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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Radio"

Layoffs and Canceled Shows at WBAI-FM, a New York Radio Original

Westlake Legal Group 07WBAI-01-facebookJumbo Layoffs and Canceled Shows at WBAI-FM, a New York Radio Original WBAI-FM Shutdowns (Institutional) Radio Pacifica Foundation Nonprofit Organizations Layoffs and Job Reductions

For decades, WBAI-FM has remained a proudly scrappy alternative in New York’s radio market, a bastion of left-wing political commentary and community voices rarely heard elsewhere on the dial.

That identity was cast into doubt on Monday when the station’s owner, the nonprofit Pacifica Foundation, abruptly laid off most of WBAI’s staff and replaced its local programming with shows drawn from Pacifica’s four other stations.

Ten of WBAI’s 12 employees were laid off, according to John Vernile, Pacifica’s interim executive director.

Employees and volunteer hosts at the station said they were blindsided by Pacifica’s decision. “We are in disbelief,” said Alexander J. Urbelis, a host of “Off the Hook,” a weekly show about computer hacking. “Nobody was given any notice of this or any opportunity to be heard.”

Berthold Reimers, WBAI’s general manager, told producers in an email on Monday morning: “There is a show on the air now that I do not recognize. This means your shows are no longer on WBAI.” Mr. Reimers declined to comment.

Pacifica leaders said that the decision to shut down WBAI’s operations in New York had been in the works for months, and that it was an essential step to save the larger foundation from ruin.

In an interview, Mr. Vernile said WBAI — which, like the network’s other stations, is listener supported — had fallen short of its fund-raising goals in recent years. He added that the station was unable to make payroll and other expenses, forcing the larger Pacifica Foundation network to bail it out.

“Listeners in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston and Washington, D.C., have been supporting the efforts in New York,” Mr. Vernile said. “It has gotten to a point where we can no longer do that.”

WBAI’s ratings are minimal, but its shows can have an impact. On Monday, Letitia James, the attorney general of New York, wrote on Twitter: “This is deeply disappointing and I hope this station is relaunched.”

WBAI and Pacifica had been under strain for years. Pacifica has not released any financial statements since 2017, when its auditor cited doubts that the organization could continue as a going concern.

The foundation faced possible bankruptcy after a New York State court ordered it in 2017 to pay $1.8 million in rent and other fees to a trust affiliated with the Empire State Building, where WBAI transmitted its signal.

Last year, Pacifica settled with the trust after obtaining a loan from FJC, a nonprofit lender. Mr. Vernile said Pacifica had been meeting its obligations under the loan agreement. Sam Marks, the chief executive of FJC, declined to comment.

WBAI, founded in 1960, was a leader in the free-form radio movement, and has had a history of extraordinary moments in broadcasting. Bob Dylan made early appearances on the station, and in the 1970s WBAI was cited by the Federal Communications Commission for indecency for running George Carlin’s routine on seven “filthy words,” a decision upheld by the Supreme Court.

As WBAI’s audience has dwindled, its finances have grown shaky. In 2013, after nearly a decade of losses, the station laid off 19 employees. At times, it has seemed crippled by factionalism, as board meetings descended into name-calling and bickering over parliamentary rules.

The station’s most valuable asset may be its license to operate a coveted spot on the dial, at 99.5 FM, but Mr. Vernile said Pacifica was determined not to sell that prime piece of radio real estate. Pacifica, he said, wants to “rebuild” WBAI at some point, although he did not offer a clear target date.

“We are not out of the woods yet,” he said, “but this puts us in a place where we have a shot at bringing everything back in full.”

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Joe Walsh Has Lost His Radio Show

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Walsh-620x417 Joe Walsh Has Lost His Radio Show republicans Radio Politics Joe Walsh Front Page Stories Featured Story elections donald trump democrats CNN Allow Media Exception 2020

Joe Walsh may have just ruined his career over his insistence that President Donald Trump is the worst President in history.

Walsh began as a major Trump supporter, but over time became one of his most ardent opponents. As my colleague Mike Ford reported over the weekend, Walsh announced his intention to primary Trump and run for President himself.

The likelihood of Walsh beating Trump and taking the Presidency is so minimal that you’d have to see his chances through a high-powered microscope. According to Gallup, Trump has an 88 percent approval rating among Republicans and his economy is still going strong.

