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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 108)

Is Campaign-Trail Spanish Really What Latino Voters Want to Hear?

MIAMI — In his months on the campaign trail, Beto O’Rourke has wanted to make one thing explicitly clear: He is not a pendejo.

Never mind whether anyone in the audience understands the Spanish slang for idiot, it is now a standard part of his stump speech: “We don’t want our kids looking back at us 40 years from now and saying, ‘Who were those pendejos?’”

During the first Democratic presidential debate, Mr. O’Rourke eagerly brought his Spanish to prime time.

“Necesitamos incluir cada persona en nuestro democracia,” he said, responding to a question about taxes with a riff on inclusion, roughly translated as: “We must include every person in our democracy.”

Senator Cory Booker jumped in to show that he, too, could communicate in Spanish, which he had picked up mainly from language classes in Mexico and Ecuador. Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., has made it known he speaks not just Norwegian, but Spanish as well, conducting bilingual interviews on Telemundo.

Then there is Julián Castro. He ended the debate last week by declaring: “Me llamo Julián Castro, y estoy postulando por presidente de los Estados Unidos.”

With imperfect grammar, Mr. Castro reminded Spanish speakers exactly who he is: the grandson of a Mexican immigrant who was raised speaking English in a Latino-majority city.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 05spanish2-articleLarge Is Campaign-Trail Spanish Really What Latino Voters Want to Hear? United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Spanish Language Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 O'Rourke, Beto Hispanic-Americans Democratic Party Debates (Political) Castro, Julian Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Booker, Cory A

Julián Castro, left, and Senator Cory Booker both spoke Spanish during the first Democratic presidential debate in Miami last month.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

At campaign events, Mr. Castro often leaves out Spanish. His relationship with the language, he has said, is somewhat fraught. He has taken lessons, but he can still appear uncomfortable speaking Spanish in large crowds or off the cuff.

In this way, he’s representative of many Latino voters. Only 13 percent of Latinos who are currently registered to vote in the United States speak Spanish as their primary language, according to the Pew Research Center.

So, then, who is all this campaign-trail Spanish for?

More than 40 million people in the United States speak Spanish, making it the second-most spoken language in the country behind English. But the history of Spanish in the United States, and who feels comfortable speaking it publicly, is complicated. Mr. Castro’s biography illustrates some of the complexity.

As a child, he often accompanied his mother, a prominent Chicana activist, to political meetings and protests. She told him stories of how she had been shamed and forcefully told not to speak Spanish. While he heard the language on television and from his grandparents, he rarely spoke it. When Mr. Castro was elected to the San Antonio City Council, he sought out a private tutor.

“There is an irony,” he said in an interview. “There’s a greater expectation, because I’m Latino, of speaking Spanish. Many folks outside of second or third generation Latino communities are not aware of the history of the attempts to eradicate the Spanish language from families.”

Even as the Latino population in the United States continues to grow, and a majority of those who are parents now speak Spanish to their children, Latinos tell pollsters that they don’t view Spanish as essential to the culture.

About 28 percent say Spanish skills are a requirement for someone who identifies as Latino, according to Pew. A recent poll by UnidosUS, a Latino advocacy group, showed that a candidate’s ability to speak Spanish was last on a list of Latino voters’ priorities, well below “values diversity” and “willing to work with both parties.”

None of that has stopped Mr. O’Rourke. Even when it is unclear a crowd has any Spanish speakers, he toggles between English and Spanish.

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., has made it known he speaks not just Norwegian, but Spanish as well, conducting bilingual interviews on Telemundo.CreditAudra Melton for The New York Times

During a recent trip through South Carolina, Mr. O’Rourke displayed his Spanish at nearly every campaign stop, which did resonate with some voters. After a forum in Sumter, where Hispanics make up about 3 percent of the 40,000 residents, one woman rushed over to thank him. She said he was the first politician she had heard speak Spanish since she immigrated from Mexico nearly 20 years ago.

Though he was born Robert, for most of his life Mr. O’Rourke has gone by Beto, a common Spanish nickname for Roberto. He said that when he was growing up in El Paso, his public school offered Spanish lessons a couple of times a week and that he had taken a Spanish literature class as a student at Columbia University. There had been a handful of private lessons when he returned to El Paso and more work on his skills before running for City Council.

“I think Latinos in this country, including those who speak Spanish, have been marginalized and forgotten, if they were ever remembered or known,” he said during an interview. “So I think it’s really important that everyone knows that they’re not just welcome, but that we’re counting on them.”

Both Mr. O’Rourke and Mr. Castro are Texas natives who have made immigration and their experiences along the Mexican border central aspects of their campaigns. Their relationships with Spanish have also shaped their political identities and the ways they appeal to voters.

Mr. O’Rourke can casually speak Spanish in a manner that people at his events find charming. Mr. Castro is often under greater scrutiny, frequently asked why he is not fluent. He has also been careful not to portray himself as a candidate who caters to only Hispanic voters.

Mr. Buttigieg and Mr. Booker sharpened their Spanish skills with local media as mayors, and often prepared for interviews by asking staff members to scribble down Spanish translations for words such as “contraception” or “generational change.”

“I find there’s a tremendous amount of appreciation, if you show that you put in the work,” Mr. Booker said in an interview. “There’s gratitude and this incredible generosity.”

Native Spanish speakers do, of course, evaluate the candidates’ efforts. After the debates, The Miami Herald assigned a grade to everyone who tried. Mr. O’Rourke received the highest: B.

During a recent trip through South Carolina, Beto O’Rourke spoke Spanish at nearly every campaign stop.CreditTravis Dove for The New York Times

“If you are going to butcher the language, you are better off sticking to English,” said Arturo Vargas, the chief executive officer of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. The group hosted a presidential forum in Miami in June in which eight candidates spoke to several hundred people.

Privately, Mr. Castro has seethed over the scrutiny of his Spanish. In 2016, he strongly denied a report in The New York Post’s gossip pages that he was “cramming with Rosetta Stone,” while Hillary Clinton was mulling her potential running mate. Ultimately, she chose Senator Tim Kaine, who is bilingual.

During the 2016 Republican primary campaign, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, who are both Cuban-American, sparred over who really knew the language. Donald Trump attacked Jeb Bush for using Spanish, echoing an argument made by Tom Tancredo, a Republican who ran for president in 2007. At the time, Mr. Tancredo boycotted a Spanish-language debate for Republican presidential candidates, saying it had no place in the presidential race because naturalized citizens must know English.

Spanish is most significant, among the early voting states, in Nevada, where nearly 20 percent of Democratic caucus attendees in 2016 were Hispanic.

“It’s very different to be able to tell your story without a translator,” said Astrid Silva, an immigration activist in the Las Vegas area. “You’re able to connect.”

Mr. Buttigieg said his formal Spanish instruction ended after two years of high school and he is “very far from being fluent.” Still, he has not hesitated to accept invitations to be interviewed in Spanish. “The point is not to impress people, as much as to make people feel included,” he said.

After the debates last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City showed up at the Miami airport to support workers on strike there. Holding a microphone, he enthusiastically shouted one of the best-known sayings in Latin American history: “Hasta la victoria siempre!”

It’s a phrase popularized by Che Guevara, an Argentine guerrilla who helped Fidel Castro lead a communist revolution in Cuba. Hundreds of thousands of people fled the regime, many to South Florida — where few historical figures are more despised than Castro and Guevara.

