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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "LOLITA C. BALDOR"

Acting defense chief: Major drills with SKorea still on hold

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said Sunday that so far he sees no need to restore large-scale military exercises with South Korea that have been curtailed over the past year as a diplomatic olive branch to North Korea.

“I’m confident that we have the readiness that we are required to have,” Shanahan said as he flew to Seoul to meet with his commanders and South Korean officials. But he also said he wants to discuss the issue with his top American commander in South Korea, Army Gen. Robert Abrams, to “make sure that the plan that we put in place is sufficient.”

Shanahan’s visit to Seoul comes as the U.S. and partners in the region weigh how to respond to missile tests conducted last month by North Korea. The tests fuel debate over whether the elimination of drills may impair the U.S. and South Korea’s ability to respond if the North is once again turning away from diplomacy and moving to heighten hostilities.

Senior U.S. officials, including Shanahan, have said that the North Korean test launches of what they believe were short-range ballistic missiles were a violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North has defended the launches as efforts to exercise its right to self-defense.

South Korea and the U.S. last year eliminated larger military drills and said they would replace them with smaller exercises. The North has viewed the large drills as an invasion rehearsal. In place of the bigger exercises, the U.S. and South Korea have been doing newly designed command post drills and revised field training programs.

The decision to dump the bigger drills came last June after President Donald Trump’s first summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Trump abruptly announced the decision, saying that he disapproved of what he called U.S. “war games” in South Korea. He called the maneuvers provocative and expensive.

At the time, military leaders defended the move as a way to support diplomacy aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. Pentagon officials said they believed the shift to smaller exercises would not harm military readiness, but that the decision would be periodically re-evaluated.

Last September, Abrams said at his Senate confirmation hearing that the suspension of the drills had contributed to a “slight” dip in combat readiness.

And some experts say it will likely weaken the allies’ military readiness and hurt the ability of the U.S. and South Korean troops to work seamlessly together in the event of an attack or other emergency.

On Saturday in Singapore, Shanahan made clear that the U.S. believes that North Korea “remains an extraordinary threat.” He told the Shangri-La Dialogue security conference that Pyongyang has “neared a point where it could credibly strike regional allies, U.S. territory and our forward-deployed forces.”

Heightened tensions with the North in 2017 were followed by a surprising diplomatic outreach by Pyongyang in 2018, when Kim attended summits with the South Korean and Chinese presidents and with Trump. But North Korea has not received what it wants most from its summitry: relief from punitive sanctions imposed over its nuclear and missile programs.

A summit earlier this year between Trump and Kim ended in failure, with the United States saying that North Korea was not offering to take enough disarmament steps in return for the widespread sanctions relief it sought.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f78df806cf6e4af6ae68535f51556da1 Acting defense chief: Major drills with SKorea still on hold LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fox-news/us fnc/world fnc b98ce87b-f59c-5d70-881b-693dd88f402b Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f78df806cf6e4af6ae68535f51556da1 Acting defense chief: Major drills with SKorea still on hold LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fox-news/us fnc/world fnc b98ce87b-f59c-5d70-881b-693dd88f402b Associated Press article

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Trump says not involved with keeping McCain ship out of view

President Donald Trump and his acting defense secretary distanced themselves Thursday from an order to keep a warship rededicated in honor of the late Sen. John McCain, a Trump thorn , out of sight during the commander in chief’s recent visit to Japan.

The Pentagon’s acting chief, Patrick Shanahan, said he never authorized attempts to make sure Trump would not see the USS John S. McCain at its homeport in Japan and would have his chief of staff investigate. Trump said he was not involved in the matter.

Trump, who long feuded with McCain , told reporters at the White House that he “was not a big fan” of the Arizona Republican and onetime presidential nominee “in any way, shape or form.” But, Trump added, “I would never do a thing like that.”

“Now, somebody did it because they thought I didn’t like him, OK? And they were well-meaning, I will say,” he said, while insisting he was kept in the dark.

