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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 21)

Coronavirus Live Updates: Boris Johnson Treated in I.C.U.

Westlake Legal Group coronavirus-live-updates-boris-johnson-treated-in-i-c-u Coronavirus Live Updates: Boris Johnson Treated in I.C.U. Trump, Donald J Tests (Medical) Quarantines Johnson, Boris Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Here’s what you need to know:

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain has been moved to intensive care.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_171338751_23df313b-4d40-456a-af4e-fff9154153f5-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Boris Johnson Treated in I.C.U. Trump, Donald J Tests (Medical) Quarantines Johnson, Boris Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Credit…Andrew Testa for The New York Times

Prime Minister Boris Johnson was moved into intensive care on Monday, a worrisome turn in his 10-day battle with the coronavirus and the starkest evidence yet of how the virus has threatened the British political establishment and thrown its new government into upheaval.

The government said the decision was a precaution and that the prime minister had been in good spirits earlier in the day. But with Mr. Johnson’s aides releasing few details about his condition, the nation kept a tense vigil on Monday night, hoping for the best and experiencing, together, the frightening mysteries of this disease.

In a sign of how grave the situation had become, Downing Street said in a statement on Monday that Mr. Johnson had asked the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, to deputize for him “where necessary.” The pound fell against the dollar after investors reacted to the news.

After noting earlier in the day that the prime minister was still getting official papers, Mr. Johnson’s aides said he had been moved to the intensive care unit in case he needed a ventilator to help his recovery. Not every patient in critical care is ventilated, medical experts said, but many are — or are at least given oxygen. Mr. Johnson remains conscious, officials said.

For Mr. Johnson, 55, it was an especially cruel reversal. Just four months ago, he engineered the greatest Conservative Party victory since Margaret Thatcher’s in 1987, delivered his promise to take Britain out of the European Union, and set in motion an ambitious economic program to transform his divided country.

Now, Mr. Johnson, a political phenomenon whose career has always had a quicksilver quality, finds himself in a debilitating battle after contracting a virus he initially viewed with characteristic nonchalance.

For Britain, which had so recently emerged from three-and-half years of paralysis and polarization over Brexit, Mr. Johnson’s illness plunges the country back into the uncertainty Britons thought they had left behind.

Navarro warned in January that a pandemic could imperil the lives of millions of Americans.

A top White House adviser starkly warned Trump administration officials in late January that the coronavirus crisis could cost the United States trillions of dollars and put millions of Americans at risk of illness or death.

The warning, written in a memo by Peter Navarro, President Trump’s trade adviser, is the highest-level alert known to have circulated inside the West Wing as the administration was taking its first substantive steps to confront a crisis that had already consumed China’s leaders and would go on to upend life in Europe and the United States.

“The lack of immune protection or an existing cure or vaccine would leave Americans defenseless in the case of a full-blown coronavirus outbreak on U.S. soil,” Mr. Navarro’s memo said. “This lack of protection elevates the risk of the coronavirus evolving into a full-blown pandemic, imperiling the lives of millions of Americans.”

Dated Jan. 29, it came during a period when Mr. Trump was playing down the risks to the United States, and he would later go on to say that no one could have predicted such a devastating outcome.

Mr. Navarro said in the memo that the administration faced a choice about how aggressive to be in containing an outbreak, saying the human and economic costs would be relatively low if it turned out to be a problem along the lines of a seasonal flu.

But he went on to emphasize that the “risk of a worst-case pandemic scenario should not be overlooked” given the information coming from China.

In one worst-case scenario cited in the memo, more than a half-million Americans could die.

Cases are spiking in Japan, but a state of emergency relies on voluntary compliance.

As Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prepares to declare a state of emergency for Japan’s largest population centers, citizens and businesses in cities like Tokyo, Yokohama, Osaka, Kobe and Fukuoka must now decide how to respond.

Unlike in other countries, Mr. Abe does not have the legal power to issue stay-at-home orders or force businesses to close, and he has promised to keep public transit operational.

Even as experts warn that Japan is on the brink of an explosion of infections that could overwhelm its health care system, the government will largely depend on voluntary compliance.

Those covered by the planned emergency declaration — about 56.1 million people across seven prefectures, or less than half of Japan’s total population — will be strongly urged for the next month to work from home and avoid going out for anything other than essential trips to the market or pharmacy.

Until now, Japan’s health officials have reassured the public that they have prevented the virus from raging out of control, mainly by closing schools, asking organizers of large sports and cultural events to cancel them, and quickly identifying clusters of cases and tracing close contacts to infected people.

But as Mr. Abe, who also announced an economic stimulus package on Monday that he said was worth nearly $1 trillion, prepares to take the nation’s containment measures a step further with an official declaration that is expected Tuesday evening, some experts saw that as a tacit admission that the government’s previous approach was no longer working.

As of Tuesday morning, Japan had confirmed a total of 3,906 cases and 80 deaths from the coronavirus.

Trump again misleads on the availability of coronavirus testing.

President Trump, at his coronavirus task force briefing, again said the number of coronavirus tests in the United States now exceeds that in other countries, wrongly suggesting that the country is doing a better job of monitoring the spread of the disease than other nations.

Though it is true that the total number of tests in the United States has now edged higher than the number in South Korea last week, America has a much larger population than that country. On a per-capita basis, the United States has tested far fewer people than several other countries.

There is also substantial local variation in the country, with tests much harder to obtain, on average, in some parts of the country than others.

Even as new and faster tests become available, lengthy delays in obtaining results continue and test materials are running low, compounding the crises hospitals are facing.

Private companies like Quest and LabCorp are now running thousands of tests a day. But demand for testing has overwhelmed many labs and testing sites.

Doctors and officials around the country say that lengthy delays in getting results have persisted and that uneven access to tests has prolonged rationing and hampered patient care. In addition, swabs and chemicals needed to run the tests are in short supply in many of the nation’s hot zones.

Strongmen are reverting to their standard playbook, but they can’t arrest a virus.

In responding to the coronavirus pandemic, the world’s autocrats are turning to their tried-and-tested tool kits, employing a mixture of propaganda, repression and ostentatious shows of strength to exude an aura of total control over an inherently chaotic situation.

