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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 15)

A Timeline of the George Floyd Protests

After the death of George Floyd on Monday, protests and unrest have rocked Minneapolis. Demonstrators vandalized property and targeted police cars. The police have used tear gas and fired rubber bullets into crowds.

Elsewhere in the United States, demonstrators have also come out in force. In Detroit, the police said a man had been killed after someone opened fire into a crowd. In New York, demonstrations left people injured, and in Atlanta, protesters vandalized a CNN sign.

Here’s a timeline of the protests across the nation so far.

May 25

George Floyd, a 46-year-old African-American man in Minneapolis, died on Monday after being handcuffed and pinned to the ground by Derek Chauvin, a white police officer. Bystanders captured video of the officer behind a police car using his knee to pin down Mr. Floyd between his neck and head. Mr. Floyd repeatedly said, “I can’t breathe.”

Credit…Darnella Frazier from Facebook, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The next day, the video was widely shared on social media and ultimately became a driving force for protests in Minneapolis.

May 26

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_172866624_ef998609-a6a4-4aa9-9733-089cc3e17ffc-articleLarge A Timeline of the George Floyd Protests vandalism Trump, Donald J Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Looting (Crime) Frey, Jacob (1981- ) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Chauvin, Derek (1976- ) Black People
Credit…Kerem Yucel/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

That night, hundreds of protesters flooded into the Minneapolis streets. Some demonstrators vandalized police vehicles with graffiti and targeted the precinct house where the four officers had been assigned, John Elder, a police spokesman, said.

Protests also occurred in the city in the subsequent days. Officers used tear gas and fired rubber bullets into crowds. Some businesses, including restaurants and an auto-parts store, were set on fire. Videos shared on social media captured people taking items out of stores that had been damaged.

May 27

Credit…Ringo H.W. Chiu/Associated Press

Demonstrators in other cities began organizing. In Memphis, a protest over the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky., and Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick, Ga., led the police to temporarily shut down a portion of a street.

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Updated 12m ago

In Los Angeles, hundreds of protesters converged in the city’s downtown area to march around the Civic Center. A group of demonstrators broke off from the march and blocked the Route 101 freeway.

May 28

Credit…Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune, via Associated Press

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota activated the National Guard on Thursday. The order came as the city asked for help after vandalism and fires broke out during demonstrations and as the Justice Department said a federal investigation into Mr. Floyd’s death was a top priority.

Mr. Walz later said that he had activated thousands of additional National Guard troops to send to Minneapolis but had declined the Army’s offer to deploy military police units.

“Let’s be very clear,” Mr. Walz said. “The situation in Minneapolis, is no longer, in any way, about the murder of George Floyd. It is about attacking civil society, instilling fear and disrupting our great cities.”

May 28

Credit…Elizabeth Flores/Star Tribune, via Associated Press

After two days of protests in Minneapolis, Mayor Jacob Frey on Twitter called for order and said there would be “an all-out effort to restore peace and security” in the city.

He pleaded with protesters to return to their homes. “We need to offer the radical love and compassion we all have in us,” he said. “We must restore peace so we can do this hard work together.”

May 29

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

President Trump delivered an ultimatum to Minneapolis protesters on Friday and suggested that the military could use armed force to suppress riots. On Twitter, Mr. Trump called the protesters “thugs” and said, “When the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

He also criticized the city’s Democratic mayor.

“I can’t stand back & watch this happen to a great American City,” Mr. Trump said. “A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

May 29

Credit…Dustin Chambers/Reuters

In the nights that followed, more protests erupted across the country.

On Friday, hundreds of demonstrators poured into the streets near Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, leaving behind smashed windows. Some climbed atop a large red CNN sign outside the media company’s headquarters and spray-painted messages on it.

That night, protesters also clashed with the police across Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan, leaving officers and demonstrators injured. Thousands marched in the demonstrations before splitting into smaller violent protests. Some people threw bottles and debris at officers, who responded with pepper spray and arrests.

In Washington, a crowd gathered outside the White House, prompting the Secret Service to temporarily lock down the building. In Detroit, a 19-year-old man was killed when someone opened fire into a crowd of demonstrators, the police said.

In Dallas, protesters and the police clashed during a demonstration blocks from City Hall. Officers responded with tear gas after protesters blocked the path of a police vehicle and banged on its hood.

And in Denver, according to a news broadcast, hundreds of protesters converged on Civic Center Park, waving signs and chanting as Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” played.

May 30

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

After four nights of chaos in Minneapolis, Mr. Frey called on people to stay home. “What started as largely peaceful protests for George Floyd have turned to outright looting and domestic terrorism in our region,” he said on Twitter.

He said people who broke the 8 p.m. curfew would be helping those who use crowds to prey on Minneapolis.

“We are now confronting white supremacists, members of organized crime, out-of-state instigators, and possibly even foreign actors to destroy and destabilize our city and our region,” he said.

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Twitter Had Been Drawing a Line for Months When Trump Crossed It

Westlake Legal Group 29twitter-facebookJumbo Twitter Had Been Drawing a Line for Months When Trump Crossed It United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Rumors and Misinformation Freedom of Speech and Expression Executive Orders and Memorandums Dorsey, Jack Cyberharassment Corporate Social Responsibility Computers and the Internet Censorship

OAKLAND, Calif. — Jack Dorsey was up late Thursday at his home in San Francisco talking online with his executives when their conversation was interrupted: President Trump had just posted another inflammatory message on Twitter.

Tensions between Twitter, where Mr. Dorsey is chief executive, and Mr. Trump had been running high for days over the president’s aggressive tweets and the company’s decision to begin labeling some of them. In his latest message, Mr. Trump weighed in on the clashes between the police and protesters in Minneapolis, saying, “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

A group of more than 10 Twitter officials, including lawyers and policymakers, quickly gathered virtually to review Mr. Trump’s post and debate over the messaging system Slack and Google Docs whether it pushed people toward violence.

They soon came to a conclusion. And after midnight, Mr. Dorsey gave his go-ahead: Twitter would hide Mr. Trump’s tweet behind a warning label that said the message violated its policy against glorifying violence. It was the first time Twitter applied that specific warning to any public figure’s tweets.

The action has prompted a broad fight over whether and how social media companies should be held responsible for what appears on their sites, and was the culmination of months of debate inside Twitter. For more than a year, the company had been building an infrastructure to limit the impact of objectionable messages from world leaders, creating rules on what would and would not be allowed and designing a plan for when Mr. Trump inevitably broke them.

But the path to that point was not smooth. Inside Twitter, dealing with Mr. Trump’s tweets — which are the equivalent of a presidential megaphone — was a fitful and uneven process. Some executives repeatedly urged Mr. Dorsey to take action on the inflammatory posts while others insisted he hold back, staying hands-off as the company had done for years.

Outside Twitter, the president’s critics urged the company to shut him down as he pushed the limits with insults and untruths, noting ordinary users were sometimes suspended for lesser transgressions. But Twitter argued that posts by Mr. Trump and other world leaders deserved special leeway because of their news value.

The efforts were complicated by Mr. Dorsey, 43, who was sometimes absent on travels and meditative retreats before the coronavirus pandemic. He often delegated policy decisions, watching the debate from the sidelines so he would not dominate with his own views. And he frequently did not weigh in until the last minute.

Now Twitter is at war with Mr. Trump over its treatment of his posts, which has implications for the future of speech on social media. In the past week, the company for the first time added fact-checking and other warning labels to three of Mr. Trump’s messages, refuting their accuracy or marking them as inappropriate.

In response, an irate Mr. Trump issued an executive order designed to limit legal protections that tech companies enjoy and posted more angry messages.

Twitter’s position is precarious. The company is grappling with charges of bias from the right over its labeling of Mr. Trump’s tweets; one of its executives has faced a sustained campaign of online harassment. Yet Twitter’s critics on the left said that by leaving Mr. Trump’s tweets up and not banning him from the site, it was enabling the president.

“It really is about whether or not Twitter blinks,” said James Grimmelmann, a law professor at Cornell University. “You really have to stick to your guns and ensure you do it right.”

Twitter is girding for a protracted battle with Mr. Trump. Some employees have locked down their social media accounts and deleted their professional affiliation to avoid being harassed. Executives, holed up at home, are meeting virtually to discuss next steps while also handling a surge of misinformation related to the pandemic.

This account of how Twitter came to take action on Mr. Trump’s tweets was based on interviews with nine current and former company employees and others who work with Mr. Dorsey outside of Twitter. They declined to be identified because they were not authorized to speak publicly and because they feared being targeted by Mr. Trump’s supporters.

A Twitter spokesman declined to comment. Mr. Dorsey tweeted on Friday that the fact-checking process should be open to the public so that the facts are “verifiable by everyone.”

Mr. Trump said on Twitter that his recent statements were “very simple” and that “nobody should have any problem with this other than the haters, and those looking to cause trouble on social media.” The White House declined to comment.

The confrontation between Mr. Trump and Twitter has raised questions about free speech. Under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, social media companies are shielded from most liability for the content posted on their platforms. Republican lawmakers have argued the companies are acting as publishers and not mere distributors of content and should be stripped of those protections.

But a hands-off approach by the companies has allowed harassment and abuse to proliferate online, said Lee Bollinger, the president of Columbia University and a First Amendment scholar. So now the companies, he said, have to grapple with how to moderate content and take more responsibility, without losing their legal protections.

“These platforms have achieved incredible power and influence,” Mr. Bollinger said, adding that moderation was a necessary response. “There’s a greater risk to American democracy in allowing unbridled speech on these private platforms.”

For years, Twitter did not touch Mr. Trump’s messages. But as he continued using Twitter to deride rivals and spread falsehoods, the company faced mounting criticism.

That set off internal debates. Mr. Dorsey observed the discussions, sometimes raising questions about who could be harmed by posts on Twitter or its moderation decisions, executives said.

In 2018, two of the president’s tweets stood out to Twitter officials. In one, Mr. Trump discussed launching nuclear weapons at North Korea, which some employees believed violated company policy against violent threats. In the other, he called a former aide, Omarosa Manigault Newman, “a crazed, crying lowlife” and “that dog.”

At the time, Twitter had rules against harassing messages like the tweet about Ms. Manigault Newman, but left the tweet up.

The company began working on a specific solution to allow it to respond to violent and inaccurate posts from Mr. Trump and other world leaders without removing the messages. Mr. Dorsey had expressed interest in finding a middle ground, executives said. It also rolled out labels to denote that a tweet needed fact-checking or had videos and photos that had been altered to be misleading.

The effort was overseen by Vijaya Gadde, who leads Twitter’s legal, policy, trust and safety teams. The labels for world leaders, unveiled last June, explained how a politician’s message had broken a Twitter policy and took away tools that could amplify it, like retweets and likes.

“We want to elevate healthy conversations on Twitter and that may sometimes mean offering context,” Del Harvey, Twitter’s vice president of trust and safety, said in an interview this year.

By the time the labels were introduced, Mr. Trump was not the only head of state testing Twitter’s boundaries. Shortly before Twitter released them, the president of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro, tweeted a sexually explicit video and the Iranian leader Ali Khamenei posted threatening remarks about Israel.

Last month, Twitter used the labels on a tweet from the Brazilian politician Osmar Terra in which he falsely claimed that quarantine increased cases of the coronavirus.

“This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules,” the label read. “However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible.”

