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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 17)

5 Takeaways From the G20 Summit: Easing Off Trump’s China Trade War, for Now

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157182750_0429a038-22d8-4549-a912-00f0a8e8dcfe-articleLarge 5 Takeaways From the G20 Summit: Easing Off Trump’s China Trade War, for Now United States International Relations Trump, Donald J South Korea Putin, Vladimir V Osaka (Japan) North Korea Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Japan Abe, Shinzo

The American and Chinese delegations on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

After meeting China’s leader, Xi Jinping, on the side lines of the G20 summit, Mr. Trump told reporters on Saturday: “We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track” with trade talks.

Mr. Trump also said that the United States would not impose any new tariffs on Chinese exports while the talks were underway, and that China had agreed to resume broad purchases of American farm products and other goods.

The negotiations broke down seven weeks ago, when the Chinese side said that it could not accept some provisions that had been tentatively agreed to in an incomplete draft. The Saturday developments delay the imposition of 25 percent tariffs on some $300 billion in Chinese imports.

In a more surprising move, Mr. Trump backtracked on a ban on sales of American equipment to Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant. “U.S. companies can sell their equipment to Huawei,” Mr. Trump said, explaining that he wanted to help American companies that had complained about the ban. In exchange, he said, China agreed to buy a “tremendous amount” of American food and agricultural products.

In May, the Commerce Department put Huawei on a blacklist that prohibits American companies from selling equipment to Huawei. The move was a major blow to Huawei, which relies on chips and other equipment from the United States.

South Korean soldiers on guard in May in the village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditKim Hong-Ji/Reuters

Mr. Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the Demilitarized Zone that separates North and South Korea on Sunday and publicly invited Mr. Kim, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there.

In a post on Twitter, Mr. Trump said he would be happy to see Mr. Kim.

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

[Read more about the stakes of Mr. Trump’s invitation]

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps and even his own advisers off balance, since his last meeting with Mr. Kim, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure. He told reporters that the tweet had been spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

In reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday that Mr. Trump had signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

President Trump portrayed Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of a Saudi dissident.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

No one is more important to Saudi efforts to rehabilitate Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman after the murder of Jamal Khashoggi than President Trump, who hosted the de facto Saudi ruler for a personal breakfast on Saturday where he lavished praise on the prince as a reformer opening up his society.

Mr. Trump’s actions sent a powerful signal to the rest of the world and represented a cold-eyed calculation that America’s relationship with Saudi Arabia was more important than the killing of one dissident.

Mr. Trump depicted the prince as a revolutionary figure who is modernizing his country and fighting terrorism. “It’s like a revolution in a very positive way,” Mr. Trump said. “I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done a really spectacular job.”

The president ignored questions from reporters about the prince’s role in the killing and dismemberment of Mr. Khashoggi last October. He also asserted that Prince Mohammed was “very unhappy about” the murder.

Mr. Trump’s own Central Intelligence Agency long ago concluded that the crown prince ordered the murder of Mr. Khashoggi, who was working as a columnist for The Washington Post while living in the United States, and a United Nations investigator recently pointed the finger at Prince Mohammed as well.

Climate change stood out as a clear area of dispute among the world leaders coming into the G20 summit in Osaka. Mr. Trump has signaled that the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord, while President Emmanuel Macron of France threatened this past week that he would not sign any joint statement unless it dealt with climate change, which he called a “red line.”

In a clear move to prevent the group from splintering, the final statement that leaders agreed to at the summit’s conclusion on Saturday reflected an agree-to-disagree approach. The statement said that those signatories that had confirmed their commitment to the pact at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires last year “reaffirm their commitment to its full implementation.”

But the statement also declared that the United States reiterated “its decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement because it disadvantages American workers and taxpayers.”

Prime Minister Shinzo of Abe of Japan, the host of the meeting, acknowledged after the end of the final general session that there had been “major differences in opinions” on climate change. “But to hand over a better planet to the next generation is shared by everyone,” Mr. Abe said, adding, “I believe what is important is to deliver outcomes.”

Climate activists expressed disappointment that the G20 had not been able to push for more aggressive targets.

Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Kamala Harris clashed during a Democratic debate on Thursday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Even from 7,000 miles away, Mr. Trump kept close tabs on his 2020 Democratic rivals.

The president demonstrated a close familiarity with a dramatic exchange on Thursday between Senator Kamala Harris of California and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Ms. Harris drew favorable reviews, particularly on the left, for her stinging attack on Mr. Biden’s history of opposing school integration through busing and his warm recollections of his work with segregationist senators.

Mr. Trump said he was less impressed: “I thought that she was given too much credit,” he said. “It wasn’t that outstanding.”

Mr. Trump also lashed out at a former president, Jimmy Carter, who had questioned the legitimacy of Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory by saying he had “no doubt” that Russia had meddled in the presidential election.

“He’s a nice man. He was a terrible president,” Mr. Trump said in response to a question during a news conference. He added: “I won not because of Russia, not because of anybody but myself.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Juggling High-Stakes Meetings Abroad, Trump Keeps an Eye on Rivals at Home

OSAKA, Japan — President Trump was nearly 7,000 miles from home and had just finished a packed schedule of meetings with world leaders. But he still kept an eye on the Democratic presidential contest back home.

At a news conference in Osaka, Japan on Saturday, at the end of the Group of 20 summit, Mr. Trump provided his analysis of a heated exchange between Senator Kamala Harris of California and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. during the Democratic presidential debates on Thursday, declaring that Ms. Harris had been given “too much credit” for challenging Mr. Biden.

He also lashed out at a former president, Jimmy Carter, who had questioned the legitimacy of Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory by saying Mr. Trump “didn’t actually win” the 2016 presidential election. Mr. Trump proclaimed Mr. Carter “a terrible president.”

And he warned that Democratic policies would bring economic disaster to the United States if he is defeated in next year’s election.

Although reporters broached the first two subjects, Mr. Trump made no effort to deflect them, and his response to the question about Ms. Harris and Mr. Biden revealed the keenness of his interest in the Democratic contest to find his 2020 challenger.

Ms. Harris received favorable reviews, particularly on the left, for her stinging attack on Mr. Biden’s history of opposing school integration through busing and his warm recollections of his work with segregationist senators.

Mr. Trump was less impressed.

“I thought that she was given too much credit,” Mr. Trump said. “It wasn’t that outstanding.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157117863_c9885289-dc60-46e4-8551-575667c26a0e-articleLarge Juggling High-Stakes Meetings Abroad, Trump Keeps an Eye on Rivals at Home United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Harris, Kamala D Group of Twenty Democratic Party Carter, Jimmy Biden, Joseph R Jr

Mr. Trump said that Senator Kamala Harris had been given “too much credit” for challenging former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. during the Democratic debates.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Speaking about the debates in an unusual level of detail for a sitting president, Mr. Trump criticized Ms. Harris for delivering what he called a scripted blow by invoking her personal experience as a young girl who was bused to school in California as part of an integration program.

“That was so out of the can, what she said. That thing was right out of the box,” Mr. Trump said. But he criticized Mr. Biden, too, saying that he “didn’t respond great” and adding, “This was not Winston Churchill we’re dealing with.”

Given that he has spent weeks attacking the former vice president, it was notable that Mr. Trump defended Mr. Biden, whom his advisers see as a dangerous adversary.

If Mr. Trump is feeling any fresh unease about Ms. Harris’s suddenly energized candidacy, he would not say so. Asked whether he thought Ms. Harris would be a “tough” general election opponent, Mr. Trump demurred.