For Egypt’s president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, that meant deploying chemical warfare troops, clad in protective suits and armed with disinfectant, to the streets of Cairo, in a theatrical display of military muscle projected via social media.

Russia’s leader, Vladimir V. Putin, donned the plastic suit himself, in canary yellow, for a visit to a Moscow hospital for coronavirus patients. Then he dispatched to Italy 15 military planes filled with medical supplies and emblazoned with the slogan “From Russia with Love.”

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, a prodigious jailer of journalists, locked up a few reporters who criticized his early efforts to counter the virus, then sent a voice message to the phone of every citizen over 50, stressing that he had everything under control.

And in Turkmenistan, one of the world’s most repressive countries, where not a single infection has been officially declared, the president for life, Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, promoted his book on medicinal plants as a possible solution to the pandemic.

Wisconsin election fight previews battle over virus-era voting.

Wisconsin voters will face a choice between protecting their health and exercising their civic duty on Tuesday after state Republican leaders, backed up by a conservative majority on the state’s Supreme Court, rebuffed the Democratic governor’s attempt to postpone in-person voting in their presidential primary and local elections. The political and legal skirmishing throughout Monday was only the first round of an expected national fight over voting rights in the year of Covid-19.

The Republicans’ success came at the end of a day that left anxious voters whipsawed between competing claims from Gov. Tony Evers and his opponents in the G.O.P.-controlled State Legislature over whether Tuesday’s election would proceed as planned. It rattled democracy in a key battleground state already shaken by a fast-growing number of cases of the coronavirus.

The governor had issued an executive order postponing in-person voting and extending to June the deadline for absentee ballots. But Republican leaders succeeded in getting the state’s top court to stay the decree.

And in a decision late Monday capping the election-eve chaos, the U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative-leaning majority dealt its own blow to Wisconsin Democrats. In a 5-4 vote, the majority ruled against their attempt to extend the deadline for absentee voting in Tuesday’s elections, saying such a change “fundamentally alters the nature of the election.” The court’s four liberal members dissented, with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg writing that “the court’s order, I fear, will result in massive disenfranchisement.”

Manila’s lockdown is extended for two weeks, as restrictions continue across Southeast Asia.

President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines on Tuesday extended for another two weeks a lockdown on the country’s main island that encompasses about 60 million people, as virus-related restrictions look set to continue elsewhere in Southeast Asia.

The lockdown on the island of Luzon covers the Philippine capital, Manila, which has a population of 14 million and a sprawling network of slums. The weather there is particularly scorching at this time of year, with average temperatures above 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

Mr. Duterte’s move came a day after the authorities in Thailand extended by 12 days a ban on all incoming passenger flights. The ban took effect over the weekend and was initially designed to end on Monday.

And in Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, the governor was preparing on Tuesday to impose greater social distancing restrictions, including requiring employees to work from home, prohibiting religious gatherings and reducing public transportation. The governor had previously closed schools and some workplaces and urged the public to maintain social distancing.

Manila and Jakarta, which has a population of about 11 million, are two of the world’s most populous cities.

A ‘Liberty’ rebellion in Idaho threatens to undermine coronavirus orders.

In a state with pockets of deep wariness about both big government and mainstream medicine, the sweeping restrictions aimed at containing the spread of the virus have run into outright rebellion in some parts of Idaho, which is facing its own worrying spike in coronavirus cases.

The opposition is coming not only from people like Ammon Bundy, whose armed takeover of the Oregon refuge with dozens of other men and women in 2016 led to a 41-day standoff, but also from some state lawmakers and a county sheriff who are calling the governor’s statewide stay-at-home order an infringement on individual liberties.

Health care providers and others have been horrified at the public calls to countermand social-distancing requirements, warning that failing to take firm measures could overwhelm Idaho’s small hospitals and put large numbers of people at risk of dying.

Many of the latest claims about the Constitution have come from Idaho’s northern panhandle, where vaccination rates for other diseases have always been low and where wariness of government is high.

At a time when health officials say social-distancing measures are vital to avert catastrophic outbreaks of the kind that could overwhelm hospitals — as happened in Italy — Idaho’s tensions threaten to undermine compliance. While the state was one of the last in the country to identify a coronavirus case, it now has far more cases per capita than California. Blaine County, which includes the popular Sun Valley ski resort, now has the largest per capita concentration of coronavirus cases in the nation.

How to help from home

Sitting at home, it’s easy to feel like there’s nothing you can do to help those on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. But there are many things you can do to help medical professionals, the people affected directly by the virus and your local businesses.

Reporting was contributed by Mike Baker, Declan Walsh, Andrew Higgins, Carlotta Gall, Patrick Kingsley, Stephen Castle and Mark Landler, Adam Liptak, Sheila Kaplan, Katie Thomas, Motoko Rich, Mike Ives, Richard C. Paddock and Hannah Beech.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trade Adviser Warned White House in January of Risks of a Pandemic

Westlake Legal Group trade-adviser-warned-white-house-in-january-of-risks-of-a-pandemic Trade Adviser Warned White House in January of Risks of a Pandemic United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Pottinger, Matthew Navarro, Peter National Security Council Mulvaney, Mick Fauci, Anthony S Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Westlake Legal Group 06dc-virus-trump1-facebookJumbo Trade Adviser Warned White House in January of Risks of a Pandemic United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Pottinger, Matthew Navarro, Peter National Security Council Mulvaney, Mick Fauci, Anthony S Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

A top White House adviser starkly warned Trump administration officials in late January that the coronavirus crisis could cost the United States trillions of dollars and put millions of Americans at risk of illness or death.

The warning, written in a memo by Peter Navarro, President Trump’s trade adviser, is the highest-level alert known to have circulated inside the West Wing as the administration was taking its first substantive steps to confront a crisis that had already consumed China’s leaders and would go on to upend life in Europe and the United States.

“The lack of immune protection or an existing cure or vaccine would leave Americans defenseless in the case of a full-blown coronavirus outbreak on U.S. soil,” Mr. Navarro’s memo said. “This lack of protection elevates the risk of the coronavirus evolving into a full-blown pandemic, imperiling the lives of millions of Americans.”

Dated Jan. 29, it came during a period when Mr. Trump was playing down the risks to the United States, and he would later go on to say that no one could have predicted such a devastating outcome.

