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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 103)

Evangelical Leaders Close Ranks With Trump After Scathing Editorial

Westlake Legal Group 20evangelical1-facebookJumbo Evangelical Leaders Close Ranks With Trump After Scathing Editorial Wehner, Peter United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Reed, Ralph E Jr Presidential Election of 2020 Perkins, Anthony Richard Graham, Franklin Galli, Mark Family Research Council Faith and Freedom Coalition Evangelical Movement Christians and Christianity Christianity Today (Magazine)

The publication is small, reaching just a fraction of the evangelical movement.

But when Christianity Today called for President Trump’s removal in a blistering editorial on Thursday, it met the full force and fury of the president and his most prominent allies in the Christian conservative world. If the response seemed disproportionate, it vividly reflected the nuanced reality of evangelical Christianity in the Trump era.

While white evangelicals are the cornerstone of Mr. Trump’s political base and their leaders are among his most visible and influential spokesmen, a significant number of people who are followers of the faith remain deeply uncomfortable with the alliance with the president.

Mr. Trump, after being impeached this week, has repeatedly insisted that the Republican Party and its voters are unanimously lined up behind him. And on Friday he lashed out on two separate occasions at Christianity Today, erroneously calling it a “far left magazine” that was doing the Democratic Party’s bidding.

“I guess the magazine, ‘Christianity Today,’ is looking for Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, or those of the socialist/communist bent, to guard their religion,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter on Friday. “How about Sleepy Joe? The fact is, no President has ever done what I have done for Evangelicals, or religion itself!”

The president’s reaction was a sign of how critically important the white evangelical voting bloc is to his re-election. And the response from his leading Christian supporters — laced with animosity and mockery that mimicked Mr. Trump’s signature style — reflected how he has reshaped the evangelical political movement in his own mold, much as he has done with the Republican Party.

Ralph Reed, founder of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, said on Twitter that he was “sad” to see the publication “echo the arguments of The Squad & the Resistance & deepen its irrelevance among Christians.”

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, compared Christianity Today to Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “CT, like Pelosi, makes claims w/o evidence,” he wrote on Twitter. “We’ve heard this before. Christians should apply a biblical worldview, not a PC worldview, to the current political landscape.”

Franklin Graham, whose father, the Rev. Billy Graham, founded Christianity Today, said in a Facebook post that the editorial was a “totally partisan attack” and revealed that the elder Graham had voted for the president in 2016, a little more than a year before he died. Mr. Graham went on to tally numerous accomplishments that he said Mr. Trump had achieved.

For the past three years, conservative American politics, and white evangelical Christianity along with it, has realigned steadily and forcefully around Mr. Trump and his coalition. Much like the “Never Trump” voices within the Republican Party, evangelical detractors have receded into the background during the three years Mr. Trump has been president.

Their absence from the national conversation was partly why the editorial was so jolting. But it was also a reminder that the evangelical movement is not monolithic and includes people who may appreciate some of the president’s actions, like the appointment of conservative judges, but are repelled by his inflammatory rhetoric on issues like race and immigration.

That sentiment was clearly expressed in the Christianity Today editorial by Mark Galli, the magazine’s editor in chief. “The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” Mr. Galli wrote. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

For many Christians who felt the same way, but who felt largely voiceless, the piece was a catharsis.

Peter Wehner, a Christian columnist and author who worked as a speechwriter for President George W. Bush, said that Mr. Trump’s most outspoken defenders had created a misleading impression that evangelical Christians universally embrace the president.

“They speak as if they define the movement,” he said. “And a lot of people who aren’t familiar with evangelical Christianity see this and say, ‘Well, they must be representing all Christians.’”

“That’s the significance of what Christianity Today did,” Mr. Wehner added. “They stood up and they said no. That’s not right. We can’t continue with this charade, this moral freak show anymore.”

No leaders in the evangelical movement see any clear signs of an organized resistance to Mr. Trump rising from the editorial. And even dissenters like Mr. Wehner acknowledge they are vastly outnumbered.

According to a recent poll from the Public Religion Research Institute, 77 percent of white evangelical Protestants approved of the job Mr. Trump is doing in office, including half who strongly approve. And nearly all — 99 percent — of Republican white evangelical Protestants said they opposed Mr. Trump’s impeachment, the institute found.

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After Impeachment, an Angry Trump Looks to Voters for Vindication

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-trump-facebookJumbo After Impeachment, an Angry Trump Looks to Voters for Vindication United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidents and Presidency (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

WASHINGTON — President Trump sat forward on the edge of his chair and chatted at length with reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday, unbowed but for him a little subdued. The day after he was impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, he dismissed the judgment of the House of Representatives and punched back by celebrating with a Democratic congressman who switched parties to stand with him.

“I don’t feel like I’m being impeached because it’s a hoax, it’s a setup,” Mr. Trump insisted as he showcased Representative Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, the newly minted Republican, and looked beyond his seemingly certain acquittal in a Senate trial to next fall’s election.

“I’m beating everybody by a lot,” the president said, “and I think that’s where we’re going.”

For Mr. Trump, it was the first day of his new reality, the first day when he woke up with the scarlet letter of impeachment marked with indelible ink on his page in the history books. No matter what else happens, he now enters posterity as the third president to be impeached.

But barring the unforeseen, he will also be the first impeached president to face re-election, setting up a 320-day campaign to convince voters that he was right and his accusers were wrong. He has a chance that Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton never had — to mitigate, at least, the sting of impeachment — and his political operation wasted little time mounting a counterassault on what Mr. Trump characterizes as the corrupt, liberal Democrats who orchestrated a largely party-line scheme to nullify his election.

In a fund-raising pitch on Thursday, Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, called the Democrats who voted to impeach him “traitors” and urged supporters to fight back. “Let’s make sure they know that we will NEVER FORGET,” Mr. Parscale wrote. The campaign announced a “Democrats for Trump” coalition of disaffected members of the other party.

Still, some Republicans were less confident that impeachment would be a boon at the ballot box. Corry Bliss, a Republican strategist who oversaw the party’s independent but ultimately unsuccessful effort to defend its House majority in 2018, said there was a long road to Nov. 3.

“The world is going to end 500 times between impeachment and the election,” he said. “We don’t live in a society where anything can last for 10 or 11 months.”

In a blistering editorial on Thursday evening, a prominent evangelical magazine, Christianity Today, called for Mr. Trump to be removed from office. The move was a pointed departure from the vast majority of Mr. Trump’s white evangelical base, which has supported the president through myriad controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” wrote Mark Galli, the editor in chief. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

But the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist evangelical thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support him.