“You never know who’s going to be tough, you never know,” he said, recalling that the crowded 2016 Republican primary field had played out in ways he was not expecting. “One who you think is going to be tough turns out to be not so much,” he said. “I’ve seen it.”

Pressed for his own view of court-ordered busing, Mr. Trump was vague, at one point observing that the use of buses “certainly is a primary method of getting people to schools.” He did hint at a critical view of the practice, saying that it “has been done with a hammer instead of a velvet glove.”

Mr. Trump’s ire was not reserved for Democrats with presidential ambitions. He also fumed at one of his predecessors.

Not for the first time, Mr. Trump showed deep frustration over the idea that he had not earned his 2016 election victory — a notion that Mr. Carter endorsed on Friday, making him among the most senior Democrats to do so.

Former President Jimmy Carter at church in Plains, Ga., this month. On Friday, he questioned the legitimacy of Mr. Trump’s election victory.CreditCurtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, via Associated Press

On Friday, Mr. Carter said that Russian election interference, “if fully investigated, would show that Trump didn’t actually win the election in 2016. He lost the election, and he was put into office because the Russians interfered on his behalf.”

Bucking a convention under which current and former presidents refrain from personal attacks against one another, Mr. Trump laced into the 94-year-old Mr. Carter.

“Russia, Russia, Russia,” Mr. Trump said with frustration when asked about Mr. Carter’s comments.

“Jimmy Carter, look. He’s a nice man. He was a terrible president,” Mr. Trump said, charging that Mr. Carter had been a weak negotiator with Tehran during the 1979-80 Iran hostage crisis. “He’s a Democrat, and it’s a typical talking point.”

“I won not because of Russia, not because of anybody but myself,” he added. “I went out and campaigned smarter, harder, better than Hillary Clinton.”

The American intelligence community concluded in 2017 that Russia had tried to assist Mr. Trump during the 2016 campaign, but did not address whether the Kremlin’s efforts might have swayed public opinion enough to tilt the election’s outcome. No evidence has emerged that the Russian meddling affected voting machines or the final vote count.

Mr. Trump set off an uproar on Friday after meeting in Osaka with the Russian president, Vladimir V. Putin, whom American intelligence officials say ordered the election interference. Asked whether he would ask Mr. Putin not to interfere with the 2020 election, Mr. Trump playfully wagged a finger and said to the Russian leader: “Don’t meddle in the election.”

Mr. Trump first mentioned his Democratic rivals in his remarks before taking questions, and warned that their policies would bring economic disaster to the United States should they be implemented.

But Mr. Trump suggested that he was glad to see the Democrats promote what he has previously called “socialist” views. “I want them to go and take these policies,” he said. “I don’t want them to change them anytime soon. Let them go and have a good time.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Offers Kim Jong-un a Last-Minute Invitation to Meet at the DMZ

OSAKA, Japan — President Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea on Sunday, and he publicly invited Kim Jong-un, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there for what would be their third get-together.

In a post on Twitter as he started the second of two days of meetings in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Trump said that during his next stop, in South Korea, he would be happy to greet Mr. Kim across the line that has divided Korea for nearly 75 years.

“I will be leaving Japan for South Korea (with President Moon),” the tweet said. “While there, if Chairman Kim of North Korea sees this, I would meet him at the Border/DMZ just to shake his hand and say Hello(?)!”

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

“I believe that if a North Korea-U.S. summit is realized on the line dividing Korea, as President Trump wishes, it will become another opportunity to deepen the friendship that exists between the two heads of state and to improve relations of the two nations,” Ms. Choe said.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 29trumpkim2-articleLarge Trump Offers Kim Jong-un a Last-Minute Invitation to Meet at the DMZ United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Korean Demilitarized Zone Kim Jong-un

South Korean soldiers on guard in May in the village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditKim Hong-Ji/Reuters

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps in Asia and the president’s own advisers off balance, since the last meeting between the two leaders, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure, and no further substantive talks have taken place. No serious preparations have been made for an encounter on Sunday.

But Mr. Trump likes to be unpredictable and has made clear repeatedly in recent days that he is eager to restart negotiations aimed at persuading North Korea to eliminate its nuclear arsenal. He told reporters that Saturday’s tweet was spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

In reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday after his tweet that Mr. Trump had signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday, saying he “might” try to meet with Mr. Kim during an already planned but secret trip to the DMZ. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

Mr. Trump flew to Seoul late Saturday afternoon and was to have dinner with President Moon Jae-in, a strong proponent of diplomacy with North Korea. His DMZ visit would take place on Sunday before he flies back to Washington.

Mr. Moon’s office issued a statement supporting more contact with Mr. Kim without confirming any meeting this weekend. “Nothing has been decided, but our position remains unchanged that we want dialogue to happen between North Korea and the U.S.,” the statement said.

Experts on the region said Mr. Trump’s flair for theater was not a substitute for a serious negotiation strategy. “It’s like ‘The Bachelor,’” said Michael Green, who was President George W. Bush’s Asia adviser. “But North Korea has stated clearly it will only denuclearize part of its weapons program, and this won’t change any of that even if they do shake hands.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

5 Takeaways From the G20 Summit: Easing Off the Trade War, for Now

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157182750_0429a038-22d8-4549-a912-00f0a8e8dcfe-articleLarge 5 Takeaways From the G20 Summit: Easing Off the Trade War, for Now United States International Relations Trump, Donald J South Korea Putin, Vladimir V Osaka (Japan) North Korea Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Japan Abe, Shinzo

The American and Chinese delegations on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

After meeting China’s leader, Xi Jinping, on the side lines of the G20 summit, Mr. Trump told reporters on Saturday: “We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track” with trade talks.

Mr. Trump also said that the United States would not impose any new tariffs on Chinese exports while the talks were underway, and that China had agreed to resume broad purchases of American farm products and other goods.

The negotiations broke down seven weeks ago, when the Chinese side said that it could not accept some provisions that had been tentatively agreed to in an incomplete draft. The Saturday developments delay the imposition of 25 percent tariffs on some $300 billion in Chinese imports.

In a more surprising move, Mr. Trump backtracked on a ban on sales of American equipment to Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant. “U.S. companies can sell their equipment to Huawei,” Mr. Trump said, explaining that he wanted to help American companies that had complained about the ban. In exchange, he said, China agreed to buy a “tremendous amount” of American food and agricultural products.

In May, the Commerce Department put Huawei on a blacklist that prohibits American companies from selling equipment to Huawei. The move was a major blow to Huawei, which relies on chips and other equipment from the United States.

South Korean soldiers on guard in May in the village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditKim Hong-Ji/Reuters

Mr. Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the Demilitarized Zone that separates North and South Korea on Sunday and publicly invited Mr. Kim, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there.

In a post on Twitter, Mr. Trump said he would be happy to see Mr. Kim.

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps and even his own advisers off balance, since his last meeting with Mr. Kim, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure. He told reporters that the tweet had been spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

In reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday that Mr. Trump had signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

President Trump portrayed Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of a Saudi dissident.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

No one is more important to Saudi efforts to rehabilitate Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman after the murder of Jamal Khashoggi than President Trump, who hosted the de facto Saudi ruler for a personal breakfast on Saturday where he lavished praise on the prince as a reformer opening up his society.

Mr. Trump’s actions sent a powerful signal to the rest of the world and represented a cold-eyed calculation that America’s relationship with Saudi Arabia was more important than the killing of one dissident.

Mr. Trump depicted the prince as a revolutionary figure who is modernizing his country and fighting terrorism. “It’s like a revolution in a very positive way,” Mr. Trump said. “I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done a really spectacular job.”