Responding to the instant backlash, Mr. de Blasio issued an apology within hours, saying he did not know the history and only meant the words literally: “Until victory always.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Jobs Report: Gain of 224,000 in a June Rebound

Westlake Legal Group 05jobs1-facebookJumbo U.S. Jobs Report: Gain of 224,000 in a June Rebound United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Powell, Jerome H Labor and Jobs Interest Rates Federal Reserve System Factories and Manufacturing Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Employers added 224,000 jobs in June, the Labor Department reported on Friday. Economists had expected a gain of about 170,000.

  • The unemployment rate was 3.7 percent, up from 3.6 percent in May.

  • Average earnings rose 6 cents an hour from May, and are up 3.1 percent over the past year.

  • Estimates of job growth in April and May were revised down slightly, by a combined 11,000 jobs.

The job market rebounded last month after a dismal May, easing fears that the record-setting economic expansion could be running out of steam.

The June gain was stronger than economists had predicted, suggesting that trade tensions and cooling global growth have done little to sap the job market’s fundamental strength. Unemployment is near a five-decade low, wage growth is solid and employers have added jobs for 105 consecutive months, easily a record.

“There’s lots of talk about uncertainty, and maybe that’s going to lend itself to a weakening in hiring, but we haven’t actually seen it happen yet,” said Michelle Meyer, chief economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

That resilience is good news for workers, who are benefiting from what is now, at least unofficially, the longest economic expansion on record. But it could complicate the decision facing Federal Reserve policymakers, who are weighing whether to cut interest rates to forestall a downturn, a jolt of stimulus that investors were expecting.

Even with June’s healthy growth, there are signs the job market has cooled since last year. Employers have added an average of 171,000 jobs per month over the past three months, down from 223,000 per month for all of 2018. Wage growth was disappointing in June, and has stalled in recent months.

June marked the 10th anniversary of the official end of the Great Recession. And unless a new recession has begun (something economists often don’t know for several months), the expansion is now the longest on record.

The recovery has been more remarkable for its durability than for its strength. Hiring has been slower than in many past rebounds, and wage growth has been anemic until recently. Only lately have the gains extended to black and Hispanic workers, the less-educated, and those facing discrimination or other barriers to employment.

The job market picked up last year, at least partly because of tax cuts and government spending increases that provided a short-term boost to economic growth. But those effects are fading. Still, the expansion has repeatedly defied predictions that it was nearing an end.

“We have seen rapid declines like that in this recovery before,” said Martha Gimbel, an economist at the job-search site Indeed. “I think it’s really hard to figure out. Is this just another rapid decline that’s going to go away, or is this a decline we need to start worrying about?”

Manufacturers added 17,000 jobs in June, the most since January. That should allay concerns that Mr. Trump’s trade war is dragging down the broader economy. Data from the Institute for Supply Management this week showed that the industry’s struggles continued in June, although the decline wasn’t as severe as some economists had predicted.

Still, economists say they don’t expect manufacturing to be the engine of growth that it was early in Mr. Trump’s term.

“Uncertainty remains very high for manufacturers and for companies with global exposure right now,” Ms. Meyer said. “They’re still producing to meet demand, but they’re not looking to exceed that. They’re being very cautious.”

At Taco Metals, a Miami-based manufacturer of equipment for the recreational marine industry, tariffs have meant higher costs for the raw materials and parts it imports from China and other countries. That has added to fears from boat builders and dealers about how long the good times can last in an industry that is highly sensitive to the broader economy.

“The tariffs just kind of forced people to think twice about is this going to continue,” said Bill Kushner, a vice president at the company. “There’s starting to be more hesitation on both the manufacturing side and the dealer side.”

As customers pull back, Mr. Kushner’s company, which employs about 150 workers in Florida and Tennessee, is doing the same. They are holding off on some equipment purchases and waiting to fill some positions.

“It’s just caused us to take a little step back and reassess some of the direction and make sure we’re not jumping the gun,” Mr. Kushner said. “It’s like, ‘Well, are we sure we’re going to need to do this, or should we try to outsource?’”

Policymakers at the Federal Reserve will be examining the report closely as they weigh whether to take steps to bolster the economy.

Jerome H. Powell, the Fed chair, has resisted calls from Mr. Trump and other critics — and even from some Fed officials — to cut interest rates. But he has signaled that he is prepared to act if the economy slows further. Investors have interpreted those comments to mean that the Fed will cut rates when it meets this month, although Mr. Powell has stopped short of promising to do so.

Friday’s report contained mixed signals for policymakers. On the one hand, job growth was strong, suggesting companies remain confident enough to keep hiring even without the central bank’s assistance. But many Fed officials will probably focus on the weakness in hourly earnings, which means wages are unlikely to put upward pressure on inflation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Added 224,000 Jobs in June; Unemployment Rate at 3.7%

Westlake Legal Group 05jobs1-facebookJumbo U.S. Added 224,000 Jobs in June; Unemployment Rate at 3.7% United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Powell, Jerome H Labor and Jobs Interest Rates Federal Reserve System Factories and Manufacturing Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Employers added 224,000 jobs in June, the Labor Department reported on Friday. Economists had expected a gain of about 170,000.

  • The unemployment rate was 3.7 percent, up from 3.6 percent in May.

  • Average earnings rose 6 cents an hour from May, and are up 3.1 percent over the past year.

  • Estimates of job growth in April and May were revised down slightly, by a combined 11,000 jobs.

The job market rebounded last month after a dismal May, easing fears that the record-setting economic expansion could be running out of steam.

The June gain was stronger than economists had predicted, suggesting that trade tensions and cooling global growth have done little to sap the job market’s fundamental strength. Unemployment is near a five-decade low, wage growth is solid and employers have added jobs for 105 consecutive months, easily a record.

“There’s lots of talk about uncertainty, and maybe that’s going to lend itself to a weakening in hiring, but we haven’t actually seen it happen yet,” said Michelle Meyer, chief economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

That resilience is good news for workers, who are benefiting from what is now, at least unofficially, the longest economic expansion on record. But it could complicate the decision facing Federal Reserve policymakers, who are weighing whether to cut interest rates to forestall a downturn, a jolt of stimulus that investors were expecting.

Even with June’s healthy growth, there are signs the job market has cooled since last year. Employers have added an average of 171,000 jobs per month over the past three months, down from 223,000 per month for all of 2018. Wage growth was disappointing in June, and has stalled in recent months.

June marked the 10th anniversary of the official end of the Great Recession. And unless a new recession has begun (something economists often don’t know for several months), the expansion is now the longest on record.

The recovery has been more remarkable for its durability than for its strength. Hiring has been slower than in many past rebounds, and wage growth has been anemic until recently. Only lately have the gains extended to black and Hispanic workers, the less-educated, and those facing discrimination or other barriers to employment.

The job market picked up last year, at least partly because of tax cuts and government spending increases that provided a short-term boost to economic growth. But those effects are fading. Still, the expansion has repeatedly defied predictions that it was nearing an end.

“We have seen rapid declines like that in this recovery before,” said Martha Gimbel, an economist at the job-search site Indeed. “I think it’s really hard to figure out. Is this just another rapid decline that’s going to go away, or is this a decline we need to start worrying about?”

