make the most of themselves and share in rising prosperity. Now we have moved out of the period of austerity this is an easier argument to make, so we can be more aggressive in calling out Labour’s attempts to demonise all of us.

At the same time, we must be vigilant in not giving Labour the chance to claim that the moderate Conservative tradition is in danger. This is not the article in which to discuss in detail the removal of the Whip from some of my colleagues, but it is absolutely the place to remind us all that the One Nation tradition is a central part of conservatism, and its underlying insight that the Conservative duty is to bind society together is more important than ever in these troubled times.

The biggest task for any Conservative is to convince a dubious electorate that properly regulated capitalism is the best system both for creating wealth and for spreading it fairly. We will need the maximum number of supporters, and the full breadth of all Conservative traditions to make this argument with force. At a time when Labour is determined to convince the non-political majority that Conservatives are basically evil, it is more important than ever that we demonstrate on a daily basis that we are the normal, decent majority in this country.

Even in the short term we should remember that the Liberal Democrats attract some normally Conservative voters in the same way that the Brexit Party does. We need to be careful on both our flanks. A strategy of delivering Brexit and simultaneously demonstrating that we can improve public services to the benefit of everyone is not just the best approach for the coming election, but the most convincing way of dismissing the Labour smear about our underlying motives.

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Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-Feature-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
Outside of Amazon’s HQ2 Career Day in Arlington, lines extended down 12 Street South and led to two-hour-long wait times, just to get inside. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

It’s safe to say that the excitement over Amazon’s arrival in Northern Virginia is real, and it’s spreading.

The Seattle-based company held its first of many Amazon Career Days in Arlington on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in an attempt to fill the first round of an estimated 30,000 jobs within the next 12 years, even before breaking ground at its incoming HQ2 location in Crystal City.

Before the event had kicked off at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, and a two-and-a-half-hour line stretched down the block of 12 Street South in Arlington, registration to get inside had already closed on Sunday, Sept. 15. Over 6,000 people had registered in hopes of getting facetime with a real, in-person Amazon employee in their desired department or program.

The first person stood in line at 6 a.m., two hours before the large, circus-like white tent at the Amazon HQ2 site, named The Grounds, (and across the street from Whole Foods) would open to the public with dozens of stands, thousands of informative flyers and a lot of hopeful job candidates in every nook and cranny of the offered space.

I arrived at 1:30 p.m. after the event had already cycled through a minimum of 1,500 people and was hardly seeing the horizon of the day ending, since the company extended the hours to 8 p.m. to account for longer waiting times and more presentations from senior-level employees.

Security guards held down the fort outside, not allowing any outsiders without an Amazon employee badge to cross the threshold unless they were being herded inside with another batch of 25-plus interested attendees. But once inside, it was clear that this event wasn’t your average job fair.

Amazon’s Arlington Career Day felt like a solid mix of a stereotypical job fair and a college open house. There were areas for interview tips and resume reviews, lots of separate tables and handouts to grab, but it was mostly filled with Amazon employees meant to teach the community about the company, and welcome job-seeking hopefuls from all aspects of its sprawling business model.

It felt like everyone was there.

Fresh-out-of-college graduates looking for entry-level positions, experienced ex-military professionals looking for a fresh start and dozens upon dozens of casually dressed Amazon employees ready to answer questions and pass out informative flyers.

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-2-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
Attendees waited inside to speak with Amazon employees about resumes, the interview process and a variety of offered roles in the company. Gina Rice-Holland (third from right), traveled from Prince William County to see what she “needs to do right,” after submitting over 100 applications over the last year. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

On one side of the decorative walls, Amazon’s technological history was listed in a timeline, from starting as a online bookseller, all the way to the development of Amazon Web Services and the Alexa devices that now sit atop kitchen counters around the world.

Dueling lines wrapped around the space, with one leading to the resume review area (where an Amazon employee would look through, circle phrases, offer tips and lead candidates to their intended department stand) and another location to sit down with an Amazon employee and work through interview tips (such as problem-solving scenarios, using job-specific terminology and more).

As the attendees waited in line, they could grab a bag of chips, a bottle of water and simply wait.

“The lines are getting through fairly quickly,” said Gina Rice-Holland, a resident of Prince William County who has applied for over 100 positions at Amazon within the past year. “And everyone has been extremely pleasant and patient.”