Mr. Navarro said in the memo that the administration faced a choice about how aggressive to be in containing an outbreak, saying the human and economic costs would be relatively low if it turned out to be a problem along the lines of a seasonal flu.

But he went on to emphasize that the “risk of a worst-case pandemic scenario should not be overlooked” given the information coming from China.

In one worst-case scenario cited in the memo, more than a half-million Americans could die.

The memo was dated the same day that Mr. Trump named a White House task force to deal with the threat, and as the administration was weighing whether to bar some travelers from China, an option being pushed by Mr. Navarro.


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Mr. Trump would approve the limits on travel from China the next day, though it would be weeks before he began taking more aggressive steps to head off spread of the virus.

Questions about Mr. Trump’s handling of crisis, especially in its early days when he suggested it was being used by Democrats to undercut his re-election prospects, are likely to define his presidency. Mr. Navarro’s memo is evidence that some in the upper ranks of the administration had at least considered the possibility of the outbreak turning into something far more serious than Mr. Trump was acknowledging publicly at the time.

Neither Mr. Navarro nor spokespeople for the White House responded to requests for comment.

The memo, which was reviewed by The New York Times, was sent from Mr. Navarro to the National Security Council and then distributed to several officials across the administration, people familiar with the events said. It reached a number of top officials as well as aides to Mick Mulvaney, then the acting chief of staff, they said, but it was unclear whether Mr. Trump saw it.

Mr. Navarro is a well-established China hawk who has long been mistrustful of the country’s government and trade practices. Both Mr. Navarro and Matthew Pottinger, the chief deputy at the National Security Council, were among the few officials urging colleagues in January to take a harder line in relation to the growing threat of the coronavirus.

But their warnings were seen by other officials as primarily reflecting their concerns about China’s behavior — and their concerns look more prescient in hindsight than they actually were, other officials argue.

With the subject line “Impose Travel Ban on China?” Mr. Navarro opened the memo by writing, “If the probability of a pandemic is greater than roughly 1%, a game-theoretic analysis of the coronavirus indicates the clear dominant strategy is an immediate travel ban on China.”

Mr. Navarro concluded at one point: “Regardless of whether the coronavirus proves to be a pandemic-level outbreak, there are certain costs associated with engaging in policies to contain and mitigate the spread of the disease. The most readily available option to contain the spread of the outbreak is to issue a travel ban to and from the source of the outbreak, namely, mainland China.”

He suggested that under an “aggressive” containment scenario, a travel ban may need to last as long as 12 months for proper containment, a duration of time that at that point some White House aides saw as unsustainable.

The travel limits subsequently imposed by Mr. Trump did not entirely ban travel from China, and many travelers continued to stream into the United States from China.

Mr. Navarro was at odds with medical experts like Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, who had argued that such travel bans only delay the eventual spread but do not contain it.

Mr. Navarro alluded to that debate on Saturday during a separate argument with Dr. Fauci in the Situation Room about the whether the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine was effective in treating or preventing the virus, according to two people familiar with the events.

In the memo, Mr. Navarro cautioned that it was “unlikely the introduction of the coronavirus into the U.S. population in significant numbers will mimic a ‘seasonal flu’ event with relatively low contagion and mortality rates.”

He noted the history of pandemic flus and suggested the chances were elevated for one after the new pathogen had developed in China.

“This historical precedent alone should be sufficient to prove the need to take aggressive action to contain the outbreak,” he wrote, going on to say the early estimates of how easily the virus was spreading supported the possibility that the risks were even greater than the history of flu pandemics suggested.

Mark Mazzetti contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s Aggressive Advocacy of Malaria Drug for Treating Coronavirus Divides Medical Community

Westlake Legal Group trumps-aggressive-advocacy-of-malaria-drug-for-treating-coronavirus-divides-medical-community Trump’s Aggressive Advocacy of Malaria Drug for Treating Coronavirus Divides Medical Community United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Giuliani, Rudolph W Food and Drug Administration Fauci, Anthony S Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Westlake Legal Group 06dc-virus-drug-facebookJumbo Trump’s Aggressive Advocacy of Malaria Drug for Treating Coronavirus Divides Medical Community United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Giuliani, Rudolph W Food and Drug Administration Fauci, Anthony S Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

WASHINGTON — President Trump made a rare appearance in the Situation Room on Sunday as his pandemic task force was meeting, determined to talk about the anti-malaria medicine that he has aggressively promoted lately as a treatment for the coronavirus.

Once again, according to a person briefed on the session, the experts warned against overselling a drug yet to be proved a safe remedy, particularly for heart patients. “Yes, the heart stuff,” Mr. Trump acknowledged. Then he headed out to the cameras to promote it anyway. “So what do I know?” he conceded to reporters at his daily briefing. “I’m not a doctor. But I have common sense.”

Day after day, the salesman turned president has encouraged coronavirus patients to try hydroxychloroquine with all of the enthusiasm of a real estate developer. The passing reference he makes to the possible dangers is usually overwhelmed by the full-throated endorsement. “What do you have to lose?” he asked five times on Sunday.

Bolstered by his trade adviser, a television doctor, Larry Ellison of Oracle and Rudolph W. Giuliani, a former New York mayor, Mr. Trump has seized on the drug as a miracle cure for the virus that has killed thousands and paralyzed American life. Along the way, he has prompted an international debate about a drug that many doctors in New York and elsewhere have been trying in desperation even without conclusive scientific studies.

Mr. Trump may ultimately be right, and physicians report anecdotal evidence that has provided hope. But it remains far from certain, and the president’s assertiveness in pressing the case over the advice of advisers like Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease specialist, has driven a wedge inside his coronavirus task force and has raised questions about his motives.

If hydroxychloroquine becomes an accepted treatment, several pharmaceutical companies stand to profit, including shareholders and senior executives with connections to the president. Mr. Trump himself has a small personal financial interest in Sanofi, the French drugmaker that makes Plaquenil, the brand-name version of hydroxychloroquine.

“I certainly understand why the president is pushing it,” said Dr. Joshua Rosenberg, the medical director at Brooklyn Hospital Center. “He’s the president of the United States. He has to project hope. And when you are in a situation without hope, things go very badly. So I’m not faulting him for pushing it even if there isn’t a lot of science behind it, because it is, at this point, the best, most available option for use.”