Walsh has now said that he lost his nationally syndicated radio show during a CNN interview after he revealed that the majority of his listeners are pro-Trump.

“I just found out that I lost my national radio show. So that’s gone, but I figure that might happen, John,” Walsh told CNN on Monday.

Walsh said that he found out he had lost the radio show moments before he went on air with CNN.

“I’m running for president. I oppose this president. Most of my listeners support the president. It’s not an easy thing to do to be in conservative talk radio and oppose this president,” said Walsh.

Walsh said he’s okay with it, and that he’ll be campaigning full time anyway.

Who he’s going to try to win over is a mystery. Even his own fanbase wasn’t with him. Regardless, many mainstream news outlets who were content to call Walsh a racist and a crackpot are now giving him all the airtime he could possibly ask for. This says more about the desperation and derangement of the leftist media than it does anything else.

Furthermore, I’m not sure said airtime is going to do him any good. The Republican party is pretty united behind Trump, especially in the face of the radical threat from the left. It’s not going to uproot itself from Trump’s camp in order to support someone the left now approves of.

 

The post Joe Walsh Has Lost His Radio Show appeared first on RedState.

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Joe Walsh for President?

Westlake Legal Group JoeWalsh1 Joe Walsh for President? The Blog Radio Joe Walsh GOP primary donald trump 2020 Elections

It’s always nice when you see one of your own colleagues doing well, isn’t it? That’s why we took particular note of a New York Times story this morning suggesting that Salem radio host (and former congressman) Joe Walsh was getting ready to challenge President Trump in the GOP primary. If nothing else, he’s at least got more national name recognition with the GOP base than many other elected officials thanks to his media platform.

Joe Walsh, a conservative radio show host and former Republican congressman from Illinois, is expected to announce he is running for president as early as this weekend, presenting President Trump with a challenger from the right his critics hope will weaken the president in the 2020 election.

Mr. Walsh stands virtually no chance of wresting the Republican presidential nomination from Mr. Trump, whose approval rating with Republican voters is consistently in the high 80s, and whose political aides have been aggressively moving to tighten their control over state parties to thwart primary challenges.

But those encouraging Mr. Walsh, a Tea Party conservative who served one term in the House and went from staunch Trump supporter to acerbic critic, hope he can appeal to reluctant Trump voters who are open to an alternative.

This isn’t a done deal yet. Joe was on CNN during the seven o’clock block this morning and clearly stated that he hasn’t made up his mind yet, though he’s strongly considering it.

Should we be surprised? Nope. I chat with Joe on Twitter occasionally and follow his feed in my “must watch” list. Once an ardent Trump supporter, Walsh has nothing but vitriol for the President now, rarely having anything approaching a kind word for him. (And let’s be fair here… Donald Trump really seems to go out of his way to inflame passions both for and against him.)

With all that said, it’s kind of difficult to see this as anything other than a “statement campaign” if Walsh actually does toss his hat in the ring. Joe Walsh is far from stupid and he obviously realizes that Trump’s approval rating among Republicans remains stubbornly up in the 80s, if not 90s. There are already a couple of other Republicans who are declared primary candidates and you rarely (if ever) see any headlines about them in the MSM. The reason is obvious. They’re not gaining any traction.

Could it be different for our friend and colleague Joe Walsh? As I said, he has a national platform with a direct line into the ears of the GOP base of voters. He has legitimate political experience and a great voice for speeches and earned media appearances. He’s not going to turn into some sort of Bidenesque gaffe machine. But even with all he has going for him, that’s one heck of a mountain to climb. And as I already said, I’m not telling you anything that Joe doesn’t already know.

The post Joe Walsh for President? appeared first on Hot Air.

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Hosts of NPR’s ‘Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!’ talk comedy in today’s political climate

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-151 Hosts of NPR’s ‘Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!’ talk comedy in today’s political climate wolf trap trivia Things to Do Features Things to Do Radio Politics Peter Sagal npr News & Updates game show Culture comedy broadcast Bill Kurtis
Bill Kurtis (left) and Peter Sagal (right) will host Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me! at Wolf Trap this month. (Photo courtesy of Wolf Trap)

For the fourth year in a row, National Public Radio (NPR) fans will have the chance to laugh along with host Peter Sagal and announcer Bill Kurtis for not one, but two nights of Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me! in Northern Virginia.

