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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "recycling"

Sponsored Post: Airlines UK: The aviation industry has an ambitious plan to deliver net zero carbon emissions

This is a sponsored post by Airlines UK.

This is a critical year for our world-class aviation sector. Whilst carbon emissions from UK aviation account for only around seven per cent of the UK’s total – substantially less than road transport and comparable to shipping – aviation is at risk of becoming one of the poster boys for the climate crisis if it is not careful.

Earlier this year, UK aviation took an important step forward in challenging this perception. Collectively, the UK’s airlines and airports, as well as aerospace manufacturers and air service navigation providers, came together to commit to delivering net zero carbon emissions by 2050, whilst continuing to meet passenger and freight demand and helping to deliver the UK’s economic objectives as a global trading nation in a post-Brexit world.

This is an unprecedented commitment by any national aviation sector anywhere in the world, and is a clear signal that the UK aviation sector recognises that it can only grow if it is accompanied by rapid decarbonisation.

Why does this matter? Because we simply cannot afford to dismiss aviation as a lost cause. Today nearly 400 international destinations are served by routes from the UK, the third largest market in the world. In total, some 4.5 percent of the country’s GDP is supported by our air transport sector, supporting over 1.6 million UK jobs. Just over half of Brits took to the skies last year, and we know that people want to be able to go on holiday and visit family and friends – they just want to be able to do it better, knowing that the sector is acting responsibly to cut its environmental impact.

But what does net zero aviation mean in practice, and how will it be delivered? Importantly, aviation is not starting from scratch. It might surprise some but emissions from UK aviation have remained level in recent years despite a 25 per cent rise in passenger numbers – the result of airline investment totalling tens of billions of pounds in hundreds of new, cleaner aircraft type.

This is only the start. UK aviation today plans to deliver an absolute reduction in carbon emissions – i.e. emissions from source – to below the level recommended by the Committee on Climate Change in their latest advice to Government on how the country can meet net zero. It will then use measures to remove CO2 from the atmosphere to offset remaining emissions, and deliver net zero aviation. This would mean that UK aviation plays its full part in in helping the UK deliver its contribution to the global goal of restricting temperature rises to no more than 1.5C above pre-industrial levels by 2050.

How can this be delivered? There is no silver bullet. The industry has set out a plan that shows how improvements in technology – starting with delivering the latest engine technology, but including the introduction of hybrid and then electric aircraft – can save around 23.5Mt of carbon by 2050. This exciting future is becoming a reality, with EasyJet, for example, in a partnership with US company Wright Electric, aiming to develop a 186-seat electric aircraft by 2030.

Alongside this, the up-scaled and fully commercialised use of sustainable aviation fuels has the potential to reduce UK emissions in 2050 by at least a further 30 per cent, saving 14.4Mt of CO₂. British Airways has plans to open a fuels plant in Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, which will turn hundreds of thousands of tonnes of post-recycling waste destined for landfill into over 60 million litres of clean burning sustainable jet and road fuel per year. Virgin Atlantic are working with the company LanzaTech to develop a novel carbon capture and utilisation approach, which recycles waste carbon-rich gases from heavy industries into jet fuel, and aims to provide all Virgin Atlantic’s fuel out of the UK as a 50:50 blend, with 70 per cent CO2 savings.

Modernising our airspace, which will cut delays and eliminate the need for wasteful stacking and re-routing, can save a further 3.1Mt.

Finally, robust carbon offsets and investment in innovative carbon removal solutions will then address residual UK aviation emissions, building on the UN-backed global offsetting scheme for aviation, CORSIA, which starts in earnest next year and delivers carbon neutral growth for all of international aviation.

This is a credible and deliverable plan for aviation, and one that promises not only carbon savings, but allows for the sector to meet expected demand growth, competing internationally and delivering huge advantages to the whole of the UK, as a leader in the global green economy. Taking sustainable aviation fuels as an example, there is potential for up to 14 fuel plants operating in the UK by 2035, most built in regions outside the South East. This would create thousands of new skilled jobs and be a boon to this Government’s levelling-up agenda.