A senior physician at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn, where doctors are not providing the drug, however, said the current demand was worrisome for patients on it chronically for rheumatic diseases. At St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx, another doctor said his staff was giving it to coronavirus patients but criticized the president and Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo for “cheerleading” the drug without proof. “False hope can be bad, too,” he said.

The professional organization that published a positive French study cited by Mr. Trump’s allies changed its mind in recent days. The International Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy said, “The article does not meet the society’s expected standard.” Some hospitals in Sweden stopped providing hydroxychloroquine to treat the coronavirus after reports of adverse side effects, according to Swedish news media.

But Mr. Cuomo told reporters on Monday that he would ask Mr. Trump to increase the federal supply of hydroxychloroquine to New York pharmacies, allowing the state to lift a limit on purchases. “There has been anecdotal evidence that it is promising,” Mr. Cuomo said, while noting the lack of a formal study.


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Mr. Trump first expressed interest in hydroxychloroquine a few weeks ago, telling associates that Mr. Ellison, a billionaire and a founder of Oracle, had discussed it with him. At the time, Dr. Mehmet Oz, the host of television’s “The Doctor Oz Show,” was in touch with Mr. Trump’s advisers about expediting approval to use the drug for the coronavirus.

Mr. Giuliani has urged Mr. Trump to embrace the drug, based in part on the advice of Dr. Vladimir Zelenko, a self-described simple country doctor who has become a hit on conservative media after administering a cocktail of hydroxychloroquine, the antibiotic azithromycin and zinc sulfate.

In an interview on Monday, Mr. Giuliani denied any financial stake and said he spoke with Mr. Trump only after the president had already promoted the drug publicly. Mr. Giuliani said he turned to the issue after researching former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in Ukraine, a project that led to the president’s impeachment.

“When I finished Biden, I immediately switched to coronavirus and I have been doing an enormous amount of research on it,” he said. As it happened, Dr. Zelenko was born in Ukraine, and when they first spoke, Mr. Giuliani accidentally called him “Dr. Zelensky,” mixing up his name with Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky.

Mr. Giuliani said he brought a prosecutor’s experience to his research. “One of the things that a good litigator becomes, is you kind of become an instant expert on stuff, and then you forget about it,” he said. “I don’t claim to be a doctor. I just repeat what they said.”

The Food and Drug Administration, which has approved hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for malaria and lupus, issued an emergency order late last month allowing doctors to administer it to coronavirus patients if they saw fit. Mr. Trump said the federal government would distribute 29 million doses and that he had called Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India requesting more.

Dr. Fauci made his concern clear last week. “I think we’ve got to be careful that we don’t make that majestic leap to assume that this is a knockout drug,” he said on Friday on Fox News. “We still need to do the kinds of studies that definitively prove whether any intervention, not just this one, any intervention is truly safe and effective.”

The same day, Laura Ingraham, a Fox host, visited Mr. Trump at the White House with two doctors who had been on her program promoting hydroxychloroquine, one of whom made a presentation on its virtues, according to an official, confirming a Washington Post report.

The next day, Peter Navarro, the president’s trade adviser, who has been assigned to expedite production of medical equipment and become an advocate of the drug, upbraided Dr. Fauci at a White House task force meeting, according to people informed about the discussion.

Mr. Navarro arrived at the meeting armed with a thick sheaf of papers recounting research. When the issue was raised, according to a person informed about the meeting, confirming a report by Axios, Mr. Navarro picked it up off a chair, dropped it on the table and started handing out copies.

Mr. Navarro, who earned a doctorate in economics from Harvard, defended his position on Monday despite his lack of medical credentials. “Doctors disagree about things all the time. My qualifications in terms of looking at the science is that I’m a social scientist,” he said on CNN. “I have a Ph.D. And I understand how to read statistical studies, whether it’s in medicine, the law, economics or whatever.”

Mr. Trump made clear on Sunday whose side he took in Mr. Navarro’s confrontation with Dr. Fauci. At his briefing after the meeting, he said it was wrong to wait for the kind of study Dr. Fauci wanted. “We don’t have time,” the president said. “We don’t have two hours because there are people dying right now.”

Some associates of Mr. Trump’s have financial interests in the issue. Sanofi’s largest shareholders include Fisher Asset Management, the mutual fund company run by Ken Fisher, a major donor to Republicans, including Mr. Trump. A spokesman for Mr. Fisher declined to comment.

Another investor in both Sanofi and Mylan, another pharmaceutical firm, is Invesco, the fund previously run by Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary. Mr. Ross said in a statement Monday that he “was not aware that Invesco has any investments in companies producing” the drug, “nor do I have any involvement in the decision to explore this as a treatment.”

As of last year, Mr. Trump reported that his three family trusts each had investments in a Dodge & Cox mutual fund, whose largest holding was in Sanofi.

Several generic drugmakers are gearing up to produce hydroxychloroquine pills, including Amneal Pharmaceuticals, whose co-founder Chirag Patel is a member of Trump National Golf Course Bedminster in New Jersey and has golfed with Mr. Trump at least twice since he became president, according to a person who saw them.

Mr. Patel, whose company is based in Bridgewater, N.J., did not respond to a request for comment. Amneal announced last month that it would increase production of the drug and donate millions of pills to New York and other states. Other generic drugmakers are ramping up production, including Mylan and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries.

Roberto Mignone, a Teva board member, reached out to the team of Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, through Nitin Saigal, who used to work for Mr. Mignone and is a friend of Mr. Kushner’s, according to people informed about the discussions.

Mr. Kushner’s team referred him to the White House task force and Mr. Mignone asked for help getting India to ease export restrictions, which have since been relaxed, allowing Teva to bring more pills into the United States. Mr. Mignone, who is also a vice chairman of NYU Langone Health, which is running a clinical study of hydroxychloroquine, confirmed on Monday that he has spoken with the administration about getting more medicine into the country.

Dr. Daniel H. Sterman, the critical care director at NYU Langone Health, said doctors there are using hydroxychloroquine, but data about its effectiveness remained “weak and unsubstantiated” pending the study. “We do not know whether our patients are benefiting from hydroxychloroquine treatment at the present time,” he said.