On Tuesday, Twitter officials began discussing labeling Mr. Trump’s messages after he falsely asserted that mail-in ballots were illegally printed and implied they would lead to fraud in the November election. His tweets were flagged to Twitter through a portal it had opened specifically for nonprofit groups and local officials involved in election integrity to report content that could discourage or interfere with voting.

Twitter quickly concluded that Mr. Trump had posted false information about mail-in ballots. The company then labeled two of his tweets, urging people to “get the facts” about voting by mail. An in-house team of fact checkers also assembled a list of what people should know about mail-in ballots.

Mr. Trump struck back, drafting an executive order designed to chip away at Section 230. He and his allies also singled out a Twitter employee who had publicly criticized him and other Republicans, falsely suggesting that employee was responsible for the labels.

Mr. Dorsey and his executives kept on alert. On Wednesday, Twitter labeled hundreds of other tweets, including those that falsely claimed to include images of Derek Chauvin, the white police officer who was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, an African-American man in Minnesota.

Mr. Trump did not let up. Even after Twitter called out his shooting tweet for glorifying violence, he posted the same sentiment again.

“Looting leads to shooting,” Mr. Trump wrote, adding that he did not want violence to occur. “It was spoken as a fact.”

This time, Twitter did not label the tweet.

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George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide

Westlake Legal Group george-floyd-updates-minneapolis-is-under-curfew-as-protests-continue-nationwide George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_172975950_58d5f52b-8121-4ecd-8494-b69a080309a6-articleLarge George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Fired officer is charged with third-degree murder after George Floyd’s death.

The former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, a black man who later died, has been arrested and charged with murder, the authorities announced on Friday, after days of growing unrest in Minneapolis escalated with the burning of a police station and protests that drew attention from the White House.

The former Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, who is white, was arrested by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension on Friday, the authorities said. Mr. Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, Mike Freeman, the Hennepin County attorney, announced on Friday afternoon.

Credit…Agence France-Presse/Getty Images, via Facebook

Mr. Floyd’s relatives said in a statement that they were disappointed by the decision not to seek first-degree murder charges.

Third-degree murder does not require an intent to kill, according to the Minnesota statute, only that the perpetrator caused someone’s death in a dangerous act “without regard for human life.” Charges of first- and second-degree murder require prosecutors to prove, in almost all cases, that the perpetrator made a decision to kill the victim.

Mr. Chauvin was also charged with second-degree manslaughter, a charge that requires prosecutors to prove he was so negligent as to create an “unreasonable risk,” and consciously took the chance that his actions would cause Mr. Floyd to be severely harmed or die.

An investigation into the other three officers who were present at the scene on Monday was ongoing, Mr. Freeman said.

The developments came after a night of chaos in which protesters set fire to a police station in Minneapolis, the National Guard was deployed to help restore order, and President Trump injected himself into the mix with tweets that appeared to threaten violence against protesters.

Video

0:00/01:23:38

transcript

Officer Who Pinned George Floyd Is Charged With Murder

Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is in custody. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been charged by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office with murder and with manslaughter. He has been charged with third-degree murder. We are in the process of continuing to review the evidence. There may be subsequent charges later. I’ve failed to share with you — a detailed complaint will be made available to you this afternoon. I didn’t want to wait any longer to share the news that he’s in custody and has been charged with murder. We have evidence, we have the citizen’s camera’s video that — the horrible, horrific, terrible thing we’ve all seen over and over again. We have the officer’s body-worn camera. We have statements from some witnesses. We have a preliminary report from the medical examiner. We have discussions with an expert. All of that has come together. So we felt in our professional judgment it was time to charge and we have so done.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-05-29-at-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

The tensions in Minneapolis reflected a growing frustration around the country, as demonstrators took to the streets to protest the death of Mr. Floyd and other recent killings of black men and women.

Mr. Floyd, 46, died on Monday after pleading “I can’t breathe” while Mr. Chauvin pressed his knee into Mr. Floyd’s neck, in an encounter that was captured on video.

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota, a Democrat, expressed solidarity with the protesters during a news conference on Friday, but said that a return to order was needed to lift up the voices of “those who are expressing rage and anger and those who are demanding justice” and “not those who throw firebombs.”

President Trump, who previously called the video of Mr. Floyd’s death “shocking,” drew criticism for a tweet early Friday that called the protesters “thugs” and said that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” The comments prompted Twitter to attach a warning to the tweet, saying that it violated the company’s rules about “glorifying violence.”

The president gave his first extensive remarks on the protests later on Friday at the White House, declaring that “we can’t allow a situation like happened in Minneapolis to descend further into lawless anarchy and chaos. It’s very important, I believe, to the family, to everybody, that the memory of George Floyd be a perfect memory.”

Addressing his earlier Twitter comments, Mr. Trump said, “The looters should not be allowed to drown out the voices of so many peaceful protesters. They hurt so badly what is happening.”

Protests Over Racism and Police Violence

Protests broke out in cities across the country over the death of a black man in police custody in Minnesota and other recent killings of unarmed black people.






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Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330 George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330-state_borders_innerlines George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330-protest_location_markers George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

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Westlake Legal Group protests_map-460 George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-460-state_borders_innerlines George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-460-protest_location_markers George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

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Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600 George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600-state_borders_innerlines George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600-protest_location_markers George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

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Minneapolis/St. Paul Protesters clashed with police after a video showed a white Minneapolis police officer pinning George Floyd, a black man, to the ground with his knee as Mr. Floyd said, “I can’t breathe.”

Louisville At least seven people were shot Thursday night at a protest over the death of Breonna Taylor, a black woman killed by police in March.

Memphis On Wednesday, demonstrators protested the killings of Mr. Floyd and Ms. Taylor as well as Ahmaud Arbery, a black man shot dead after being pursued by white men in Georgia.

By Jugal. K Patel, Jin Wu and Juliette Love

The spectacle of a police station in flames and a president appearing to threaten violence against those protesting the death of a black man in police custody, set against the backdrop of a coronavirus pandemic that has kept many people from engaging with one another directly for months, added to the anxiety of a nation already plagued by crises.

The protests — some peaceful, some marked by violence — have spread across the country, from Denver and Phoenix to Louisville, Ky., and Columbus, Ohio, with more expected on Friday night.

Minneapolis is under a night curfew as the National Guard roams the streets.

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis imposed an 8 p.m. curfew to try to stem the escalating violence that has engulfed the city for the last three nights.

The curfew will extend through the weekend, according to the mayor’s order, expiring at 6 a.m. each morning. During the hours of the curfew, people are prohibited from traveling on public streets or gathering in a public place.

But even as the curfew was taking effect on Friday evening, protesters were defying it, gathering in the streets around the police station that was burned a night earlier.

They chanted, “No justice, no peace, prosecute the police!”

Law enforcement officials fired tear gas into the streets and patrolled in military vehicles.

Governor Walz, who activated the National Guard on Thursday as local police appeared to lose control over angry demonstrators, also extended the curfew to St. Paul and said guardsmen would return to the streets in anticipation of more protests.

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In the unrest on Thursday night, more than 160 buildings were destroyed, damaged or looted, The Star Tribune reported. Nearly all businesses in the Seward neighborhood of Minneapolis were shut on Friday, many protected with plywood.

During a 90-minute news conference on Friday, the governor said officials should have anticipated that the protests could become violent, but he said it was unrealistic to expect law enforcement to stop people from coming out to demonstrate, even amid the social-distancing orders that have been imposed during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Watching what happened to George Floyd had people say, ‘To hell with staying home,’” he said. “The idea that we would go in and break up those expressions of grief and rage was ridiculous.”

Camille J. Gage, 63, an artist and musician who joined the protests, said she was relieved that Mr. Chauvin had been charged. “How can anyone watch that video and think it was anything less?” she said. “Such blatant disregard for another living soul.”

Kelsey Lindell, 27, an executive producer for a local film company, said all four officers at the scene of the incident should be arrested, charged and punished for murder. “I want to see a higher charge for all the officers,” she said, “but the biggest thing for me is that this guy gets jail time.”

Mr. Walz acknowledged that the Minneapolis police had lost the trust of city residents, but he implored residents to see the National Guard as a peacekeeping force meant to keep “anarchists” from taking over and destroying more of the city.

“I need to ask Minnesotans, those in pain and those who feel like justice has not been served yet, you need to help us create the space so that justice will be served,” the governor said. “It is my expectation that it will be swift.”

By Jin Wu

Days of protests had intensified on Thursday night when the Minneapolis Police Department’s Third Precinct station house was overrun by a crowd of protesters, with some people tossing fireworks and other items at officers, while the police fired projectiles back.

Officers retreated in vehicles just after 10 p.m. Thursday local time as protesters stormed the building — smashing equipment, lighting fires and setting off fireworks, according to videos posted from the scene.

Mr. Frey said at a news conference Friday morning that he had made the call for officers to flee the Third Precinct, saying, “The symbolism of a building cannot outweigh the importance of life.”

Mr. Frey, a Democrat, said he understood the anger of the city’s residents but pleaded with people to stop destroying property and looting stores. “It’s not just enough to do the right thing yourself,” he said. “We need to be making sure that all of us are held accountable.”John Harrington, the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said that arrests had been made related to looting on Thursday night, but that he did not know how many. The arrests included people breaking into the grocery stores, Targets and pharmacies, he said.

Police cars and CNN sign are vandalized as unrest grows in Atlanta.

Credit…Dustin Chambers/Reuters

A demonstration turned destructive in Atlanta on Friday night, as hundreds of protesters took to the streets, smashing windows and clashing with the police.

They gathered around Centennial Olympic Park, the city’s iconic tourist destination. People jumped on police cars. Some climbed atop a large red CNN sign outside the media company’s headquarters and spray-painted messages on it. Some threw rocks at the glass doors of the Omni Hotel, eventually breaking the glass. Others shattered windows at the College Football Hall of Fame, where people rushed in and emerged with branded fan gear.

Jay Clay, 19, an Atlanta resident and graphic designer, watched the protests from across a street with a mixture of curiosity and solidarity.

“After all this injustice and prejudice, people get fed up,” Mr. Clay said. “I wanted to come down and check it out. But this feels like it’s getting out of hand.”

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms pleaded for calm as the demonstrations unfolded.

“It’s enough. You need to go home,” she said. “We are all angry. This hurts. This hurts everybody in this room. But what are you changing by tearing up a city? You’ve lost all credibility now. This is not how we change America. This is not how we change the world.”

Bernice King, the youngest daughter of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., also spoke at the news conference, invoking her father’s legacy.

“Violence in fact creates more problems. It is not a solution,” Ms. King said. She said she felt and understood the anger of protesters but added, “There are people who would try to incite a race war in this country. Let’s not fall into their hands and into their trap. There’s another way.”

As the protests went on, police officers in riot gear were gathering. By 9:30 p.m., tear gas canisters were launched, and a wave of protesters ran back toward the park.

Protests spread across the country, briefly locking down the White House.

Credit…Eric Thayer/Reuters

Chanting “Hands up! Don’t shoot,” and “I can’t breathe,” thousands of protesters gathered in cities across the country on Friday, the third consecutive day of mass demonstrations after Mr. Floyd’s death.

In Washington, a large crowd gathered and chanted outside the White House, prompting the Secret Service to temporarily lock down the building. Video on social media showed demonstrators knocking down barricades, confronting police officers and spray painting other buildings nearby.