The order that a Navy destroyer be kept out of sight reflected what appeared to be an extraordinary White House effort to avoid offending an unpredictable president known for holding a grudge, including a particularly bitter one against McCain.

Three U.S. officials confirmed to The Associated Press that the White House told the Navy to keep the warship named for McCain, his father and his grandfather out of Trump’s sight during Trump’s visit Tuesday to a base outside Tokyo.

The Wall Street Journal first reported that a U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official wrote an email to Navy and Air Force officials about Trump’s Memorial Day weekend visit, including instructions for preparations for the USS Wasp, where he was to speak.

“USS John McCain needs to be out of sight,” according to the email, obtained by the Journal and whose existence was confirmed to the AP by the three U.S. officials. They spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private email correspondence.

When a Navy commander expressed surprise at the instruction, the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official answered, “First I heard of it as well,” the Journal reported. The official said he would talk to the White House Military Office to get more information about the directive, the newspaper reported.

Trump tweeted late Wednesday that he “was not informed about anything having to do with the Navy Ship USS John S. McCain during my recent visit to Japan.”

Still, he added Thursday that he “was very, very angry with McCain because he killed health care. I was not a big fan of John McCain in any way, shape or form.”

As a senator, McCain broke with the president in key areas. He incensed Trump with his thumbs-down vote foiling the effort to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law. Trump also mocked McCain’s military service, which included years of imprisonment and torture during the Vietnam War.

The warship, commissioned in 1994, was originally named for the senator’s father and grandfather, both Navy admirals named John Sidney McCain. Last year, the Navy rededicated the ship to honor the senator as well.

Shanahan told reporters in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Thursday that he had been unaware of the request about the USS John S. McCain.

“I never authorized, I never approved any action around the movement or activities regarding that ship,” Shanahan said. He said the military “needs to do their job” and stay out of politics.

The Journal, citing photos it reviewed, reported that a tarp was placed over the USS John S. McCain’s name before Trump’s arrival and that sailors were instructed to remove any coverings from the ship that included its name.

Asked if the tarp was meant to block Trump’s view of the ship, the officials said the tarp had been placed on the ship for maintenance and removed for the visit. Navy Cdr. Clay Doss, spokesman for U.S. 7th Fleet, told the AP that the tarp was on the ship on Friday but was removed by Saturday morning, the day Trump arrived in Japan.

“All ships remained in normal configuration during the President’s visit,” he said.

Two U.S. officials told AP that all the ships in the harbor were lined up for Trump’s visit, and they were visible from the USS Wasp. The officials said most of their names probably could not be seen since they were side by side but that the name of the USS John S. McCain could be seen from the pier.

Rear Adm. Charlie Brown, Navy public affairs officer, tweeted Wednesday night: “The name of USS John S. McCain was not obscured during the POTUS visit to Yokosuka on Memorial Day. The Navy is proud of that ship, its crew, its namesake and its heritage.” POTUS stands for president of the United States.

A paint barge was in front of the USS John S. McCain on Saturday morning when 7th Fleet officials walked the pier to see how everything looked for the visit. The barge was then ordered to be moved and was gone by the time Trump arrived, the officials said.

The Journal reported that sailors on the USS John S. McCain, who usually wear hats with the ship’s name on it, were given the day off when Trump visited.

Two U.S. officials told the AP that sailors on the USS John S. McCain were not told to stay away but that many were away for the long weekend. The officials also said that about 800 sailors from more than 20 ships and Navy commands were on the USS Wasp during the president’s visit, and all wore the same Navy hat that has no logo, rather than wearing individual ship or command hats.

Trump was not welcome at McCain’s funeral and raised the White House’s U.S. flag back to full-staff shortly after McCain’s death last August, despite U.S. Flag Code stating that it should remain at half-staff for another day. The flag returned to half-staff later in the day.

McCain’s daughter Meghan tweeted Wednesday that Trump will “always be deeply threatened by the greatness of my dads incredible life.”