However, this exciting future cannot happen without a renewed partnership between government and industry, whereby investment by the sector is supported by smart policies and genuine vision.  This means UK Government pushing ahead and completing vital airspace modernisation. It means supporting the uptake of sustainable aviation fuels through matched public/private funding to support commercial plants built in the early 2020s, alongside reforms to incentives to put sustainable fuels on a competitive footing. It means supporting aerospace research and development through the Aerospace Growth Partnership and increasing investment in the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI), delivering the hybrid and electric aircraft of the future, sooner. The UK Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) has funded 260 projects with a grant value of £1.3 billion up to the end of October 2019.

It also means recognising that blunt instruments like higher taxation, making air travel less accessible to families and making it even harder for UK carriers (who already pay the highest aviation taxes in the world through Air Passenger Duty) to invest in new technology, carbon credits and alternative fuel sources – are not the way to go.

The upcoming Budget – and COP 26 later this year – is a real opportunity to signal through support for innovation a positive vision for UK aviation, rather than one in which we accept the false premise that only by making our aviation sector less competitive can we address the climate challenge. We can do better, and we must.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Glass recycling pickup has ended across NoVA. Enter the Purple Can Club.

Westlake Legal Group purple-can-recycling-sketch-feature Glass recycling pickup has ended across NoVA. Enter the Purple Can Club. vienna recycling purple can club prince william county News & Updates News Local Recycling Home glass recycling fairfax environment arlington alexandria
Illustration by James Boyle

Empty glass container? You can toss that in recycling. Well, you can toss it into the purple, glass-only recycling container located somewhere around town. Or into your trash can. You can’t, however, throw it into your blue bin for curbside pickup like your paper and plastic waste, a change that took effect across the region in August.

In place of curbside pickup is the Purple Can Club, the new method for NoVA residents to recycle their glass waste. The Purple Can Club consists of 24 purple, glass-only drop-off containers that can be found across the region. The glass is then brought to Fairfax County’s processing plant (nicknamed “Big Blue” for its blue color and large size) in Lorton where it is crushed into sand and gravel for use in a variety of projects, including pipe bedding and backfill, which protects pipes in new infrastructures.

When the change in curbside recycling policies was announced in a number of NoVA counties, it caused an uproar. But, say local officials, the decision to remove glass from the single-stream recycling programs in Fairfax, Prince William and Arlington counties, as well as Alexandria, was approved in order to increase recycling—not reduce it. “We had to separate the glass in order to get it really recycled, and that’s why we started the Purple Can Club,” says Erik Grabowsky, chief of Solid Waste Bureau in Arlington County government’s Department of Environmental Services. The Purple Can Club is a regional partnership between Arlington, Alexandria, Fairfax and Prince William counties, as well as the town of Vienna.

“Now that we are getting the material, we’re actually able to recycle it, rather than telling people it’s being recycled when it wasn’t,” says Grabowsky.

In the single-stream system (in which all paper fibers, plastics, metals and other containers are mixed, instead of being sorted), broken glass was contaminating other recyclable materials and causing issues for the machines at the material recovery facilities.

“When you put your bin at home on the curbside, and you put in glass with everything else that’s recyclable, a truck comes by and dumps it into a truck, which transports it to the material recovery facility,” says Eric Forbes, director of engineering and environmental compliance for Fairfax County’s Solid Waste Management. “Through that handling process, evidently, glass breaks. When that glass breaks, all of those little pieces of glass then stick to everything else, causing contamination.”

Recycling contamination has become a big problem for the U.S. over the past two years since China, the largest customer of recycled material, imposed strict standards on the quality of materials, meaning it was accepting less waste from the U.S. and contamination of recyclable materials was now a home front problem.

Because of the changes set in place by China, there was also a drop in the market value of glass recyclables, resulting in recycling centers depositing glass in landfills rather than forwarding them on to recycling facilities. “The big change happened when China suggested that it wasn’t going to accept materials from the U.S. anymore because of contaminations,” explains Forbes. “The fact that China closed its doors meant the market, domestically, was flooded with more material now. There’s more supply, less demand.”

To counteract the contamination, Northern Virginia’s Purple Can Club turns glass either into sand or peasized gravel for construction projects, or ships it to a glass processor in North Carolina that turns glass into aggregate. “Fairfax County is shipping some of it down to Wilson, North Carolina,” says Grabowsky. “Where now it’s truly being recycled. Some of it gets turned back into glass bottles and some into fiberglass.”