The president ignored questions from reporters about the prince’s role in the killing and dismemberment of Mr. Khashoggi last October. He also asserted that Prince Mohammed was “very unhappy about” the murder.

Mr. Trump’s own Central Intelligence Agency long ago concluded that the crown prince ordered the murder of Mr. Khashoggi, who was working as a columnist for The Washington Post while living in the United States, and a United Nations investigator recently pointed the finger at Prince Mohammed as well.

Climate change stood out as a clear area of dispute among the world leaders coming into the G20 summit in Osaka. President Trump has signaled that the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord, while President Emmanuel Macron of France threatened this past week that he would not sign any joint statement unless it dealt with climate change, which he called a “red line.”

In a clear move to prevent the group from splintering, the final statement that leaders agreed to at the summit’s conclusion on Saturday reflected an agree-to-disagree approach. The statement said that those signatories that had confirmed their commitment to the pact at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires last year “reaffirm their commitment to its full implementation.”

But the statement also declared that the United States reiterated “its decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement because it disadvantages American workers and taxpayers.”

Prime Minister Shinzo of Abe of Japan, the host of the meeting, acknowledged after the end of the final general session that there had been “major differences in opinions” on climate change. “But to hand over a better planet to the next generation is shared by everyone,” Mr. Abe said, adding, “I believe what is important is to deliver outcomes.”

Climate activists expressed disappointment that the G20 had not been able to push for more aggressive targets.

Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Kamala Harris clashed during a Democratic debate on Thursday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Even from 7,000 miles away, Mr. Trump kept close tabs on his 2020 Democratic rivals.

The president demonstrated a close familiarity with a dramatic exchange on Thursday between Senator Kamala Harris of California and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Ms. Harris drew favorable reviews, particularly on the left, for her stinging attack on Mr. Biden’s history of opposing school integration through busing and his warm recollections of his work with segregationist senators.

Mr. Trump said he was less impressed: “I thought that she was given too much credit,” he said. “It wasn’t that outstanding.”

Mr. Trump also lashed out at a former president, Jimmy Carter, who had questioned the legitimacy of Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory by saying he had “no doubt” that Russia had meddled in the presidential election.

“He’s a nice man. He was a terrible president,” Mr. Trump said in response to a question during a news conference. He added: “I won not because of Russia, not because of anybody but myself.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump and Xi Agree to Restart Trade Talks, Avoiding Escalation in Tariff War

OSAKA, Japan — President Trump and President Xi Jinping of China agreed on Saturday to resume trade talks after a seven-week breakdown, averting for now an escalation of their multibillion-dollar tariff war that has roiled global markets and threatened the future of the world’s two largest economies.

The agreement, brokered during more than an hour of discussion between the leaders, did not by itself signal any major breakthrough in resolving the fundamental conflict. But it represented a temporary cease-fire to give negotiators another chance to forge a permanent accord governing the vast flow of goods and services between the two nations.

“We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track,” Mr. Trump told reporters after his session with Mr. Xi on the sidelines of the annual summit meeting of the Group of 20 nations in Osaka, Japan. “We had a very, very good meeting with China,” the president added, “I would say probably even better than expected, and the negotiations are continuing.”

Mr. Trump promised to hold off on his threat to slap new 25 percent tariffs on $300 billion in Chinese imports, and he agreed to lift some restrictions on Huawei, the Chinese technology giant at the center of a dispute between the nations.

In exchange, he said, China agreed to buy a “tremendous amount” of American food and agricultural products. “We will give them a list of things we want them to buy,” he said.

Even as he returned to the negotiating table with China, Mr. Trump pursued a surprise initiative to lure North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, back into talks, as well. In response to his Twitter invitation to meet on Sunday at the Demilitarized Zone dividing North and South Korea, the president said Mr. Kim “was very receptive,” and the two sides scrambled on Saturday to see if they could arrange such an encounter at the last minute.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_151323855_8d92a9dc-b105-44ff-8cdd-12e6ab046d17-articleLarge Trump and Xi Agree to Restart Trade Talks, Avoiding Escalation in Tariff War Xi Jinping United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Osaka (Japan) Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Khashoggi, Jamal International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Group of Twenty

Mr. Trump meeting with the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“I understand we may be meeting with Chairman Kim,” Mr. Trump told reporters. “We won’t call it a summit. We’ll call it a handshake.” Asked if he would be willing to cross over the line into North Korea for that handshake, he said: “Sure I would. I feel very comfortable doing that. I would have no problem.”

For Mr. Trump, who loves the theater of international affairs and relishes unpredictability, such a head-snapping turn of events would be the capstone to an eventful trip to Asia. He has juggled a variety of high-stakes disputes over security, economics and other issues, while keeping an eye on the emerging Democratic presidential campaign back home.

His wrap-up news conference before leaving Osaka for Seoul was a quintessential Trump performance. He roamed widely, sometimes in free association, weighing in not just on Asian issues, but also on the border situation at home, various court battles and his economic record. And for good measure, he threw in an unprovoked jab at Hillary Clinton, still his favorite punching bag.

Mr. Trump also left behind a stink bomb for his host, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan, divulging that he had told the premier that the 68-year-old Japanese-American defense treaty, which has long been the foundation of the relationship between the two nations, should be overhauled. It is, in his view, not fair to the United States. “I told him, ‘We’ll have to change it,’” he said.

A meeting with Mr. Kim, following two others in the past year over his nuclear arsenal, would not be his only session with an authoritarian ruler during his visit to the region. During his news conference on Saturday, he defended his approach to meetings with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia and the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman.

He issued a particularly strong defense of Prince Mohammed, all but exonerating him in the murder and dismemberment of Jamal Khashoggi, the Saudi dissident and columnist for The Washington Post.

“Nobody has directly pointed a finger” at the crown prince, Mr. Trump said, ignoring the fact that American and international intelligence agencies have done just that. His own C.I.A. has determined that Prince Mohammed ordered the killing, and a United Nations investigator found credible evidence to make a similar conclusion.

The village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditLee Jin-Man/Associated Press

Instead, Mr. Trump indicated that he accepted the crown prince’s explanation that the Saudi government was prosecuting those who committed the murder. “A lot of people are being prosecuted, and they’re taking it very seriously there,” the president said. He asserted that Prince Mohammed was upset over the murder. “He’s very angry about it,” Mr. Trump said. “He’s very unhappy about it.”

As for Mr. Putin, he again brushed off the intelligence agencies’ conclusion that Russia had interfered in the 2016 election on his behalf. A day after making light of it by jokingly telling Mr. Putin in front of cameras “don’t meddle in the election,” Mr. Trump dismissed criticism that he was not taking it seriously enough. “I did say it,” he argued.

He said the issue came up in his private conversation with Mr. Putin, but noted that the Russian leader had again denied it, an assertion with which he did not publicly quarrel. Indeed, Mr. Trump said he might accept an invitation by Mr. Putin to visit Moscow next spring for the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II.

He also tried to smooth over a rift with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey about his country’s purchase of S-400 missile defense systems from Russia. Mr. Trump blamed President Barack Obama’s administration for the dispute and acknowledged that he might have to impose sanctions required by law, but said he hoped to avoid that.

“It’s a problem, there’s no question about it,” Mr. Trump said with Mr. Erdogan at his side as the two prepared to meet behind closed doors. “We’re looking at different solutions.”

But the talks with China, with so much at stake for both sides, were the centerpiece of the trip.

The latest pause in the trade war seemed to be a repeat of sorts of what happened at the last G20 summit meeting, in December in Buenos Aires. There, Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi also met and agreed to postpone further tariffs pending negotiations and more soybean purchases by Beijing. The question is whether the new opening will yield any better result.