For Mr. Trump, the day after found him still a little shellshocked, according to people close to him. Despite the clear momentum behind impeachment among Democrats in recent weeks, some of Mr. Trump’s advisers tried to convince him — and themselves — that Speaker Nancy Pelosi did not have the votes and might not even bring the articles of impeachment to the floor, despite warnings from the White House director of legislative affairs, Eric Ueland, that the votes were there.

Mr. Trump’s aides packed his schedule with events to keep him out of Washington as the debate took place on Wednesday. He vented his fury at a rally in Michigan that started even as the votes were being recorded. But having gotten his emotions off his chest, he was unusually talkative flying home on Air Force One. Impeachment “doesn’t feel like anything,” he told aides, according to one person briefed on the conversation.

However much the humiliation and the ensuing news coverage stung, Mr. Trump was intent on not showing it — even in private.

By Thursday morning, he was eager for information. He watched television coverage, listening for clues about what Ms. Pelosi might be up to. Almost as soon as she said she might delay sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate, Mr. Trump started surveying advisers about what it could mean. “Why do you think she’s doing that?” he asked one person after another.

The answers varied and advisers assured him they were looking at options, including trying to push through a trial regardless or arguing that he technically was never actually impeached in the first place, according to a person familiar with the discussions.

Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter, made a point of going on CBS News to make clear that Mr. Trump was undaunted by impeachment. “He’s energized,” she said.

To make sure of that, and to press any advantage against Democrats, Mr. Trump’s aides rushed to put together an event for Thursday with Mr. Van Drew, one of two Democrats to vote against both articles.

Mr. Van Drew, who declared himself a Republican after the votes, was invited to the Oval Office on a day’s notice.

“You have my undying support,” he told the president. “Always.”

Mr. Trump thanked him. “And by the way, same way,” he said. “I’m endorsing him, O.K.?”

No other president has gone on to an election after being impeached. Johnson, who had not been elected in the first place and acceded to the office after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, was shunted aside after being acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial.

A Democrat who had joined the Republican Lincoln’s ticket as his vice-presidential running mate in 1864, Johnson found himself without a party in 1868. Within weeks of the Senate verdict, both parties nominated other candidates without considering him, and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant went on to win as a Republican.

Johnson later mounted a comeback of sorts when the Tennessee legislature made him a senator back in the days before direct elections, but he died several months after joining the body that had put him on trial.

As for Mr. Clinton, he was in his second term when he was acquitted by the Senate in 1999 and therefore ineligible to run again. His vice president, Al Gore, ended up losing the 2000 election.

For that matter, President Richard M. Nixon was also in his second term when he resigned after the approval of articles of impeachment by the House Judiciary Committee in 1974. His vice president and successor, Gerald R. Ford, ended up losing in 1976.

Mr. Trump resolved to reverse that record, and advisers said they had already detected a surge of support from the president’s base. The Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign said they had raised at least $5 million on Thursday alone and $20.6 million in the past month. About 600,000 new volunteers have signed up since September, the party said.

“It’s absolutely been more unifying than anything I’ve seen in years,” said Dan Eberhart, a Republican donor. “Impeachment is really Chapter 1 for the 2020 race. It’s setting up the battle lines and people are realigning their strategies based on how certain members voted.”

Catalina Lauf, a former Trump administration official who is challenging Representative Lauren Underwood, Democrat of Illinois, said impeachment had fired up even some Democrats in her district. “You might disagree with the man,” she said, “but you also feel the treatment he’s been given since the day he was elected is pure madness.”

That sense of grievance and persecution neatly fits into the message Mr. Trump has conveyed from the start — that the elites are out to get him, that they hate him and that they hate his supporters, the “deplorables,” to use the word once uttered by Hillary Clinton that has become a rallying cry for the president’s team.

John Fredericks, a radio host in Virginia, said the volume of calls into his morning show on Thursday was so inundating that he finally had to stop answering them.

“People are outraged because they know what is really going on is that Pelosi and the Democrats think that they know best,” Mr. Fredericks said. “Their message to us is, ‘You are really stupid people who go to Walmart and smell and can’t be trusted.’ It’s an insult.”

Still, Democrats are energized, too, and may be more so if a Senate trial results in acquittal along party lines. Moreover, Mr. Trump’s backlash strategy did not work as well as he had hoped during last year’s midterm elections when he tried to convert conservatives’ anger over what they considered unfair sexual misconduct allegations against Brett M. Kavanaugh, the president’s Supreme Court nominee, into turnout at the polls.

Arguably, the passion generated by the Kavanaugh hearings helped Republicans in select Senate races, but Democrats went on to capture the House.

John Whitbeck, the Republican Party chairman in Virginia, where Democrats captured the state legislature last month, said that impeachment helped Republicans see the stakes of the 2020 election more clearly. But the longer term political trends, he warned, suggested the party could still fall short.

“If you are a Trump supporter and you didn’t vote in these off-year elections, I just don’t see how you don’t show up,” he said. “But I don’t know if that’s going to be enough to overcome the fervor on the other side.”

In states like Virginia that have trended away from Republicans, Mr. Whitbeck said antipathy toward Mr. Trump has been so overwhelming that his political operation has been unable to account for it accurately in its data.

“We spent a ton of money trying to get Trump voters engaged. We’re doing everything we can to account for the high turnout. And still we’ve underestimated it every year,” he said. “It’s just historic on the other side.”

Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Jeremy W. Peters reported from Washington, and Elaina Plott from New York. Nick Corasaniti contributed reporting from New York, and Elizabeth Dias from Washington.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

After Impeachment, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-trump-facebookJumbo After Impeachment, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidents and Presidency (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

WASHINGTON — President Trump sat forward on the edge of his chair and chatted at length with reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday, unbowed but for him a little subdued. The day after he was impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, he dismissed the judgment of the House of Representatives and punched back by celebrating with a Democratic congressman who switched parties to stand with him.

“I don’t feel like I’m being impeached because it’s a hoax, it’s a setup,” Mr. Trump insisted as he showcased Representative Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, the newly minted Republican, and looked beyond his seemingly certain acquittal in a Senate trial to next fall’s election.

“I’m beating everybody by a lot,” the president said, “and I think that’s where we’re going.”

For Mr. Trump, it was the first day of his new reality, the first day when he woke up with the scarlet letter of impeachment marked with indelible ink on his page in the history books. No matter what else happens, he now enters posterity as the third president to be impeached.

But barring the unforeseen, he will also be the first impeached president to face re-election, setting up a 320-day campaign to convince voters that he was right and his accusers were wrong. He has a chance that Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton never had — to mitigate, at least, the sting of impeachment — and his political operation wasted little time mounting a counterassault on what Mr. Trump characterizes as the corrupt, liberal Democrats who orchestrated a largely party-line scheme to nullify his election.