Despite the reduced convenience, so far, the new recycling logistics seem to be working.

As of press time, Arlington County, for example, has seen a dramatic increase in residents participating in the Purple Can Club. “To date, we’ve collected 380 tons of glass. In October, we got 85.69 tons, which was doubled from the month before,” says Grabowsky.

As a result, in Arlington County, the non-glass contamination rate was down to 8.2% in October, in comparison to 20.7% in April. “Those are just really good statistics,” he says. “Arlington is doing much better than the norm (15-25% contamination) and it allows us to manage our recyclables differently. If we’re generating a third of the residue that other communities are, it just makes our overall value of our commodity stream higher. In addition to making aggregate out of the glass, a lot of glass is now being turned back into bottles and into insulation. That’s positive news.”


Wishful Recycling Be Gone

Don’t just toss any glass into purple containers to feel good. Here’s what you can and can’t recycle in the Purple Can Club.

Recyclable:

All colors of clean glass bottles and jars are accepted in the purple containers. They must be empty, washed of any food waste and dry.

Non-Recyclable:

• Plastic bags
• Windows
• Lamps
• Light bulbs
• Ceramics
• Porcelain
• Mirrors
• Sheet Glass
• Mixed materials (for example, don’t leave a metal lid on a glass jar)

Where to Find the Purple Can Club

This post originally appeared in our January 2020 print issue. For more news you need to know, subscribe to our e-newsletters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Here’s where to recycle your Christmas trees in NoVA

Westlake Legal Group christmas-trees-recycling-nova-leopictures Here’s where to recycle your Christmas trees in NoVA trash recycling recycle loudoun county january Home Resources holidays Holiday Trees falls church fairfax december Christmas trees christmas arlington alexandria
© leopictures / stock.adobe.com

When the holidays come to an end, there’s usually one problem that starts to pile up—trash. 

Aside from the bundles of wrapping paper, broken-down cardboard boxes and discarded dinner party necessities, your Christmas tree is yet another thing that needs to be disposed. 

Luckily, Northern Virginia has options for curbside removal, tree recycling and more. For more information on your location, visit the county websites below. 

Do love home design and learning more about local resources? Subscribe to our weekly Home e-newsletter for more tips and tricks sent straight to your inbox. 

Alexandria

Residents who receive city trash service must place their trees on the curb (no alleys) by Saturday, Jan. 11 or Saturday, Jan. 18 at 7 a.m., to be picked up for recycling purposes in the City of Alexandria. Trees picked up during this period will be turned into next spring’s mulch, where residents can come on a first-come, first-served basis to collect free mulch for their yards or property. Mulch delivery is available for an additional fee. Trees set on the curb after Jan. 18 will be collected as regular refuse. Make sure to remove all ornaments, tinsel and tree stands, and do not place the tree in any sort of plastic bag (which can contaminate the mulch). 

Arlington

Residents don’t even have to leave their homes to recycle their discarded Christmas trees in Arlington, since the county is offering free pickup on Monday through Friday trash days, from Monday, Dec. 30 to Friday, Jan. 10. Be sure to place your trees at the curb where your trash cans are located by 6 a.m., with all decorations, nails, stands and plastic bags removed. Want to keep your tree longer than Jan. 10? Christmas trees are also a part of the year-round yard waste collection, which means they’ll be turned into mulch after being picked up with other leaves, yard waste and more. Trees over 8 feet long must be dismantled for this service. 

If you’re an Arlington resident without curbside pickup (living in a townhouse, apartment or condominium), you can bring your tree to the Solid Waste Bureau’s Earth Products Yard in Shirlington. You can make an appointment to ensure safe drop off Monday through Friday, and you must show proof of Arlington residence. // Solid Waste Bureau’s Earth Products Yard: 4300 29th St. S., Arlington

Falls Church

Due to the holidays being in the middle of the week this year (Christmas is on Wednesday, as well as New Year’s Day), trash service in Falls Church will be suspended on both days and delayed to Saturday, Dec. 28 and Saturday, Jan. 4. Christmas trees will be collected free of charge on Wednesdays in January and February, but placing your trees at the curb in the first two weeks of January will ensure it is collected promptly and disposed of. 