The “two sides are highly harmonious, and the areas of cooperation are broad,” Mr. Xi said, according to The People’s Daily, an official Chinese news outlet. “They should not fall into the trap of so-called conflict confrontation, but should promote each other and develop together.”

Mr. Trump and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia at the G20 summit on Friday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

The biggest question over Saturday’s deal involved what exactly Mr. Trump had agreed to do for Huawei, which the United States has called a security threat. Mr. Trump said that he would allow more sales of American components to the telecom giant, and that the Commerce Department would soon review its legal measures restricting these exports.

But Mr. Trump did not say what would happen to pending Justice Department actions against the company and one of its executives, both of whom have denied wrongdoing.

Trade talks collapsed in May when China’s leadership became uncomfortable with many provisions in the draft text of a deal. Particularly contentious were draft provisions calling for China’s legislature to enact many amendments to Chinese laws.

The United States had insisted on the amendments as a way to make it more likely that Chinese government agencies would abide by promises made by Chinese negotiators. But a nationalistic backlash within the Chinese government prompted Chinese negotiators to send a new version of the draft agreement to American negotiators that deleted extensive passages.

Trade talks then broke down a week later, and Mr. Trump responded by raising tariffs on $200 billion a year in Chinese imports. He also threatened to slap 25 percent tariffs on another $300 billion a year worth of American imports from China. Beijing retaliated with its own tariffs.

Scott Kennedy, a China specialist at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said resuming trade talks and pausing further American tariffs still left the two sides with broad differences. In parallel with raising tariffs over the past year, the Trump administration has also imposed ever tighter limits on the sale of American high-tech products to China and on Chinese investment in the United States.

“They are more likely to continue going around in circles rather than reaching the destination of a real deal,” Mr. Kennedy said. “Neither side looks ready to compromise; meanwhile, the tech war will continue to intensify. This is a truce on only one front of the wider conflict.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump and Xi Agree to Restart Trade Talks, Avoiding Escalation in Tariff War

OSAKA, Japan — President Trump and President Xi Jinping of China agreed on Saturday to resume trade talks after a seven-week breakdown, averting for now an escalation of their multibillion-dollar tariff war that has roiled global markets and threatened the future of the world’s two largest economies.

The agreement, brokered during more than an hour of discussion between the leaders, did not by itself signal any major breakthrough in resolving the fundamental conflict. But it represented a temporary cease-fire to give negotiators another chance to forge a permanent accord governing the vast flow of goods and services between the two nations.

“We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track,” Mr. Trump told reporters after his session with Mr. Xi on the sidelines of the annual summit meeting of the Group of 20 nations in Osaka, Japan. “We had a very, very good meeting with China,” the president added, “I would say probably even better than expected, and the negotiations are continuing.”

Mr. Trump promised to hold off on his threat to slap new 25 percent tariffs on $300 billion in Chinese imports, and he agreed to lift some restrictions on Huawei, the Chinese technology giant at the center of a dispute between the nations.

In exchange, he said, China agreed to buy a “tremendous amount” of American food and agricultural products. “We will give them a list of things we want them to buy,” he said.

Even as he returned to the negotiating table with China, Mr. Trump pursued a surprise initiative to lure North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, back into talks, as well. In response to his Twitter invitation to meet on Sunday at the Demilitarized Zone dividing North and South Korea, the president said Mr. Kim “was very receptive,” and the two sides scrambled on Saturday to see if they could arrange such an encounter at the last minute.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_151323855_8d92a9dc-b105-44ff-8cdd-12e6ab046d17-articleLarge Trump and Xi Agree to Restart Trade Talks, Avoiding Escalation in Tariff War Xi Jinping United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Osaka (Japan) Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Khashoggi, Jamal International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Group of Twenty

Mr. Trump meeting with the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“I understand we may be meeting with Chairman Kim,” Mr. Trump told reporters. “We won’t call it a summit. We’ll call it a handshake.” Asked if he would be willing to cross over the line into North Korea for that handshake, he said: “Sure I would. I feel very comfortable doing that. I would have no problem.”

For Mr. Trump, who loves the theater of international affairs and relishes unpredictability, such a head-snapping turn of events would be the capstone to an eventful trip to Asia. He has juggled a variety of high-stakes disputes over security, economics and other issues, while keeping an eye on the emerging Democratic presidential campaign back home.

His wrap-up news conference before leaving Osaka for Seoul was a quintessential Trump performance. He roamed widely, sometimes in free association, weighing in not just on Asian issues, but also on the border situation at home, various court battles and his economic record. And for good measure, he threw in an unprovoked jab at Hillary Clinton, still his favorite punching bag.

Mr. Trump also left behind a stink bomb for his host, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan, divulging that he had told the premier that the 68-year-old Japanese-American defense treaty, which has long been the foundation of the relationship between the two nations, should be overhauled. It is, in his view, not fair to the United States. “I told him, ‘We’ll have to change it,’” he said.

A meeting with Mr. Kim, following two others in the past year over his nuclear arsenal, would not be his only session with an authoritarian ruler during his visit to the region. During his news conference on Saturday, he defended his approach to meetings with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia and the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman.

He issued a particularly strong defense of Prince Mohammed, all but exonerating him in the murder and dismemberment of Jamal Khashoggi, the Saudi dissident and columnist for The Washington Post.

“Nobody has directly pointed a finger” at the crown prince, Mr. Trump said, ignoring the fact that American and international intelligence agencies have done just that. His own C.I.A. has determined that Prince Mohammed ordered the killing, and a United Nations investigator found credible evidence to make a similar conclusion.

The village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditLee Jin-Man/Associated Press

Instead, Mr. Trump indicated that he accepted the crown prince’s explanation that the Saudi government was prosecuting those who committed the murder. “A lot of people are being prosecuted, and they’re taking it very seriously there,” the president said. He asserted that Prince Mohammed was upset over the murder. “He’s very angry about it,” Mr. Trump said. “He’s very unhappy about it.”

As for Mr. Putin, he again brushed off the intelligence agencies’ conclusion that Russia had interfered in the 2016 election on his behalf. A day after making light of it by jokingly telling Mr. Putin in front of cameras “don’t meddle in the election,” Mr. Trump dismissed criticism that he was not taking it seriously enough. “I did say it,” he argued.

He said the issue came up in his private conversation with Mr. Putin, but noted that the Russian leader had again denied it, an assertion with which he did not publicly quarrel. Indeed, Mr. Trump said he might accept an invitation by Mr. Putin to visit Moscow next spring for the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II.

He also tried to smooth over a rift with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey about his country’s purchase of S-400 missile defense systems from Russia. Mr. Trump blamed President Barack Obama’s administration for the dispute and acknowledged that he might have to impose sanctions required by law, but said he hoped to avoid that.

“It’s a problem, there’s no question about it,” Mr. Trump said with Mr. Erdogan at his side as the two prepared to meet behind closed doors. “We’re looking at different solutions.”

But the talks with China, with so much at stake for both sides, were the centerpiece of the trip.

The latest pause in the trade war seemed to be a repeat of sorts of what happened at the last G20 summit meeting, in December in Buenos Aires. There, Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi also met and agreed to postpone further tariffs pending negotiations and more soybean purchases by Beijing. The question is whether the new opening will yield any better result.

The “two sides are highly harmonious, and the areas of cooperation are broad,” Mr. Xi said, according to The People’s Daily, an official Chinese news outlet. “They should not fall into the trap of so-called conflict confrontation, but should promote each other and develop together.”