In Denver, hundreds of protesters converged on Civic Center Park, waving signs and chanting as Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” played over a loudspeaker. Some thrust fists in the air and scrawled messages on the ground in chalk, according to a live broadcast of the event by ABC News.

Bus and rail service into and out of downtown Denver was suspended in response to the protest Friday and another one planned for Saturday, which is expected to draw more than 10,000 people, according to the Regional Transportation District in Denver.

The agency said it had suspended the service “to ensure the safety of our staff and our riders.”

In Houston, a march in downtown Houston briefly turned chaotic as the windows of a police SUV were smashed and protesters were arrested. At one point, officers holding batons encircled a downtown street as other officers arrested a demonstrator who was on the ground.

In Milwaukee, protesters shouted “I can’t breathe” — echoing Mr. Floyd’s anguished plea and the words of Eric Garner, a black man who died in New York Police Department custody in 2014. The protesters briefly shut down part of Interstate 43, a major highway in Milwaukee, according to WTMJ-TV. A Milwaukee police spokeswoman referred questions to the county sheriff’s office, which did not immediately respond to messages.

In Detroit, a small crowd gathered outside police headquarters, declaring, “Black is not a crime.”

Leading the crowd in a chant, Mary Sheffield, a member of the Detroit City Council, proclaimed, “I’m fired up. I’m fed up.” She said what she saw on her television and how the country values black lives is unacceptable.

“To be honest with you, I’m tired of rallying. I’m tired of marching. I’m tired of asking. I’m tired of arguing. I’m just tired,” she said. “We must come to a point where we are demanding now. We are demanding justice.”

Later, the demonstration in Detroit swelled to more than 1,000, as protesters marched on major thoroughfares leading downtown, blocking traffic along the way.

In San Jose, Calif., protesters marched through that city’s downtown before blocking Highway 101, standing across at least five lanes of traffic, according to NBC News Bay Area.

Officers and protesters trade projectiles outside Barclays Center in New York.

Credit…Gabriela Bhaskar for The New York Times

Tensions flared in New York for the second night in a row as thousands of protesters stormed the perimeter of Barclays Center in Brooklyn, trading projectiles of plastic water bottles, debris and tear gas and mace with police officers.

The protest had begun peacefully Friday afternoon, with hundreds chanting “Black lives matter” and “We want justice” in downtown Manhattan. But the demonstrations took a turn in Brooklyn, where police officers made dozens of arrests.

Officers with twist-tie handcuffs hanging from their belts stood next to Department of Corrections buses and squad cars with lights flashing, encircling the perimeter. A police helicopter and a large drone whirred in the hot air overhead.

Protesters were later seen throwing water bottles, an umbrella and other objects at officers, who responded by shooting tear gas into the crowd.

As that crowd scattered, protesters gathered in the streets in the nearby Fort Greene neighborhood, continuing to chant at the police. An empty patrol van was set ablaze, then pillaged, as people pried the doors off the hinges. Fireworks were thrown into the burned shell of the vehicle. Scribbled on the hood was the phrase “dead cops.”

By 10 p.m., riot police had descended on the neighborhood. A police official had described the scene in parts of the borough as “out of control.”

Earlier in the evening, several hundred people filled Foley Square near the city’s criminal courthouses. After a man in a green sweatshirt crossed a police barricade, he was swarmed by officers while protesters screamed. He was led away on foot in handcuffs.

“It was kind of his mistake,” said Jason Phillips, 27, of Queens. “But they were trying to push him back, and as they pushed him back, he slipped, and they took that as some type of threat.”

Despite the frustrations of demonstrators on Friday, the police said the number of people detained was much smaller than the night before, when 72 people were arrested.

Mr. Floyd was pinned for minutes while unresponsive, prosecutors said.

Credit…Tim Gruber for The New York Times

In a probable cause affidavit released on Friday after the charges against Mr. Chauvin were filed, prosecutors said that the former officer held his knee to Mr. Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes. “Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive,” the affidavit said.

But preliminary results from an autopsy indicated that Mr. Floyd did not die from suffocation or strangulation, prosecutors wrote, and that “the combined effects” of an underlying heart condition, any potential intoxicants and the police restraint likely contributed to his death. He also began complaining that he could not breathe before he was pinned down, the affidavit said.

The officers’ body cameras were running throughout the encounter, prosecutors said.

Four officers responded to a report at about 8 p.m. on Monday about a man suspected of making a purchase from a store with a fake $20 bill, prosecutors said. After learning that the man was parked near the store, the first two responding officers, who did not include Mr. Chauvin, approached Mr. Floyd, a former high school sports star who worked as a bouncer at a restaurant in Minneapolis.

Mr. Floyd, who was in a car with two other people, was ordered out and arrested. But when the officers began to move him toward a squad car, he stiffened and resisted, according to the affidavit. While still standing, Mr. Floyd began to say he could not breathe, the affidavit said.

Read the criminal complaint against Derek Chauvin

Mr. Chauvin, a white former Minneapolis police officer, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for kneeling on the neck of George Floyd, a black man, for nearly nine minutes. Mr. Floyd was pronounced dead at a hospital. (PDF, 7 pages, 0.69 MB)


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Westlake Legal Group thumbnail George Floyd Updates: Minneapolis Is Under Curfew as Protests Continue Nationwide Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

That was when Mr. Chauvin, who was among two other officers who arrived at the scene, got involved, prosecutors said. Around 8:19 p.m., Mr. Chauvin pulled Mr. Floyd out of the squad car and placed his knee onto Mr. Floyd’s neck area, holding him down on the ground while another officer held his legs. At times, Mr. Floyd pleaded, the affidavit said, saying, “I can’t breathe,” “please” and “mama.”

“You are talking fine,” the officers said, according to the affidavit, as Mr. Floyd wrestled on the ground.

At 8:24 p.m., Mr. Floyd went still, prosecutors said. A minute later, one of the other officers checked his wrist for a pulse but could not find one. Mr. Chauvin continued to hold his knee down on Mr. Floyd’s neck until 8:27, according to the affidavit.

The other officers, who have been identified as Thomas Lane, Tou Thao and J. Alexander Kueng, are under investigation. Mr. Freeman, the county attorney, said he expected to bring more charges in the case but offered no further details.

A stronger murder charge would have required a motive for Mr. Floyd’s death.

Credit…Jenn Ackerman for The New York Times

Richard Frase, a professor of criminal law at the University of Minnesota, said it was reasonable for prosecutors to charge Mr. Chauvin with third-degree murder, as opposed to a more severe form of murder, which would require proving that Mr. Chauvin intended to kill Mr. Floyd.

Professor Frase said the case against Mr. Chauvin appeared to be even stronger than the one that Hennepin County prosecutors brought against Mohamed Noor, a former Minneapolis police officer who shot and killed Justine Ruszczyk in 2017.

Mr. Noor was charged with the same combination of crimes, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, and was convicted of both.

In that case, Professor Frase said, the officer had seemingly panicked and fired a single shot. “There’s a question of whether he even had time to be reckless,” he said, referring to Mr. Noor. “Here, there’s eight minutes.”

The criminal complaint against Mr. Chauvin, Professor Frase said, did not identify any specific motive for officers to kill Mr. Floyd, which he said essentially ruled out first or second-degree murder unless additional evidence surfaced.

Ben Crump, a civil rights lawyer representing Mr. Floyd’s family, released a statement on Friday calling the arrest of Mr. Chauvin “a welcome but overdue step on the road to justice.” But he said the charges did not go far enough.

“We expected a first-degree murder charge. We want a first-degree murder charge. And we want to see the other officers arrested,” said the statement, which was attributed to Mr. Floyd’s family and to Mr. Crump.

“The pain that the black community feels over this murder and what it reflects about the treatment of black people in America is raw and is spilling out onto streets across America,” the statement said.

Professor Frase said he expected Mr. Chauvin’s lawyers to seize on the preliminary autopsy findings that showed that Mr. Floyd had not died of asphyxiation, which could form the basis for an argument that there was no way Mr. Chauvin could have expected him to die. But Professor Frase said another common strategy used by police officers facing charges of brutality — arguing that they were in harm’s way — may be unlikely to convince a jury.

“In this case, there was nobody but Mr. Floyd in danger,” he said. “And there was all that time when it seems there was no need to keep kneeling on his neck like that.”

A government drone in the skies over Minneapolis stokes civil liberties concerns.

A Predator drone operated by the federal Customs and Border Protection agency flew a surveillance mission over Minneapolis on Friday morning as the city reeled from days of escalating violence, stoking suspicion and prompting criticism from civil liberties groups.

An agency spokesman said in a statement that the unmanned aircraft “was preparing to provide live video to aid in situational awareness at the request of our federal law enforcement partners in Minneapolis.”

But after more than an hour flying in a holding pattern at 20,000 feet over the city, according to publicly available flight data, the drone returned to its base in North Dakota. “The requesting agency determined that the aircraft was no longer needed,” the statement said.

In recent years, U.S. government agencies have used surveillance aircraft to monitor protests in American cities. The American Civil Liberties Union, which is suing the Baltimore Police Department to block its surveillance plane program, called on Friday for Customs and Border Protection to immediately halt the use of its drone over Minneapolis.

“This rogue agency’s use of military technology to surveil protesters inside U.S. borders is deeply disturbing,” Neema Singh Guliani, a lawyer for the group, said in a statement.

Trump suggested protesters could be shot, and Twitter said the president violated its rules.

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The tweet from President Trump suggesting that protesters in Minneapolis could be shot violated Twitter’s rules against “glorifying violence,” the company said on Friday, escalating tensions between the president and his favorite social media megaphone and injecting Mr. Trump into a growing crisis over police abuse and race that will be another test of his ability to lead an anxious nation.

The company prevented users from viewing Mr. Trump’s message, which contained the phrase, “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” without first reading a brief notice describing the rule violation and also blocked users from liking or replying to Mr. Trump’s post. But the site did not take the message down, saying it was in the public interest for the president’s words to remain accessible.

Mr. Trump attempted to explain his earlier tweets in new postings on Friday afternoon. “Looting leads to shooting,” he said, pointing to incidents in Minneapolis and Louisville, Ky., during protests in both places this week. “I don’t want this to happen, and that’s what the expression put out last night means.”

Video

transcript

Minneapolis Precinct Fire: How a Night of Chaos Unfolded

Videographers for The Times captured the scene outside the Third Precinct in Minneapolis as peaceful demonstrations over the death of George Floyd turned violent, and a group of protesters set the building on fire.

Protester: “Hands up, don’t shoot. Hands up, don’t shoot. Hands up —” [explosion] The Third Precinct of the Minneapolis Police Department. On fire. Nearby businesses, ablaze. This is how the night of May 28 unfolded. George Floyd’s arrest and death in police custody on Monday set off protests in the Twin Cities. The protesters are demanding that criminal charges be brought against the officers involved. Protester: “Put that fist up — we’re all him. All lives matter.” When that didn’t happen on Thursday, some demonstrators escalated their tactics … … while others tried to keep the peace. [shouting] Police scanner audio, and footage from outside the precinct, provide insight into what happened. The police shoot tear gas from grenade launchers. “You want more of your people to die? You [expletive] coward. You want more of the people you’re supposed to protect to [expletive] die? You [expletive] coward — [expletive] you!” This back and forth with protesters continues for about an hour. Around 10 p.m., the officers begin evacuating the precinct. Crowd: “No justice, no peace.” Protester: “Everybody get garbage — let’s fill the cops’ place with garbage.” Protester: “Burn it!” On Friday, one former officer was charged with murder and manslaughter in connection with George Floyd’s death.