Make sure to remove all plastic bags, ropes and decorations, including tinsel. Residents who live in apartments, townhouses or condominiums may recycle trees by taking them to the brush collection area at the Fairfax County Citizens Disposal and Recycling Facility. // Fairfax County Citizens Disposal and Recycling Facility: 4618 West Ox Road, Fairfax

Fairfax

Fairfax residents with curbside pickup can place their trees on the curb (where your trash cans would be located) during the first two weeks in January. After that, you must schedule a brush pickup to have your Christmas tree removed and disposed of. 

To recycle your Christmas tree in Fairfax, residents can drop off their trees at the I-66 Transfer Station or the I-95 Landfill Complex. There is a $1 fee to recycle your tree. All ornaments, decorations (including tinsel) and stands must be removed prior. // I-66 Transfer Station: 4618 W. Ox Road, Fairfax; I-95 Landfill Complex: 9850 Furnace Road, Lorton

Loudoun County

For curbside Christmas tree recycling in Loudoun County, residents should contact their homeowners association, town office or private water collection service for more information on what the guidelines are for this year. 

If residents would like to take recycling matters into their own hands, Christmas trees can be recycled into mulch (available to Loudoun County residents for free) in Leesburg, Lovettsville, Purcellville, Sterling and South Riding. All Christmas trees should have decorations removed prior to disposal or recycling. These services are for Loudoun County residents only. // Loudoun County Landfill Recycling Dropoff Center: 21101 Evergreen Mills Road, Leesburg; Game Protective Association: 16 S. Berlin Pike, Lovettsville; Franklin Park: 17501 Franklin Park Drive, Purcellville; Claude Moore Park: 46150 Loudoun Park Lane, Sterling; Town Hall: 43066 Center St., South Riding

Prince William County

After removing all decorations from your family’s Christmas tree, there are several drop-off locations for it in Prince William County (curbside pickup is not available). Visit the Prince William County Landfill, the Balls Ford Road Compost Facility, Leesylvania State Park or Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative. Times vary at each location, and the Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative will offer mulch to residents free of charge with delivery. // Prince William County Landfill: 14811 Dumfries Road, Manassas; Balls Ford Road Yard Waste Compost Facility: 13000 Balls Ford Road, Manassas; Leesylvania State Park: 2001 Daniel K Ludwig Drive, Woodbridge; Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative: 10323 Lomond Drive, Manassas

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Plastic “Trump straws” sell out almost immediately

Westlake Legal Group TrumpStraw Plastic “Trump straws” sell out almost immediately The Blog Straws recycling plastic straw ban plastic merchandise donald trump

This is a follow-up to a story that Allahpundit covered on Friday. While the subject of plastic waste that doesn’t decompose winding up in our oceans and landfills is a serious one, not all of the proposals to address the situation are as serious as others. As AP noted, the President was asked about a ban on plastic straws and he responded by saying that it makes little sense to ban them when we’re not banning all of the other, larger plastic products that are also not recycled.

Not long after that, somebody saw a fundraising opportunity and plastic “Trump straws” were on sale at the President’s fundraising site. Charging a dollar and a half each for what is essentially just a plain, red plastic straw with Trump’s name emblazoned on the side might not sound like much of a bargain, but that obviously wasn’t the point. The President was capitalizing on pushback against a liberal idea that seemed excessively intrusive while producing little in the way of measurable results. So how did it work out? The straws sold out in a matter of days.

“I’m so over paper straws, and I’m sure you are too. Much like most liberal ideas, paper straws don’t work and they fall apart instantly. That’s why we just launched our latest product – Official Trump Straws,” Parscale wrote late Friday. “Now you can finally be free from liberal paper straws that fall apart within minutes and ruin your drink.”

Journalist Yashar Ali appears to have been the first to notice the new merchandise in Trump’s campaign store. A pack of 10, which are red and emblazoned with “TRUMP” in silver, is available for $15. However, it takes almost two weeks for shipping.

They’re still taking orders, but you’ll have to wait a few weeks to get them. And considering what they cost in bulk and how many people are snapping them up, whoever came up with this idea probably deserves a bonus next month.