Manufacturers added 17,000 jobs in June, the most since January. That should allay concerns that Mr. Trump’s trade war is dragging down the broader economy. Data from the Institute for Supply Management this week showed that the industry’s struggles continued in June, although the decline wasn’t as severe as some economists had predicted.

Still, economists say they don’t expect manufacturing to be the engine of growth that it was early in Mr. Trump’s term.

“Uncertainty remains very high for manufacturers and for companies with global exposure right now,” Ms. Meyer said. “They’re still producing to meet demand, but they’re not looking to exceed that. They’re being very cautious.”

At Taco Metals, a Miami-based manufacturer of equipment for the recreational marine industry, tariffs have meant higher costs for the raw materials and parts it imports from China and other countries. That has added to fears from boat builders and dealers about how long the good times can last in an industry that is highly sensitive to the broader economy.

“The tariffs just kind of forced people to think twice about is this going to continue,” said Bill Kushner, a vice president at the company. “There’s starting to be more hesitation on both the manufacturing side and the dealer side.”

As customers pull back, Mr. Kushner’s company, which employs about 150 workers in Florida and Tennessee, is doing the same. They are holding off on some equipment purchases and waiting to fill some positions.

“It’s just caused us to take a little step back and reassess some of the direction and make sure we’re not jumping the gun,” Mr. Kushner said. “It’s like, ‘Well, are we sure we’re going to need to do this, or should we try to outsource?’”

Policymakers at the Federal Reserve will be examining the report closely as they weigh whether to take steps to bolster the economy.

Jerome H. Powell, the Fed chair, has resisted calls from Mr. Trump and other critics — and even from some Fed officials — to cut interest rates. But he has signaled that he is prepared to act if the economy slows further. Investors have interpreted those comments to mean that the Fed will cut rates when it meets this month, although Mr. Powell has stopped short of promising to do so.

Friday’s report contained mixed signals for policymakers. On the one hand, job growth was strong, suggesting companies remain confident enough to keep hiring even without the central bank’s assistance. But many Fed officials will probably focus on the weakness in hourly earnings, which means wages are unlikely to put upward pressure on inflation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Here’s What to Expect From the June Jobs Report

Westlake Legal Group 05jobs1-facebookJumbo Here’s What to Expect From the June Jobs Report United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Powell, Jerome H Labor and Jobs Interest Rates Federal Reserve System Factories and Manufacturing Bureau of Labor Statistics

A question has hung over the American economy for the past month: Was the sharp slowdown in job growth in May just another soft patch in a recovery that has set records for its durability? Or was it a warning of more significant trouble?

Friday’s jobs report will help provide the answer.

Economists expect the Labor Department’s monthly report, which will be released at 8:30 a.m., to show that American employers added 170,000 jobs in June. That would be a substantial rebound from the disappointing total of 75,000 in May. (May’s figure will also be revised on Friday.) And it would suggest that the job market remained on solid footing, even if it lost some momentum since last year.

A second straight weak report, however, would spark fresh worries that trade tensions and other factors could be undermining the 10-year economic expansion. And it could raise the stakes for the Federal Reserve’s meeting this month.

“We have seen rapid declines like that in this recovery before,” said Martha Gimbel, an economist at the job-search site Indeed. “I think it’s really hard to figure out. Is this just another rapid decline that’s going to go away, or is this a decline we need to start worrying about?”

Here’s what to watch for.

There is no question that the job market has cooled. Employers have added an average of 151,000 jobs per month over the past three months, down from 233,000 in the final three months of 2018. The manufacturing sector, a major driver of growth in the first two years of President Trump’s term, is slowing down, and retailers are shedding jobs. Wage growth, though solid, is no longer accelerating.

What is less clear is whether that slowdown is anything to worry about. Tax cuts and government spending increases gave a temporary jolt to the economy last year, but the effects were always expected to fade. There has been no sign of an increase in layoffs, which have been the most reliable early sign of a downturn in the job market.

“We’re still creating jobs,” said Lindsey Piegza, chief economist at the investment bank Stifel. “We’re still putting Americans back to work on a day-to-day basis, but we’re doing so at a significantly slower clip.”

By most measures, the job market is still fundamentally strong. The unemployment rate, 3.6 percent, is at a nearly 50-year low. Employers have added jobs for 104 consecutive months, easily a record. After such a long stretch of growth, a gradual cooling is hardly surprising.

What worries economists is the possibility that the slowdown will not be so gradual.

“Everyone knew the pace was going to slow,” said Brett Ryan, an economist at Deutsche Bank. “The question is if it’s going to slow more sharply.”

If the economy does shift down further in the months ahead, one likely culprit will be Mr. Trump’s trade war.

Hiring has already slowed in manufacturing, a trend that economists and industry executives attribute in large part to uncertainty surrounding tariffs and trade. Data from the Institute for Supply Management this week showed that the industry’s struggles continued in June, although the decline wasn’t as severe as some economists had predicted.

“Uncertainty remains very high for manufacturers and for companies with global exposure right now,” said Michelle Meyer, chief economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “They’re still producing to meet demand, but they’re not looking to exceed that. They’re being very cautious.”

The manufacturing slowdown alone probably won’t be enough to threaten the broader economy. But if the pullback spreads to the much larger services sector, that could be a bigger problem. Hiring in services was unexpectedly weak in May, with retailers continuing to cut jobs and other industries also pulling back. Ms. Meyer said the pattern probably reversed in June — but if it didn’t, that would be a troubling sign.

Policymakers at the Federal Reserve will be watching the report closely as they weigh whether to take steps to bolster the economy.

Jerome H. Powell, the Fed chair, has resisted calls from Mr. Trump and other critics — and even from some Fed officials — to cut interest rates. But he has signaled that he is prepared to act if the economy slows further. Investors have interpreted those comments to mean that the Fed will cut rates when it meets this month, although Mr. Powell has stopped short of promising to do so.

Friday’s report could help tip the scales in either direction. A weak report would all but guarantee a cut, economists said, perhaps by as much as half a percentage point. Even a relatively neutral report, or one containing conflicting signals, might be enough to push the Fed toward action. But an unambiguously strong report — solid gains in jobs and wages, perhaps paired with upward revisions to prior months — might keep policymakers on the sidelines until its September meeting or beyond.

The Fed’s complex calculus means that a good jobs report could be bad news for financial markets. Investors want — and expect — a rate cut in July. So a report strong enough to call a cut into question could disappoint investors and cause stocks to fall. The impact could be intensified by the low trading volumes of the holiday week, when many traders are on vacation.

“It’s possible that you see the stock market become a little uneasy if there’s a question about whether the Fed is going to be easing,” Mr. Ryan said. “That’s definitely a risk.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What to Expect From the June Jobs Report

Westlake Legal Group 05jobs1-facebookJumbo What to Expect From the June Jobs Report United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Powell, Jerome H Labor and Jobs Interest Rates Federal Reserve System Factories and Manufacturing Bureau of Labor Statistics

A question has hung over the American economy for the past month: Was the sharp slowdown in job growth in May just another soft patch in a recovery that has set records for its durability? Or was it a warning of more significant trouble?

Friday’s jobs report will help provide the answer.

Economists expect the Labor Department’s monthly report, which will be released at 8:30 a.m., to show that American employers added 170,000 jobs in June. That would be a substantial rebound from the disappointing total of 75,000 in May. (May’s figure will also be revised on Friday.) And it would suggest that the job market remained on solid footing, even if it lost some momentum since last year.