New York City’s Health and Hospitals Corporation, which runs its public hospitals, is advising but not requiring doctors to use hydroxychloroquine based on a trial showing a decreased cough and fever with mild side effects in two patients, Dr. Mitchell Katz, who oversees the hospital system, said by email on Monday.

Dr. Roy M. Gulick, the chief of infectious diseases at Weill Cornell Medicine, said hydroxychloroquine was given on a case-by-case basis. “We explain the pros and cons and explain that we don’t know if it works or not,” he said.

Doctors at Northwell Health and Mount Sinai Health System are using it as well. At the Mount Sinai South Nassau County branch on Long Island, doctors have employed a regimen of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin “pretty much since day one” with mixed results, said Dr. Adhi Sharma, its chief medical officer.

“We’ve been throwing the kitchen sink at these patients,” he said. “I can’t tell whether someone got better on their own or because of the medication.”

Peter Baker and Katie Rogers reported from Washington, and David Enrich and Maggie Haberman from New York. Reporting was contributed by Kenneth P. Vogel from Washington, and Jesse Drucker, Sheri Fink, Joseph Goldstein, Jesse McKinley, William K. Rashbaum, Brian M. Rosenthal, Michael Rothfeld and Michael Schwirtz from New York.

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Biden and Trump Speak About Coronavirus

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Joseph R. Biden Jr. and President Trump spoke on Monday about the coronavirus pandemic, a rare direct conversation between the incumbent president and his likely Democratic challenger.

Mr. Biden, who has been harshly critical of Mr. Trump’s handling of the crisis, had offered to speak with Mr. Trump in recent days. The two connected after Mr. Biden’s team renewed efforts to reach out to the White House on Monday following a tweet by Mr. Trump that read, “What ever happened to that phone call he told the Fake News he wanted to make to me?”

At the White House on Monday evening, Mr. Trump called it a “really wonderful, warm conversation.”

“We just had a very friendly conversation,” Mr. Trump said. “Lasted probably 15 minutes. And it was really good, it was really good, really nice.” The president added, “I appreciate his calling.”

Kate Bedingfield, a deputy campaign manager for Mr. Biden, also called it a “good call.”

Ms. Bedingfield said that Mr. Biden “shared several suggestions for actions the administration can take now to address the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and expressed his appreciation for the spirit of the American people in meeting the challenges facing the nation.”

The good vibes did not last long.

Mr. Trump’s campaign quickly emailed that “Sleepy Joe Biden has completely lost touch with the American People,” accusing him of pushing to raise taxes. Mr. Biden, meanwhile, wrote on Twitter that Mr. Trump’s response to the coronavirus had been slow. “Week after week, he downplayed the threat it posed, misled the American people, and failed to act,” he said.

Ahead of their brief conversation on Monday, the two camps had both suggested willingness to make the unusual call happen. Mr. Trump said last week that he would “love” to take Mr. Biden’s call, saying that he had “always found him to be a nice guy.”

“If he’d like to call I would absolutely take his call,” he had said. “OK? You can tell him.”

Their conversation came as Mr. Biden has sought to find ways to communicate with voters virtually from his home in the Wilmington, Del., area, though he has often found himself overshadowed by the bully pulpit of the presidency.

In a brief virtual news conference with reporters last week, Mr. Biden said that if he spoke with Mr. Trump, “it won’t be, ‘I told you so, Mr. President.’” The intention, he said, would be to share his recommendations for combating the virus and to discuss his own experience dealing with other crises. The Ebola outbreak, for example, happened during the Obama administration.

“This is beyond politics right now,” Mr. Biden said. “We’re talking about a lot of people potentially dying. And we’re now leading the world in the number of cases. And we’ve got to act more swiftly, more rapidly. And, you know, we’ve been through this, in a slightly different way, in the past. And I hope they can learn some lessons from what we did right and maybe what we did wrong.”

Katie Glueck and Annie Karni contributed reporting.

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Hospitals Run Low on Supplies as the U.S. Death Toll Nears 10,000

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Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_171310203_bb33b969-09c2-463f-b3d1-917674760c5f-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Hospitals Run Low on Supplies as the U.S. Death Toll Nears 10,000 United States Politics and Government Unemployment Trump, Donald J Tests (Medical) Johnson, Boris Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Fauci, Anthony S Epidemics Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Credit…Johnny Milano for The New York Times

Cuomo says there may be a plateau, but the state still faces a dire emergency.

New York City remained the center for the outbreak, with harrowing scenes of panicked doctors and besieged hospitals.

On Monday, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York said that 599 more people had died in the state, a number almost identical with that of the previous day. The total number of deaths is 4,758.

“It is hopeful but it is also inconclusive, and it still depends on what we do,” the governor said of the possibility that the state had reached a plateau in terms of the number of dead.

Mr. Cuomo said that the data suggested that the spread of the virus in New York could be plateauing, but emphasized that the state was still facing an emergency. “If we are plateauing, we are plateauing at a very high level and there is tremendous stress on the health care system,” he said.

“Now is not the time to be lax,” he said, chastising residents of New York City who were still ignoring the guidelines on social distancing, calling their behavior “unacceptable.”

“If I can’t convince you to show discipline for yourself, then show discipline for other people. If you get infected, you infect someone else and go to a E.R., you put a burden on all sorts of people you don’t know and frankly don’t have the right to burden with your irresponsibility,” Mr. Cuomo said.

“You don’t have the right to risk someone else’s life,” he added.

Mr. Cuomo said that the fine for those who violated restrictions on social distancing would increase, from $500 to $1,000 for violators.

“Now is not the time to be playing Frisbee in the park with your friends,” he said.

Mr. Cuomo asserted that New York had done all it could to prevent the loss of lives that could have been saved. “Have we saved everyone? No. But have we lost anyone because we didn’t have a bed or we didn’t have a ventilator, or we didn’t have health care staff? No.”

“Everyone has what they need,” the governor said. “There is no one who said I’m out of ventilators, and I have a critical need, who hasn’t gotten one.”

Mr. Cuomo said that the state had been proactive in shifting lifesaving ventilators to where they were needed, and that it had moved “thousands and thousands of ventilators” throughout its health care system.