Mr. Trump and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia at the G20 summit on Friday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

The biggest question over Saturday’s deal involved what exactly Mr. Trump had agreed to do for Huawei, which the United States has called a security threat. Mr. Trump said that he would allow more sales of American components to the telecom giant, and that the Commerce Department would soon review its legal measures restricting these exports.

But Mr. Trump did not say what would happen to pending Justice Department actions against the company and one of its executives, both of whom have denied wrongdoing.

Trade talks collapsed in May when China’s leadership became uncomfortable with many provisions in the draft text of a deal. Particularly contentious were draft provisions calling for China’s legislature to enact many amendments to Chinese laws.

The United States had insisted on the amendments as a way to make it more likely that Chinese government agencies would abide by promises made by Chinese negotiators. But a nationalistic backlash within the Chinese government prompted Chinese negotiators to send a new version of the draft agreement to American negotiators that deleted extensive passages.

Trade talks then broke down a week later, and Mr. Trump responded by raising tariffs on $200 billion a year in Chinese imports. He also threatened to slap 25 percent tariffs on another $300 billion a year worth of American imports from China. Beijing retaliated with its own tariffs.

Scott Kennedy, a China specialist at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said resuming trade talks and pausing further American tariffs still left the two sides with broad differences. In parallel with raising tariffs over the past year, the Trump administration has also imposed ever tighter limits on the sale of American high-tech products to China and on Chinese investment in the United States.

“They are more likely to continue going around in circles rather than reaching the destination of a real deal,” Mr. Kennedy said. “Neither side looks ready to compromise; meanwhile, the tech war will continue to intensify. This is a truce on only one front of the wider conflict.”

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G20 Live Updates: U.S. and China Agree to Restart Trade Talks

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157182750_0429a038-22d8-4549-a912-00f0a8e8dcfe-articleLarge G20 Live Updates: U.S. and China Agree to Restart Trade Talks Xi Jinping United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Russia Putin, Vladimir V Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Khashoggi, Jamal Japan International Trade and World Market International Relations Group of Twenty China

President Trump and President Xi Jinping of China led a bilateral meeting in Osaka, Japan, on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

The United States and China have agreed to resume trade talks, President Trump said on Saturday after meeting with Xi Jinping, China’s top leader, during the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

During a news conference on Saturday afternoon, Mr. Trump said that the United States would not impose any new tariffs on Chinese exports as the talks resume.

The negotiations had broken down seven weeks ago when the Chinese side said that it could not accept some provisions that had been tentatively agreed to in an incomplete draft text.

“We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track,” Mr. Trump told reporters early Saturday afternoon following his meeting with President Xi.

Mr. Trump later added, “We had a very, very good meeting with China, I would say probably even better than expected, and the negotiations are continuing.”

“The interests of the two sides are highly integrated and the areas of cooperation are broad,” Mr. Xi said, according to the People’s Daily, the main newspaper of China’s ruling Communist Party. “They should not fall into the trap of so-called conflict and confrontation, but should promote each other and develop together.”

When talks broke down in early May, Mr. Trump had directed his aides to make the legal preparations to put 25 percent tariffs on another $300 billion a year worth of American imports from China. Those tariffs would be in addition to the 25 percent tariffs that the Trump administration has already imposed on $250 billion a year of Chinese goods.

Mr. Trump and his aides had not specified a date when he might actually impose the tariffs on the additional $300 billion. Mr. Trump did not mention these tariffs during his remarks to reporters early Saturday afternoon, saying that he would host a full news conference two hours later.

South Korean soldiers on guard in May in the village of Panmunjom, which lies inside the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas.CreditKim Hong-Ji/Reuters

President Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea on Sunday and publicly invited Kim Jong-un, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there for what would be their third get-together.

In a post on Twitter as he started the second of two days of meetings in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Trump said that during his next stop, in South Korea, he would be happy to greet Mr. Kim across the line that has divided Korea for nearly 75 years.

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps in Asia and even the president’s own advisers off balance, since the last meeting between the two leaders, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure, and no further substantive talks have taken place.

But Mr. Trump likes to be unpredictable and has made clear repeatedly in recent days that he is eager to restart negotiations aimed at persuading North Korea to eliminate its nuclear arsenal. He told reporters that Saturday morning’s tweet was spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

And yet, in reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday after his tweet that Mr. Trump had actually signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday, saying he “might” try to meet with Mr. Kim during an already planned but secret trip to the DMZ. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

Mr. Moon’s office issued a statement supporting more contact with Mr. Kim without confirming any meeting this weekend. “Nothing has been decided, but our position remains unchanged that we want dialogue to happen between North Korea and the U.S.,” the statement said.

President Trump portrayed Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of a Saudi dissident.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Trump lavished praise on Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia on Saturday, depicting him as a revolutionary figure who is modernizing his country and fighting terrorism, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of the writer Jamal Khashoggi.

Hosting Prince Mohammed for breakfast, Mr. Trump ignored questions from reporters about the prince’s role in the killing and dismemberment of Mr. Khashoggi, an American resident, last October. Instead, the president portrayed the crown prince as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, specifically citing more freedom for women.

“It’s like a revolution in a very positive way,” Mr. Trump told the crown prince. “I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done a really spectacular job.”

The president also credited the Saudi royal family with cutting off aid to terrorist and extremist groups. “All of the money that was going for groups we don’t like has ceased, and I appreciate that very much,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ve carefully followed it, we’ve studied it very carefully and you have actually stopped.”

Under Prince Mohammed, Saudi Arabia finally granted women the right to drive a year ago, but progress toward more expansive women’s rights remains scant, and activists fighting for such rights have been arrested and face trial. In April, Prince Mohammed expanded his crackdown on even mild dissent with the arrests of at least nine intellectuals, journalists, activists and their relatives, including two with dual American citizenship.

The C.I.A. has concluded that Prince Mohammed ordered the murder of Mr. Khashoggi, a longtime Saudi dissident who was working as a columnist for The Washington Post while living in the United States. A United Nations investigator last week pointed the finger at Prince Mohammed as well.

While not addressing that on Saturday, Mr. Trump has recently played down the murder, saying that American arms sales to Saudi Arabia were too important to disrupt.

President Trump and President Xi Jinping of China at the G20 summit on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Although Mr. Trump has often praised President Xi Jinping of China, and declared they “will always be friends,” relations between Washington and Beijing have strained amid their bruising trade war.

Tariffs have been raised, tech companies have been blacklisted and American officials have argued around the world that a Chinese telecommunications giant poses a security threat to the West. The trade war is chilling business and investment almost everywhere, worsening a global economic slowdown.

American and Chinese officials appeared to be on the verge of a deal in April, but talks collapsed in May, after Beijing rejected some of the Trump administration’s demands. Since then, both Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi appear to have hardened their positions, leaving it unclear how they might resolve the tensions.

“At a minimum, it will be productive,” Mr. Trump said on Friday about the meeting.

Although he has played it cool ahead of the meeting, one factor that could be pushing Mr. Trump toward a deal with China is that his trade policies are broadly unpopular with American voters.

Large majorities of Democrats and independents say the tariffs Mr. Trump has imposed on Chinese goods — and the retaliatory tariffs that China has imposed on American products — will be bad for the United States, according to a survey this month for The New York Times by the online research platform SurveyMonkey.

Republicans still mostly support Mr. Trump’s trade policies, but there are cracks showing. A majority of Republicans said they expected tariffs to lead to higher prices for American consumers. Only among the president’s strongest supporters do a plurality believe his policies will bring back manufacturing jobs without raising prices, as Mr. Trump has claimed.