In a fund-raising pitch on Thursday, Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, called the Democrats who voted to impeach him “traitors” and urged supporters to fight back. “Let’s make sure they know that we will NEVER FORGET,” Mr. Parscale wrote. The campaign announced a “Democrats for Trump” coalition of disaffected members of the other party.

Still, some Republicans were less confident that impeachment would be a boon at the ballot box. Corry Bliss, a Republican strategist who oversaw the party’s independent but ultimately unsuccessful effort to defend its House majority in 2018, said there was a long road to Nov. 3.

“The world is going to end 500 times between impeachment and the election,” he said. “We don’t live in a society where anything can last for 10 or 11 months.”

In a blistering editorial on Thursday evening, a prominent evangelical magazine, Christianity Today, called for Mr. Trump to be removed from office. The move was a pointed departure from the vast majority of Mr. Trump’s white evangelical base, which has supported the president through myriad controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” wrote Mark Galli, the editor in chief. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

But the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist evangelical thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support him.

For Mr. Trump, the day after found him still a little shellshocked, according to people close to him. Despite the clear momentum behind impeachment among Democrats in recent weeks, some of Mr. Trump’s advisers tried to convince him — and themselves — that Speaker Nancy Pelosi did not have the votes and might not even bring the articles of impeachment to the floor, despite warnings from the White House director of legislative affairs, Eric Ueland, that the votes were there.

Mr. Trump’s aides packed his schedule with events to keep him out of Washington as the debate took place on Wednesday. He vented his fury at a rally in Michigan that started even as the votes were being recorded. But having gotten his emotions off his chest, he was unusually talkative flying home on Air Force One. Impeachment “doesn’t feel like anything,” he told aides, according to one person briefed on the conversation.

However much the humiliation and the ensuing news coverage stung, Mr. Trump was intent on not showing it — even in private.

By Thursday morning, he was eager for information. He watched television coverage, listening for clues about what Ms. Pelosi might be up to. Almost as soon as she said she might delay sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate, Mr. Trump started surveying advisers about what it could mean. “Why do you think she’s doing that?” he asked one person after another.

The answers varied and advisers assured him they were looking at options, including trying to push through a trial regardless or arguing that he technically was never actually impeached in the first place, according to a person familiar with the discussions.

Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter, made a point of going on CBS News to make clear that Mr. Trump was undaunted by impeachment. “He’s energized,” she said.

To make sure of that, and to press any advantage against Democrats, Mr. Trump’s aides rushed to put together an event for Thursday with Mr. Van Drew, one of two Democrats to vote against both articles.

Mr. Van Drew, who declared himself a Republican after the votes, was invited to the Oval Office on a day’s notice.

“You have my undying support,” he told the president. “Always.”

Mr. Trump thanked him. “And by the way, same way,” he said. “I’m endorsing him, O.K.?”

No other president has gone on to an election after being impeached. Johnson, who had not been elected in the first place and acceded to the office after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, was shunted aside after being acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial.

A Democrat who had joined the Republican Lincoln’s ticket as his vice-presidential running mate in 1864, Johnson found himself without a party in 1868. Within weeks of the Senate verdict, both parties nominated other candidates without considering him, and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant went on to win as a Republican.

Johnson later mounted a comeback of sorts when the Tennessee legislature made him a senator back in the days before direct elections, but he died several months after joining the body that had put him on trial.

As for Mr. Clinton, he was in his second term when he was acquitted by the Senate in 1999 and therefore ineligible to run again. His vice president, Al Gore, ended up losing the 2000 election.

For that matter, President Richard M. Nixon was also in his second term when he resigned after the approval of articles of impeachment by the House Judiciary Committee in 1974. His vice president and successor, Gerald R. Ford, ended up losing in 1976.

Mr. Trump resolved to reverse that record, and advisers said they had already detected a surge of support from the president’s base. The Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign said they had raised at least $5 million on Thursday alone and $20.6 million in the past month. About 600,000 new volunteers have signed up since September, the party said.

“It’s absolutely been more unifying than anything I’ve seen in years,” said Dan Eberhart, a Republican donor. “Impeachment is really Chapter 1 for the 2020 race. It’s setting up the battle lines and people are realigning their strategies based on how certain members voted.”

Catalina Lauf, a former Trump administration official who is challenging Representative Lauren Underwood, Democrat of Illinois, said impeachment had fired up even some Democrats in her district. “You might disagree with the man,” she said, “but you also feel the treatment he’s been given since the day he was elected is pure madness.”

That sense of grievance and persecution neatly fits into the message Mr. Trump has conveyed from the start — that the elites are out to get him, that they hate him and that they hate his supporters, the “deplorables,” to use the word once uttered by Hillary Clinton that has become a rallying cry for the president’s team.

John Fredericks, a radio host in Virginia, said the volume of calls into his morning show on Thursday was so inundating that he finally had to stop answering them.

“People are outraged because they know what is really going on is that Pelosi and the Democrats think that they know best,” Mr. Fredericks said. “Their message to us is, ‘You are really stupid people who go to Walmart and smell and can’t be trusted.’ It’s an insult.”

Still, Democrats are energized, too, and may be more so if a Senate trial results in acquittal along party lines. Moreover, Mr. Trump’s backlash strategy did not work as well as he had hoped during last year’s midterm elections when he tried to convert conservatives’ anger over what they considered unfair sexual misconduct allegations against Brett M. Kavanaugh, the president’s Supreme Court nominee, into turnout at the polls.

Arguably, the passion generated by the Kavanaugh hearings helped Republicans in select Senate races, but Democrats went on to capture the House.

John Whitbeck, the Republican Party chairman in Virginia, where Democrats captured the state legislature last month, said that impeachment helped Republicans see the stakes of the 2020 election more clearly. But the longer term political trends, he warned, suggested the party could still fall short.

“If you are a Trump supporter and you didn’t vote in these off-year elections, I just don’t see how you don’t show up,” he said. “But I don’t know if that’s going to be enough to overcome the fervor on the other side.”

In states like Virginia that have trended away from Republicans, Mr. Whitbeck said antipathy toward Mr. Trump has been so overwhelming that his political operation has been unable to account for it accurately in its data.

“We spent a ton of money trying to get Trump voters engaged. We’re doing everything we can to account for the high turnout. And still we’ve underestimated it every year,” he said. “It’s just historic on the other side.”

Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Jeremy W. Peters reported from Washington, and Elaina Plott from New York. Nick Corasaniti contributed reporting from New York, and Elizabeth Dias from Washington.

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Evangelical Magazine Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162600882_406e6d54-9551-4f8b-8ccb-6f3d3f145f59-facebookJumbo Evangelical Magazine Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal Trump, Donald J Graham, Billy Evangelical Movement Christians and Christianity

Christianity Today, a prominent evangelical magazine, called for President Trump to be removed from office in a blistering editorial on Thursday, a day after he became the third president in history to be impeached and face expulsion by the Senate.