The dynamic game show, which pushes listeners and celebrity guests to test their knowledge on world news and entertainment, has been an NPR staple for almost 22 years. Each week, celebrity panelists are invited to dismantle what’s real and what’s fake in the daily news, all while playing off the witty banter of Sagal and Kurtis, who are legends in their own right in the media industry and beyond.

At this year’s performances, being held on on Aug. 29 and Aug. 30, the panelists will include actor Peter Grosz, comedian Negin Farsad, local style writer for The Washington Post, Roxanne Roberts and more. Plus, Sagal promises some guest appearances from well-known individuals in the District, such as chef José Andrés. 

While this is not the first time Sagal has visited Northern Virginia for a show, he still remarks: “It’s kind of stunning to me that someone like me gets to perform on that stage.”  

In preparation for two nights of jokes about daily headlines and the individuals that encompass them in the political capital of the world, Sagal and Kurtis share how the quiz show comes to fruition and why it’s so important today, below. 

How much preparation is involved in the writing of each script?
PS: It’s really a process of research, writing and collaboration. We are a lot like other comedy writers rooms—a lot of pitches, attempts to make each other laugh, constant vetting—and we start every week on Monday. We discuss what we should talk about, what we shouldn’t and what we need to talk about. It’s a huge process of research because all of our content is based on the news.

A lot of the times, one of the things that happens is we try all these ideas and you have to go through them to get something original. But really, what makes us different than other shows is that while we write and prepare a lot, it’s all just so we can go into it with our panelists and our guests and see what happens. We do a lot of preparation to be spontaneous. It’s why I think our show has appeal. You’re hearing, as a listener, content that we come up with in the moment, which is sometimes the best stuff. 

BK: For me, the writing is done primarily by Peter and a team, much like The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. There’s an interesting creative community, everybody is sort of connected because there’s a special talent in writing jokes. For me, I’ve been a newsman all my life so I get to kick back and read their plans. I’m along for the ride and it’s a great time. 

Peter, you’ve been a host since the show started in 1998. How does your experience as an author, playwright and journalist, among other things, impact your role on the show?
PS: I’ve been extraordinarily fortunate that the thing I stumbled into has not only turned into a career, but it’s given me the chance to reach people in an incredible way. People depend on us to make them laugh, and I get to do this show with my friends every week.

When I think about what prepared me for it other than the fact that I was the rude guy in the back of the classroom, I’d say the fact that I was a playwright gives me the ability to hear what sounds good. I’m kind of creating live dialogue on the fly. And the weird thing is, once we started doing it in front of a live audience, I became more confident.

How do you find that balance between the discourse of the news today and the lighthearted nature of your show?
PS: If there’s any one concept that we think about more than any other topic when we plan, it is exactly that. We think, what does our audience really want from us? We know that they want us to talk about the major stories in the news, which tend to all revolve around one person, and we know they want us to say something about them. And there’s a real value in that for our listeners, especially the public radio listeners, because everything they listen to is balanced. We are not. We are the jokesters, jesters and clowns at the back of the classroom. 

We know our audience looks forward to our show as a break from all the news. They want the stuff that’s not scary and life threatening. So every week, it’s about what our audience needs to hear and what will relieve them? It’s always a balance, because on the one hand, if we totally ignore the constant chaos coming out of Washington, our audience would start to lose trust in us, but if we do it too much then we are part of the problem. We meet listeners every time we do the show and honestly I’m just like them. I’m caught between wanting to know but it also exhausts me.

BK: We all kind of live with it. We started thinking about it, being like, “Hey, this will be great” for NPR. And we go through these periods of uncertainty and now, it’s kind of hard to be funny about it because the reality is it’s not funny anymore. And with the Trump administration there was a conversation about what to do. But we realized people listen to us because they want some release, they want to let the air out and make fun of these situations. 

For me, I was an anchor, a correspondent and everything else for all those years. You were never “allowed” to laugh, smile or any of that. I feel released and free on this show. I can have fun with what’s going on outside of the studio. It’s a jolly old time. 