“We don’t need any additional ventilators right now,” he added, a notable shift in tone from the previous weeks, during which the state had pleaded for the devices.

The governor was asked a question about a possibility that had been floated by a New York City Council member on Monday morning, that the city might be compelled to temporarily bury people who die after contracting the virus in an unspecified park.

“I have heard a lot of wild rumors but I have not heard anything about the city burying people in parks,” Mr. Cuomo said.

The governor said that he would ask Mr. Trump if the Navy military ship, the Comfort, could be shifted to take patients suffering from the virus. The ship, which has 1,000 beds, had previously been reserved for non-virus patients.

California is trying to organize states to work together, instead of competing, to secure medical supplies.

As the pandemic has spread across America, chaos has reigned in the process of securing much-need medical supplies for frontline workers. States are competing with one another, and with the federal government. The process has drawn in fraudsters, and a number of F.B.I. investigations are underway.

In California, the state has received moldy masks that were useless, and in Los Angeles, a deal put together by a labor union to secure millions of N95 masks for the county’s hospitals never materialized, spurring a federal investigation.

California, the most populous state with 40 million people, is trying now to band together with other, smaller states to procure supplies. The goal is two-fold: to bring order the process; and to ensure that smaller states do not lose out to California, which has the ability to outbid other states because of its size.

“This has been described, I think appropriately, as the wild, wild west,” Gov. Gavin Newson said on Sunday. “We are trying to organize in a more deliberative manner.”

Last week, Mr. Cuomo put the supply chain problem this way: “You now literally will have a company call you up and say, ‘Well, California just outbid you.’ It’s like being on eBay with 50 other states, bidding on a ventilator.”

Mr. Newsom said he has been deluged by text messages and phone calls from friends who tell him they have friends with supplies to offer. “Some of the friends of our friends are not all above board. There’s a lot of fraud,” he said.

Mr. Newsom said he has been in discussions with other states to organize their procurement efforts, and he said he would have more specific announcements to make this week. “We are trying to avoid the competition in this space with each other,” he said.

The state — which has not seen a surge in cases like New York and Louisiana, but is preparing for a possible jump in hospitalizations in the coming weeks — said Monday it was sending 500 ventilators to the national stockpile to aid New York.

In doing so, California follows similar actions by Oregon, which has said it was sending 140 ventilators to New York, and Washington State, which has offered up 400 ventilators to New York.

A new government report confirmed that hospitals are facing severe shortages of critical supplies.

Hospitals continue to confront severe shortages in testing and protective equipment for medical staff working to combat the coronavirus outbreak, according to a government watchdog report released on Monday that appears to undercut President Trump’s assurances that states have sufficient resources.

Staff and patients alike are put at risk by the lack of available protective gear, according to the report by the inspector general of Health and Human Services.

Hospital administrators are forced to grapple with “sharp increases” in prices for items such as masks, gloves and face shields from vendors, the report continues.

The lack of testing has forced hospitals to extend the stays of patients, pushing the facilities even farther beyond their capacities. Hospitals are also in need of thermometers, disinfectants, medical gas, linens, toilet paper and food. And doctors around the United States are still pleading for ventilators, even as the federal government has limited the number of lifesaving devices issued to states.

The report was based on interviews conducted March 23 through March 27 with more than 320 hospitals across 46 states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

The findings are in line with pleas made by governors, medical workers and hospital administrators, but they contrast sharply with statements made by Mr. Trump, who said this weekend that hospital administrators were “thrilled to be where they are.”

“Whenever local shortages are reported, we’re asking states to immediately meet the demand. And we’re stockpiling large amounts in different areas,” Mr. Trump said at a White House news briefing on Saturday.

The report was issued days after reports that protective equipment in the government’s strategic national stockpile was nearly depleted, forcing the Federal Emergency Management Agency to conduct an international search for such equipment. Those efforts have also increased competition for states and localities.

Amid quarantine orders, highway checkpoints appear along some state lines.

As stay-at-home orders have spread across the United States, checkpoints have appeared along some state lines, where certain visitors are being told to quarantine for 14 days.

Governors in Rhode Island, Texas and Florida have ordered some drivers coming from out of state to be stopped at the border and reminded of the quarantine requirement. No state has blocked drivers from passing through on their way to their final destination. Some municipalities have added checkpoints and restrictions of their own.

Texas set up checkpoints on its border with Louisiana on Sunday to screen people for the coronavirus, widening the scope of a mandatory quarantine order for visitors from one of the country’s emergent hot spots, the authorities said.

Photos of the checkpoints appeared on the Facebook page of the Louisiana State Police, which advised travelers to exercise caution and remain alert for traffic congestion in a post mentioning the enforcement measures. The post said commercial traffic would not be obstructed.

The screening measures came a week after Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas expanded a mandatory 14-day self-quarantine for travelers arriving from Louisiana, as well as air travelers from a number of other states and cities.

The steps taken by the Texas authorities recalled an order last month by Gov. Gina Raimondo of Rhode Island, who ordered checkpoints in her state that singled out vehicles with New York license plates to enforce a similar quarantine.

Some two weeks after Marie Margolius, 27, drove from her apartment in Brooklyn to a family home in Middletown, R.I., to stay with her family, the National Guard dropped by.

The family cars, all with Massachusetts license plates, were parked in the front yard. The officers took notes of the family members’ names and date of arrival into town and instructed them to continue self-isolating.

“It felt surreal seeing these men in uniform, wearing masks, knocking on doors in an effort to get a handle on who’s here,” she said. “But it made me feel safe. The fact that they are attempting to really understand the situation in our community was sort of comforting.”

The first legal challenge to public health restrictions has been filed by the A.C.L.U. in Puerto Rico.

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed its first lawsuit over government-imposed virus restrictions.

The suit, filed over the weekend, argues that Puerto Rico’s nightly curfew and some other strict rules aimed at limiting public contact are unconstitutional. The police in Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, have cited hundreds of people for violating the 7 p.m.-5 a.m. curfew since it was imposed on March 15.

Gov. Wanda Vázquez’s executive order also requires that people stay home during the day unless they are going to a grocery store, pharmacy, bank, gas station or medical appointment, or are providing medical care. Those found guilty of violating the order face a $5,000 fine or up to six months in jail.