The move was the most notable example of dissent among the religious conservative base that has supported Mr. Trump through controversy after controversy, and came at one of the most vulnerable moments of his presidency.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” Mark Galli, the editor in chief of Christianity Today, wrote in the editorial. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

The editorial was a surprising move for a publication that has generally avoided jumping into bitter partisan battles. But it was unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s core support; the magazine has long represented more centrist thought and popular evangelical leaders with large followings continue to rally behind the president.

“My father would be embarrassed,” Franklin Graham said in an interview of how his father, Billy Graham, who founded the magazine in 1956, would view the move. The younger Mr. Graham has often defended the president.

“It is not going to change anybody’s mind about Trump,” he added. “There’s a liberal element within the evangelical movement. Christianity Today represents that.”

Mr. Galli’s words appealed directly to Mr. Trump’s evangelical base, a group that he said continues “to support Mr. Trump in spite of his blackened moral record,” in the apparent hope of rallying a fragmented resistance.

“Remember who you are and whom you serve,” he wrote. “If we don’t reverse course now, will anyone take anything we say about justice and righteousness with any seriousness for decades to come?”

The piece drew so much attention that the publication’s website initially crashed. Many liberal Christians expressed relief and amazement at the move.

“The heart of white evangelicalism is realizing that its pulse is weak, and that there is sickness in the faith,” said Lisa Sharon Harper, president of FreedomRoad.us, a Christian justice group.

“The fact that it took them so long is something they must learn from,” she added. “But I’m glad they spoke out.”

Opposition to Mr. Trump among white evangelicals remains exceedingly rare, especially in heated moments. Nearly all — 99 percent — of Republican white evangelical Protestants said they opposed Mr. Trump’s impeachment in a recent poll by the Public Religion Research Institute.

Christianity Today, a publication based in the Chicago suburbs, has about 80,000 print subscribers and publishes news and commentary to appeal to evangelical audiences, in the tradition of Billy Graham.

“The beloved evangelist felt the urgent need for balanced reporting, biblical commentary and a loving posture” on issues facing Christians, the group says of its mission on its website.

Though it reaches top evangelical influencers, the publication’s subscriber base is about the equivalent of a handful of megachurches. First Baptist Dallas, which is led by Robert Jeffress, a vocal supporter of the president, alone has about 13,000 members.

The editorial is also perhaps a final word from Mr. Galli, who announced his retirement in October. His departure is effective Jan. 3, 2020.

The magazine is not united about Mr. Galli’s call to remove Mr. Trump. A member of Christianity Today’s board of directors, the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, released a 17-paragraph statement opposing impeachment after the House vote on Wednesday. The editorial, he said in an interview on Thursday evening, came as a surprise.

“Christianity Today is very apolitical,” Mr. Rodriguez said. “We don’t do politics, we don’t even bring up politics in a board meeting.”

He added: “I don’t think it should affect anything.”

The publication had previously expressed concern about Mr. Trump in an editorial before the 2016 election, after old footage surfaced of him making lewd comments about women.

“To indulge in sexual immorality is to make oneself and one’s desires an idol,” the column said. “That Trump has been, his whole adult life, an idolater of this sort, and a singularly unrepentant one, should have been clear to everyone.”

The magazine also took President Bill Clinton to task for “unsavory dealings and immoral acts” in 1998, after Mr. Clinton publicly acknowledged his relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky.

“Unfortunately, the words that we applied to Mr. Clinton 20 years ago apply almost perfectly to our current president,” Mr. Galli wrote.

Evangelicals who have remained unsettled by Mr. Trump have often found it difficult to gain an audience among their own ranks. During his time in office, Mr. Trump’s anti-abortion policies and appointment of conservative justices have assuaged many who reluctantly voted for him in 2016, and have even drawn new supporters.

Despite this record, “none of the president’s positives can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character,” Mr. Galli said. “That he should be removed, we believe, is not a matter of partisan loyalties but loyalty to the Creator of the Ten Commandments.”

Michael Levenson contributed reporting.

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On the Day After, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-trump-facebookJumbo On the Day After, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidents and Presidency (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

WASHINGTON — President Trump sat forward on the edge of his chair and chatted at length with reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday, unbowed but for him a little subdued. The day after he was impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, he dismissed the judgment of the House of Representatives and punched back by celebrating with a Democratic congressman who switched parties to stand with him.

“I don’t feel like I’m being impeached because it’s a hoax, it’s a setup,” Mr. Trump insisted as he showcased Representative Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, the newly minted Republican, and looked beyond his seemingly certain acquittal in a Senate trial to next fall’s election.

“I’m beating everybody by a lot,” the president said, “and I think that’s where we’re going.”

For Mr. Trump, it was the first day of his new reality, the first day when he woke up with the scarlet letter of impeachment marked with indelible ink on his page in the history books. No matter what else happens, he now enters posterity as the third president to be impeached.

But barring the unforeseen, he will also be the first impeached president to face re-election, setting up a 320-day campaign to convince voters that he was right and his accusers were wrong. He has a chance that Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton never had — to mitigate, at least, the sting of impeachment — and his political operation wasted little time mounting a counterassault on what Mr. Trump characterizes as the corrupt, liberal Democrats who orchestrated a largely party-line scheme to nullify his election.

In a fund-raising pitch on Thursday, Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, called the Democrats who voted to impeach him “traitors” and urged supporters to fight back. “Let’s make sure they know that we will NEVER FORGET,” Mr. Parscale wrote. The campaign announced a “Democrats for Trump” coalition of disaffected members of the other party.

Still, some Republicans were less confident that impeachment would be a boon at the ballot box. Corry Bliss, a Republican strategist who oversaw the party’s independent but ultimately unsuccessful effort to defend its House majority in 2018, said there was a long road to Nov. 3.

“The world is going to end 500 times between impeachment and the election,” he said. “We don’t live in a society where anything can last for 10 or 11 months.”

In a blistering editorial on Thursday evening, a prominent evangelical magazine, Christianity Today, called for Mr. Trump to be removed from office. The move was a pointed departure from the vast majority of Mr. Trump’s white evangelical base, which has supported the president through myriad controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” wrote Mark Galli, the editor in chief. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

But the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist evangelical thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support him.

For Mr. Trump, the day after found him still a little shellshocked, according to people close to him. Despite the clear momentum behind impeachment among Democrats in recent weeks, some of Mr. Trump’s advisers tried to convince him — and themselves — that Speaker Nancy Pelosi did not have the votes and might not even bring the articles of impeachment to the floor, despite warnings from the White House director of legislative affairs, Eric Ueland, that the votes were there.