A second straight weak report, however, would spark fresh worries that trade tensions and other factors could be undermining the 10-year economic expansion. And it could raise the stakes for the Federal Reserve’s meeting this month.

“We have seen rapid declines like that in this recovery before,” said Martha Gimbel, an economist at the job-search site Indeed. “I think it’s really hard to figure out. Is this just another rapid decline that’s going to go away, or is this a decline we need to start worrying about?”

Here’s what to watch for.

There is no question that the job market has cooled. Employers have added an average of 151,000 jobs per month over the past three months, down from 233,000 in the final three months of 2018. The manufacturing sector, a major driver of growth in the first two years of President Trump’s term, is slowing down, and retailers are shedding jobs. Wage growth, though solid, is no longer accelerating.

What is less clear is whether that slowdown is anything to worry about. Tax cuts and government spending increases gave a temporary jolt to the economy last year, but the effects were always expected to fade. There has been no sign of an increase in layoffs, which have been the most reliable early sign of a downturn in the job market.

“We’re still creating jobs,” said Lindsey Piegza, chief economist at the investment bank Stifel. “We’re still putting Americans back to work on a day-to-day basis, but we’re doing so at a significantly slower clip.”

By most measures, the job market is still fundamentally strong. The unemployment rate, 3.6 percent, is at a nearly 50-year low. Employers have added jobs for 104 consecutive months, easily a record. After such a long stretch of growth, a gradual cooling is hardly surprising.

What worries economists is the possibility that the slowdown will not be so gradual.

If the economy does shift down further in the months ahead, one likely culprit will be Mr. Trump’s trade war.

Hiring has already slowed in manufacturing, a trend that economists and industry executives attribute in large part to uncertainty surrounding tariffs and trade. Data from the Institute for Supply Management this week showed that the industry’s struggles continued in June, although the decline wasn’t as severe as some economists had predicted.

“Uncertainty remains very high for manufacturers and for companies with global exposure right now,” said Michelle Meyer, chief economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “They’re still producing to meet demand, but they’re not looking to exceed that. They’re being very cautious.”

Policymakers at the Federal Reserve will be watching the report closely as they weigh whether to take steps to bolster the economy.

Jerome H. Powell, the Fed chair, has resisted calls from Mr. Trump and other critics — and even from some Fed officials — to cut interest rates. But he has signaled that he is prepared to act if the economy slows further. Investors have interpreted those comments to mean that the Fed will cut rates when it meets this month, although Mr. Powell has stopped short of promising to do so.

Friday’s report could help tip the scales in either direction. A weak report would all but guarantee a cut, economists said, perhaps by as much as half a percentage point. Even a relatively neutral report, or one containing conflicting signals, might be enough to push the Fed toward action. But an unambiguously strong report — solid gains in jobs and wages, perhaps paired with upward revisions to prior months — might keep policymakers on the sidelines until its September meeting or beyond.

The Fed’s complex calculus means that a good jobs report could be bad news for financial markets. Investors want — and expect — a rate cut in July. So a report strong enough to call a cut into question could disappoint investors and cause stocks to fall. The impact could be intensified by the low trading volumes of the holiday week, when many traders are on vacation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What to Expect From the June Jobs Report

Westlake Legal Group 05jobs1-facebookJumbo What to Expect From the June Jobs Report United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Powell, Jerome H Labor and Jobs Interest Rates Federal Reserve System Factories and Manufacturing Bureau of Labor Statistics

A question has hung over the American economy for the past month: Was the sharp slowdown in job growth in May just another soft patch in a recovery that has set records for its durability? Or was it a warning of more significant trouble?

Friday’s jobs report will help provide the answer.

Economists expect the Labor Department’s monthly report, which will be released at 8:30 a.m., to show that American employers added 170,000 jobs in June. That would be a substantial rebound from the disappointing total of 75,000 in May. (May’s figure will also be revised on Friday.) And it would suggest that the job market remained on solid footing, even if it lost some momentum since last year.

A second straight weak report, however, would spark fresh worries that trade tensions and other factors could be undermining the 10-year economic expansion. And it could raise the stakes for the Federal Reserve’s meeting this month.

“We have seen rapid declines like that in this recovery before,” said Martha Gimbel, an economist at the job-search site Indeed. “I think it’s really hard to figure out. Is this just another rapid decline that’s going to go away, or is this a decline we need to start worrying about?”

Here’s what to watch for.

There is no question that the job market has cooled. Employers have added an average of 151,000 jobs per month over the past three months, down from 233,000 in the final three months of 2018. The manufacturing sector, a major driver of growth in the first two years of President Trump’s term, is slowing down, and retailers are shedding jobs. Wage growth, though solid, is no longer accelerating.

What is less clear is whether that slowdown is anything to worry about. Tax cuts and government spending increases gave a temporary jolt to the economy last year, but the effects were always expected to fade. There has been no sign of an increase in layoffs, which have been the most reliable early sign of a downturn in the job market.

“We’re still creating jobs,” said Lindsey Piegza, chief economist at the investment bank Stifel. “We’re still putting Americans back to work on a day-to-day basis, but we’re doing so at a significantly slower clip.”

By most measures, the job market is still fundamentally strong. The unemployment rate, 3.6 percent, is at a nearly 50-year low. Employers have added jobs for 104 consecutive months, easily a record. After such a long stretch of growth, a gradual cooling is hardly surprising.

What worries economists is the possibility that the slowdown will not be so gradual.

If the economy does shift down further in the months ahead, one likely culprit will be Mr. Trump’s trade war.

Hiring has already slowed in manufacturing, a trend that economists and industry executives attribute in large part to uncertainty surrounding tariffs and trade. Data from the Institute for Supply Management this week showed that the industry’s struggles continued in June, although the decline wasn’t as severe as some economists had predicted.

“Uncertainty remains very high for manufacturers and for companies with global exposure right now,” said Michelle Meyer, chief economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “They’re still producing to meet demand, but they’re not looking to exceed that. They’re being very cautious.”

Policymakers at the Federal Reserve will be watching the report closely as they weigh whether to take steps to bolster the economy.

Jerome H. Powell, the Fed chair, has resisted calls from Mr. Trump and other critics — and even from some Fed officials — to cut interest rates. But he has signaled that he is prepared to act if the economy slows further. Investors have interpreted those comments to mean that the Fed will cut rates when it meets this month, although Mr. Powell has stopped short of promising to do so.

Friday’s report could help tip the scales in either direction. A weak report would all but guarantee a cut, economists said, perhaps by as much as half a percentage point. Even a relatively neutral report, or one containing conflicting signals, might be enough to push the Fed toward action. But an unambiguously strong report — solid gains in jobs and wages, perhaps paired with upward revisions to prior months — might keep policymakers on the sidelines until its September meeting or beyond.

The Fed’s complex calculus means that a good jobs report could be bad news for financial markets. Investors want — and expect — a rate cut in July. So a report strong enough to call a cut into question could disappoint investors and cause stocks to fall. The impact could be intensified by the low trading volumes of the holiday week, when many traders are on vacation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Two Americas, Celebrating Separately in One Place

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157492479_10e2e0d7-20f5-4355-a0a7-2745004ebd29-articleLarge Two Americas, Celebrating Separately in One Place washington dc United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Speeches and Statements Military Aircraft Independence Day (US) (July 4) Fireworks Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

The Navy’s Blue Angels soared over the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday at the conclusion of President Trump’s speech.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Most days the National Mall, a two-mile grassy expanse with the Capitol on its east end and the Lincoln Memorial on the west, is home to Frisbee players, museumgoers and joggers. On the Fourth of July, it hosted two distinct versions of America.