Much like other attendees, Rice-Holland was looking to find out what she needs to do to get her resume through to the next round. So she stood in the resume review line with several hundred others as some made their ways around the more career-specific stands.

The various stops included finance, human resources, military recruitment, Amazon web services, Amazon Alexa, Kindle Direct publishing, Amazon delivery, selling on Amazon, Amazon stores, apprenticeship programs, student programs, training and certifications and more. Messy lines formed around certain areas to listen to employees speak about the positions’ requirements and the company’s benefits, while others waited and hoped to offer a resume and make a human connection.

The only problem? The recruiters from the event (many who traveled from the company’s headquarters in Seattle), weren’t taking resumes. They were there to answer questions and let people know, “Here’s why you might want to work for Amazon.”

“It feels like a lot of this could have been done online,” says Lester Grant, who recently moved back to Arlington and is actively looking for a software engineering position. “They’re not taking resumes, so really I could have just found the job postings myself.”

But when asked what drew him to the company, Grant replied, “I see Amazon as a more career-driven company.”

It was a common theme for others too: The image of solidity from a large company that is the second-largest private employer in the United States (only falling behind Walmart), with over 566,000 employees.

“It’s the stability,” Julian Edwards, a resident of Prince George County, Maryland, said, after asked why he wanted to get his foot in the door at the multi-billion-dollar company. “It seems like they just keep growing.”

And the company is, according to Ardine Williams, the vice president of Workforce Development. The company currently has around 30,000 job openings across the country,  from software engineers to delivery-truck drivers, and all are guaranteed part-time or full-time work with highly competitive benefits, which is why Arlington was one of several Amazon Career Days, also being held in Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Nashville and Seattle.

In the DMV, Williams says, there are about 1,500 current job openings and an estimated 150 to 200 for HQ2, and the company is on track to hire 400 by the end of the year in the Northern Virginia area.

But if this event wasn’t meant to find strong candidates for those roles, what exactly was it for?

“This event gives people the opportunity to learn about Amazon, find out specific job titles and roles (along with the responsibilities), and then once they have those conversations, they can go outside and click to apply,” says Williams. “The candidate’s experience is very important, and you can’t have a thoughtful conversation in this environment. It’s just not practical.”

With the loud, upbeat music, to the whirl of the air conditioners and long wait times, it surely didn’t seem like the ideal environment to get to know someone, let alone offer them a job. But, after my two-and-a half-hour stint inside, one thing seemed very clear: It was just enough to let the job-seeking community get to know Amazon.

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-3-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
The company passed out snacks while folks waited in line, including this aptly designed trail mix. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

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Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-Feature-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
Outside of Amazon’s HQ2 Career Day in Arlington, lines extended down 12 Street South and led to two-hour-long wait times, just to get inside. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

It’s safe to say that the excitement over Amazon’s arrival in Northern Virginia is real, and it’s spreading.

The Seattle-based company held its first of many Amazon Career Days in Arlington on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in an attempt to fill the first round of an estimated 30,000 jobs within the next 12 years, even before breaking ground at its incoming HQ2 location in Crystal City.

Before the event had kicked off at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, and a two-and-a-half-hour line stretched down the block of 12 Street South in Arlington, registration to get inside had already closed on Sunday, Sept. 15. Over 6,000 people had registered in hopes of getting facetime with a real, in-person Amazon employee in their desired department or program.

The first person stood in line at 6 a.m., two hours before the large, circus-like white tent at the Amazon HQ2 site, named The Grounds, (and across the street from Whole Foods) would open to the public with dozens of stands, thousands of informative flyers and a lot of hopeful job candidates in every nook and cranny of the offered space.

I arrived at 1:30 p.m. after the event had already cycled through a minimum of 1,500 people and was hardly seeing the horizon of the day ending, since the company extended the hours to 8 p.m. to account for longer waiting times and more presentations from senior-level employees.

Security guards held down the fort outside, not allowing any outsiders without an Amazon employee badge to cross the threshold unless they were being herded inside with another batch of 25-plus interested attendees. But once inside, it was clear that this event wasn’t your average job fair.

Amazon’s Arlington Career Day felt like a solid mix of a stereotypical job fair and a college open house. There were areas for interview tips and resume reviews, lots of separate tables and handouts to grab, but it was mostly filled with Amazon employees meant to teach the community about the company, and welcome job-seeking hopefuls from all aspects of its sprawling business model.