Mr. Trump’s aides packed his schedule with events to keep him out of Washington as the debate took place on Wednesday. He vented his fury at a rally in Michigan that started even as the votes were being recorded. But having gotten his emotions off his chest, he was unusually talkative flying home on Air Force One. Impeachment “doesn’t feel like anything,” he told aides, according to one person briefed on the conversation.

However much the humiliation and the ensuing news coverage stung, Mr. Trump was intent on not showing it — even in private.

By Thursday morning, he was eager for information. He watched television coverage, listening for clues about what Ms. Pelosi might be up to. Almost as soon as she said she might delay sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate, Mr. Trump started surveying advisers about what it could mean. “Why do you think she’s doing that?” he asked one person after another.

The answers varied and advisers assured him they were looking at options, including trying to push through a trial regardless or arguing that he technically was never actually impeached in the first place, according to a person familiar with the discussions.

Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter, made a point of going on CBS News to make clear that Mr. Trump was undaunted by impeachment. “He’s energized,” she said.

To make sure of that, and to press any advantage against Democrats, Mr. Trump’s aides rushed to put together an event for Thursday with Mr. Van Drew, one of two Democrats to vote against both articles.

Mr. Van Drew, who declared himself a Republican after the votes, was invited to the Oval Office on a day’s notice.

“You have my undying support,” he told the president. “Always.”

Mr. Trump thanked him. “And by the way, same way,” he said. “I’m endorsing him, O.K.?”

No other president has gone on to an election after being impeached. Johnson, who had not been elected in the first place and acceded to the office after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, was shunted aside after being acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial.

A Democrat who had joined the Republican Lincoln’s ticket as his vice-presidential running mate in 1864, Johnson found himself without a party in 1868. Within weeks of the Senate verdict, both parties nominated other candidates without considering him, and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant went on to win as a Republican.

Johnson later mounted a comeback of sorts when the Tennessee legislature made him a senator back in the days before direct elections, but he died several months after joining the body that had put him on trial.

As for Mr. Clinton, he was in his second term when he was acquitted by the Senate in 1999 and therefore ineligible to run again. His vice president, Al Gore, ended up losing the 2000 election.

For that matter, President Richard M. Nixon was also in his second term when he resigned after the approval of articles of impeachment by the House Judiciary Committee in 1974. His vice president and successor, Gerald R. Ford, ended up losing in 1976.

Mr. Trump resolved to reverse that record, and advisers said they had already detected a surge of support from the president’s base. The Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign said they had raised at least $5 million on Thursday alone and $20.6 million in the past month. About 600,000 new volunteers have signed up since September, the party said.

“It’s absolutely been more unifying than anything I’ve seen in years,” said Dan Eberhart, a Republican donor. “Impeachment is really Chapter 1 for the 2020 race. It’s setting up the battle lines and people are realigning their strategies based on how certain members voted.”

Catalina Lauf, a former Trump administration official who is challenging Representative Lauren Underwood, Democrat of Illinois, said impeachment had fired up even some Democrats in her district. “You might disagree with the man,” she said, “but you also feel the treatment he’s been given since the day he was elected is pure madness.”

That sense of grievance and persecution neatly fits into the message Mr. Trump has conveyed from the start — that the elites are out to get him, that they hate him and that they hate his supporters, the “deplorables,” to use the word once uttered by Hillary Clinton that has become a rallying cry for the president’s team.

John Fredericks, a radio host in Virginia, said the volume of calls into his morning show on Thursday was so inundating that he finally had to stop answering them.

“People are outraged because they know what is really going on is that Pelosi and the Democrats think that they know best,” Mr. Fredericks said. “Their message to us is, ‘You are really stupid people who go to Walmart and smell and can’t be trusted.’ It’s an insult.”

Still, Democrats are energized, too, and may be more so if a Senate trial results in acquittal along party lines. Moreover, Mr. Trump’s backlash strategy did not work as well as he had hoped during last year’s midterm elections when he tried to convert conservatives’ anger over what they considered unfair sexual misconduct allegations against Brett M. Kavanaugh, the president’s Supreme Court nominee, into turnout at the polls.

Arguably, the passion generated by the Kavanaugh hearings helped Republicans in select Senate races, but Democrats went on to capture the House.

John Whitbeck, the Republican Party chairman in Virginia, where Democrats captured the state legislature last month, said that impeachment helped Republicans see the stakes of the 2020 election more clearly. But the longer term political trends, he warned, suggested the party could still fall short.

“If you are a Trump supporter and you didn’t vote in these off-year elections, I just don’t see how you don’t show up,” he said. “But I don’t know if that’s going to be enough to overcome the fervor on the other side.”

In states like Virginia that have trended away from Republicans, Mr. Whitbeck said antipathy toward Mr. Trump has been so overwhelming that his political operation has been unable to account for it accurately in its data.

“We spent a ton of money trying to get Trump voters engaged. We’re doing everything we can to account for the high turnout. And still we’ve underestimated it every year,” he said. “It’s just historic on the other side.”

Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Jeremy W. Peters reported from Washington, and Elaina Plott from New York. Nick Corasaniti contributed reporting from New York, and Elizabeth Dias from Washington.

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Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162600882_406e6d54-9551-4f8b-8ccb-6f3d3f145f59-facebookJumbo Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal Trump, Donald J Graham, Billy Evangelical Movement Christians and Christianity

Christianity Today, a prominent evangelical magazine, called for President Trump to be removed from office in an editorial on Thursday, a day after Mr. Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives.

The editorial was a surprising move for a publication that typically avoids taking sides in bitter partisan battles and a pointed departure from the vast majority of the president’s white evangelical base, which has supported Mr. Trump through multiple controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” Mark Galli, the editor-in-chief, wrote. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

Still, the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support the president.

“My father would be embarrassed,” Franklin Graham said in an interview, referring to his father, Billy Graham, who founded the magazine.

“It is not going to change anybody’s mind about Trump,” Mr. Graham said. “There’s a liberal element within the evangelical movement. Christianity Today represents that.”

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Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan McCain, Cindy impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One widow instantly knew how the other one felt.

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” one said.

“I’m terribly sorry,” the other replied. “Please know I am thinking about you.”

The Twitter exchange sounded like a salutation between two women facing the season alone, but the message of support from Cindy McCain, the widow of John McCain, the Arizona senator, to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, was about a different shared experience.

It was a message of solidarity sent after President Trump had mocked Ms. Dingell (“You know Dingell? You ever hear of her, Michigan? Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty.”) and implied that her husband — John D. Dingell Jr., the former Michigan congressman who died in February — was “looking up” from hell. Ms. McCain’s own husband has been the object of relentless presidential attacks since he died.

In an interview on Thursday, hours after Mr. Trump became the third president in history to be impeached — an outcome she voted for — Ms. Dingell said that her husband “was never afraid to fight for what was right” but that the president’s remarks about him had cut deep.