On the Capitol side Thursday afternoon, a smattering of mostly local residents, some carrying picnic hampers, waited in the humid weather for the traditional Independence Day concert featuring singer-songwriter Carole King, the National Symphony Orchestra, a special guest appearance by the Muppets and fireworks at nightfall.

On the Lincoln Memorial side, a raucous crowd of President Trump’s faithful, wearing red hats and plastic rain ponchos, pushing strollers, leaning on canes, and lugging lawn chairs, Chihuahuas and at least one Great Dane, began arriving more than six hours before Mr. Trump’s scheduled speech.

The first lady, Melania Trump, with Mr. Trump before his speech.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Dodging thundershowers, they pitched tents and blanket encampments inside a muddy, cyclone-fenced enclosure in the shadow of the Jumbotron, chanting “U.S.A.!” and “Four more years!” as they awaited the president’s words.

“There must be a million of us,” said Ron Beauchemin, 53, hyperbolizing as he swept his eyes over the crowd streaming through security, and lined up 90 deep at a nearby hot-dog stand.

Mr. Beauchemin and his wife, Crystal, 56, who own a moving business, had come up from Sarasota, Fla., for the weekend, accompanied by Darlene Izzo, a 53-year-old accountant from Sanibel Island, whom they had met at a Trump rally.

“God sent Darlene to me,” Ms. Beauchemin said. The trio had chipped in on a $25 Chick-fil-A gift card for Mr. Trump, and planned to deliver it during a White House tour they had booked for Friday. “He likes burgers and fast food,” Mr. Beauchemin said.

Supporters of Mr. Trump watched a flyover.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times Two F-22 Raptor fighters flanked a B-2 Spirit stealth bomber during a flyover.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times
An M2A3 Bradley infantry fighting vehicle sat near the stage as the president spoke.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times Military personal surrounded the National Mall.CreditSamuel Corum for The New York Times

“I have three sons in the Marines, and I wanted to bring my grandchildren to the White House,” Ms. Beauchemin said. But she left them at home, afraid of anti-Trump demonstrators “hitting people with crowbars and throwing cement on them,” she said.

Crowbars and cement were absent from Thursday’s festivities. The giant “Trump baby” balloon made only intermittent appearances, partly grounded by rain.

In the middle of the Mall, at the Smithsonian Metro stop, people disembarked from the subway and headed either east to the symphony band shell, or west to the Jumbotron and MAGA encampment.

In the dead center of this demilitarized zone stood the Frisch family.

“We’re just here for the dinosaurs,” said Kyle Frisch, 32, wandering with his brother Kevin, 27, toward the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History flanking the Mall.

Kyle Wells helped tie a flag on his son, Jason, in support of Mr. Trump.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times

They were visiting their father, Neil Frisch, and were in Washington for a long weekend that began with a Rolling Stones concert. They planned to avoid Mr. Trump’s speech, and watch the fireworks from Mr. Frisch’s waterfront rooftop.

“To me politics is all kids playing in a sandbox,” Neil Frisch said. “I wish they’d get some things done.”

A man who would identify himself only as Jay was also there, and confessed that Thursday on the Mall was “the first time I’ve ever seen a MAGA hat up close.”

“I live in a kind of liberal bubble,” in College Park, Md., he said. He was downtown for a screening of “Echo in the Canyon,” about the 1960s music scene in Los Angeles. “I thought I’d take a picture of the tanks just to show how bizarre the world has gotten. But I don’t want to get into any fights,” he said, moving toward the Metro.

Anti-Trump demonstrators with the “Trump baby” balloon.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times Trump supporters argued with opponents.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times
A decorated float in support of Mr. Trump.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times A protest of the use of the military vehicles during the event.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times

Moving east toward the band shell, the Mall was mostly empty Thursday afternoon, except for a group of girls taking photos of one another holding miniature versions of the Trump baby balloon, and a woman carried a placard reading “Fight Ignorance, Not Immigrants” under her arm.

The Correa family, from the Washington suburb of Gaithersburg, Md., was celebrating daughter Kenzie’s fifth birthday with a Smithsonian visit and carousel ride. “It would be really cool” for son Logan, 15 months, to see the tanks outside the Lincoln Memorial, said his mother, Nikki Correa. But instead the family was headed home. Mr. Trump’s salute to America “honestly is a complete embarrassment,” she said.

Back on the Trump side, the crowd gradually thickened, converging at the Washington Monument into a sea of people wearing Trump paraphernalia. A heavily tattooed man pushed a shopping cart, selling banners with a full-color photo of Mr. Trump and the slogan “A Hero Will Rise.”

Anti-Trump demonstrators burned an American flag in front of the White House, setting off a brawl that involved more than a dozen people.CreditEric Thayer/Reuters

A man in a Superman T-shirt carried a sign reading “Are You Good Enough to Go to Heaven?” A family purchased matching “Keep America Great” T-shirts from a sidewalk vendor: “That’s what they’re changing it to, kids!” a woman told two children. “Make America Great Again, Keep America Great. 2020!”

A middle-age man blitzed past on a scooter and shouted, “This city is in desperate need of Jesus!”

The Beauchemins and Ms. Izzo were standing between the flag salesman and a bottled-water vendor, looking for directions to the rally. Ms. Izzo wore a MAGA T-shirt and a shawl resembling an American flag with armholes; her toenails were painted in stars and stripes. Ms. Beauchemin wore a commemorative “Salute to America” T-shirt and red, white and blue Mardi Gras beads; Mr. Beauchemin wore a black-and-white “Trump 2020” tank top with a sketch of the president’s face.

Helped by a bystander, they made it through security as the rain started, passing a likeness of Mr. Trump sitting on a golden toilet and holding a cellphone as a recording played his voice saying, “No collusion.”

Floats and balloons being prepared before the National Independence Day Parade.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times

“Why do they hate him so much?” Ms. Beauchemin said. “Look at that disrespect. Nobody has ever been so disrespectful of a president.”

“Umbrellas down!” people shouted, as the Marine band played on the Jumbotron, and children pressed up against the fencing to see. “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!”

More and more people, most of them white, squeezed into the enclosure. A man hoisted two little boys wearing flag-printed shirts onto his shoulders. “Look at them,” Ms. Beauchemin said. “That’s America.”

This rally “is not about politics,” she said. “It’s about our country.”

Lola Fadulu and John Ismay contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Two Americas, Celebrating Separately in One Place

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157492479_10e2e0d7-20f5-4355-a0a7-2745004ebd29-articleLarge Two Americas, Celebrating Separately in One Place washington dc United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Speeches and Statements Military Aircraft Independence Day (US) (July 4) Fireworks Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

The Navy’s Blue Angels soared over the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday at the conclusion President Trump’s speech.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Most days the National Mall, a two-mile grassy expanse with the Capitol on its east end and the Lincoln Memorial on the west, is home to Frisbee players, museumgoers and joggers. On the Fourth of July, it hosted two distinct versions of America.