What’s it like working with one another?
PS: Bill Kurtis is just the best. He’s a lot like my former co-host, Carl Kasell, in that they both have had successful careers in media. What makes them similar is that late in life they were given the chance to do something different, not for the money or for the work, but just because they enjoy it. That affects Bill’s performance and his presence, he really lightens up the room. People don’t understand the extent to which he is such a news source—he actually kind of inspired the character of Ron Burgundy in Anchorman. The way that Ron Burgundy was set up as this giant icon, that was bill in Chicago in the ’70s and ’80s, so for him to come and lend us that gravitas is really fun and exciting. 

BK: Peter is incredibly bright. He is an intellectual, in fact he is now invited yearly to go out to the Bohemian Grove—it’s a gathering of CEOs, businessmen, musicians, every summer where they celebrate theater and music. And Peter on the show portrays another level of humor that is unexplainable. We go to the rehearsal, and he will go in and play off the headlines of the day like it’s easy. We are great friends. He was actually recently married at my house in the backyard. I love working with him.


For tickets to the upcoming shows, click here. // Filene Center: 1551 Trap Road, Vienna; $45-$80

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LISTEN: Breakdown Of The Democratic Candidates On Healthcare

Westlake Legal Group marianne-williamson1-j-620x317 LISTEN: Breakdown Of The Democratic Candidates On Healthcare Radio President Media listen live Front Page Stories democrats debate Allow Media Exception 2020

Author Marianne Williamson speaks during the first of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Tuesday, July 30, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

One of the biggest topics featured in the Democratic debates this week was healthcare, with a big focus on Medicare For All, the plan touted by the super progressive candidates.

Some of the biggest fights in the two debates were between the progressive candidates and the more moderate (in tone) candidates and the issue of healthcare, and there is no way we can’t talk about it. You can spend days going over every detail. If you want a solid summary, though, you can listen starting at about 7:35 a.m. this morning as I discuss it with KPEL 96.5 in Lafayette, Louisiana.

 

Consider this an open thread. Listen in and share your thoughts on the Democrats and their healthcare plans.

The post LISTEN: Breakdown Of The Democratic Candidates On Healthcare appeared first on RedState.

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Rush: “All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around”

Westlake Legal Group rl Rush: “All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around” Trump The Blog Rush Limbaugh Radio Mark Sanford fiscal Deficit debt conservative bogus

“Nobody is a fiscal conservative anymore,” he said on today’s show.

Well, I know one person who isn’t.

He said this today in response to a caller who wants Trump dumped from the GOP ticket next year. Why? Because, the guy reasoned, it’s bananas to stick with someone who has as much baggage as POTUS when you could swap in an anodyne Republican and make the election all about how insane Democrats have become instead. Why rerun the lesser-of-two-very-evil-evils contest of 2016 when you could take the lay-up?

That’s a flawed argument for several reasons, starting with the fact that no political party will voluntarily shed the advantage of incumbency. But Rush’s reply went in an … interesting direction:

CALLER: (unintelligible) …Trump Derangement Syndrome, and that will allow any normal Republican to get elected in 2020. Republicans can nominate a young, potentially two-term president, one that believes in fiscal conservatism. We’re gonna have… In 2019, there’s gonna be a $1 trillion deficit. Trump doesn’t really care about that. He’s not really a fiscal conservative. We have to acknowledge that Trump has been cruelly used.

RUSH: Nobody is a fiscal conservative anymore. All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around.

Well.

I went looking for audio and couldn’t find it. Re-reading the exchange, I thought what Limbaugh might have meant was that nobody *in Washington* is a fiscal conservative anymore, which is true enough. He’s not saying that he thinks concern about spending is bogus, he’s saying that the Republican leadership’s endless screeching about it during the Obama presidency was bogus based on how they’ve behaved themselves while in power. Which, again, is true. Rush wasn’t giving us his view here, he was critiquing the GOP establishment’s abandonment of small-government conservatism.

Except no, he wasn’t. The segment continued:

Well, we have a name! A Republican has thrown hit hat into the ring. It happened on CNN right now earlier this afternoon. The hostette, Brianna Keilar, was asking a member of Congress — a Republican from South Carolina — about his possibility of running for president. “So you’re considering a primary run against a sitting president. Tell us why, Mark Sanford.”