“He hurt me,” Ms. Dingell said. “I think there’s some things that should be off limits.”

Mr. Trump has freely and frequently brought the power of his office down on a variety of journalists, lawmakers, Foreign Service officers and members of the military he has seen as standing in his way.

But Ms. Dingell is now joining the ranks of a more select group that includes the McCains and a Gold Star military family, who have suffered profound loss only to see it mocked and used as political ammunition by the president.

Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that she was still grieving the loss of her husband, who was the longest-serving congressman in American history. He retired from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside Detroit, for 59 years. His wife, who now holds his seat, called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

“If anything good comes out of this,” Ms. Dingell said, “maybe people will take a deep breath and think about it.”

But Mr. Trump is not prone to contemplation. At his rally on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump was speaking off the cuff to supporters as he called out Democrats like Ms. Dingell, who had voted in favor of the two articles of impeachment against him. But the president singled her out because she had done so after he approved an “A-plus treatment” for her husband’s burial.

“So she calls me up: ‘It’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened; thank you so much,’” Mr. Trump said at the rally, mocking the congresswoman’s voice while recounting their call. He suggested that Ms. Dingell had begged for him to lower American flags to half-staff and, apparently impersonating her, said: “Do this, do that, do that. Rotunda.”

Mr. Dingell did not lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda — Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that that had not been one of his requests. Still, Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell had said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said at one point. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

Ms. Dingell said the president had ordered American flags lowered, but beyond that, Mr. Dingell’s military service in World War II made him eligible for the only request he had made, which was to be buried at Arlington National Ceremony. At the time, she said, she had welcomed the president’s call — emphasizing that he called her.

“He was very kind,” Ms. Dingell said. “He had told me that he heard he was a great man and I thought it was very thoughtful for him to call at a time when I was really grieving.”

But Mr. Trump’s public remarks about their exchange were condemned by both Republicans — including Representative Fred Upton, who faces re-election next year in Michigan — and Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading 2020 candidate whose own political life has been punctuated by loss.

“This is equally as cruel as it is pathetic,” Mr. Biden, whose son Beau died in 2015, said on Twitter, “and it is beyond unconscionable that our President would behave this way.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has also been called “crazy” and “nervous” by Mr. Trump as she steered her caucus toward impeachment, said there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all. It’s very sad.”

Mr. Upton, a close friend of Mr. Dingell’s who delivered a eulogy for him, called on the president to apologize, and said on Twitter, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Representative Paul Mitchell, another Michigan Republican, also said the president’s comments warranted an apology. “To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States,” he said. “An apology is due, Mr. President.”

The Trump campaign had no comment about whether the president’s comments could affect his political fortunes in Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016. Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also sidestepped the question.

“I have great respect for the Dingells’ decades of service to the state of Michigan and I’m very sorry for Representative Debbie Dingell’s loss,” Ms. McDaniel said in a statement. “I was glad to see the late Representative John Dingell honored so highly by the president when he passed away.”

As the criticism mounted, the White House did not apologize and instead suggested that the public consider how Mr. Trump might feel about being impeached.

“He has been under attack, and under impeachment attack, for the last few months, and then just under attack politically for the last two and a half years,” Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, said in an interview with ABC on Thursday. “I think that as we all know, the president is a counterpuncher.”

She declined to explain how Mr. Dingell, who died 10 months ago, had thrown the first punch.

The president’s rough comments on his adversaries have earned him condemnation from grieving families before. In 2016, Mr. Trump criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, who had denounced the president during the Democratic National Convention. Mr. Trump said Captain Khan’s father had delivered the entire speech because his mother was not “allowed” to speak.

Khizr Khan, the soldier’s father, said he felt a sense of recognition when he heard that Mr. Trump had mocked the Dingell family.

“All three of them have served this nation and they have passed,” Mr. Khan said of his son, Mr. Dingell and Mr. McCain. “They deserve to be respected.”

Mr. Trump has particularly fixated on Mr. McCain, who died in 2018 from complications from brain cancer and, as he was dying, made plans to keep the president away from his funeral.

After Mr. McCain died, Mr. Trump waited days to issue a proclamation marking the senator’s death, relenting only under enormous pressure. He has repeatedly brought up Mr. McCain’s vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act at his political rallies. And when Mr. Trump traveled to Japan in May, the White House asked the Navy to hide a destroyer named after Mr. McCain during the president’s visit to Yokosuka Naval Base.

The senator’s daughter, Meghan McCain, offered her own sharp criticism on Thursday.

“The comments from Trump about Rep Dingell is utterly sick and cruel,” Ms. McCain said on Twitter. “Take heed in knowing he only attacks people for whom he is threatened by their great legacies. History will forever judge him very harshly.”

The McCain family declined to comment further. But for her part, Ms. Dingell said she did not want the president to call her again, even if he had an apology.

“No,” Ms. Dingell said. “He’s taken his shot.”

Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

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Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan McCain, Cindy impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One widow instantly knew how the other one felt.

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” one said.

“I’m terribly sorry,” the other replied. “Please know I am thinking about you.”

The Twitter exchange sounded like a salutation between two women facing the season alone, but the message of support from Cindy McCain, the widow of John McCain, the Arizona senator, to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, was about a different shared experience.

It was a message of solidarity sent after President Trump had mocked Ms. Dingell (“You know Dingell? You ever hear of her, Michigan? Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty.”) and implied that her husband — John D. Dingell Jr., the former Michigan congressman who died in February — was “looking up” from hell. Ms. McCain’s own husband has been the object of relentless presidential attacks since he died.

In an interview on Thursday, hours after Mr. Trump became the third president in history to be impeached — an outcome she voted for — Ms. Dingell said that her husband “was never afraid to fight for what was right” but that the president’s remarks about him had cut deep.

“He hurt me,” Ms. Dingell said. “I think there’s some things that should be off limits.”

Mr. Trump has freely and frequently brought the power of his office down on a variety of journalists, lawmakers, Foreign Service officers and members of the military he has seen as standing in his way.

But Ms. Dingell is now joining the ranks of a more select group that includes the McCains and a Gold Star military family, who have suffered profound loss only to see it mocked and used as political ammunition by the president.

Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that she was still grieving the loss of her husband, who was the longest-serving congressman in American history. He retired from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside Detroit, for 59 years. His wife, who now holds his seat, called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

“If anything good comes out of this,” Ms. Dingell said, “maybe people will take a deep breath and think about it.”

But Mr. Trump is not prone to contemplation. At his rally on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump was speaking off the cuff to supporters as he called out Democrats like Ms. Dingell, who had voted in favor of the two articles of impeachment against him. But the president singled her out because she had done so after he approved an “A-plus treatment” for her husband’s burial.