She added, “There is a lot of criticism of how much I speak about my dad, but nine months since he passed, Trump won’t let him RIP. So I have to stand up for him.

“It makes my grief unbearable.”

___

Associated Press writer Jill Colvin contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-bd504223ee4e4bb69aa0b00d79223288 Trump says not involved with keeping McCain ship out of view LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 095a19df-19d7-50fa-8be3-a60c101de552   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-bd504223ee4e4bb69aa0b00d79223288 Trump says not involved with keeping McCain ship out of view LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 095a19df-19d7-50fa-8be3-a60c101de552

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AP sources: White House wanted McCain ship away from Trump

The White House wanted the U.S. Navy to keep a warship named for the late Sen. John McCain out of President Donald Trump’s view during his trip to Japan, three U.S. officials said.

As first reported Wednesday by The Wall Street Journal, a U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official wrote an email to Navy and Air Force officials about Trump’s arrival in Japan over Memorial Day weekend. It included instructions for the proper landing areas for helicopters and preparations for the USS Wasp, the ship on which the president was to speak.

The official then issued a third instruction: “USS John McCain needs to be out of sight,” according to the email, which was obtained by the Journal and whose existence was confirmed to The Associated Press.

The three U.S. officials spoke Wednesday to the AP on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private email correspondence.

When a Navy commander expressed surprise at the instruction, the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official answered, “First I heard of it as well,” the Journal reported. The official said he would talk to the White House Military Office to get more information about the directive, the newspaper reported.

In response to the story, Trump — who feuded with McCain publicly for years and at one point mocked his military service — tweeted that he “was not informed about anything having to do with the Navy Ship USS John S. McCain during my recent visit to Japan.”

The president notably does not say that he was not informed about the ship before his visit to Japan. A message seeking clarification was left late Wednesday for White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.

In Jakarta, Indonesia, on Thursday morning, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told reporters, “When I read about it this morning, it was the first I heard about it.” Asked if he would investigate, Shanahan said he would need to know more first.

The Wall Street Journal reported that a tarp was placed over the USS John S. McCain’s name before Trump’s arrival, according to photos it reviewed, and that sailors were instructed to remove any coverings from the ship that included its name.

U.S. Navy Cdr. Clay Doss, spokesman for U.S. 7th Fleet, told the AP that the tarp was on the ship on Friday but was removed by Saturday morning, the day Trump arrived. “All ships remained in normal configuration during the President’s visit,” he said.

Two U.S. officials told the AP that all the ships in the harbor were lined up for Trump’s visit, and they were visible from the USS Wasp. The officials said, however, that most of their names probably could not be seen since they were side by side but that the name of the USS John S. McCain could be seen from the pier.

Asked if the tarp was meant to block Trump’s view of the ship, the officials said the tarp had been placed on the ship for maintenance and removed for the visit.

Rear Adm. Charlie Brown, Navy public affairs officer, tweeted Wednesday night: “The name of USS John S. McCain was not obscured during the POTUS visit to Yokosuka on Memorial Day. The Navy is proud of that ship, its crew, its namesake and its heritage.”

Two U.S. officials said a paint barge was in front of the USS John S. McCain on Saturday morning when 7th Fleet officials walked the pier to see how everything looked for the visit. The barge was then ordered to be moved and was gone by the time Trump arrived, the officials said.

The Journal reported, based on people familiar with the matter, that sailors on the USS John S. McCain, who usually wear hats with the ship’s name on it, were given the day off when Trump visited.

Two U.S. officials told the AP that sailors on the USS John S. McCain were not told to stay away but that many were away for the long weekend. The officials also said that about 800 sailors from more than 20 ships and Navy commands were on the USS Wasp during the president’s visit, and all wore the same Navy hat that has no logo, rather than wearing individual ship or command hats.

Trump and McCain had a frosty relationship and that continued, on Trump’s part, even after McCain died in August 2018 of brain cancer.