The order further limits gatherings to close family members, a criterion the lawsuit says should not be defined by the state and is too vague for practical application by the police. Three plaintiffs who joined the lawsuit said that they fear arrest when they leave their homes each day to care for their elderly mothers.

(Puerto Rico has restricted traffic to alternating days based on license plates.)

“The order expects constitutional rights to be blindly handed over to the government, and that is unacceptable,” the lawsuit says.

On Sunday, Gov. Vázquez announced even tighter rules, shutting down all businesses except pharmacies and gas stations later this week from Good Friday through Easter Sunday.

Stocks rally as investors see some hopeful signs.

Even as officials were warning Americans to brace themselves for a week of sadness, death and challenges, U.S. stocks rallied and global markets surged on Monday as investors looked to signs that the outbreak was peaking in some of the world’s worst-hit places.

The S&P 500 rose more than 5 percent by midday.

After grappling with intense market volatility during the month of March as efforts to contain the spread of the virus weighed on the economy, investors were cheered by numbers showing that the pace of new confirmed infections and deaths was slowing in some places in Europe. In the United States, the Trump administration, while warning of a hard week ahead, suggested that the outbreak could be near its peak in some places.

Analysts highlighted the tentative deceleration of infections in New York as a good sign for other virus hot spots in the United States, as well as stock market sentiment. European stocks were trading higher after a modest rally in Asia picked up steam later in the day.

U.S. Treasury bond prices fell in Asian trading. But the price of oil, which generally rises on good economic news, fell amid a continuing spat over supplies between Russia and Saudi Arabia.

Japan will declare a state of emergency as the virus surges in Tokyo and other cities.

With new cases of the virus rapidly increasing in Tokyo and other cities in Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Monday that he would declare a state of emergency in seven prefectures that include the country’s largest population centers.

Mr. Abe, whose country faces a deep recession as the virus hinders trade and tourism, also announced an economic stimulus package worth nearly $1 trillion. He said that the government would suspend $240 billion in tax and social security payments and pay about $55 billion to households whose incomes have been affected by the pandemic.

The seven prefectures to be covered by the state of emergency, which Mr. Abe said would last about a month, are Chiba, Fukuoka, Hyogo, Kanagawa, Osaka, Saitama and Tokyo.

Under an emergency law enacted last month, Mr. Abe can ask prefectural governors to close schools, request that residents refrain from going out or holding events, and order building owners to contribute their facilities for medical use. He cannot issue stay-at-home orders or force businesses to close, as other countries have done.

Mr. Abe said that public transit would continue to run and that supermarkets would remain open.

Nearly three months into its outbreak, Japan is continuing to record new daily highs in confirmed infections, with the health ministry announcing 383 on Monday. Japan’s total number of cases has more than doubled, to 3,654, in the last eight days.

Japan has so far not reported the sort of explosive rise in cases that other countries have experienced, even though it has not taken aggressive steps like restricting people’s movements or testing widely for the virus. Its leaders have said for weeks that they have managed to contain the outbreak by quickly identifying clusters and tracing close contacts to infected people, but experts fear that the limited testing has allowed the virus to spread.

In remarks to reporters, Yoshihide Suga, Mr. Abe’s chief cabinet secretary, said that “in urban areas, including Tokyo, the number of infections is rapidly increasing, and the number of infections that cannot be tracked is increasing.”

In Tokyo on Sunday, the governor, Yuriko Koike, announced 143 new cases, a record high. By Monday evening, the city had announced an additional 83 cases. In all, Tokyo has reported more than 1,000 cases and 30 deaths.

The situation in Japan presents a contrast to the trajectory of the outbreak in neighboring South Korea. That country, which has tested 466,804 people for the virus, more than 10 times the number in Japan, announced only 47 new cases on Monday, down from 78 a week earlier.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain is hospitalized for coronavirus treatment.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson remained in the hospital on Monday after being admitted the day before for tests under his doctor’s advice, more than a week after he tested positive for the virus.

Mr. Johnson, 55, had been in isolation in his residence next door to 10 Downing Street after announcing in a video message on March 27 that he was infected and had been experiencing a fever and other mild symptoms. But a spokesman for Mr. Johnson said on Sunday that the prime minister was still dealing with the effects of the virus and had gone to the hospital as a precautionary measure.

Downing Street said Mr. Johnson, who was running a high temperature, remained at the helm of the government, and on Monday morning noted that he had a comfortable night in the hospital, was in good spirits and remained under observation.

“This is a precautionary step, as the prime minister continues to have persistent symptoms of coronavirus 10 days after testing positive,” a spokesman said on Sunday.

The persistent symptoms are said to be a high temperature and coughing. In a series of tweets, Mr. Johnson said he was keeping in touch with his team and thanked the National Health Service.

On Saturday, Mr. Johnson’s 32-year-old girlfriend, Carrie Symonds, disclosed that she, too, was suffering symptoms. Ms. Symonds is pregnant.

The British foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, was expected to lead the daily cabinet meeting on the pandemic on Monday. Under the government’s succession plan, Mr. Raab would take up Mr. Johnson’s duties if he became incapacitated.

The announcement of Mr. Johnson’s hospitalization came hours after Queen Elizabeth II issued a rare televised address on Sunday, attempting to rally her fellow Britons to confront the pandemic with the resolve and self-discipline that have seen the nation through its greatest trials.

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Queen Elizabeth II rallied Britons in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected at least 40,000 in the country. Her remarks were pre-recorded from Windsor Castle, where she is sequestering herself.CreditCredit…Paul Ellis/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“I am speaking to you at what I know is an increasingly challenging time,” the queen said in taped remarks from Windsor Castle. The virus has infected at least 40,000 people in Britain, including her eldest son and heir, Prince Charles, and several members of the government.

The queen called it “a time of disruption in the life of our country: a disruption that has brought grief to some, financial difficulties to many, and enormous changes to the daily lives of us all.”

The appearance was only the fourth time in her 66-year reign that the queen has addressed the British people, apart from her annual Christmas greeting — and it carries a distinct echo of the celebrated radio address that her father, George VI, delivered in September 1939, as Britain stood on the brink of war with Germany.