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Videographers for The Times captured the scene outside the Third Precinct in Minneapolis as peaceful demonstrations over the death of George Floyd turned violent, and a group of protesters set the building on fire.CreditCredit…Carlos Barria/Reuters

When a reporter at the White House later asked whether Mr. Trump was aware of the racist history of the phrase he had used, Mr. Trump said he had heard it for years, but said he was not aware that it had been used by Walter E. Headley, a former Miami police chief, during a news conference in December 1967. The chief’s comment further inflamed racial tensions in that city, and riots broke out the following year.

“When there’s looting,” Mr. Trump said, explaining the intentions behind his tweet, “people get shot and they die.”

Mr. Trump also said that he had spoken to members of Mr. Floyd’s family, calling them “terrific people.”

Mr. Trump had begun tweeting about the unrest in Minneapolis around 1 a.m., as cable news showed a Minneapolis police station engulfed in a fire set by protesters. He called the protesters “thugs.”

Chief Headley attracted national attention in the late 1960s for using shotguns, dogs and other heavy-handed policies to fight crime in the city’s black neighborhoods. “We haven’t had any serious problems with civil uprising and looting, because I’ve let the word filter down that when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” he said in 1967, adding, “we don’t mind being accused of police brutality.”

When asked about Mr. Trump’s tweet on Friday, Governor Walz said, “It’s just not helpful.” “Anything we do to add fuel to that fire is really, really challenging,” he added.

Obama and Biden addressed Mr. Floyd’s death.

Former President Barack Obama on Friday called on the nation to work together to create a “new normal” in which bigotry no longer infects institutions, while former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. used a short speech to call for “justice for George Floyd.”

In a statement posted to Twitter, Mr. Obama said, “It’s natural to wish for life ‘to just get back to normal’ as a pandemic and economic crisis upend everything around us.” But for millions of Americans, being treated differently because of race is “normal,” Mr. Obama said, referencing two other recent cases: Ahmaud Arbery, who was killed after two men confronted him while he was running in South Georgia, and Christian Cooper, who was bird watching in Central Park when a woman called police to say she was being threatened.

“This shouldn’t be ‘normal’ in 2020 America,” Mr. Obama said, adding,

“It falls on all of us, regardless of our race or station, to work together to create a ‘new normal’ in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts.”

Mr. Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, rebuked President Trump for his response to the protests in Minneapolis.

“This is no time for incendiary tweets,” Mr. Biden said in a brief speech delivered via livestream. “It’s no time to encourage violence. This is a national crisis, and we need real leadership right now. Leadership that will bring everyone to the table so we can take measures to root out systemic racism.” He did not mention Mr. Trump by name.

Describing the United States as “a country with an open wound,” Mr. Biden called for “real police reform” so that “bad cops” are held accountable.

Mr. Biden said he had just spoken with members of Mr. Floyd’s family, and he addressed them as he concluded his speech. “I promise you, I promise you, we’ll do everything in our power to see to it that justice is had in your brother, your cousin’s case,” he said.

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, who has risen on the national political stage for his coronavirus response, spoke up in defense of the protesters in Minnesota.

“I stand figuratively with the protesters,” he said on Friday. “I stand against the arson and the burglary and the criminality and I think all well-meaning Americans stand with the protesters. Enough is enough.”

Reporting was contributed by Victoria Bekiempis, Katie Benner, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Audra D.S. Burch, Jo Corona, Maria Cramer, Julie Davis, Sopan Deb, Richard Fausset, Thomas Fuller, Katie Glueck, Russell Goldman, John Eligon, Matt Furber, Maggie Haberman, Christine Hauser, Jack Healy, Thomas Kaplan, Michael Levenson, Dan Levin, Neil MacFarquhar, Eric Melzer, Sarah Mervosh, Elian Peltier, Katie Rogers, Edgar Sandoval, Marc Santora, Nate Schweber, Derrick Bryson Taylor, Neil Vigdor, Mike Wolgelenter and Raymond Zhong.

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While Twitter Confronts Trump, Zuckerberg Keeps Facebook Out of It

SAN FRANCISCO — Earlier this week, as Twitter executives waded into a confrontation with President Trump, Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive of Facebook, took a very different tack: He kept his head down.

Jack Dorsey, chief executive of Twitter, took to his site not long after to say Twitter would not back down, presenting a stark contrast to Mr. Zuckerberg, who, in an interview a day earlier with Fox News, said Facebook wasn’t going to judge Mr. Trump’s posts.

“We’ve been pretty clear on our policy that we think that it wouldn’t be right for us to do fact checks for politicians,” Mr. Zuckerberg said. “I think in general, private companies probably shouldn’t be — or especially these platform companies — shouldn’t be in the position of doing that.”

Mr. Zuckerberg’s reminder that Facebook would not interfere with posts from Mr. Trump — even if they violate rules that would apply to other people — was in part the product of his longtime belief that his company should avoid getting into the political fray and let its three billion users have their say.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 29zuckerberg2-articleLarge While Twitter Confronts Trump, Zuckerberg Keeps Facebook Out of It Zuckerberg, Mark E United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Rumors and Misinformation Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Facebook Inc Dorsey, Jack Computers and the Internet

His assurance that his company would not be an “arbiter of truth” in political discussion was also indicative of an aggressive effort over the last year or so to court Republicans in Washington and conservative voices in the media. The goal: to keep regulators off his giant internet company’s back.

By staying on the sidelines as Twitter does battle with Mr. Trump and his allies, Mr. Zuckerberg could gain unlikely Republican friends to stave off regulatory intervention into his business, which lawmakers around the world have threatened for more than a year.

Many people in the tech industry believe regulators — not economic collapse brought on by the coronavirus pandemic or any other problem — are the one existential risk to Mr. Zuckerberg’s business.

“Zuckerberg’s instincts have been right,” said Brendan Carr, a Republican commissioner at the Federal Communications Commission. “Zuckerberg said, ‘We trust people to make up their minds.’”

But Mr. Zuckerberg’s hands-off approach to Mr. Trump’s increasingly incendiary behavior on social media runs the risk of alienating some users who think the rules about what can be posted to Facebook should be applied equally to everyone, including world leaders. It could also infuriate some of the company’s Silicon Valley work force, who still believe Facebook isn’t doing enough to counter misinformation campaigns.

And it could lend more ammunition to critics who say Mr. Zuckerberg is still unwilling — or unable — to own up to his company’s role in disseminating information to the world, particularly when many news organizations are collapsing.

“Twitter and Facebook both have community standards and policies to combat voter suppression, hate and the incitement of violence, and yet Twitter is actually enforcing those standards against the president of the United States and Facebook is doing nothing,” said Vanita Gupta, the president of the Leadership Conference of Civil and Human Rights. “The harm from this approach by Facebook is mass confusion, voter suppression and possible violence.”

Twitter has started to experience the repercussions of taking on the White House. Several Republican lawmakers and regulators argued — on Twitter — that Twitter was being hypocritical because it was focusing on Mr. Trump while allowing other world leaders to spread lies.

“I’m filing a complaint with the Federal Election Commission because of Twitter’s domestic election interference against President @realDonaldTrump,” Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida said in a tweet.

After Twitter applied the warning label on a tweet from Mr. Trump on Friday morning, Ajit Pai, the F.C.C. chairman, called on Twitter to apply its rules against inciting violence equally to other world leaders. He provided a link to to anti-Israel tweets from Iran’s supreme leader.

Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, retweeted Mr. Pai’s post and called for criminal action against Twitter.

That kind of confrontation is exactly what Mr. Zuckerberg, who controls a far larger internet megaphone than Mr. Dorsey, wants to avoid. In a speech at Georgetown University in October 2019, Mr. Zuckerberg declared that political speech would be protected on Facebook, including lies made by politicians on the site.

“Twitter is doubling down and they are showing how amazingly bad they are at the politics on this,” said Rachel Bovard, a senior adviser to the conservative Internet Accountability Project and a former aide to Republican senators Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky. “Republicans want social media to be a pass-through, a billboard. They believe bad speech will be countered by good speech and that is what Zuckerberg is saying he will do.”

Facebook did not immediately comment on Friday. A spokesman for Twitter declined to comment.

In truth, Facebook’s and Twitter’s rules are not all that different. Both companies have said they would take down posts, even from a president, if they contained threats and incitement to violence or attempts to suppress voter turnout or citizens’ ability to participate in elections.

But when it comes to political discussion and advertising, the companies have diverged over the last year.

In October, Twitter said it would stop accepting political advertising because of issues with disinformation and the effect that false political ads could have on civic discourse. Facebook continued to accept political advertising and said it would not fact check those ads. Mr. Zuckerberg argued that declining political ads would disenfranchise less well-established candidates with smaller budgets.

Credit…Justin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

Mr. Zuckerberg’s courtship of conservatives has been aided by Joel Kaplan, a former aide in President George W. Bush’s administration and a well-connected Washington operative. Mr. Zuckerberg and Mr. Kaplan have tried to convince Republicans that although Silicon Valley may be largely left-leaning, Facebook’s platform itself is neutral.

Last year, Mr. Zuckerberg dined with top congressional Republicans, including Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri and Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. The Facebook chief also met with conservative journalists like Tucker Carlson of Fox News. And in a dinner with Mr. Trump last fall, Mr. Zuckerberg flattered Mr. Trump’s standing as the public figure with the “most engaged following” across all of Facebook.

Courting conservatives seems to have helped Facebook in Washington, but the strategy has not been entirely embraced by the company’s employees.

Some have long believed that a double standard applies to conservatives on the platform. In discussions posted to the company’s internal message boards and privately between employees on Friday, workers wondered what the final breaking point will be for Facebook to enforce its rules evenly, according to three people familiar with the company’s internal deliberations.

Mr. Zuckerberg’s attempts to avoid the political fray face additional challenges. Democrats are criticizing Mr. Zuckerberg’s unwillingness to enforce its policies, while Republicans are embracing an executive order handed down by President Trump that could make tech companies — including, and especially, Facebook — liable for the content that appears on their platforms.

“They’re not neutral platforms, they are publishers, the most powerful publishers in the world,” said Mr. Carlson in a monologue delivered on his show Thursday evening. “It empowers a handful of tech monopolies to the detriment of everyone else.”

Late Friday afternoon, Mr. Zuckerberg wrote a post to his personal Facebook page explaining why Mr. Trump’s posts were not flagged in any way. He also addressed employees in a question-and-answer video session.

Despite what he called his own “visceral negative reaction” to Mr. Trump’s language, Mr. Zuckerberg said he felt compelled to keep the posts up on Facebook and Instagram, and that the president’s language did not violate the company’s policies.

“I know many people are upset that we’ve left the President’s posts up, but our position is that we should enable as much expression as possible unless it will cause imminent risk of specific harms or dangers spelled out in clear policies,” Mr. Zuckerberg wrote.

“ I disagree strongly with how the President spoke about this,” he continued, “but I believe people should be able to see this for themselves, because ultimately accountability for those in positions of power can only happen when their speech is scrutinized out in the open.”