In 2015, McCain, a Republican senator from Arizona, had gotten under then-candidate Trump’s skin by saying he had “fired up the crazies” at a rally in Phoenix. Trump, also a Republican, later told a crowd in Iowa that McCain was only a war hero “because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured.”

After Trump took office, McCain established himself as a leading critic, opposing Trump’s immigration-limiting order, warning him against coziness with Moscow and lecturing him on the illegality of torture. The senator incensed the president with his thumbs-down vote that foiled the president’s efforts to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Trump was not welcome at McCain’s funeral and raised the White House’s U.S. flag back to full-staff shortly after McCain’s death, despite U.S. Flag Code stating that it should remain at half-staff for another day. The flag returned to half-staff later in the day.

McCain’s daughter, Meghan, tweeted Wednesday that Trump will “always be deeply threatened by the greatness of my dads incredible life.”

She added, “There is a lot of criticism of how much I speak about my dad, but nine months since he passed, Trump won’t let him RIP. So I have to stand up for him.

“It makes my grief unbearable.”

Westlake Legal Group ca7866eb-ContentBroker_contentid-0977137d3a024a9393d80edeeab4384a AP sources: White House wanted McCain ship away from Trump LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 095a19df-19d7-50fa-8be3-a60c101de552   Westlake Legal Group ca7866eb-ContentBroker_contentid-0977137d3a024a9393d80edeeab4384a AP sources: White House wanted McCain ship away from Trump LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 095a19df-19d7-50fa-8be3-a60c101de552

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AP sources: White House wanted USS McCain moved for Trump

The White House wanted the U.S. Navy to keep a warship named for the late Sen. John McCain out of President Donald Trump’s view during his trip to Japan, three U.S. officials said Wednesday.

As first reported by The Wall Street Journal, a U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official wrote an email to Navy and Air Force officials about Trump’s arrival in Japan over Memorial Day weekend. It included instructions for the proper landing areas for helicopters and preparations for the USS Wasp, the ship on which the president was to speak.

The official then issued a third instruction: “USS John McCain needs to be out of sight,” according to the email, which was obtained by the Journal and whose existence was confirmed to The Associated Press.

The three U.S. officials spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private email correspondence.

When a Navy commander expressed surprise at the instruction, the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official answered, “First I heard of it as well,” the Journal reported. The official said he would talk to the White House Military Office to get more information about the directive, the newspaper reported.

In response to the story, Trump — who feuded with McCain publicly for years and at one point mocked his military service — tweeted that he “was not informed about anything having to do with the Navy Ship USS John S. McCain during my recent visit to Japan.”

The president notably does not say that he was not informed about the ship before his visit to Japan. A message seeking clarification was left late Wednesday for White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.

In Jakarta, Indonesia, on Thursday morning, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told reporters, “When I read about it this morning, it was the first I heard about it.” Asked if he would investigate, Shanahan said he would need to know more first.

The Wall Street Journal reported that a tarp was placed over the USS John S. McCain’s name before Trump’s arrival, according to photos it reviewed, and that sailors were instructed to remove any coverings from the ship that included its name.

U.S. Navy Cdr. Clay Doss, spokesman for U.S. 7th Fleet, told the AP that the tarp was on the ship on Friday but was removed by Saturday morning, the day Trump arrived. “All ships remained in normal configuration during the President’s visit,” he said.

Two U.S. officials told the AP that all the ships in the harbor were lined up for Trump’s visit, and they were visible from the USS Wasp. The officials said, however, that most of their names probably could not be seen since they were side by side but that the name of the USS John S. McCain could be seen from the pier.

Asked if the tarp was meant to block Trump’s view of the ship, the officials said the tarp had been placed on the ship for maintenance and removed for the visit.

Rear Adm. Charlie Brown, Navy public affairs officer, tweeted Wednesday night: “The name of USS John S. McCain was not obscured during the POTUS visit to Yokosuka on Memorial Day. The Navy is proud of that ship, its crew, its namesake and its heritage.”