Over all, 53 percent of Americans say the China tariffs will be bad for the United States, compared with 43 percent who say the tariffs will be a good thing.

Most voters don’t put trade high on their list of top issues, however, and it barely came up at the first Democratic presidential debates this week. But if the trade war starts to damage the broader American economy, then all bets are off.

President Trump with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia on Friday in Osaka.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, amid meetings with President Trump and other leaders, has drawn attention for his remarks in an interview published on Friday — and for his bonhomie with Mr. Trump, who seemed to joke about being rid of journalists.

First, The Financial Times on Friday published an interview with Mr. Putin, in which he declared “the liberal idea” had “outlived its purpose.” He said that Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany had erred in allowing a million refugees into her country, and that Mr. Trump was right in trying to halt migrants from Central America.

“The liberal idea has become obsolete. It has come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population,” he said. In a conference call with Russian-based reporters, Mr. Putin’s spokesman later clarified that Mr. Putin was not criticizing the liberal political order per se but what he saw as efforts by Western leaders to impose it to the exclusion of other political systems.

And in opening remarks before a meeting with Mr. Trump, Mr. Putin listened cheerily to an apparent joke about getting rid of journalists in Russia. “Get rid of them,” Mr. Trump said of reporters. “Fake news is a great term, isn’t it? You don’t have this problem in Russia, but we do.”

Mr. Putin responded that “it’s the same” in Russia. The Committee to Protect Journalists has documented the untimely deaths of 58 journalists in Russia in the post-Soviet period, many of them by murder or unexplained accidents.

President Trump appeared to make light of Russia’s interference in the 2016 election on Friday as he met with President Vladimir V. Putin — seeming to again dismiss the conclusions of American intelligence agencies and the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

At the opening remarks before the leaders’ meeting, a reporter asked whether Mr. Trump would tell Russia not to meddle in American elections. “Yes, of course I will,” he answered.

Turning to Mr. Putin, he said with a slight grin, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

Mr. Putin smiled, and Mr. Trump pointed at another Russian official, repeating, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

The remarks risked another domestic political backlash like the one Mr. Trump endured after the leaders’ last official meeting in Helsinki, Finland, when Mr. Trump, standing at Mr. Putin’s side, challenged the conclusion of his own intelligence agencies about the Russian election operation and credited the Kremlin leader’s “extremely strong and powerful” denial.

Before their meeting on Friday, the presidents said they would discuss trade, arms control and other issues. A written summary of the meeting by the White House indicated that they had spoken about Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Ukraine as well — nations where the United States and Russia are at odds — but there was no mention of election interference or an international investigation that pointed to Russia in the 2014 downing of a passenger jet over Ukraine.

Reporting was contributed by Michael Crowley, Peter Baker, Keith Bradsher and Motoko Rich from Osaka, Japan, Jane Perlez from Beijing, Choe Sang-Hun from Seoul, South Korea, Andrew Kramer from Moscow and Ben Casselman from New York.

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Trump Invites Kim Jong-un to Meet Him at the DMZ on Sunday

Westlake Legal Group 29trumpkim-img-facebookJumbo Trump Invites Kim Jong-un to Meet Him at the DMZ on Sunday United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Korean Demilitarized Zone Kim Jong-un

OSAKA, Japan — President Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea on Sunday, and he publicly invited Kim Jong-un, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there for what would be their third get-together.

In a post on Twitter as he started the second of two days of meetings in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Trump said that during his next stop, in South Korea, he would be happy to greet Mr. Kim across the line that has divided Korea for nearly 75 years.

“I will be leaving Japan for South Korea (with President Moon),” the tweet said. “While there, if Chairman Kim of North Korea sees this, I would meet him at the Border/DMZ just to shake his hand and say Hello(?)!”

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

“I believe that if a North Korea-U.S. summit is realized on the line dividing Korea, as President Trump wishes, it will become another opportunity to deepen the friendship that exists between the two heads of state and to improve relations of the two nations,” Ms. Choe said.

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps in Asia and even the president’s own advisers off balance, since the last meeting between the two leaders, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure, and no further substantive talks have taken place. No serious preparations have been made for an encounter on Sunday.

But Mr. Trump likes to be unpredictable and has made clear repeatedly in recent days that he is eager to restart negotiations aimed at persuading North Korea to eliminate its nuclear arsenal. He told reporters that Saturday morning’s tweet was spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

And yet, in reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday after his tweet that Mr. Trump had actually signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday, saying he “might” try to meet with Mr. Kim during an already planned but secret trip to the DMZ. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

Mr. Trump is scheduled to fly to Seoul late Saturday afternoon and have dinner with President Moon Jae-in, a strong proponent of diplomacy with North Korea. His DMZ visit would take place on Sunday before he flies back to Washington.

Mr. Moon’s office issued a statement supporting more contact with Mr. Kim without confirming any meeting this weekend. “Nothing has been decided, but our position remains unchanged that we want dialogue to happen between North Korea and the U.S.,” the statement said.

Experts on the region said Mr. Trump’s flair for theater was not a substitute for a serious negotiation strategy. “It’s like ‘The Bachelor,’” said Michael Green, who was President George W. Bush’s Asia adviser. “But North Korea has stated clearly it will only denuclearize part of its weapons program, and this won’t change any of that even if they do shake hands.”

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G20 Live Updates: China Says U.S. Agrees to Restart Trade Talks

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157174200_425b4539-8a41-4bba-b12c-5d6d1ab5349d-articleLarge G20 Live Updates: China Says U.S. Agrees to Restart Trade Talks Xi Jinping United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Russia Putin, Vladimir V Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Khashoggi, Jamal Japan International Trade and World Market International Relations Group of Twenty China

President Trump and the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, fourth from left, during a working breakfast at the G20 summit on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

China and the United States have agreed to resume trade talks, official Chinese media announced Saturday after President Trump and Xi Jinping, China’s top leader, held an 80-minute meeting during the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

The talks had broken down seven weeks ago when the Chinese side said that it could not accept some provisions that had been tentatively agreed to in an incomplete draft text.

“We discussed a lot of things, and we’re right back on track,” Mr. Trump told reporters early Saturday afternoon following his meeting with President Xi.

Mr. Trump later added, “We had a very, very good meeting with China, I would say probably even better than expected, and the negotiations are continuing.”

China’s official Xinhua News Agency provided more detail, saying that the two sides had also agreed that the United States would not impose any new tariffs.

When talks broke down in early May, Mr. Trump had directed his aides to make the legal preparations to put 25 percent tariffs on another $300 billion a year worth of American imports from China. Those tariffs would be in addition to the 25 percent tariffs that the Trump administration has already imposed on $250 billion a year of Chinese goods.

Mr. Trump and his aides had not specified a date when he might actually impose the tariffs on the additional $300 billion. Mr. Trump did not mention these tariffs during his remarks to reporters early Saturday afternoon, saying that he would host a full news conference two hours later.

President Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea on Sunday and publicly invited Kim Jong-un, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there for what would be their third get-together.

In a post on Twitter as he started the second of two days of meetings in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Trump said that during his next stop, in South Korea, he would be happy to greet Mr. Kim across the line that has divided Korea for nearly 75 years.

North Korea indicated on Saturday that it would welcome such a meeting.

“I consider this a very interesting suggestion, but we have not received any official proposal,” Choe Son-hui, North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, said in a brief statement carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency.

“I believe that if a North Korea-U.S. summit is realized on the line dividing Korea, as President Trump wishes, it will become another opportunity to deepen the friendship that exists between the two heads of state and to improve relations of the two nations,” Ms. Choe said.