The underlying idea that kicked all of this off is a very real one, however. I’ve tried those paper straws at a local diner and they’re simply useless. You can finish maybe a third of a 12-ounce cup of ice tea before the straw is totally falling apart and filling your drink with soggy paper. But what’s the viable alternative? You can carry your own around, but glass straws have a nasty habit of breaking and immediately turning into a rather deadly weapon. The metal straws seem like a far better choice, assuming you don’t die while impaling your brain on them. I haven’t had a chance to try one of the bamboo ones yet, but I’ll admit they sound like they would last longer than paper, though I have to wonder if they don’t impart some sort of bamboo taste.

The other problem with reusable straws is that they have to be washed and there is no brush or other device I’m aware of that can fully clean the inside of them. If all you’re drinking is water or other very “thin” liquids, you should be able to soak them in hot water and then run rise water through them and get them mostly clean. But if it’s any sort of thick, creamy beverage you can probably forget it.

Aside from milkshakes, how many drinks do you actually need a straw for? Sure, they’re very convenient if you’re in the car, but still…can’t we sip out of the little slots in the cup lid? (Odds are that your cup lid is probably plastic too, but let’s not be distracted by that.)

Surely some genius out there can come up with some sort of artificial wood material that would biodegrade and can be rolled up to make straws, lids or cups at a reasonable cost. If they do, they should be in for a decent profit. Until then, I suppose we can just pony up fifteen bucks for Trump straws or buy one hundred of them at the dollar store and bring them with us when traveling.

The post Plastic “Trump straws” sell out almost immediately appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group TrumpStraw-300x159 Plastic “Trump straws” sell out almost immediately The Blog Straws recycling plastic straw ban plastic merchandise donald trump  Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Vote Conservative in next week’s local elections

Three in five Conservative Party members intend to vote for the Brexit Party in the European elections, according to our recent survey.  So do two in five Tory councillors, according to a recent poll.  These are elections that shouldn’t be happening, in which the candidate selection process gives no choice to members…and in which the Brexit Party is standing.

None of this applies to next week’s local elections.

Party members should be grateful to well-run Tory councils, circumstances, fellow Conservative activists, the opposition and so many excellent Tory councillors and candidates for making the choice so simple for them.  So should Conservative voters – though many will doubtless use next week’s poll to protest.

If so, that’s their choice – but it may hit them in the pocket, and in other ways.

On this site today, Charles Roberts describes how Tory-run East Cambridge District Council is freezing council tax for the sixth year running.  The council’s story of delivering value for money while improving local services is not untypical – at least, when Conservatives are in charge.

So there is no good reason to punish local Tory candidates for Parliamentary manoeuverings and national Government failures.

As the cliché has it, Conservative councils cost you less and, like quite a lot of clichés, it is true.  The vast majority also have a good record on services, and deliver in other ways – recycling more than Labour ones, for example.  So cut off your nose to spite your face – or rather pocket – next week if you please.  But don’t assume that there won’t be consequences.

If you have the opportunity, vote Tory next week.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Vote Conservative in next week’s local elections

Three in five Conservative Party members intend to vote for the Brexit Party in the European elections, according to our recent survey.  So do two in five Tory councillors, according to a recent poll.  These are elections that shouldn’t be happening, in which the candidate selection process gives no choice to members…and in which the Brexit Party is standing.

None of this applies to next week’s local elections.

Party members should be grateful to well-run Tory councils, circumstances, fellow Conservative activists, the opposition and so many excellent Tory councillors and candidates for making the choice so simple for them.  So should Conservative voters – though many will doubtless use next week’s poll to protest.

If so, that’s their choice – but it may hit them in the pocket, and in other ways.

On this site today, Charles Roberts describes how Tory-run East Cambridge District Council is freezing council tax for the sixth year running.  The council’s story of delivering value for money while improving local services is not untypical – at least, when Conservatives are in charge.

So there is no good reason to punish local Tory candidates for Parliamentary manoeuverings and national Government failures.

As the cliché has it, Conservative councils cost you less and, like quite a lot of clichés, it is true.  The vast majority also have a good record on services, and deliver in other ways – recycling more than Labour ones, for example.  So cut off your nose to spite your face – or rather pocket – next week if you please.  But don’t assume that there won’t be consequences.

If you have the opportunity, vote Tory next week.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com