Two U.S. officials said a paint barge was in front of the USS John S. McCain on Saturday morning when 7th Fleet officials walked the pier to see how everything looked for the visit. The barge was then ordered to be moved and was gone by the time Trump arrived, the officials said.

The Journal reported, based on people familiar with the matter, that sailors on the USS John S. McCain, who usually wear hats with the ship’s name on it, were given the day off when Trump visited.

Two U.S. officials told the AP that sailors on the USS John S. McCain were not told to stay away but that many were away for the long weekend. The officials also said that about 800 sailors from more than 20 ships and Navy commands were on the USS Wasp during the president’s visit, and all wore the same Navy hat that has no logo, rather than wearing individual ship or command hats.

Trump and McCain had a frosty relationship and that continued, on Trump’s part, even after McCain died in August 2018 of brain cancer.

In 2015, McCain, a Republican senator from Arizona, had gotten under then-candidate Trump’s skin by saying he had “fired up the crazies” at a rally in Phoenix. Trump, also a Republican, later told a crowd in Iowa that McCain was only a war hero “because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured.”

After Trump took office, McCain established himself as a leading critic, opposing Trump’s immigration-limiting order, warning him against coziness with Moscow and lecturing him on the illegality of torture. The senator incensed the president with his thumbs-down vote that foiled the president’s efforts to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Trump was not welcome at McCain’s funeral and raised the White House’s U.S. flag back to full-staff shortly after McCain’s death, despite U.S. Flag Code stating that it should remain at half-staff for another day. The flag returned to half-staff later in the day.

McCain’s daughter, Meghan, tweeted Wednesday that Trump will “always be deeply threatened by the greatness of my dads incredible life.”

She added, “There is a lot of criticism of how much I speak about my dad, but nine months since he passed, Trump won’t let him RIP. So I have to stand up for him.

“It makes my grief unbearable.”

Westlake Legal Group ca7866eb-ContentBroker_contentid-0977137d3a024a9393d80edeeab4384a AP sources: White House wanted USS McCain moved for Trump LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc c55dc2cd-d7cf-5fce-9d50-181ffca90ce0 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ca7866eb-ContentBroker_contentid-0977137d3a024a9393d80edeeab4384a AP sources: White House wanted USS McCain moved for Trump LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc c55dc2cd-d7cf-5fce-9d50-181ffca90ce0 Associated Press article

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US moving Patriot missile battery to Mideast to counter Iran

Westlake Legal Group us-moving-patriot-missile-battery-to-mideast-to-counter-iran US moving Patriot missile battery to Mideast to counter Iran LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 719288fc-a315-5ce2-af8b-ab6cb09dde1d

The U.S. will move a Patriot missile battery into the Middle East to counter threats from Iran, the Pentagon said Friday, reflecting ongoing concerns that Tehran may be planning to attack America forces or interests in the region.

The Defense Department released a statement about the move but provided no details. An official said the decision comes after intelligence showed that the Iranians have loaded military equipment and missiles onto small boats controlled by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. The official was not authorized to discuss the information publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Officials had said earlier this week that sending a Patriot battery to the area was under discussion and was part of the initial request made by the Pentagon’s U.S. Central Command. They said it took a few days to get final approval for the Patriot, a long-range, all-weather air defense system to counter tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and advanced aircraft.

The U.S. removed Patriot missile batteries from Bahrain, Kuwait and Jordan late last year. It was not clear if the battery would go back to one of those countries.

U.S. officials announced Sunday that they would rush an aircraft carrier strike group and bombers to the region. The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln and accompanying ships have passed through the Suez Canal and are now in the Red Sea.

Officials had initially indicated that the military moves were based in part on indications that Iran had moved short-range ballistic missiles onto small boats called dhows along its shore.

Officials would not say if the intelligence showed that the boats have mobile launchers on them. But a notice to mariners in the region has warned of potential threats to commercial maritime traffic.