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‘The Pain Is Too Intense’: Joe Biden Challenges White Americans

WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., addressing a nation on edge, challenged white Americans on Friday to fully confront the enduring inequities faced by black Americans because, he said, “the pain is too intense for one community to bear alone.”

In his first formal remarks since a white Minneapolis police officer was recorded kneeling on the neck of a black man who later died, Mr. Biden spoke in stark terms about the everyday indignities African-Americans still suffer, from the threat of police violence to the cloud of suspicion that follows them from coffee shops to public parks.

“This is the norm black people in this country deal with,” he said in a brief speech from his Wilmington, Del., home. “They don’t have to imagine it.”

His impassioned plea stood in contrast to President Trump, who just minutes after Mr. Biden spoke appeared at the White House but declined to address the country’s boiling racial tensions — after stoking them with an inflammatory tweet in the morning suggesting that unruly protesters might be shot. Mr. Trump did address the death of the man, George Floyd, at a round table later Friday, calling it a terrible event that should “never happen.”

What was just as revealing about Mr. Biden’s address Friday, and his underlying political wager, is what he did not say.

He made no attempt to soothe the fears of those white Americans who, while sympathetic to the plight of people of color, are just as uneasy about the kind of disturbances that left parts of Minneapolis in flames Thursday night.

Over nearly a half-century in politics Mr. Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, has carefully balanced appeals for racial justice with tough-on-crime rhetoric. On Friday, however, he offered no equivocation and did not warn against violence, except to implicitly chide Mr. Trump for his warning that looters could be shot. The burden of responsibility, Mr. Biden suggested, was not on the shoulders of those protesting in the streets of American cities.

“With our complacency, our silence, we are complicit in perpetuating these cycles of violence,” he said, warning that “if we simply allow this wound to scab over once more without treating the underlying injury, we’ll never truly heal.”

Mixing a prepared speech with off-the-cuff comments, Mr. Biden did not stretch for rhetorical greatness. Perhaps befitting the setting, his basement, he was more intimate than lofty.

But his spare words amounted to a bet that other white Americans now share the equally concise sentiment he expressed earlier Friday on Twitter: “Enough.”

He is wagering that the necessity for on-the-other-hand politics, the sort he and his party have long practiced to appeal to the center, has been obviated by a pandemic that is disproportionately sickening and killing people of color; by the now-common stories of people like Christian Cooper, a black man threatened by a white woman while birding in Central Park; and by the names of the deceased Mr. Biden read off at the start of his speech, whose true fate is known only because of cellphone cameras that do not lie.

“I think the reaction of a lot of white people is now just, ‘Damn man, this is bad,’” James Carville, the Democratic strategist, said, referring to shifting sensibilities about the treatment of minorities. “The technology has just brought this home to people, that this is really what is happening.”

The forcefulness of Mr. Biden’s remarks was a pleasant surprise to some black Democrats, who have witnessed him commit a string of gaffes related to race, and were skeptical that a 77-year-old white man could channel African-American anguish.

“Joe Biden went there,” said Bakari Sellers, a Democratic activist who has written about growing up black in the rural South. “Even Barack Obama hedged on issues of race and was not always clear in his language. But to be completely fair, I’m not sure Barack Obama could have given that speech.”

Former Senator Carol Moseley Braun, the nation’s first black female senator, added, “I just need voters to see the Joe Biden I know, who is very clear on race and racism.”

But Mr. Biden has not always made that easy, and Ms. Moseley Braun said his campaign must do more to communicate with voters on this subject, especially after Mr. Biden’s remark last week suggesting that African-Americans torn between himself and Mr. Trump “ain’t black.” The immediate backlash prompted him to apologize hours later.

“The campaign needs to step up their game and connect more,” she said. “I think I fielded 30 phone calls since his foot got in his mouth.”

Mr. Biden may eventually feel compelled to denounce the rioting that began Thursday in a number of cities, particularly if the violence escalates or if police officers are killed in the line of duty, as some were in the summer of 2016.

Few Democrats have found success when they let Republicans seize the mantle of law and order.

“Most Americans are fair-minded people who want justice to be done in situations where wrong has occurred,” the Republican pollster Whit Ayres said. “But they also believe that you shouldn’t go out destroying innocent people’s property and threatening people’s lives as a means of doing so.”

For the moment, just as he did in his comeback primary victory, Mr. Biden is greatly benefiting from his opposition.

Shortly after the former vice president spoke, Mr. Trump seemed poised to wield the full stagecraft of the presidency as he strode into the Rose Garden to address reporters. But instead of speaking about Mr. Floyd, calling for law and order or some combination of both, the president stood before a group of his advisers, all white men, and sought to turn the country’s attention to China.

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Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Mr. Trump said nothing about the events of this week in Minneapolis, ignored shouted questions as he walked back in the White House and later struggled to justify calling the violent protesters “thugs” and warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

If those sentiments, expressed in a pair of after-midnight tweets, were vintage Trump, Mr. Biden’s speech mixed his familiar patter with some unexpected touches.

He opened his hastily arranged address by noting that he had spoken with the Floyd family, the sort of consoler-in-chief outreach he has become known for after his own life of loss, and concluded with another note of reassurance to the family along with a final challenge to white America.

“I love you all, and folks, we’ve got to stand up,” he said. “We’ve got to move. We’ve got to change.”

Mr. Biden also evoked past leaders, some explicitly, like the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and others less directly.

Citing the country’s founding promise, he echoed John F. Kennedy’s declaration that equality is “as old as the scriptures and is as clear as the American Constitution.”

By reciting the names of the black victims and repeating what has become a watchword of the racial justice movement, “I can’t breathe,” Mr. Biden also summoned Lyndon B. Johnson, who borrowed the lyrics of the civil rights protest song to vow “we shall overcome.”

Mr. Biden’s advisers recognize that their candidate’s greatest strength is his ability to empathize with people in pain — but finding ways to display that skill while campaigning from home has presented a steep challenge.

This week, however, a campaign that has struggled with caution and indecision in the past moved aggressively to highlight stark contrasts with Mr. Trump on matters of leadership and character.

Mr. Biden made his first public appearance in around two months on Monday, when he ventured out to pay his respects to the war dead on Memorial Day. Mr. Trump, too, saluted members of the military — but he also mocked Mr. Biden for wearing a mask, and on Tuesday he pushed an unfounded allegation of murder against a television host.

On the day that the American death toll from the coronavirus reached 100,000 lives, Mr. Biden delivered by video a somber Oval Office-style address to “my fellow Americans,” citing his own experiences with personal loss to promise that healing would come.

And on Friday morning, while parts of Minneapolis were still smoldering, Mr. Biden announced he would speak on the pain Mr. Floyd’s death had caused.

“The very soul of America is at stake,” Mr. Biden said, infusing the slogan he began his campaign with just over a year ago with fresh urgency. “We must commit as a nation to pursue justice with every ounce of our being.”

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A Justice Dept. Skeptical of Police Abuse Cases Vows to Investigate Floyd Death

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WASHINGTON — Attorney General William P. Barr on Friday labeled the images of the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis whom a white police officer knelt on for nearly nine minutes, as “harrowing” and “deeply disturbing” and vowed that the federal investigation into his death would proceed quickly.

“I am confident justice will be served,” Mr. Barr said in a statement as protesters across the country condemned the actions of the officer, Derek Chauvin, who was charged Friday by the local authorities with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

But the Trump administration’s years of inaction on police violence and President Trump’s embrace of law enforcement have made civil rights advocates wary of the Justice Department’s involvement in the Floyd case. The administration has largely dismantled police oversight efforts, curbing the use of federal consent decrees to overhaul local police departments. Mr. Barr has said that communities that criticize law enforcement may not deserve police protection, and Mr. Trump has encouraged officers not to be “too nice” in handling suspects.

Advocates for police overhaul said in interviews on Friday that they were in a difficult position: After denouncing the federal government’s retreat from police accountability — and civil rights enforcement more broadly — they are now wary of its intentions.

“Our confidence in a federal intervention in cases like this is wholly dependent on the track record of the administration that is stepping in,” said Derrick Johnson, the president of the N.A.A.C.P. “This administration lacks credibility when it comes to addressing issues of justice, fairness and race.”

Mr. Barr said that any federal charges would be “based on the law and facts,” and that they would not come until after local charging decisions.

To bring federal civil rights charges in the Floyd case, prosecutors have to meet a difficult bar: proving that Mr. Chauvin intended to violate Mr. Floyd’s civil rights and acted on that wish, Mr. Johnson said. Prosecutors are often reluctant to bring such cases because they are so difficult to win.

“We are confronted with the stark reality this family may not see justice, even with the prevailing evidence in broad daylight from multiple camera views that there was no resisting, no physical provocation, that he was subdued and cuffed, that he said he can’t breathe, and that blood was coming out of mouth,” Mr. Johnson said.

Mr. Barr’s announcement suggested no broader investigation into possible abuses in the Minneapolis Police Department, a move that local activists have demanded. Congressional Democrats also asked the Justice Department this week to open an investigation into the police. The city has a history of accusations of police abuse, and in 2017, an officer in a Minneapolis suburb was found not guilty of manslaughter in the death of Philando Castile, a black motorist.

Under President Barack Obama, the Justice Department aggressively sought to combat excessive use of force by the police. The department and local police departments signed 14 consent decrees, court-enforced agreements detailing remedies like additional police training or data collection.

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The Justice Department under Mr. Obama most likely “would have looked at Minneapolis given the pattern of problems that were apparent,” said Jonathan Smith, a former department official who negotiated several of the decrees.

Justice Department findings typically prompted the consent agreements. Police in Ferguson, Mo., where the fatal shooting in 2014 of an unarmed black teenager by a white officer set off a national debate over the use of police force, fined and arrested African-Americans in part to balance the city’s budget, the department found. It concluded that the Baltimore police were more concerned with accumulating statistics than reducing violent crime.

Mr. Trump’s first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, moved to rein Justice Department efforts to investigate patterns of allegations of misconduct by the local police.

The department under Mr. Trump has entered into consent decrees with the police in Evangeline, La., based on an investigation opened in 2015, and opened a so-called pattern-and-practice investigation into the police in Springfield, Mass. It has also pursued abuses in prison systems in Alabama and New Jersey.

But critics said that the department’s overall approach did little to address allegations of police misconduct.

“They’ve just really been dismissive about the fact that police abuse happens, and the fact that it’s a problem the federal government can and should do something about,” said Christy E. Lopez, a former deputy chief in the special litigation section of the civil rights division during the Obama administration.

She pointed to comments that Mr. Trump made in 2017 to the police on Long Island, suggesting that they should not protect the heads of suspects ushered into police cars. At the time, police departments around the country distanced themselves from the president’s position.

“It’s been the tenor of this entire administration and of the D.O.J.,” Ms. Lopez said. “That absolutely sends a message to police officers on the street.”

Mr. Sessions repeatedly argued that criticism of the police or excessive oversight could damage the morale of officers, harming their ability to control crime. Mr. Barr, in his own public comments, has stressed that abuses reflect “bad apples” more than systemic breakdowns.

Minority communities have long criticized Mr. Barr’s full-throated support of law enforcement, beginning with his first stint as attorney general under President George Bush, when he advocated on behalf of maximum sentencing laws that laid the groundwork for high rates of incarceration among black people.