SANFORD: There is little to no — I guess I’d say no — discussion of debt, deficit, and government spending in Washington these days. I’ve watched two Democratic presidential debates, and there’s been zero discussion on both of them as to this issue. The president said we’re not gonna touch the very things that drive debt and spending. So I think that we’re walking away into one heck of a financial storm, and there’s no discussion. I was just sitting on set and listening to people discussing both sides of the president’s comments. I think that they’re noxious and they’re weird and they’re all those different things that people are discussing. But there is, again, plenty of discussion on that front. The place where there’s no discussion is the way in which interest is the largest growing expense in the federal government!

RUSH: Well, there you have it. I mean, how can you stop this guy? Mark Sanford: “Everybody’s talking about how weird Trump is, but nobody’s talking about the interest and how interest on the debt is the largest growing expense of the federal government.” (interruption) “The Mark Sanford, yes. “The” Mark Sanford! (laughing) How many years have people tried to scare everybody about [the deficit]? How many years, how many decades have politicians tried to scare us about the deficit, the national debt, (Sen. Jim Sasser pronunciation) “the dafycit,” any number of things? Yet here we’re still here, and the great jaws of the deficit have not bitten off our heads and chewed them up and spit them out.

“Well, it’s coming, Rush.”

Media Matters people are rounding up some of his choicer quotes about the debt and deficits during the Obama era, when O argued that a historic recession left him no choice but to accept massive shortfalls in the federal budget while the country slowly recovered economically. Trump, however, presides over a roaring economy and yet we’re still running a mammoth deficit this year, after two years of total Republican control of government. That is, Rush’s conclusion that gross fiscal irresponsibility simply isn’t much of a concern seems curiously recent. Dating, say, to around November 2016 or thereabouts, I’m guessing.

These aren’t his first comments along these lines during the Trump era. Within a month of Trump’s victory three years ago, he was talking up how a massive infrastructure stimulus might be worth entertaining — so long as it was done right, of course, unlike Obama’s shoddy stimulus of 2009. Last year he confessed his newfound skepticism of the innermost core principle of fiscal conservatism, that government should live within its means, when he said, “[I]n the real world all of the apocalyptic warnings I grew up hearing have yet to happen. The national debt has not choked us. The national debt is not destroyed us. We may be living in the middle of the destruction and don’t see it yet, but for some reason I didn’t get caught up in it.” All he did today is reiterate that he continues to believe that. Coincidentally, on a day when news is breaking that our deficit reached a trillion dollars under Trump last year and his regular listeners might otherwise be under the impression that that’s a bad thing.

Oh well. Everyone’s entitled to change their minds politically. If the most celebrated conservative broadcaster in the history of American radio is now a Krugman-style Keynesian, that’s his right — although a little more truth in how he advertises his program would be welcome. All I ask is that he show an iota of principle by sticking to this big-government position once a Democrat is back in the White House and all the phony fiscal cons on the Hill start bleating again that d-d-d-deficits matter! If he doesn’t, one might get a funny idea that Rush doesn’t really believe anything and is simply saying at any given moment what he thinks his listeners want to hear.

The post Rush: “All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around” appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group rl-300x153 Rush: “All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around” Trump The Blog Rush Limbaugh Radio Mark Sanford fiscal Deficit debt conservative bogus   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hoo boy: The “Loqueesha” trailer

Westlake Legal Group hoo-boy-the-loqueesha-trailer Hoo boy: The “Loqueesha” trailer trailer The Blog saville Radio movie loqueesha jeremy

Westlake Legal Group l Hoo boy: The “Loqueesha” trailer trailer The Blog saville Radio movie loqueesha jeremy

Something different to end the week. Haven’t heard of “Loqueesha” yet? I hadn’t either until late this afternoon.

We’ll all be hearing more about it next week, I reckon.

Reaction on Twitter is mainly disbelief that it’s real. When I saw the poster, I thought it was a goof too. It is not. I’m curious about the movie to this extent: Is it just what it seems, a broad rip-off of “Soul Man” with a touch of gender-bending, or is there something more subversive to its treatment of “cultural appropriation”? The YouTube caption touts it as “a movie of the moment” and promises “a comical take on our current socio-political climate,” which sounds pretty ambitious for what looks to be an ultra-lowbrow comedy about a middle-aged white bro trying to do a “sassy” black woman’s voice for an hour and a half.