John Bolton, the national security adviser, announced the initial moves on Sunday, citing “troubling and escalatory indications and warnings” but did not explain what they were.

On Friday, a defense official said the Iranian threats also include potential attacks by Iranian proxies, such as Shia militias in Iraq.

Several officials said they have not yet seen any tangible move by Iran in reaction to the U.S. military shifts in the area. But they also noted there have been no attacks.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made a quick visit Tuesday to Baghdad to meet with top leaders and underscore Iraq’s need to protect Americans in their country.

The Pentagon also said Friday that the USS Arlington, an amphibious transport ship, will move to the Middle East region earlier than planned. The ship is in Europe and will be replacing the USS McHenry, which is scheduled to leave.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2579a3441c9344e89e83f2d5e5737a9d US moving Patriot missile battery to Mideast to counter Iran LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 719288fc-a315-5ce2-af8b-ab6cb09dde1d   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2579a3441c9344e89e83f2d5e5737a9d US moving Patriot missile battery to Mideast to counter Iran LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 719288fc-a315-5ce2-af8b-ab6cb09dde1d

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Army training brigade prepares for new worldwide deployments

Just months after the Army’s new training brigade returned from Afghanistan, its teams are preparing for a different type of deployment that will scatter them around the world.

Rather than putting all 800 soldiers in one war-torn nation, the Army is expected to begin dispatching the unit’s small teams separately to countries in Europe, Africa or other regions where they will train and advise local forces.

Army Brig. Gen. Scott Jackson, the brigade’s commander, told The Associated Press that while the Afghanistan tour focused heavily on combat operations, future efforts will center on helping partner forces train better and learn to avoid conflicts.

“I think future deployments throughout the world will be in much smaller packages,” Jackson said, adding that the brigade was built in 2017 to be decentralized. “I think a situation where you have a single team in a single country is a likely scenario.”

He said the top contenders are countries in Africa, Europe and South America. But he said he is not sure where his teams will be sent or when they may go.

The Army’s 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade was created by Gen. Mark Milley, the service’s chief of staff. It was designed to take the pressure off other Army brigades and units that are currently being used for training but are needed more for other U.S. security operations around the globe.

Since the brigade returned from Afghanistan, its training has shifted a bit to focus on developing training plans and working more as military consultants that can pinpoint the needs of the partner forces.

“We need to build a formation that’s flexible enough to be employed everywhere in the world, and then we’ll adjust based on the countries we go to,” Jackson said. “But the base doctrine has got to be universal across the world.”

The Army is planning to build six of the brigades over the next several years, and already the 2nd Brigade is deploying to Afghanistan to replace Jackson’s teams that left the warzone late last year. The plans reflect the new reality of America at war: Army soldiers advising and building indigenous security forces, not doing the fighting for them on foreign soil.

During the 1st Brigade’s nine-month Afghanistan tour last year, two of the unit’s soldiers were killed and three others were wounded in two insider attacks.

Cpl. Joseph Maciel , of South Gate, California, was shot and killed by a member of the Afghan security forces in July, and Sgt. Maj. Timothy Bolyard , of Thornton, West Virginia, was killed by a member of the Afghan national police in September.

After the first killing, the U.S. beefed up security and urged Afghan commanders to also make changes, including increased vetting of their troops.

The Afghans, said Jackson, “understand the impact that those kinds of green-on-blue-type incidents can have to a strategic partnership. They take it seriously, and they were ready to make the necessary changes” to make things more secure.

The war in Afghanistan has dragged on for nearly 18 years and is at a critical point. The U.S. is pressing the Taliban to negotiate a peace with the Afghan government, and talks between the insurgent group and a U.S. special envoy are ongoing.