Mr. Trump’s tweet caught the diplomatic corps in Asia and even the president’s own advisers off balance, since the last meeting between the two leaders, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure, and no further substantive talks have taken place. No serious preparations have been made for an encounter on Sunday.

But Mr. Trump likes to be unpredictable and has made clear repeatedly in recent days that he is eager to restart negotiations aimed at persuading North Korea to eliminate its nuclear arsenal. He told reporters that Saturday morning’s tweet was spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

And yet, in reality, he had been toying with the idea for days. The Hill, a Capitol Hill news organization, reported on Saturday after his tweet that Mr. Trump had actually signaled his interest in the idea during an interview on Monday, saying he “might” try to meet with Mr. Kim during an already planned but secret trip to the DMZ. The White House asked that his comment not be reported because of security concerns.

Mr. Trump is scheduled to fly to Seoul late Saturday afternoon and have dinner with President Moon Jae-in, a strong proponent of diplomacy with North Korea. His DMZ visit would take place on Sunday before he flies back to Washington.

Mr. Moon’s office issued a statement supporting more contact with Mr. Kim without confirming any meeting this weekend. “Nothing has been decided, but our position remains unchanged that we want dialogue to happen between North Korea and the U.S.,” the statement said.

Experts on the region said Mr. Trump’s flair for theater was not a substitute for a serious negotiation strategy. “It’s like ‘The Bachelor,’” said Michael Green, who was President George W. Bush’s Asia adviser. “But North Korea has stated clearly it will only denuclearize part of its weapons program, and this won’t change any of that even if they do shake hands.”

President Trump lavished praise on Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia on Saturday, depicting him as a revolutionary figure who is modernizing his country and fighting terrorism, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of the writer Jamal Khashoggi.

Hosting Prince Mohammed for breakfast, Mr. Trump ignored questions from reporters about the prince’s role in the killing and dismemberment of Mr. Khashoggi, an American resident, last October. Instead, the president portrayed the crown prince as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, specifically citing more freedom for women.

“It’s like a revolution in a very positive way,” Mr. Trump told the crown prince. “I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done a really spectacular job.”

The president also credited the Saudi royal family with cutting off aid to terrorist and extremist groups. “All of the money that was going for groups we don’t like has ceased, and I appreciate that very much,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ve carefully followed it, we’ve studied it very carefully and you have actually stopped.”

Under Prince Mohammed, Saudi Arabia finally granted women the right to drive a year ago, but progress toward more expansive women’s rights remains scant, and activists fighting for such rights have been arrested and face trial. In April, Prince Mohammed expanded his crackdown on even mild dissent with the arrests of at least nine intellectuals, journalists, activists and their relatives, including two with dual American citizenship.

The C.I.A. has concluded that Prince Mohammed ordered the murder of Mr. Khashoggi, a longtime Saudi dissident who was working as a columnist for The Washington Post while living in the United States. A United Nations investigator last week pointed the finger at Prince Mohammed as well.

While not addressing that on Saturday, Mr. Trump has recently played down the murder, saying that American arms sales to Saudi Arabia were too important to disrupt.

Although Mr. Trump has often praised President Xi Jinping of China, and declared they “will always be friends,” relations between Washington and Beijing have strained amid their bruising trade war.

Tariffs have been raised, tech companies have been blacklisted and American officials have argued around the world that a Chinese telecommunications giant poses a security threat to the West. The trade war is chilling business and investment almost everywhere, worsening a global economic slowdown.

American and Chinese officials appeared to be on the verge of a deal in April, but talks collapsed in May, after Beijing rejected some of the Trump administration’s demands. Since then, both Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi appear to have hardened their positions, leaving it unclear how they might resolve the tensions.

“At a minimum, it will be productive,” Mr. Trump said on Friday about the meeting.

Although he has played it cool ahead of the meeting, one factor that could be pushing Mr. Trump toward a deal with China is that his trade policies are broadly unpopular with American voters.

Large majorities of Democrats and independents say the tariffs Mr. Trump has imposed on Chinese goods — and the retaliatory tariffs that China has imposed on American products — will be bad for the United States, according to a survey this month for The New York Times by the online research platform SurveyMonkey.

Republicans still mostly support Mr. Trump’s trade policies, but there are cracks showing. A majority of Republicans said they expected tariffs to lead to higher prices for American consumers. Only among the president’s strongest supporters do a plurality believe his policies will bring back manufacturing jobs without raising prices, as Mr. Trump has claimed.

Over all, 53 percent of Americans say the China tariffs will be bad for the United States, compared with 43 percent who say the tariffs will be a good thing.

Most voters don’t put trade high on their list of top issues, however, and it barely came up at the first Democratic presidential debates this week. But if the trade war starts to damage the broader American economy, then all bets are off.

President Trump with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia on Friday in Osaka.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, amid meetings with President Trump and other leaders, has drawn attention for his remarks in an interview published on Friday — and for his bonhomie with Mr. Trump, who seemed to joke about being rid of journalists.

First, The Financial Times on Friday published an interview with Mr. Putin, in which he declared “the liberal idea” had “outlived its purpose.” He said that Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany had erred in allowing a million refugees into her country, and that Mr. Trump was right in trying to halt migrants from Central America.

“The liberal idea has become obsolete. It has come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population,” he said. In a conference call with Russian-based reporters, Mr. Putin’s spokesman later clarified that Mr. Putin was not criticizing the liberal political order per se but what he saw as efforts by Western leaders to impose it to the exclusion of other political systems.

And in opening remarks before a meeting with Mr. Trump, Mr. Putin listened cheerily to an apparent joke about getting rid of journalists in Russia. “Get rid of them,” Mr. Trump said of reporters. “Fake news is a great term, isn’t it? You don’t have this problem in Russia, but we do.”

Mr. Putin responded that “it’s the same” in Russia. The Committee to Protect Journalists has documented the untimely deaths of 58 journalists in Russia in the post-Soviet period, many of them by murder or unexplained accidents.

President Trump appeared to make light of Russia’s interference in the 2016 election on Friday as he met with President Vladimir V. Putin — seeming to again dismiss the conclusions of American intelligence agencies and the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

At the opening remarks before the leaders’ meeting, a reporter asked whether Mr. Trump would tell Russia not to meddle in American elections. “Yes, of course I will,” he answered.

Turning to Mr. Putin, he said with a slight grin, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

Mr. Putin smiled, and Mr. Trump pointed at another Russian official, repeating, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

The remarks risked another domestic political backlash like the one Mr. Trump endured after the leaders’ last official meeting in Helsinki, Finland, when Mr. Trump, standing at Mr. Putin’s side, challenged the conclusion of his own intelligence agencies about the Russian election operation and credited the Kremlin leader’s “extremely strong and powerful” denial.

Before their meeting on Friday, the presidents said they would discuss trade, arms control and other issues. A written summary of the meeting by the White House indicated that they had spoken about Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Ukraine as well — nations where the United States and Russia are at odds — but there was no mention of election interference or an international investigation that pointed to Russia in the 2014 downing of a passenger jet over Ukraine.

Reporting was contributed by Michael Crowley, Peter Baker, Keith Bradsher and Motoko Rich from Osaka, Japan, Jane Perlez from Beijing, Choe Sang-Hun from Seoul, South Korea, Andrew Kramer from Moscow and Ben Casselman from New York.