“So she calls me up: ‘It’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened; thank you so much,’” Mr. Trump said at the rally, mocking the congresswoman’s voice while recounting their call. He suggested that Ms. Dingell had begged for him to lower American flags to half-staff and, apparently impersonating her, said: “Do this, do that, do that. Rotunda.”

Mr. Dingell did not lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda — Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that that had not been one of his requests. Still, Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell had said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said at one point. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

Ms. Dingell said the president had ordered American flags lowered, but beyond that, Mr. Dingell’s military service in World War II made him eligible for the only request he had made, which was to be buried at Arlington National Ceremony. At the time, she said, she had welcomed the president’s call — emphasizing that he called her.

“He was very kind,” Ms. Dingell said. “He had told me that he heard he was a great man and I thought it was very thoughtful for him to call at a time when I was really grieving.”

But Mr. Trump’s public remarks about their exchange were condemned by both Republicans — including Representative Fred Upton, who faces re-election next year in Michigan — and Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading 2020 candidate whose own political life has been punctuated by loss.

“This is equally as cruel as it is pathetic,” Mr. Biden, whose son Beau died in 2015, said on Twitter, “and it is beyond unconscionable that our President would behave this way.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has also been called “crazy” and “nervous” by Mr. Trump as she steered her caucus toward impeachment, said there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all. It’s very sad.”

Mr. Upton, a close friend of Mr. Dingell’s who delivered a eulogy for him, called on the president to apologize, and said on Twitter, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Representative Paul Mitchell, another Michigan Republican, also said the president’s comments warranted an apology. “To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States,” he said. “An apology is due, Mr. President.”

The Trump campaign had no comment about whether the president’s comments could affect his political fortunes in Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016. Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also sidestepped the question.

“I have great respect for the Dingells’ decades of service to the state of Michigan and I’m very sorry for Representative Debbie Dingell’s loss,” Ms. McDaniel said in a statement. “I was glad to see the late Representative John Dingell honored so highly by the president when he passed away.”

As the criticism mounted, the White House did not apologize and instead suggested that the public consider how Mr. Trump might feel about being impeached.

“He has been under attack, and under impeachment attack, for the last few months, and then just under attack politically for the last two and a half years,” Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, said in an interview with ABC on Thursday. “I think that as we all know, the president is a counterpuncher.”

She declined to explain how Mr. Dingell, who died 10 months ago, had thrown the first punch.

The president’s rough comments on his adversaries have earned him condemnation from grieving families before. In 2016, Mr. Trump criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, who had denounced the president during the Democratic National Convention. Mr. Trump said Captain Khan’s father had delivered the entire speech because his mother was not “allowed” to speak.

Khizr Khan, the soldier’s father, said he felt a sense of recognition when he heard that Mr. Trump had mocked the Dingell family.

“All three of them have served this nation and they have passed,” Mr. Khan said of his son, Mr. Dingell and Mr. McCain. “They deserve to be respected.”

Mr. Trump has particularly fixated on Mr. McCain, who died in 2018 from complications from brain cancer and, as he was dying, made plans to keep the president away from his funeral.

After Mr. McCain died, Mr. Trump waited days to issue a proclamation marking the senator’s death, relenting only under enormous pressure. He has repeatedly brought up Mr. McCain’s vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act at his political rallies. And when Mr. Trump traveled to Japan in May, the White House asked the Navy to hide a destroyer named after Mr. McCain during the president’s visit to Yokosuka Naval Base.

The senator’s daughter, Meghan McCain, offered her own sharp criticism on Thursday.

“The comments from Trump about Rep Dingell is utterly sick and cruel,” Ms. McCain said on Twitter. “Take heed in knowing he only attacks people for whom he is threatened by their great legacies. History will forever judge him very harshly.”

The McCain family declined to comment further. But for her part, Ms. Dingell said she did not want the president to call her again, even if he had an apology.

“No,” Ms. Dingell said. “He’s taken his shot.”

Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

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Debbie Dingell Calls for Civility After Trump Insults Her Late Husband

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Calls for Civility After Trump Insults Her Late Husband United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One day after the House impeached President Trump largely along party lines, Republicans and Democrats found themselves in agreement on something: the president’s swipe at a beloved late Democratic congressman was neither funny nor appropriate.

Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, said Thursday that Mr. Trump’s words about her late husband, former Representative John D. Dingell Jr., “hurt me.”

She called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

The president’s comments, suggesting that Mr. Dingell went to hell after he died, came during a rally in Western Michigan on Wednesday, as Democrats in Washington voted to impeach him.

Mr. Dingell died earlier this year. He announced his retirement from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside of Detroit, for 59 years. Ms. Dingell was elected to his seat.

The president’s decision to go after the Dingells, a long-respected political family in Michigan — a key state in the upcoming presidential election — struck a familiar tone. Mr. Trump repeatedly attacked Senator John S. McCain, Republican of Arizona, for months after his death in 2018.

The president’s bit did not go over well at the rally where the crowd was heard booing after his swipe at Mr. Dingell.

After complaining about the hypocrisy he faces in Washington, Mr. Trump described the respect he displayed for Mr. Dingell after he died, offering accounts of reverent gestures he made that in some cases, according to Ms. Dingell, were inaccurate.

Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell called him and thanked him profusely for steps he took to honor her husband and recalled that she said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said during the rally. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

In an opinion piece published Tuesday, Ms. Dingell explained why she planned to vote to impeach Mr. Trump.

“If we don’t address this abuse of power, we abdicate our constitutional and moral responsibility,” she wrote. “Failing to address it would also condone these actions as acceptable for future administrations.”

The president’s two-hour speech began as Ms. Dingell and most other Democrats were voting to impeach Mr. Trump. Ms. Dingell’s vote appeared to surprise the president, who described how grateful she was for the tributes he had paid to Mr. Dingell.

Ms. Dingell responded on Twitter on Wednesday and asked the president to “set politics aside.”

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” she wrote. “You brought me down in a way you can never imagine and your hurtful words just made my healing much harder.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all, it’s very sad.”

Two Republican representatives from Michigan called on Mr. Trump to apologize for what he said about Mr. Dingell.

“To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States. An apology is due, Mr. President,” Representative Paul Mitchell said on Thursday.

His colleague, Representative Fred Upton, said, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a staunch Trump defender most of the time, said he had not seen the president’s comments but, “If he said that, I think he should apologize.”

Asked about the remarks, a White House spokesman, Hogan Gidley, said Thursday that Mr. Trump respected Mr. Dingell’s military service and decades in Congress, and it was because of his respect that the president lowered the flags after he died.

“He appreciates her and him,” Mr. Gidley said on Fox Business. “And you know, your heart goes out to her for her loss. There’s no question about that.”