Civil rights groups, including the N.A.A.C.P., opposed his confirmation last year. During his confirmation hearing, Mr. Barr defended his record but said that such a strict approach on sentencing was now unnecessary.

Critics wary of the Justice Department’s intervention in the Floyd case also pointed to statements Mr. Barr made over the past year in which he backed the police and cast protesters as endangering public safety.

He warned in December that critics of the police risked losing law enforcement protection, saying, “If communities don’t give that support and respect, they may find themselves without the police protection they need.” And he said last summer that officers were unfairly scrutinized when people resisted arrest while the fact that suspects who resisted arrest, endangering themselves and the police, “frequently goes without mention.”

“The cynicism that people have is well-grounded,” said David Rudovsky, a civil rights lawyer in Philadelphia and a senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School who has long worked on police accountability cases.

The burden in the Floyd case is on law enforcement “to show that they can actually do a credible investigation,” he said.

Mr. Barr’s defenders pointed to his first stint as attorney general, when the acquittals of four white Los Angeles police officers in the beating of a black motorist, Rodney King, incited protests and riots in Los Angeles and across the country.

The Justice Department intervened, charging the officers with violating Mr. King’s civil rights. Federal prosecutors secured guilty verdicts against two of the officers, and many civil rights advocates said that the federal government had helped secure justice for Mr. King.

“Bill did take a very personal interest in the case,” said George Terwilliger, Mr. Barr’s top deputy at the time. “The damage that can be done to law enforcement interests when officers engage in criminal acts can’t be underestimated.”

Mr. Terwilliger said that every attorney general should have a record of solid support for police, “but that doesn’t mean that when law enforcement authority is abused, that you’re going to lay down.”

Mr. Floyd’s death has echoes of the death of Eric Garner, who died after an officer on Staten Island wrapped his arm around Mr. Garner’s neck. The encounter was captured on video and Mr. Garner’s dying words of “I can’t breathe” became a rallying cry for demonstrations.

A local grand jury voted not to indict the officer, Daniel Pantaleo, and the Justice Department declined to charge him after a five-year investigation, saying it could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he had willingly and knowingly violated Mr. Garner’s civil rights. The New York Police Department ultimately dismissed Mr. Pantaleo over his use of an illegal chokehold on Mr. Garner.

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Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates

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Video

Westlake Legal Group merlin_172942449_8cff6994-4c1d-4a84-bdc0-ad9103829814-videoSixteenByNine3000 Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
Videographers for The Times captured the scene outside the Third Precinct in Minneapolis as peaceful demonstrations over the death of George Floyd turned violent, and a group of protesters set the building on fire.CreditCredit…Carlos Barria/Reuters

Here’s what you need to know:

The officer who pinned George Floyd has been charged with third-degree murder.

The former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, a black man who later died, has been arrested and charged with murder, the authorities announced on Friday, after days of growing unrest in Minneapolis escalated with the burning of a police station and protests that drew attention from the White House.

The former Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, who is white, was arrested by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension on Friday, the authorities said. Mr. Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, Mike Freeman, the Hennepin County attorney, announced on Friday afternoon.

Mr. Floyd’s relatives said in a statement that they were disappointed by the decision not to seek first-degree murder charges.

Third-degree murder does not require an intent to kill, according to the Minnesota statute, only that the perpetrator caused someone’s death in a dangerous act “without regard for human life.” Charges of first- and second-degree murder require prosecutors to prove, in almost all cases, that the perpetrator made a decision to kill the victim.

Mr. Chauvin was also charged with second-degree manslaughter, a charge that requires prosecutors to prove he was so negligent as to create an “unreasonable risk,” and consciously took the chance that his actions would cause Mr. Floyd to be severely harmed or die.

An investigation into the other three officers who were present at the scene on Monday was ongoing, Mr. Freeman said.

The developments came after a night of chaos in which protesters set fire to a police station in Minneapolis, the National Guard was deployed to help restore order, and President Trump injected himself into the mix with tweets that appeared to threaten violence against protesters.

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Officer Who Pinned George Floyd Is Charged With Murder

Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is in custody. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been charged by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office with murder and with manslaughter. He has been charged with third-degree murder. We are in the process of continuing to review the evidence. There may be subsequent charges later. I’ve failed to share with you — a detailed complaint will be made available to you this afternoon. I didn’t want to wait any longer to share the news that he’s in custody and has been charged with murder. We have evidence, we have the citizen’s camera’s video that — the horrible, horrific, terrible thing we’ve all seen over and over again. We have the officer’s body-worn camera. We have statements from some witnesses. We have a preliminary report from the medical examiner. We have discussions with an expert. All of that has come together. So we felt in our professional judgment it was time to charge and we have so done.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-05-29-at-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

The tensions in Minneapolis reflected a growing frustration around the country, as demonstrators took to the streets to protest the death of Mr. Floyd and other recent killings of black men and women.

Mr. Floyd, 46, died on Monday after pleading “I can’t breathe” while Mr. Chauvin pressed his knee into Mr. Floyd’s neck, in an encounter that was captured on video.

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota, a Democrat, expressed solidarity with the protesters during a news conference on Friday, but said that a return to order was needed to lift up the voices of “those who are expressing rage and anger and those who are demanding justice” and “not those who throw firebombs.”

President Trump, who previously called the video of Mr. Floyd’s death “shocking,” drew criticism for a tweet early Friday that called the protesters “thugs” and said that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” The comments prompted Twitter to attach a warning to the tweet, saying that it violated the company’s rules about “glorifying violence.”

The president gave his first extensive remarks on the protests later on Friday at the White House, declaring that “we can’t allow a situation like happened in Minneapolis to descend further into lawless anarchy and chaos. It’s very important, I believe, to the family, to everybody, that the memory of George Floyd be a perfect memory.”

Addressing his earlier Twitter comments, Mr. Trump said, “The looters should not be allowed to drown out the voices of so many peaceful protesters. They hurt so badly what is happening.”

Protests Over Racism and Police Violence

Protests broke out in cities across the country over the death of a black man in police custody in Minnesota and other recent killings of unarmed black people.






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Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330 Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330-state_borders_innerlines Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-330-protest_location_markers Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

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Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600 Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600-state_borders_innerlines Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)  Westlake Legal Group protests_map-600-protest_location_markers Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)

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Minneapolis/St. Paul Protesters clashed with police after a video showed a white Minneapolis police officer pinning George Floyd, a black man, to the ground with his knee as Mr. Floyd said, “I can’t breathe.”

Louisville At least seven people were shot Thursday night at a protest over the death of Breonna Taylor, a black woman killed by police in March.

Memphis On Wednesday, Demonstrators protested the killings of Mr. Floyd and Ms. Taylor as well as Ahmaud Arbery, a black man shot dead after being pursued by white men in Georgia.

By Jugal. K Patel and Jin Wu

The spectacle of a police station in flames and a president appearing to threaten violence against those protesting the death of a black man in police custody, set against the backdrop of a coronavirus pandemic that has kept many people from engaging with one another directly for months, added to the anxiety of a nation already plagued by crises.

The protests — some peaceful, some marked by violence — have spread across the country, from Denver and Phoenix to Louisville, Ky., and Columbus, Ohio, with more expected on Friday night.

Minneapolis will be under a curfew Friday night, with the National Guard on the streets.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_172945632_5615374d-f3df-46e0-b494-8cdd57be87d3-articleLarge Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
Credit…John Minchillo/Associated Press

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis imposed an 8 p.m. curfew to try to stem the escalating violence that has engulfed the city for the last three nights.

The curfew will extend through the weekend, according to the mayor’s order, expiring at 6 a.m. each morning. During the hours of the curfew, people are prohibited from traveling on public streets or gathering in a public place.

Governor Walz, who activated the National Guard on Thursday as local police appeared to lose control over angry demonstrators, also extended the curfew to St. Paul and said guardsmen would return to the streets in anticipation of more protests.

During a 90-minute news conference on Friday, the governor said that officials should have anticipated that the protests could become violent, but he said it was unrealistic to expect law enforcement to stop people from coming out to demonstrate, even amid the social-distancing orders that have been imposed during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Watching what happened to George Floyd had people say, ‘To hell with staying home,’” he said. “The idea that we would go in and break up those expressions of grief and rage was ridiculous.”

While acknowledging that the Minneapolis police have lost the trust of city residents, Mr. Waltz implored residents to see the National Guard as a peacekeeping force meant to keep “anarchists” from taking over and destroying more of the city.

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Updated 16m ago

“I need to ask Minnesotans, those in pain and those who feel like justice has not been served yet, you need to help us create the space so that justice will be served,” the governor said. “It is my expectation that it will be swift.”

By Jin Wu

Days of protests had intensified on Thursday night when the Minneapolis Police Department’s Third Precinct station house was overrun by a crowd of protesters, with some people tossing fireworks and other items at officers, while the police fired projectiles back.

Officers retreated in vehicles just after 10 p.m. Thursday local time as protesters stormed the building — smashing equipment, lighting fires and setting off fireworks, according to videos posted from the scene.

Mr. Frey said at a news conference Friday morning that he had made the call for officers to flee the Third Precinct, saying, “The symbolism of a building cannot outweigh the importance of life.”

Mr. Frey, a Democrat, said he understood the anger of the city’s residents but pleaded with people to stop destroying property and looting stores. “It’s not just enough to do the right thing yourself,” he said. “We need to be making sure that all of us are held accountable.”

John Harrington, the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said that arrests had been made related to looting on Thursday night, but that he did not know how many. The arrests included people breaking into the grocery stores, Targets and pharmacies, he said.

Mr. Floyd was pinned down for nearly three minutes after he became unresponsive, prosecutors said.

In a probable cause affidavit released on Friday after the charges against Mr. Chauvin were filed, prosecutors said that the former officer held his knee to Mr. Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes. “Two minutes and 53 seconds of this was after Mr. Floyd was non-responsive,” the affidavit said.

But preliminary results from an autopsy indicated that Mr. Floyd did not die from suffocation or strangulation, prosecutors wrote, and that “the combined effects” of an underlying heart condition, any potential intoxicants and the police restraint likely contributed to his death. He also began complaining that he could not breathe before he was pinned down, the affidavit said.

The officers’ body cameras were running throughout the encounter, prosecutors said.

Four officers responded to a report at about 8 p.m. on Monday about a man suspected of making a purchase from a store with a fake $20 bill, prosecutors said. After learning that the man was parked near the store, the first two responding officers, who did not include Mr. Chauvin, approached Mr. Floyd, a former high school sports star who worked as a bouncer at a restaurant in Minneapolis.

Mr. Floyd, who was in a car with two other people, was ordered out and arrested. But when the officers began to move him toward a squad car, he stiffened and resisted, according to the affidavit. While still standing, Mr. Floyd began to say he could not breathe, the affidavit said.

That was when Mr. Chauvin, who was among two other officers who arrived at the scene, got involved, prosecutors said. Around 8:19 p.m., Mr. Chauvin pulled Mr. Floyd out of the squad car and placed his knee onto Mr. Floyd’s neck area, holding him down on the ground while another officer held his legs. At times, Mr. Floyd pleaded, the affidavit said, saying, “I can’t breathe,” “please” and “mama.”

“You are talking fine,” the officers said, according to the affidavit, as Mr. Floyd wrestled on the ground.

At 8:24 p.m., Mr. Floyd went still, prosecutors said. A minute later, one of the other officers checked his wrist for a pulse but could not find one. Mr. Chauvin continued to hold his knee down on Mr. Floyd’s neck until 8:27, according to the affidavit.