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G20 Live Updates: Trump Invites North Korea’s Leader to Meet Him at DMZ

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ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157174200_425b4539-8a41-4bba-b12c-5d6d1ab5349d-articleLarge G20 Live Updates: Trump Invites North Korea’s Leader to Meet Him at DMZ Xi Jinping United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Russia Putin, Vladimir V Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Kim Jong-un Khashoggi, Jamal Japan International Trade and World Market International Relations Group of Twenty China

President Trump and the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, fourth from left, during a working breakfast at the G20 summit on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Trump said on Saturday that he would visit the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea on Sunday and publicly invited Kim Jong-un, the North’s iron-fisted leader, to meet him there for what would be their third get-together.

In a post on Twitter as he started the second of two days of meetings in Osaka, Japan, Mr. Trump said that during his next stop, in South Korea, he would be happy to greet Mr. Kim across the line that has divided Korea for nearly 75 years.

The tweet caught the diplomatic corps in Asia and even the president’s own advisers off balance, since the last meeting between the two leaders, in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, ended in dramatic failure, and no further substantive talks have taken place. No serious preparations have been made for an encounter on Sunday.

But Mr. Trump likes to be unpredictable and has made clear repeatedly in recent days that he is eager to restart negotiations aimed at persuading North Korea to eliminate its nuclear arsenal. He told reporters that Saturday morning’s tweet was spontaneous. “I just thought of it this morning,” he said. “We’ll be there, and I just put out a feeler.”

Mr. Trump is scheduled to fly to Seoul late Saturday afternoon and have dinner with President Moon Jae-in, a strong proponent of diplomacy with North Korea. His DMZ visit would take place on Sunday before he flies back to Washington.

Mr. Moon’s office issued a statement supporting more contact with Mr. Kim without confirming any meeting this weekend. “Nothing has been decided, but our position remains unchanged that we want dialogue to happen between North Korea and the U.S.,” the statement said.

Experts on the region said Mr. Trump’s flair for theater was not a substitute for a serious negotiation strategy. “It’s like ‘The Bachelor,’” said Michael Green, who was President George W. Bush’s Asia adviser. “But North Korea has stated clearly it will only denuclearize part of its weapons program, and this won’t change any of that even if they do shake hands.”

President Trump lavished praise on Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia on Saturday, depicting him as a revolutionary figure who is modernizing his country and fighting terrorism, while ignoring evidence of his complicity in the murder of the writer Jamal Khashoggi.

Hosting Prince Mohammed for breakfast, Mr. Trump ignored questions from reporters about the prince’s role in the killing and dismemberment of Mr. Khashoggi, an American resident, last October. Instead, the president portrayed the crown prince as a reformer opening up a long-closed society, specifically citing more freedom for women.

“It’s like a revolution in a very positive way,” Mr. Trump told the crown prince. “I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done a really spectacular job.”

The president also credited the Saudi royal family with cutting off aid to terrorist and extremist groups. “All of the money that was going for groups we don’t like has ceased, and I appreciate that very much,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ve carefully followed it, we’ve studied it very carefully and you have actually stopped.”

Under Prince Mohammed, Saudi Arabia finally granted women the right to drive a year ago, but progress toward more expansive women’s rights remains scant, and activists fighting for such rights have been arrested and face trial. In April, Prince Mohammed expanded his crackdown on even mild dissent with the arrests of at least nine intellectuals, journalists, activists and their relatives, including two with dual American citizenship.

The C.I.A. has concluded that Prince Mohammed ordered the murder of Mr. Khashoggi, a longtime Saudi dissident who was working as a columnist for The Washington Post while living in the United States. A United Nations investigator last week pointed the finger at Prince Mohammed as well.

While not addressing that on Saturday, Mr. Trump has recently played down the murder, saying that American arms sales to Saudi Arabia were too important to disrupt.

President Trump with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia on Friday in Osaka.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, amid meetings with President Trump and other leaders, has drawn attention for his remarks in an interview published on Friday — and for his bonhomie with Mr. Trump, who seemed to joke about being rid of journalists.

First, The Financial Times on Friday published an interview with Mr. Putin, in which he declared “the liberal idea” had “outlived its purpose.” He said that Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany had erred in allowing a million refugees into her country, and that Mr. Trump was right in trying to halt migrants from Central America.

“The liberal idea has become obsolete. It has come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population,” he said. In a conference call with Russian-based reporters, Mr. Putin’s spokesman later clarified that Mr. Putin was not criticizing the liberal political order per se but what he saw as efforts by Western leaders to impose it to the exclusion of other political systems.

And in opening remarks before a meeting with Mr. Trump, Mr. Putin listened cheerily to an apparent joke about getting rid of journalists in Russia. “Get rid of them,” Mr. Trump said of reporters. “Fake news is a great term, isn’t it? You don’t have this problem in Russia, but we do.”

Mr. Putin responded that “it’s the same” in Russia. The Committee to Protect Journalists has documented the untimely deaths of 58 journalists in Russia in the post-Soviet period, many of them by murder or unexplained accidents.

President Trump appeared to make light of Russia’s interference in the 2016 election on Friday as he met with President Vladimir V. Putin — seeming to again dismiss the conclusions of American intelligence agencies and the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

At the opening remarks before the leaders’ meeting, a reporter asked whether Mr. Trump would tell Russia not to meddle in American elections. “Yes, of course I will,” he answered.

Turning to Mr. Putin, he said with a slight grin, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

Mr. Putin smiled, and Mr. Trump pointed at another Russian official, repeating, “Don’t meddle in the election.”

The remarks risked another domestic political backlash like the one Mr. Trump endured after the leaders’ last official meeting in Helsinki, Finland, when Mr. Trump, standing at Mr. Putin’s side, challenged the conclusion of his own intelligence agencies about the Russian election operation and credited the Kremlin leader’s “extremely strong and powerful” denial.

Before their meeting on Friday, the presidents said they would discuss trade, arms control and other issues. A written summary of the meeting by the White House indicated that they had spoken about Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Ukraine as well — nations where the United States and Russia are at odds — but there was no mention of election interference or an international investigation that pointed to Russia in the 2014 downing of a passenger jet over Ukraine.

Around the G20 summit on its first day:

  • Prime Minister Theresa May met President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia with a frosty handshake and colder words. She told him that Britain would not normalize relations with Russia until it ceases “hostile interventions” such as disinformation campaigns and cyberattacks, according to her office. She also told him Britain had irrefutable evidence Russia was behind the use of a deadly nerve agent to target a Russian former spy living in Britain, her office said.

    Mr. Putin played down the poisoning case, saying in The Financial Times interview that it was “not worth five kopecks, or even five pounds.” He also said: “Treason is the gravest crime possible and traitors must be punished. I am not saying the Salisbury incident is the way to do it. Not at all. But traitors must be punished.”

  • A day after lashing out at Germany and India, President Trump treated their leaders to friendly conversation. After criticizing India’s trade policies, he congratulated Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India for his recent re-election, and made conciliatory comments about the need for close relations. With Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany — a nation the president has accused of freeloading — Mr. Trump brought up his thoughts on the Democratic debate.

    “Perhaps you saw it,” he told her. “It wasn’t very exciting, I can tell you that. And they have another one going on. They definitely have plenty of candidates, that’s about it. So I look forward to spending time with you rather than watching.”

  • Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan is campaigning for a dramatic reduction of the plastic waste that flows into the oceans — a major challenge for Japan, the second-largest generator of plastic packaging waste per person, behind the United States. Experts say the problem is bigger than just disposal: Plastic consumption is deeply embedded in Japanese culture, and many nations export their trash to poorer countries that may not have sophisticated recycling systems.

Reporting was contributed by Michael Crowley, Peter Baker, Keith Bradsher and Motoko Rich from Osaka, Japan, Jane Perlez from Beijing, Andrew Kramer from Moscow and by Ben Casselman from New York.

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