On the Capitol side Thursday afternoon, a smattering of mostly local residents, some carrying picnic hampers, waited in the humid weather for the traditional Independence Day concert featuring singer-songwriter Carole King, the National Symphony Orchestra, a special guest appearance by the Muppets and fireworks at nightfall.

On the Lincoln Memorial side, a raucous crowd of President Trump’s faithful, wearing red hats and plastic rain ponchos, pushing strollers, leaning on canes, and lugging lawn chairs, Chihuahuas and at least one Great Dane, began arriving more than six hours before Mr. Trump’s scheduled speech.

The first lady, Melania Trump, with Mr. Trump before his speech.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Dodging thundershowers, they pitched tents and blanket encampments inside a muddy, cyclone-fenced enclosure in the shadow of the Jumbotron, chanting “U.S.A.!” and “Four more years!” as they awaited the president’s words.

“There must be a million of us,” said Ron Beauchemin, 53, hyperbolizing as he swept his eyes over the crowd streaming through security, and lined up 90 deep at a nearby hot-dog stand.

Mr. Beauchemin and his wife, Crystal, 56, who own a moving business, had come up from Sarasota, Fla., for the weekend, accompanied by Darlene Izzo, a 53-year-old accountant from Sanibel Island, whom they had met at a Trump rally.

“God sent Darlene to me,” Ms. Beauchemin said. The trio had chipped in on a $25 Chick-fil-A gift card for Mr. Trump, and planned to deliver it during a White House tour they had booked for Friday. “He likes burgers and fast food,” Mr. Beauchemin said.

Supporters of Mr. Trump watched a flyover.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times Two F-22 Raptor fighters flanked a B-2 Spirit stealth bomber during a flyover.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times
An M2A3 Bradley infantry fighting vehicle sat near the stage as the president spoke.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times Military personal surrounded the National Mall.CreditSamuel Corum for The New York Times

“I have three sons in the Marines, and I wanted to bring my grandchildren to the White House,” Ms. Beauchemin said. But she left them at home, afraid of anti-Trump demonstrators “hitting people with crowbars and throwing cement on them,” she said.

Crowbars and cement were absent from Thursday’s festivities. The giant “Trump baby” balloon made only intermittent appearances, partly grounded by rain.

In the middle of the Mall, at the Smithsonian Metro stop, people disembarked from the subway and headed either east to the symphony band shell, or west to the Jumbotron and MAGA encampment.

In the dead center of this demilitarized zone stood the Frisch family.

“We’re just here for the dinosaurs,” said Kyle Frisch, 32, wandering with his brother Kevin, 27, toward the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History flanking the Mall.

Kyle Wells helped tie a flag on his son, Jason, in support of Mr. Trump.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times

They were visiting their father, Neil Frisch, and were in Washington for a long weekend that began with a Rolling Stones concert. They planned to avoid Mr. Trump’s speech, and watch the fireworks from Mr. Frisch’s waterfront rooftop.

“To me politics is all kids playing in a sandbox,” Neil Frisch said. “I wish they’d get some things done.”

A man who would identify himself only as Jay was also there, and confessed that Thursday on the Mall was “the first time I’ve ever seen a MAGA hat up close.”

“I live in a kind of liberal bubble,” in College Park, Md., he said. He was downtown for a screening of “Echo in the Canyon,” about the 1960s music scene in Los Angeles. “I thought I’d take a picture of the tanks just to show how bizarre the world has gotten. But I don’t want to get into any fights,” he said, moving toward the Metro.

Anti-Trump demonstrators with the “Trump baby” balloon.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times A protest of the use of the military vehicles during the event.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times
A decorated float in support of Mr. Trump.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times Trump supporters argued with opponents.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times

Moving east toward the band shell, the Mall was mostly empty Thursday afternoon, except for a group of girls taking photos of one another holding miniature versions of the Trump baby balloon, and a woman carried a placard reading “Fight Ignorance, Not Immigrants” under her arm.

The Correa family, from the Washington suburb of Gaithersburg, Md., was celebrating daughter Kenzie’s fifth birthday with a Smithsonian visit and carousel ride. “It would be really cool” for son Logan, 15 months, to see the tanks outside the Lincoln Memorial, said his mother, Nikki Correa. But instead the family was headed home. Mr. Trump’s salute to America “honestly is a complete embarrassment,” she said.

Back on the Trump side, the crowd gradually thickened, converging at the Washington Monument into a sea of people wearing Trump paraphernalia. A heavily tattooed man pushed a shopping cart, selling banners with a full-color photo of Mr. Trump and the slogan “A Hero Will Rise.”

Anti-Trump demonstrators burned an American flag in front of the White House, setting off a brawl that involved more than a dozen people.CreditEric Thayer/Reuters

A man in a Superman T-shirt carried a sign reading “Are You Good Enough to Go to Heaven?” A family purchased matching “Keep America Great” T-shirts from a sidewalk vendor: “That’s what they’re changing it to, kids!” a woman told two children. “Make America Great Again, Keep America Great. 2020!”

A middle-age man blitzed past on a scooter and shouted, “This city is in desperate need of Jesus!”

The Beauchemins and Ms. Izzo were standing between the flag salesman and a bottled-water vendor, looking for directions to the rally. Ms. Izzo wore a MAGA T-shirt and a shawl resembling an American flag with armholes; her toenails were painted in stars and stripes. Ms. Beauchemin wore a commemorative “Salute to America” T-shirt and red, white and blue Mardi Gras beads; Mr. Beauchemin wore a black-and-white “Trump 2020” tank top with a sketch of the president’s face.

Helped by a bystander, they made it through security as the rain started, passing a likeness of Mr. Trump sitting on a golden toilet and holding a cellphone as a recording played his voice saying, “No collusion.”

Floats and balloons being prepared before the National Independence Day Parade.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times

“Why do they hate him so much?” Ms. Beauchemin said. “Look at that disrespect. Nobody has ever been so disrespectful of a president.”

“Umbrellas down!” people shouted, as the Marine band played on the Jumbotron, and children pressed up against the fencing to see. “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!”

More and more people, most of them white, squeezed into the enclosure. A man hoisted two little boys wearing flag-printed shirts onto his shoulders. “Look at them,” Ms. Beauchemin said. “That’s America.”

This rally “is not about politics,” she said. “It’s about our country.”

Lola Fadulu and John Ismay contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

With Flyovers and Flags, Trump Plays M.C. for the Fourth

WASHINGTON — In a made-for-television Independence Day production starring America’s military weaponry, President Trump on Thursday used the Lincoln Memorial as the backdrop for a homage to the country’s armed forces and a call for unity that has been largely absent during his divisive presidency.

Flanked by Bradley armored vehicles and M1A2 tanks in front of the statue of Abraham Lincoln, Mr. Trump paid tribute to the five branches of the military as a chorus sang each service hymn and he cued the arrival of fighter jets and other military aircraft roaring by in the skies overhead.

Speaking to a rain-soaked audience filled with troops decked out in “Make America Great Again” and “Trump 2020” paraphernalia, the president finally presided over the grand military display that he has wanted since witnessing the Bastille Day parade in Paris two years ago.

In a 45-minute speech delivered behind rain-streaked bulletproof glass, the president singled out a long list of Americans for their contributions to science, medicine, politics and the arts. But he spent most of his time recounting the history of the armed forces, ending his remarks as the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” blared through huge speakers and the Blue Angels soared overhead.