The other officers, who have been identified as Thomas Lane, Tou Thao and J. Alexander Kueng, are under investigation. Mr. Freeman, the county attorney, said he expected to bring more charges in the case but offered no further details.

Trump suggested protesters could be shot, and Twitter said the president violated its rules.

Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

The tweet from President Trump suggesting that protesters in Minneapolis could be shot violated Twitter’s rules against “glorifying violence,” the company said on Friday, escalating tensions between the president and his favorite social media megaphone and injecting Mr. Trump into a growing crisis over police abuse and race that will be another test of his ability to lead an anxious nation.

The company prevented users from viewing Mr. Trump’s message without first reading a brief notice describing the rule violation and also blocked users from liking or replying to Mr. Trump’s post. But the site did not take the message down, saying it was in the public interest for the president’s words to remain accessible.

Mr. Trump attempted to explain his earlier tweets in new postings on Friday afternoon. “Looting leads to shooting,” he said, pointing to incidents in Minneapolis and Louisville, Ky., during protests in both places this week. “I don’t want this to happen, and that’s what the expression put out last night means.”

At the White House later on Friday, Mr. Trump also said that he had spoken to members of Mr. Floyd’s family, calling them “terrific people.”

Mr. Trump had begun tweeting about the unrest in Minneapolis around 1 a.m., as cable news showed a Minneapolis police station engulfed in a fire set by protesters. He called the protesters “thugs” and used language that echoed a controversial comment by a former Miami police chief in the late 1960s.

The Miami chief, Walter E. Headley, attracted national attention for using shotguns, dogs and other heavy-handed policies to fight crime in the city’s black neighborhoods. “We haven’t had any serious problems with civil uprising and looting, because I’ve let the word filter down that when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” he said in 1967, adding, “we don’t mind being accused of police brutality.”

When asked about Mr. Trump’s tweet on Friday, Governor Walz said, “It’s just not helpful.” “Anything we do to add fuel to that fire is really, really challenging,” he added.

Obama and Biden addressed Mr. Floyd’s death.

Credit…Jenn Ackerman for The New York Times

Former President Barack Obama on Friday called on the nation to work together to create a “new normal” in which bigotry no longer infects institutions, while former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. used a short speech to call for “justice for George Floyd.”

In a statement posted to Twitter, Mr. Obama said, “It’s natural to wish for life ‘to just get back to normal’ as a pandemic and economic crisis upend everything around us.” But for millions of Americans, being treated differently because of race is “normal,” Mr. Obama said, referencing two other recent cases: Ahmaud Arbery, who was killed after two men confronted him while he was running in South Georgia, and Christian Cooper, who was bird watching in Central Park when a woman called police to say she was being threatened.

“This shouldn’t be ‘normal’ in 2020 America,” Mr. Obama said, adding,

“It falls on all of us, regardless of our race or station, to work together to create a ‘new normal’ in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts.”

Mr. Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, rebuked President Trump for his response to the protests in Minneapolis.

“This is no time for incendiary tweets,” Mr. Biden said in a brief speech delivered via livestream. “It’s no time to encourage violence. This is a national crisis, and we need real leadership right now. Leadership that will bring everyone to the table so we can take measures to root out systemic racism.” He did not mention Mr. Trump by name.

Describing the United States as “a country with an open wound,” Mr. Biden called for “real police reform” so that “bad cops” are held accountable.

Mr. Biden said he had just spoken with members of Mr. Floyd’s family, and he addressed them as he concluded his speech. “I promise you, I promise you, we’ll do everything in our power to see to it that justice is had in your brother, your cousin’s case,” he said.

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, who has risen on the national political stage for his coronavirus response, spoke up in defense of the protesters in Minnesota.

“I stand figuratively with the protesters,” he said on Friday. “I stand against the arson and the burglary and the criminality and I think all well-meaning Americans stand with the protesters. Enough is enough.”

Mr. Floyd’s family had wanted a more severe charge of first-degree murder.

Credit…Jenn Ackerman for The New York Times

Ben Crump, a civil rights lawyer representing Mr. Floyd’s family, released a statement on Friday calling the arrest of Mr. Chauvin “a welcome but overdue step on the road to justice.” But he said the charges did not go far enough.

“We expected a first-degree murder charge. We want a first-degree murder charge. And we want to see the other officers arrested,” said the statement, which was attributed to Mr. Floyd’s family and to Mr. Crump.

“The pain that the black community feels over this murder and what it reflects about the treatment of black people in America is raw and is spilling out onto streets across America,” the statement said.

Mr. Crump and the family said they want Minneapolis — and other cities across the country — to fix deficiencies in policies and training that they said permitted Mr. Floyd’s death and others like it.

Among the areas they said they want addressed are the use of appropriate, nonlethal restraint techniques, the ability to recognize the medical signs associated with the restriction of airflow, and the legal duty to seek emergency medical care and stop a civil rights violation.

“For four officers to inflict this kind of unnecessary, lethal force — or watch it happen — despite outcry from witnesses who were recording the violence — demonstrates a breakdown in training and policy by the city,” the statement said. “We fully expect to see the other officers who did nothing to protect the life of George Floyd to be arrested and charged soon.”

Mr. Floyd’s family is being forced “to explain to his children why their father was executed by police on video,” they said.

A CNN crew covering the protests was arrested on live television.

Credit…Tim Gruber for The New York Times

A CNN reporting team was arrested live on television early Friday while covering the protests in Minneapolis, an extraordinary interference with freedom of the press that drew outrage from First Amendment advocates and an apology from Minnesota’s governor.

The CNN crew, led by the correspondent Omar Jimenez, was released by the police after spending about an hour in custody. In the moments before the 5 a.m. arrest, Mr. Jimenez could be heard identifying himself as a reporter and offering to move to wherever he and his team were directed.

“Put us back where you want us, we are getting out of your way, just let us know,” Mr. Jimenez told the police officers, who were outfitted in riot gear, as the network broadcast the exchange live.

Instead, he and his team — Bill Kirkos, a producer, and Leonel Mendez, a camera operator — had their hands bound behind their backs. Their camera was placed on the ground, still rolling; CNN anchors watching from New York sounded stunned as they reported on their colleagues’ arrests.

Lawyers at CNN reached out to the Minnesota authorities, and the network’s president, Jeffrey A. Zucker, spoke briefly on Friday morning with the state’s governor, Tim Walz.

Mr. Walz told Mr. Zucker that the arrest was “inadvertent” and “unacceptable,” according to CNN’s account of the call. By about 6:30 a.m. local time, the crew had been released and was back on television.

“Everyone, to their credit, was pretty cordial,” Mr. Jimenez said of his interaction with the police officers after his arrest. “As far as the people that were leading me away, there was no animosity there. They weren’t violent with me. We were having a conversation about just how crazy this week has been for every single part of the city.”

The network had noted in a post on Twitter: “A black reporter from CNN was arrested while legally covering the protests in Minneapolis. A white reporter also on the ground was not.”

Josh Campbell, a CNN correspondent who was also reporting from Minneapolis, said, “There’s a level of heavy-handedness that we’re not used to.”

Amid unrest elsewhere, the Kentucky governor tied Louisville protests to slavery’s legacy.

Credit…WDRB.com

After gunfire broke out at a protest in Louisville, Ky. amid escalating tensions over the fatal shooting of a black woman by three white police officers several weeks ago, Gov. Andy Beshear of Kentucky said on Friday that the protests reflected a city still affected by the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow.

He also said that the protesters’ anger underscored distress over the coronavirus pandemic, which has disproportionately affected black people.

Seven people were shot during demonstrations in Louisville on Thursday night as they protested the killing of the woman, Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician. She was shot in her home in March during a narcotics investigation. The F.B.I. has said it is investigating the shooting.

“What we have seen is a response to a very concerning shooting of an E.M.T., a young woman who worked to save the lives of others here in Kentucky,” Mr. Beshear said on CNN.

Hundreds of demonstrators made their way through the city throughout Thursday evening. Jessie Halladay, a spokeswoman for the Louisville Metro Police Department, said the gathering began peacefully but escalated to involve assaults on officers and property damage.

Videos posted on social media appeared to show shots being fired while demonstrators surrounded a police vehicle. It was too early to determine who was responsible, the Louisville Metro Police Department said. Mr. Beshear said the protests began as a demonstration to honor Ms. Taylor and demand justice for her.

“Some other folks, very late, more than three hours in, came in and ultimately instigated and caused some actions and turned it into something that it should not have been,” he told CNN.

Mr. Beshear read a statement from Ms. Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, that called on protesters to keep demanding justice but to do it peacefully. “‘Breonna devoted her own life to saving other lives, to helping others, to making people smile and to bringing people together,’” he read. “‘The last thing she’d want right now is any more violence.’”

Hours before the protests started in Louisville, Mr. Beshear said the fatal shooting of Ms. Taylor pointed to flaws in the “no-knock warrant” system that the police used to enter her home.

Authorities had initially charged Kenneth Walker, Ms. Taylor’s boyfriend, with attempted murder for shooting a police officer in the leg during the intrusion. Mr. Walker told investigators that he did not hear police announce themselves and was terrified when the door was knocked down.

On Friday, Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said that the police officers involved in George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis “look pretty darn guilty,” calling the incident “a hideous crime.”

But Mr. McConnell, a Louisville resident, condemned protests in his hometown and across the country, telling reporters that violence was “not helpful.”

“I think what’s happening in Louisville and in Minneapolis really needs to stop,” Mr. McConnell said.

“This senseless violence and reaction to this is not helpful. But you can certainly understand the outrage.”

Many police departments have sought to ban the use of neck restraints.

Video

transcript

Video Shows George Floyd Telling Police He Can’t Breathe

A bystander’s video in Minneapolis shows a police officer with his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck during an arrest. He died a “short time” later, the police said.

Arrested man: [moaning] “What you trying to say?” Police officer: “Relax.” Arrested man: “Man, I can’t breathe — my face —” [inaudible] Police officer: “What do you want?” Arrested man: “I can’t breathe!” Bystander 1: “How long you all got to hold him down?” Unidentified speaker: “Don’t do drugs, kids —” Bystander 2: “This ain’t about drugs, bro.” [inaudible conversation] Bystander 2: “He is human, bro.” Bystander 1: “His nose —” Bystander 2: “ — right now bro, you know it’s broken. You can’t even look at me like a man because you a bum, bro. He’s not even resisting arrest right now, bro.” Bystander 1: “His nose is bleeding.” Bystander 3: He’s passed out!” Bystander 2: “You [expletive] stopping his breathing, right now, bro. You think that’s cool? You think that’s cool? What is that? What do you think that is? You say — you call what he’s doing, OK?” Police officer: “Get back!” Bystander 2: “You’re calling what he’s doing OK. You call what he’s doing OK, bro?” Police officer: “Only firefighters —” Bystander 4: “Yes, I am from Minneapolis.” Bystander 2: “Bro, you, you, you call — you think that’s OK? Check his pulse!” Bystander 4: “The fact that you guys aren’t checking his pulse, and doing compressions if he needs them, you guys are on —” Bystander 1: “Oh my God!” [inaudible] Bystander 4: “OK, yeah, and I have your name tag.” Bystander 5: “Freedom of speech.” [shouting] Bystander 2: “Don’t touch me!”