It felt like everyone was there.

Fresh-out-of-college graduates looking for entry-level positions, experienced ex-military professionals looking for a fresh start and dozens upon dozens of casually dressed Amazon employees ready to answer questions and pass out informative flyers.

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-2-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
Attendees waited inside to speak with Amazon employees about resumes, the interview process and a variety of offered roles in the company. Gina Rice-Holland (third from right), traveled from Prince William County to see what she “needs to do right,” after submitting over 100 applications over the last year. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

On one side of the decorative walls, Amazon’s technological history was listed in a timeline, from starting as a online bookseller, all the way to the development of Amazon Web Services and the Alexa devices that now sit atop kitchen counters around the world.

Dueling lines wrapped around the space, with one leading to the resume review area (where an Amazon employee would look through, circle phrases, offer tips and lead candidates to their intended department stand) and another location to sit down with an Amazon employee and work through interview tips (such as problem-solving scenarios, using job-specific terminology and more).

As the attendees waited in line, they could grab a bag of chips, a bottle of water and simply wait.

“The lines are getting through fairly quickly,” said Gina Rice-Holland, a resident of Prince William County who has applied for over 100 positions at Amazon within the past year. “And everyone has been extremely pleasant and patient.”

Much like other attendees, Rice-Holland was looking to find out what she needs to do to get her resume through to the next round. So she stood in the resume review line with several hundred others as some made their ways around the more career-specific stands.

The various stops included finance, human resources, military recruitment, Amazon web services, Amazon Alexa, Kindle Direct publishing, Amazon delivery, selling on Amazon, Amazon stores, apprenticeship programs, student programs, training and certifications and more. Messy lines formed around certain areas to listen to employees speak about the positions’ requirements and the company’s benefits, while others waited and hoped to offer a resume and make a human connection.

The only problem? The recruiters from the event (many who traveled from the company’s headquarters in Seattle), weren’t taking resumes. They were there to answer questions and let people know, “Here’s why you might want to work for Amazon.”

“It feels like a lot of this could have been done online,” says Lester Grant, who recently moved back to Arlington and is actively looking for a software engineering position. “They’re not taking resumes, so really I could have just found the job postings myself.”

But when asked what drew him to the company, Grant replied, “I see Amazon as a more career-driven company.”

It was a common theme for others too: The image of solidity from a large company that is the second-largest private employer in the United States (only falling behind Walmart), with over 566,000 employees.

“It’s the stability,” Julian Edwards, a resident of Prince George County, Maryland, said, after asked why he wanted to get his foot in the door at the multi-billion-dollar company. “It seems like they just keep growing.”

And the company is, according to Ardine Williams, the vice president of Workforce Development. The company currently has around 30,000 job openings across the country,  from software engineers to delivery-truck drivers, and all are guaranteed part-time or full-time work with highly competitive benefits, which is why Arlington was one of several Amazon Career Days, also being held in Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Nashville and Seattle.

In the DMV, Williams says, there are about 1,500 current job openings and an estimated 150 to 200 for HQ2, and the company is on track to hire 400 by the end of the year in the Northern Virginia area.

But if this event wasn’t meant to find strong candidates for those roles, what exactly was it for?

“This event gives people the opportunity to learn about Amazon, find out specific job titles and roles (along with the responsibilities), and then once they have those conversations, they can go outside and click to apply,” says Williams. “The candidate’s experience is very important, and you can’t have a thoughtful conversation in this environment. It’s just not practical.”

With the loud, upbeat music, to the whirl of the air conditioners and long wait times, it surely didn’t seem like the ideal environment to get to know someone, let alone offer them a job. But, after my two-and-a half-hour stint inside, one thing seemed very clear: It was just enough to let the job-seeking community get to know Amazon.

Westlake Legal Group Amazon-3-Edit Here’s your inside look at Amazon’s Arlington Career Day News & Updates News jobs hq2 Culture crystal city arlington amazon news amazon hq2 amazon
The company passed out snacks while folks waited in line, including this aptly designed trail mix. (Photo by Jennifer Zeleski)

Want more Northern Virginia news sent straight to your inbox? Subscribe to our weekly e-newsletters. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com