“As long as we stay true to our cause — as long as we remember our great history — as long as we never, ever stop fighting for a better future — then there will be nothing that America cannot do,” Mr. Trump declared to chants of “U.S.A., U.S.A.” “God bless you, God bless the military, and God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.”

Even before he spoke, the president’s appearance on the National Mall drew fierce criticism from Democrats and some members of the military, who accused the president of using the military troops and equipment as little more than political props.

“Tanks aren’t props. They are weapons of war,” said Senator Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat and West Point graduate who served in the 82nd Airborne Division. Senator Kamala Harris of California, a Democratic candidate for president, said of Mr. Trump: “I don’t think he understands, this is America’s birthday, not his birthday.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157490112_fdc488d0-d278-4fc7-97fd-c4cc5f481fd5-articleLarge With Flyovers and Flags, Trump Plays M.C. for the Fourth Veterans United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Parades Military Aircraft Independence Day (US) (July 4) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Baby Trump balloons were part of the protests on the National Mall.CreditSamuel Corum for The New York Times

But two weeks after formally announcing his re-election bid in Orlando, Fla., with a dark message of grievance and attacks on his enemies, the president on Thursday offered a different, more optimistic tone. He added himself to Washington’s annual Independence Day celebration in what he called a “Salute to America” that avoided any of his usual attacks on the news media, Democrats or his intelligence agencies.

“We all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told — the story of America,” he told a large crowd of people, many wearing the president’s red, trademark “Make America Great Again” baseball caps. “To this day, that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot.”

Previous presidents have commandeered the Lincoln Memorial, but none had ever done it the way Mr. Trump did on Thursday, packing the audience with supporters and assuming the role of master of ceremonies that centered mostly around the troops at his command.

In 2009, President Barack Obama held a star-studded inauguration party at the Lincoln Memorial two days before his swearing-in at the Capitol. Hundreds of thousands of people gathered on the Mall to hear a concert that included performances by Bruce Springsteen, U2, Beyoncé, Garth Brooks and more.

Eight years later, Mr. Trump also visited the Lincoln Memorial the night before his inauguration, delivering brief remarks and leading supporters lining the Reflecting Pool in chants of “make America great again.”

On Thursday, the president spoke not far from where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I have a dream” speech to nearly a quarter-million people in 1963, hailing Lincoln’s decision to sign the Emancipation Proclamation as a “great beacon light of hope” to millions of people.

Thousands of people braved scorching, humid weather — and later heavy downpours — as they poured into Washington D.C. for the Fourth of July festivities on Thursday.

One woman wore a “I’m a Trump Deplorable” T-shirt, followed not far behind by a man in a “Veterans for Trump” shirt. A man wearing a shirt that said “Vote Democrat: Make America a Third World Country” walked through the crowd yelling about the end of the democracy. A lone Trump opponent walked quietly with a sign that said “Dump Trump.”

Supporters of Mr. Trump during his speech, which was punctuated by flyovers from military jets.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Outside of the secure area, on the other end of the National Mall, where PBS will be holding its annual Fourth of July concert — a completely separate event from the president’s rally — there appeared to be far fewer Trump supporters. The president’s red “MAGA” hats were hard to find, and Trump 2020 T-shirts were nowhere to be found.

Before Mr. Trump’s arrival, supporters of the president huddled in the V.I.P. section under trees to escape a long downpour while the Marine Corps Band played a medley of patriotic songs, including “God Bless America.” Brief cheers of “U.S.A.! U.S.A.! U-S-A!” came from the military crowd pressed along the fence line.

Daniel P. Cortez, age 68, of Stafford, Va., who was wounded in Vietnam as a Marine infantryman, sat in the V.I.P. section waiting for the president. Mr. Cortez, who works at a group that helps veterans deal with judicial issues, said he received an invitation from the White House on Monday.

“I’m not a Republican. I’m an independent,” said Mr. Cortez, the recipient of the Navy Commendation Medal for valor, a Purple Heart and the Navy-Marine Corps Medal. “But when the White House calls, I’m not going to pass up a seat at an event like this. Patriots should go to any White House. I’m honored to go.”

Jason Cullins, a truck driver from Lafayette, La., did not plan to come to the Trump event Thursday. He was on his way to drop off a load in New Jersey and decided to stop in Washington because he could not deliver on the Fourth of July.

“There’s always a show in Washington, D.C., so I had to make a stop,” he said as he held flags that said “Trump 2020” and “Make America Great Again.” “You have everybody here. You have anti-Trump people, which I don’t agree with, but by God that’s what makes America great. We have freedom of speech. I have no problem with them.”

Supporters of Mr. Trump were greeted by the large Trump baby balloon not far from the World War II Memorial. Code Pink, a liberal, antiwar group, organized the balloon as a way to mock the president. “It’s disgusting that Trump has hijacked our national holiday and turned it into a celebration of him,” said Medea Benjamin, a founder of Code Pink.

Ms. Benjamin said most supporters of Mr. Trump had been respectful, though one man threatened to attack the balloon, something that has happened in other cities where activists have flown it.

Trump supporters and opponents faced off on the National Mall.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times

Stan Sinberg on Thursday sold anti-Trump buttons and pins, including ones that said “Border Personality Disorder” with a picture of Trump next to it. He brought his wagon of pins to Washington from New York because the Fourth of July “is supposed to be a nonpartisan event, but Trump has politicized it.”

During the event, a man told Mr. Sinberg he had to leave, and other people shouted “Trump 2020” and “Pence 2024” at him. One man asked why he hated America. “Trump is not synonymous with America,” Mr. Sinberg replied.

Mr. Trump has wanted to host the country’s military since he declared the Paris parade to be the best he had ever seen. The president initially pushed for a similar military parade in Washington for Veterans Day in 2018, but fierce local opposition and a $90 million price tag for the event forced him to back down.

The president announced months ago his intention to speak on Fourth of July. But it was just in recent weeks that he demanded a robust military presence, including tanks and fighter jet flyovers.

That led to a mad scramble in the Defense Department to gather the military leaders who would attend. The Pentagon was given only a few days notice that Trump wanted his defense secretary, all the Joint Chiefs and all the service secretaries by his side during his remarks.

Most of the Joint Chiefs were on leave or on travel. Gen. Joseph L. Lengyel of the Air Force, the head of the National Guard Bureau, had a long-scheduled trip to the Middle East that was on, then off, then on again as of Wednesday. Another National Guard general was tapped to attend.

Of the other chiefs, only Adm. Karl L. Schultz, the Coast Guard commandant, joined Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, with the president. The others were on travel or on leave, and sent their deputies in their stead.

Some Pentagon officials sought on Wednesday and Thursday to make a virtue out of a necessity, saying it would be a chance for the substitutes — generally rising stars in their services — to get some valuable face time with the commander in chief.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

With Flyovers and Flags, Trump Plays M.C. for the Fourth

WASHINGTON — In a made-for-television Independence Day production starring America’s military weaponry, President Trump on Thursday used the Lincoln Memorial as the backdrop for a homage to the country’s armed forces and a call for unity that has been largely absent during his divisive presidency.

Flanked by Bradley armored vehicles and M1A2 tanks in front of the statue of Abraham Lincoln, Mr. Trump paid tribute to the five branches of the military as a chorus sang each service hymn and he cued the arrival of fighter jets and other military aircraft roaring by in the skies overhead.