Westlake Legal Group minneapolis-video-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600-v4 Officer Derek Chauvin Charged With Murder: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Minneapolis (Minn) Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Deaths (Fatalities)
A bystander’s video in Minneapolis shows a police officer with his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck during an arrest. He died a “short time” later, the police said.CreditCredit…Storyful

In the cellphone video of Mr. Floyd’s death, the arresting officer, Derek Chauvin, presses a knee on the back of Mr. Floyd’s neck for about eight minutes until the man on the ground stops speaking or moving.

For police trainers and criminologists, the episode appears to be a textbook case of why many police departments across the country have sought to outright ban or limit the use of chokeholds or other neck restraints in recent years: The practices have too often turned fatal.

“It is a technique that we don’t use as much anymore because of the vulnerability,” said Mylan Masson, a former police officer who ran a training program for the Minneapolis police for 15 years until 2016. “We try to stay away from the neck as much as possible.”

Department records indicate, however, that the Minneapolis police have not entirely abandoned the use of neck restraints, even if the method used by Officer Chauvin is no longer part of police training.

The Minneapolis Police Department’s manual states that neck restraints and chokeholds are basically reserved only for when an officer is caught in a life-or-death situation. There was no such apparent threat during Mr. Floyd’s detention.

Criminologists viewing the tape said that the knee restraint not only put dangerous pressure on the back of the neck, but that Mr. Floyd was also kept lying on his stomach for too long. Both positions — the knee on the neck and lying face down — run the risk of cutting off the oxygen supply.

Reporting was contributed by Victoria Bekiempis, Katie Benner, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Audra D.S. Burch, Maria Cramer, Julie Davis, Sopan Deb, Katie Glueck, Russell Goldman, John Eligon, Matt Furber, Maggie Haberman, Christine Hauser, Jack Healy, Dan Levin, Neil MacFarquhar, Sarah Mervosh, Elian Peltier, Katie Rogers, Edgar Sandoval, Marc Santora, Neil Vigdor, Mike Wolgelenter, Derrick Bryson Taylor, Thomas Kaplan and Raymond Zhong.

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Trump Moves to Strip Hong Kong of Special U.S. Relationship

Westlake Legal Group 29dc-trump-china-sub2-facebookJumbo Trump Moves to Strip Hong Kong of Special U.S. Relationship Xi Jinping United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Pompeo, Mike Kudlow, Lawrence A Hong Kong Foreign Students (in US) Executive Orders and Memorandums Economic Conditions and Trends Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

WASHINGTON — President Trump announced Friday that his administration would end almost all aspects of the American government’s special relationship with Hong Kong, including on trade and law enforcement, and that it was withdrawing from the World Health Organization, where the United States has been by far the largest funder.

Speaking at a news conference in the White House Rose Garden, Mr. Trump voiced a range of grievances against China, angrily denouncing the country’s trade and security practices and its handling of the initial coronavirus outbreak.

As punishment, Mr. Trump said he would strip away Hong Kong’s privileges with the United States, ranging from an extradition treaty to commercial relations, with few exceptions.

“My announcement today will affect the full range of agreements we have with Hong Kong,” he said, including “action to revoke Hong Kong’s preferential treatment as a separate customs and travel territory from the rest of China.”

Mr. Trump’s announcement came largely in response to Beijing’s move this week to put in place broad new national security powers over Hong Kong. On Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that he was reporting to Congress a determination that Hong Kong no longer had significant autonomy under Chinese rule. Mr. Pompeo had earlier called the new Chinese law a “death knell” for the territory, a global financial and commercial hub with special status under American law because, in theory, it has semiautonomy until 2047 under an international treaty that Britain and China signed.

Mr. Pompeo’s finding amounted to a recommendation that the United States should reconsider its special relationship with Hong Kong. A 1992 law says the United States should continue to treat the Beijing-ruled territory under the same conditions it did when it was a British colony.

Mr. Trump made clear on Friday that he no longer considered Hong Kong to be separate from China.

“China claims it is protecting national security. But the truth is that Hong Kong was secure and prosperous as a free society. Beijing’s decision reverses all of that. It extends the reach of China’s invasive state security apparatus into what was formally a bastion of liberty,” Mr. Trump said.


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  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 28, 2020

    • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

      States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

    • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

      Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      More than 40 million people — the equivalent of 1 in 4 U.S. workers — have filed for unemployment benefits since the pandemic took hold. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, data from a Federal Reserve survey released on May 14 showed, and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in people reporting symptoms of chilblains, which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another symptom of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How can I help?

      Charity Navigator, which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the American Red Cross, and World Central Kitchen has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


He said the United States would suspend the entry of some Chinese citizens who have been identified as “potential security risks.” He did not give details, but appeared to be referring to a move to cancel the visas of graduate students and researchers who attended Chinese universities with ties to the military.

The New York Times reported this week that American officials had decided to go ahead with the action, which would affect thousands of Chinese students, a tiny percentage of the total number from China studying in the country.

Mr. Trump also repeated past charges that China had mishandled the coronavirus outbreak and suggested that Chinese officials had knowingly allowed travelers to fly from Wuhan to other countries, including the United States, while limiting access from Wuhan to other cities within China.

It was unclear from Mr. Trump’s announcement whether he was issuing a formal executive order to end the special relationship with Hong Kong entirely. The administration can take piecemeal actions — for example, imposing the same tariffs on goods from Hong Kong that the United States does on products from mainland China — before taking that final, drastic step.

Alan Rappeport contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s Looting Remarks on Twitter Escalate Crisis in Minneapolis

Westlake Legal Group trumps-looting-remarks-on-twitter-escalate-crisis-in-minneapolis Trump's Looting Remarks on Twitter Escalate Crisis in Minneapolis United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Race and Ethnicity Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Black People

President Trump on Friday threatened to send the National Guard to Minneapolis unless the city’s Democratic mayor brought the violent protests touched off by the death of a black man at the hands of four white police officers under control, injecting himself into a growing crisis over police abuse and race that will be another test of his ability to lead an anxious nation.

By the time the president had issued his threat in a string of tweets, Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota had already activated and deployed the National Guard in response to a request from local leaders.

“I can’t stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter. “A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

Mr. Trump began tweeting about the unrest in Minneapolis around 1 a.m., as cable news showed the police station where the four city police officers involved in the death of George Floyd were assigned engulfed in a fire set by protesters a short time earlier.

Mr. Floyd died on Monday after one of the white police officers knelt on his neck while he was handcuffed and lying face down on the ground, calling out “I can’t breathe.” Video of the episode ricocheted across social media and the officer, along with three others, were fired the next day.

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Updated 8m ago

No charges have been filed in connection with his death.

“These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen,” the president wrote in another tweet, which was flagged by Twitter. “Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!”

In saying “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” Mr. Trump echoed a phrase coined by a Miami police chief in the 1960s about crackdowns on black neighborhoods during times of unrest.

Twitter officials responded to the threat by appending the tweets with a note saying the posts were “glorifying violence.” That provoked another tweet from the president accusing Twitter of having targeted “Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States” and prompting his aides to repost his original tweets on the official White House Twitter account. It was also flagged by Twitter.

When the video of Mr. Floyd lying on the ground with the police officer’s knee on his neck first circulated, Mr. Trump called it “shocking,” and at the White House on Thursday, the press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said the president was “very upset” seeing it.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_172944165_814688e4-bedd-40fb-9371-e28461e0a835-articleLarge Trump's Looting Remarks on Twitter Escalate Crisis in Minneapolis United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Race and Ethnicity Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Floyd, George (d 2020) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Black People
Credit…John Minchillo/Associated Press

But the protests in Minneapolis have recalled some of the worst scenes of unrest in response to police brutality in the treatment of black men over the last 30 years, and the president’s tone markedly changed.

The phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” was used by Walter Headley, the Miami police chief in 1967. At the time, Mr. Headley warned that young black men who he called “hoodlums” had “taken advantage of the civil rights campaign,” and added, “We don’t mind being accused of police brutality.”

Mr. Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign made a broad appeal to white grievances. Even as he has made efforts to appeal to black voters, he has demonized Hispanic immigrants and has shared Twitter posts from extremists whose feeds routinely traffic in racism.

When racial conflict has arisen during his presidency, Mr. Trump has often avoided taking a clear position. When neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 and a counterprotester was killed, Mr. Trump condemned the death but told reporters there were “very fine people” on “both sides” of the matter, prompting outrage.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Attacks Minneapolis Mayor Over Protests

Westlake Legal Group trump-attacks-minneapolis-mayor-over-protests Trump Attacks Minneapolis Mayor Over Protests United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Race and Ethnicity Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Black People

President Trump on Friday threatened to send the National Guard to Minneapolis unless the city’s Democratic mayor brought the violent protests touched off by the death of a black man at the hands of four white police officers under control, injecting himself into a growing crisis over police abuse and race that will be another test of his ability to lead an anxious nation.

By the time the president had issued his threat in a string of tweets, Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota had already activated and deployed the National Guard in response to a request from local leaders.

“I can’t stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter. “A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

Mr. Trump began tweeting about the unrest in Minneapolis around 1 a.m., as cable news showed the police station where the four city police officers involved in the death of George Floyd were assigned engulfed in a fire set by protesters a short time earlier.

Mr. Floyd died on Monday after one of the white police officers knelt on his neck while he was handcuffed and lying face down on the ground, calling out “I can’t breathe.” Video of the episode ricocheted across social media and the officer, along with three others, were fired the next day.

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Updated 55m ago

No charges have been filed in connection with his death.

“These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen,” the president wrote in another tweet, which was flagged by Twitter. “Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!”

In saying “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” Mr. Trump echoed a phrase coined by a Miami police chief in the 1960s about crackdowns on black neighborhoods during times of unrest.

Twitter officials responded to the threat by appending the tweets with a note saying the posts were “glorifying violence.” That provoked another tweet from the president accusing Twitter of having targeted “Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States” and prompting his aides to repost his original tweets on the official White House Twitter account. It was also flagged by Twitter.

When the video of Mr. Floyd lying on the ground with the police officer’s knee on his neck first circulated, Mr. Trump called it “shocking,” and at the White House on Thursday, the press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said the president was “very upset” seeing it.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_172944165_814688e4-bedd-40fb-9371-e28461e0a835-articleLarge Trump Attacks Minneapolis Mayor Over Protests United States Politics and Government twitter Trump, Donald J Social Media Race and Ethnicity Police Department (Minneapolis, Minn) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Black People
Credit…John Minchillo/Associated Press

But the protests in Minneapolis have recalled some of the worst scenes of unrest in response to police brutality in the treatment of black men over the last 30 years, and the president’s tone markedly changed.

The phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” was used by Walter Headley, the Miami police chief in 1967. At the time, Mr. Headley warned that young black men who he called “hoodlums” had “taken advantage of the civil rights campaign,” and added, “We don’t mind being accused of police brutality.”

Mr. Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign made a broad appeal to white grievances. Even as he has made efforts to appeal to black voters, he has demonized Hispanic immigrants and has shared Twitter posts from extremists whose feeds routinely traffic in racism.

When racial conflict has arisen during his presidency, Mr. Trump has often avoided taking a clear position. When neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 and a counterprotester was killed, Mr. Trump condemned the death but told reporters there were “very fine people” on “both sides” of the matter, prompting outrage.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com