No doubt it ends with the main character contrite about his racial sins and newly sensitive to the prejudices that blacks have to deal with. That’s how “Soul Man” got away with its own comic salute to blackface. But it wasn’t really the protagonist’s contrition that made that film viable; it was the fact that it came out in 1986. A last-minute racial epiphany by the star won’t keep the heat off in 2019, which makes me wonder what the endgame is. Maybe there is no contrition and it’s actually some “sorry not sorry” thing in which the lead actor, who also wrote and directed, is trying to make a name for himself by being unapologetically “politically incorrect.” I can’t imagine why else you’d want to make a movie like this in this age unless the point is to pick a fight with the woke brigades.

Goes to show that you should never give up on your dream, though. If you’ve ever had the thought that a rudimentary ability to mimic black vernacular couldn’t possibly support a feature-length film, know that not everyone is as defeatist as you are.

The post Hoo boy: The “Loqueesha” trailer appeared first on Hot Air.

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In Louisiana, A Case Study In The Death Of Good Local Media

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Westlake Legal Group Journalism-620x413 In Louisiana, A Case Study In The Death Of Good Local Media tv Radio newspaper News media bias Media Louisiana local media journalism Front Page Stories Featured Story Allow Media Exception

CREDIT: Brandon Morse, copyright RedState.com.

Those of you who pay attention to the state of the media in your own states may recognize this story. It is a story that could have happened in your state, or maybe it’s happening there like it is here.

Here in Louisiana, the biggest newspaper in Baton Rouge, The Advocate, has opened up two bureaus in other parts of south Louisiana. The first is in Lafayette, where I live, and the Acadiana Advocate has spent years competing with the locally-owned Gannett paper, The Daily Advertiser. In New Orleans, the New Orleans Advocate has had to compete with the long-running Times-Picayune, the preeminent paper of the Big Easy.

They competed, that is, until yesterday, when it was announced that The Advocate‘s owners purchased the Times-Picayune.

Now, these two papers didn’t just compete in New Orleans. They competed in Baton Rouge, the state’s capital. Covering state government was a competitive business between the two. But now, the competition is over. The Advocate won. I’ve talked with quite a few people who have flat out said that The Advocate‘s owners’ plan all along was to become THE state’s media.

The problem is, The Advocate isn’t just THE state’s media. It has worked tirelessly under Democratic governor John Bel Edwards to become THE state media.

The Advocate‘s coverage of politics in Baton Rouge has always been one-sided, but the fact that they had to compete with the Times-Picayune did force them to try and create a better product. Without that competition, they are going to feel very little need to compete and create that product. They will have the confidence to keep going as they had been, and to go at it harder. After all, they won.

Now, Gannett has a not-insignificant presence in the state, but their closest paper is here in Lafayette, about an hour away from the state capitol – unless there’s a wreck on I-10 (as there often are), in which case it’s more like an hour and a half.

Gannett is also dealing with company-wide cuts, staff-layoffs, and some competitive poaching (the Lafayette paper lost a huge chunk of its editorial staff to the Acadiana Advocate‘s newsroom). They currently don’t appear to have the manpower to compete at that level. They are restructuring how they are running their papers at a regional level. They can get a general state capitol reporter, but they can’t have a full staff ready to go there and work it day in and day out, especially during legislative sessions.

Does this scenario seem familiar to you?

Local newspapers are struggling. They have smaller budgets and smaller newsrooms. A recovering economy will help them stay afloat as advertisers get more confident about advertising, but they are struggling. Television and radio stations have to produce newscasts, run shows, and juggle several different media at once. They don’t have time to just sit there and work on their digital print content all day. So, they can’t compete with the level of reporting that newspapers do.

There is less and less competition in this marketplace, and there are fewer and fewer voices we can read and listen to in order to get an idea of what’s going on. As much as we declare the media a liberal institution, they still perform a necessary job. When you have fewer people doing that job, the quality of that product will get worse and worse over time.

If you aren’t already, I do encourage you to support your local media as much as you can. You can’t replace them once they’re gone. Smaller local outlets tend to be a lot better than regional or national outlets in covering the issues important to you. They are the experts in your area. That’s why you need them.

The national press gets huffy when you don’t show them respect and treat them like the defenders of democracy they believe they are. But in reality, it’s the death of the small media that will hurt democracy the most.

The post In Louisiana, A Case Study In The Death Of Good Local Media appeared first on RedState.

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