Speaking to a rain-soaked audience filled with troops decked out in “Make America Great Again” and “Trump 2020” paraphernalia, the president finally presided over the grand military display that he has wanted since witnessing the Bastille Day parade in Paris two years ago.

In a 45-minute speech delivered behind rain-streaked bulletproof glass, the president singled out a long list of Americans for their contributions to science, medicine, politics and the arts. But he spent most of his time recounting the history of the armed forces, ending his remarks as the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” blared through huge speakers and the Blue Angels soared overhead.

“As long as we stay true to our cause — as long as we remember our great history — as long as we never, ever stop fighting for a better future — then there will be nothing that America cannot do,” Mr. Trump declared to chants of “U.S.A., U.S.A.” “God bless you, God bless the military, and God bless America. Happy Fourth of July.”

Even before he spoke, the president’s appearance on the National Mall drew fierce criticism from Democrats and some members of the military, who accused the president of using the military troops and equipment as little more than political props.

“Tanks aren’t props. They are weapons of war,” said Senator Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat and West Point graduate who served in the 82nd Airborne Division. Senator Kamala Harris of California, a Democratic candidate for president, said of Mr. Trump: “I don’t think he understands, this is America’s birthday, not his birthday.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157490112_fdc488d0-d278-4fc7-97fd-c4cc5f481fd5-articleLarge With Flyovers and Flags, Trump Plays M.C. for the Fourth Veterans United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Parades Military Aircraft Independence Day (US) (July 4) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Baby Trump balloons were part of the protests on the National Mall.CreditSamuel Corum for The New York Times

But two weeks after formally announcing his re-election bid in Orlando, Fla., with a dark message of grievance and attacks on his enemies, the president on Thursday offered a different, more optimistic tone. He added himself to Washington’s annual Independence Day celebration in what he called a “Salute to America” that avoided any of his usual attacks on the news media, Democrats or his intelligence agencies.

“We all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told — the story of America,” he told a large crowd of people, many wearing the president’s red, trademark “Make America Great Again” baseball caps. “To this day, that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot.”

Previous presidents have commandeered the Lincoln Memorial, but none had ever done it the way Mr. Trump did on Thursday, packing the audience with supporters and assuming the role of master of ceremonies that centered mostly around the troops at his command.

In 2009, President Barack Obama held a star-studded inauguration party at the Lincoln Memorial two days before his swearing-in at the Capitol. Hundreds of thousands of people gathered on the Mall to hear a concert that included performances by Bruce Springsteen, U2, Beyoncé, Garth Brooks and more.

Eight years later, Mr. Trump also visited the Lincoln Memorial the night before his inauguration, delivering brief remarks and leading supporters lining the Reflecting Pool in chants of “make America great again.”

On Thursday, the president spoke not far from where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I have a dream” speech to nearly a quarter-million people in 1963, hailing Lincoln’s decision to sign the Emancipation Proclamation as a “great beacon light of hope” to millions of people.

Thousands of people braved scorching, humid weather — and later heavy downpours — as they poured into Washington D.C. for the Fourth of July festivities on Thursday.

One woman wore a “I’m a Trump Deplorable” T-shirt, followed not far behind by a man in a “Veterans for Trump” shirt. A man wearing a shirt that said “Vote Democrat: Make America a Third World Country” walked through the crowd yelling about the end of the democracy. A lone Trump opponent walked quietly with a sign that said “Dump Trump.”

Supporters of Mr. Trump during his speech, which was punctuated by flyovers from military jets.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Outside of the secure area, on the other end of the National Mall, where PBS will be holding its annual Fourth of July concert — a completely separate event from the president’s rally — there appeared to be far fewer Trump supporters. The president’s red “MAGA” hats were hard to find, and Trump 2020 T-shirts were nowhere to be found.

Before Mr. Trump’s arrival, supporters of the president huddled in the V.I.P. section under trees to escape a long downpour while the Marine Corps Band played a medley of patriotic songs, including “God Bless America.” Brief cheers of “U.S.A.! U.S.A.! U-S-A!” came from the military crowd pressed along the fence line.

Daniel P. Cortez, age 68, of Stafford, Va., who was wounded in Vietnam as a Marine infantryman, sat in the V.I.P. section waiting for the president. Mr. Cortez, who works at a group that helps veterans deal with judicial issues, said he received an invitation from the White House on Monday.

“I’m not a Republican. I’m an independent,” said Mr. Cortez, the recipient of the Navy Commendation Medal for valor, a Purple Heart and the Navy-Marine Corps Medal. “But when the White House calls, I’m not going to pass up a seat at an event like this. Patriots should go to any White House. I’m honored to go.”

Jason Cullins, a truck driver from Lafayette, La., did not plan to come to the Trump event Thursday. He was on his way to drop off a load in New Jersey and decided to stop in Washington because he could not deliver on the Fourth of July.

“There’s always a show in Washington, D.C., so I had to make a stop,” he said as he held flags that said “Trump 2020” and “Make America Great Again.” “You have everybody here. You have anti-Trump people, which I don’t agree with, but by God that’s what makes America great. We have freedom of speech. I have no problem with them.”

Supporters of Mr. Trump were greeted by the large Trump baby balloon not far from the World War II Memorial. Code Pink, a liberal, antiwar group, organized the balloon as a way to mock the president. “It’s disgusting that Trump has hijacked our national holiday and turned it into a celebration of him,” said Medea Benjamin, a founder of Code Pink.

Ms. Benjamin said most supporters of Mr. Trump had been respectful, though one man threatened to attack the balloon, something that has happened in other cities where activists have flown it.

Trump supporters and opponents faced off on the National Mall.CreditMichael A. McCoy for The New York Times

Stan Sinberg on Thursday sold anti-Trump buttons and pins, including ones that said “Border Personality Disorder” with a picture of Trump next to it. He brought his wagon of pins to Washington from New York because the Fourth of July “is supposed to be a nonpartisan event, but Trump has politicized it.”

During the event, a man told Mr. Sinberg he had to leave, and other people shouted “Trump 2020” and “Pence 2024” at him. One man asked why he hated America. “Trump is not synonymous with America,” Mr. Sinberg replied.

Mr. Trump has wanted to host the country’s military since he declared the Paris parade to be the best he had ever seen. The president initially pushed for a similar military parade in Washington for Veterans Day in 2018, but fierce local opposition and a $90 million price tag for the event forced him to back down.

The president announced months ago his intention to speak on Fourth of July. But it was just in recent weeks that he demanded a robust military presence, including tanks and fighter jet flyovers.

That led to a mad scramble in the Defense Department to gather the military leaders who would attend. The Pentagon was given only a few days notice that Trump wanted his defense secretary, all the Joint Chiefs and all the service secretaries by his side during his remarks.

Most of the Joint Chiefs were on leave or on travel. Gen. Joseph L. Lengyel of the Air Force, the head of the National Guard Bureau, had a long-scheduled trip to the Middle East that was on, then off, then on again as of Wednesday. Another National Guard general was tapped to attend.

Of the other chiefs, only Adm. Karl L. Schultz, the Coast Guard commandant, joined Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, with the president. The others were on travel or on leave, and sent their deputies in their stead.

Some Pentagon officials sought on Wednesday and Thursday to make a virtue out of a necessity, saying it would be a chance for the substitutes — generally rising stars in their services — to get some valuable face time with the commander in chief.

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