The U.S. believes that a key element in keeping the peace will be the Afghan military’s ability to maintain security in the country. And the training by the new Army brigades is aimed at that goal.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-92070d9a233242b4902b82af8e631d31 Army training brigade prepares for new worldwide deployments LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/army fnc/us fnc ec605058-4524-51bd-bcbe-11b4290c77e6 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-92070d9a233242b4902b82af8e631d31 Army training brigade prepares for new worldwide deployments LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/army fnc/us fnc ec605058-4524-51bd-bcbe-11b4290c77e6 Associated Press article

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Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile

Westlake Legal Group pentagon-confirms-nk-test-launch-says-not-ballistic-missile Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan is confirming that North Korea conducted a test launch on Wednesday, but he declined to provide any details.

He is the first U.S. official to confirm the launch. He tells reporters at the Pentagon that North Korea conducted a test, but it didn’t involve a ballistic weapon and didn’t trigger any change in U.S. military operations.

North Korea has said it test-fired a new type of tactical guided weapon. The test didn’t appear to be of a banned mid- or long-range ballistic missile that could scuttle ongoing nuclear negotiations.

Pyongyang also is demanding that Washington remove Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from nuclear negotiations. The State Department says it’s aware of the report and the U.S. remains ready to engage North Korea in constructive negotiations.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

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Trump nominates naval aviator as next Navy chief

Westlake Legal Group trump-nominates-naval-aviator-as-next-navy-chief Trump nominates naval aviator as next Navy chief LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7aadc2b4-1b07-593d-906b-c2949e7aad47

President Donald Trump on Thursday nominated a naval aviator with extensive experience in budgeting and personnel reform to become the next officer to lead the U.S. Navy.

Navy Adm. Bill Moran, who piloted P-3 Orion surveillance aircraft during the Cold War, is currently the Navy’s vice chief. If confirmed by the Senate, he would become the 32nd chief of naval operations and take over from Adm. John Richardson, who is retiring.

Trump also nominated Vice Adm. Robert Burke, a submariner with experience on both attack and nuclear-armed vessels, to be the next vice chief of the Navy. He is currently the deputy for personnel and training.

Moran takes over a Navy that is struggling to overcome command, crew and training shortfalls that led to two deadly ship collisions in 2017, killing 17 sailors. A number of officers and sailors were fired, disciplined or faced courts-martial in the wake of the collisions, and the Navy launched a series of reforms to address the problems.

He also will direct the fleet’s transition to a global fight against peer competitors, such as Russia and China, including the ongoing development of the new naval Atlantic Command. The command is designed to ensure the security of the sea lanes and lines of communication between Europe and North America as part of an effort to counter Russia’s increased military patrols in the Atlantic region.

Moran has risen steadily through the ranks and has a reputation as a strong leader who has held a number of top administrative posts in the Navy.

A 1981 graduate of the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., he flew patrol and reconnaissance missions throughout the 1980s and 1990s, serving in Atlantic and Pacific squadrons. He served as head of air warfare, working to modernize Navy aircraft and weapons systems and was chief of naval personnel from 2013 to 2016, and then moved to the vice chief job.

“He has been central to the Navy adopting a fighting stance in this great power competition,” Richardson said in a statement. “As I turn over and go ashore, I will rest easy knowing that, pending confirmation, Adm. Moran has the watch.”

Moran, who is from New York, issued a statement Thursday saying that he was “honored and deeply humbled by the nomination and look forward to working with Congress during the confirmation process.”

Burke, who grew up in Michigan, graduated from Western Michigan University and the University of Central Florida. He served on attack and ballistic missile submarines, was an instructor at the Naval Nuclear Power School, and commanded Submarine Group 8 in Naples, Italy.

He served at deputy commander of the Navy’s 6th Fleet in Europe and became chief of naval personnel in 2016.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e81bfa3b2f4842b9bf933d9f1985c979 Trump nominates naval aviator as next Navy chief LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7aadc2b4-1b07-593d-906b-c2949e7aad47   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e81bfa3b2f4842b9bf933d9f1985c979 Trump nominates naval aviator as next Navy chief LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military/navy fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7aadc2b4-1b07-593d-906b-c2949e7aad47

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