The president is a “counterpuncher,” he added, and then conceded that Ms. Dingell had not thrown a punch his way.

On Thursday, Ms. Dingell said the country should take a lesson from the president’s comments. “We need more civility in this country,” she said on CNN. And in an interview with Fox Business, she recognized the gravity of the vote to impeach the president for just the third time in the country’s history.

“Yesterday was a very difficult day for this democracy,” she said. “And I think we know that.”

Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Katie Rogers contributed reporting.

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Trump Impeachment Trial in Doubt as Democrats Weigh Withholding Articles

WASHINGTON — The day after the House cast historic votes to impeach President Trump, Democrats grappled on Thursday with when to send the charges to the Republican-led Senate, hoping to gain leverage in a bicameral clash over the contours of an election-year trial.

With some leading Democrats pushing to delay transmittal of the articles and others advocating that they be withheld altogether, it appeared increasingly likely that the limbo could persist until the new year. The House is poised to leave town on Friday for the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, possibly without taking the votes that would be required to start the process in the Senate.

“We are ready,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who said Wednesday night that she was reluctant to send the charges or name the lawmakers who would prosecute the case against Mr. Trump until she was certain of a fair process for a Senate trial. “When we see what they have, we will know who and how many we will send over.”

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, has complicated the picture for Democrats by asserting that he has no intention of acting as an impartial juror in a Senate trial of Mr. Trump, but would instead do everything in his power, working in concert with the White House, to quickly acquit the president.

But if Ms. Pelosi was angling for an upper hand in negotiations about how the trial would proceed, Mr. McConnell quickly squashed the notion on Thursday in a scathing speech in which he denounced her and Democrats for impeaching Mr. Trump.

“The vote did not reflect what had been proven; it only reflects how they feel about the president,” Mr. McConnell said from the Senate floor. “The Senate must put this right. We must rise to this occasion. There is only one outcome that is suited to the paucity of evidence, the failed inquiry, the slapdash case.”

And in comments that underscored the risks Ms. Pelosi faces in withholding the articles, Mr. McConnell effectively argued that the delay reflected a weak case against Mr. Trump, a blink by the Democrats in their standoff with the president.

“The prosecutors are getting cold feet in front of the entire country and second-guessing whether they even want to go to trial,” Mr. McConnell said. “They said impeachment was so urgent that it could not even wait for due process, but now they’re content to sit on their hands. This is comical.”

Mr. Trump, echoing Mr. McConnell’s remarks, took to Twitter to attack what he called a “pathetic” case.

“Pelosi feels her phony impeachment HOAX is so pathetic she is afraid to present it to the Senate, which can set a date and put this whole SCAM into default if they refuse to show up!” Mr. Trump wrote. “The Do Nothings are so bad for our Country!”

The angry tone of the comments reflected what people close to the president have said is a keen desire by Mr. Trump to be publicly vindicated in a Senate trial, a prospect that Ms. Pelosi now appears to be placing in jeopardy.

Nerves were raw on both sides of the aisle on the morning after the House voted to impeach Mr. Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress related to his campaign to pressure Ukraine to smear Democratic rivals, making him only the third president to be impeached.

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, called Mr. McConnell’s speech a “30-minute partisan screed.” Later, he met with Ms. Pelosi behind closed doors to plan strategy.

In the House, Ms. Pelosi shot back at Mr. McConnell: “I don’t think anybody expected that we would have a rogue president and a rogue leader in the Senate at the same time.”

And even as the next step in the process remained murky, she said Democrats had been receiving accolades from people across the country who were buoyed by the House action to charge Mr. Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors.

“Seems like people have a spring in their step because the president was held accountable for his reckless behavior,” Ms. Pelosi told reporters on Capitol Hill. “No one is above the law, and the president has been held accountable.”

But the conflict in Congress over how to proceed made clear that rather than rise above the partisan vitriol that permeated the House’s impeachment inquiry and its vote on Wednesday, the Senate — traditionally the cooler-headed chamber — may replicate it. It did not bode well for negotiations between the two Senate leaders, who were expected to meet later on Thursday to discuss the parameters of a trial.

Some leading Democrats have cast doubt on whether a Senate trial will happen at all.

On Thursday morning, Representative James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, the No. 3 House Democrat, said he was willing to wait “as long as it takes” to transmit the two impeachment articles approved Wednesday night.

“Until we can get some assurances from the majority leader that he is going to allow for a fair and impartial and trial to take place, we would be crazy to walk in there knowing he has set up a kangaroo court,” Mr. Clyburn said Thursday morning on CNN.

Pressed on whether Democrats should withhold the articles permanently, pulling the plug on a Senate trial, Mr. Clyburn said his personal preference would be to do so unless Mr. McConnell relents.

“If it were me, yes, that is what I am saying — I have no idea what the speaker would do,” Mr. Clyburn said. “If you have a preordained outcome that is negative to your actions, why walk into it? I would much rather not take that chance.”

In her own news conference in the House on Thursday, Ms. Pelosi played down the delay over pressing charges in the Senate but declined repeatedly to offer a timeline for when the House might file its case. Ms. Pelosi has indicated she will work with House chairmen and Mr. Schumer to determine when the articles should be submitted and what meets her standard for fairness.

Mr. Schumer has already set forth his own detailed plan for a trial. In a letter sent Sunday night to Mr. McConnell, Mr. Schumer proposed a trial beginning Jan. 7 that would give each side a fixed amount of time to present its case, and called for four top White House officials who have not testified — including Mick Mulvaney, Mr. Trump’s acting chief of staff, and John R. Bolton, the president’s former national security adviser — to appear as witnesses.

Mr. McConnell quickly rejected the plan.

“Is the president’s case so weak that none of the president’s men can defend him under oath?” Mr. Schumer asked in a speech on the Senate floor Thursday morning.

Mr. Schumer said that Democrats wanted a “fair and speedy trial,” and that he had proposed a “very reasonable structure.”

“I have yet to hear one good argument why less evidence is better than more evidence particularly in such a serious moment,” he added.

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In her news conference after Wednesday night’s vote, Ms. Pelosi did not indicate that she was contemplating holding the articles forever.

And while she did not say explicitly what she believes would constitute a fair trial, she indicated she would support the plan laid out by Mr. Schumer.

“We’d like to see a trial where it’s up to the senators to make their own decisions and working together, hopefully, in recognition of witnesses that the president withheld from us, the documents that president withheld from us,” Ms. Pelosi said.

A top ally of Mr. Trump’s, Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, called the possibility that the House could hold back the articles a “constitutional extortion mechanism that is dangerous for the country.”

Mr. Graham, who is the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he spoke Thursday morning with Mr. Trump, who asked him, “What’s happening?”

“He’s puzzled,” Mr. Graham said. “I tried the best I could to explain it. I’m puzzled, too.”

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