“I hope in the years to come, everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge,” the queen said, “and those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any. That the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet good-humored resolve and of fellow-feeling still characterize this country.”

The Navy’s top civilian excoriated the fired commander of an aircraft carrier stricken with the coronavirus.

The U.S. Navy’s top civilian excoriated the fired commander of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt in a speech to the ship’s crew on Monday as the sailors huddled on the island of Guam amid a coronavirus outbreak among their ranks, according to a transcript that was leaked online Monday.

The New York Times has obtained an audio recording that supports the transcript’s authenticity.

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas B. Modly addressed the crew of the aircraft carrier on Monday afternoon via the ship’s internal loudspeaker system. In a profane and defensive address that one crew member described in an interview as “whiny, upset, irritated, condescending,” Mr. Modly took repeated shots at the integrity of Capt. Brett E. Crozier, who was removed from command last week, and injected partisan political tones into the address by attacking former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., who has repeatedly criticized Captain Crozier’s removal.

Mr. Modly said Captain Crozier was “too naïve or too stupid to be a commanding officer” if he thought that letter wasn’t going to leak. “The alternative is that he did this on purpose,” Mr. Modly added.

Rear Adm. Charlie Brown, the Navy’s head spokesman, said he had seen the transcript but could not verify its authenticity. “I’ve asked his personal staff about it on travel,” Brown said. “I can say the secretary traveled to Guam and he did address the crew” of the Theodore Roosevelt.

Hundreds of sailors on the ship cheered Captain Crozier during a send off last week.

Debate roils White House over an untested drug the president insists on promoting.

Mr. Trump doubled down on Sunday on his push for the use of an anti-malarial drug against the virus, issuing medical advice that goes well beyond scant evidence of the drug’s effectiveness as well as the advice of doctors and public health experts.

Mr. Trump’s recommendation of hydroxychloroquine, for the second day in a row at a White House briefing, was a striking example of his brazen willingness to distort and outright defy expert opinion and scientific evidence when it does not suit his agenda.

Mr. Trump suggested he was speaking on gut instinct, and acknowledged he had no expertise on the subject.

“But what do I know? I’m not a doctor,” Mr. Trump said, after recommending the anti-malaria drug’s use for virus patients as well as medical personnel at high risk of infection.

“If it does work, it would be a shame we did not do it early,” Mr. Trump said, noting again that the federal government had purchased and stockpiled 29 million doses of the drug.

“What do you have to lose?” Mr. Trump asked, for the second day in a row.

When a reporter asked Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to weigh in on the question of using hydroxychloroquine, Mr. Trump stopped him from answering. As the reporter noted that Dr. Fauci was the president’s medical expert, Mr. Trump made it clear he did not want the doctor to answer.

“He’s answered the question 15 times,” the president said, stepping toward the lectern where Dr. Fauci was standing.

On Saturday, Dr. Fauci had privately challenged rising optimism about the drug’s efficacy during a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the White House’s Situation Room, according to two people familiar with the events. The argument was first reported by the website Axios and confirmed on CNN on Monday morning when Peter Navarro, the president’s trade adviser who is overseeing supply chain issues related to the virus, acknowledged the disagreement.

Mr. Navarro said he had taken a sheaf of folders to the meeting, outlining several studies from various countries, as well as information culled from C.D.C. officials, showing the “clear” efficacy of chloroquines in treating the virus.

Dr. Fauci pushed back, echoing remarks he has made in a series of interviews in the last week that rigorous study is still necessary. Mr. Navarro, an economist by training, shot back that the information he had collected was “science,” according to the people familiar with what took place.

U.N. details “horrifying global surge” in domestic abuse amid lockdowns.

The United Nations has expressed alarm at a “horrifying global surge in domestic violence” linked to lockdowns imposed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

António Guterres, the secretary general of the United Nations, appealed to nations across the world to put the prevention of domestic violence at the center of their national response plans.

“For many women and girls, the threat looms largest where they should be safest: in their own homes,” he said in a video message, noting that necessary lockdowns and quarantines can “trap women with abusive partners.”

“Over the past weeks, as economic and social pressures and fear have grown, we have seen a horrifying global surge in domestic violence,” he said.

In many countries, social services are already stretched to the breaking point. Health care workers have been overwhelmed by the coronavirus outbreak. The police have been coping with infections among their ranks. Support groups have had to limit their reach and some domestic violence shelters are closed.

The United Nations reports that, since the pandemic began, nations have been detailing a rise in cases of abuse and calls for support.

In Lebanon and Malaysia, the number of calls to domestic violence help lines was double that of the same month last year, while in China, they are three times higher.

In Britain, the National Domestic Abuse Helpline has seen a 25 percent increase in calls and online requests for support since the lockdown began, the charity Refuge said. In Kosovo, the Ministry of Justice reported a 17 percent increase in gender-based violence cases.

As many as half of those with the coronavirus could be asymptomatic, Fauci says.

The nation’s leading infectious disease specialist said Sunday night that as many as half the people infected with the virus may not have any symptoms, a much larger estimate than the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave last week.

“It’s somewhere between 25 and 50 percent,” said the specialist, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, during a briefing by Mr. Trump and members of the coronavirus task force on Sunday. The doctor cautioned, however, that it was only an estimate, adding that even the scientists helping lead the nation’s fight against the virus, “the friends that we are, we differ about that.”

In an interview with National Public Radio last week, Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the C.D.C., said that as many as 25 percent of people with the virus exhibited no symptoms. The large number of symptom-free cases — and scientists’ changing understanding of just how common such cases are — helps explain why the C.D.C. last week changed its guidance, recommending that all Americans wear a cloth face covering in public settings like grocery stores and pharmacies where they cannot ensure keeping a safe distance from others.

It also underscores the extraordinary challenge of controlling the virus’s spread. Dr. Fauci emphasized that for now his estimate was only a guess and that more testing was needed to figure out exactly how many Americans were carrying the virus without realizing it.

“Then we can answer the question in a scientifically sound way,” he said. “Right now, we’re just guessing.”

Cases continue to climb in Spain and Italy, but at a slower rate.

Western Europe may have reached an important turning point in the coronavirus epidemic: while the total number of patients continues to climb, the rate of new infections is no longer rising.

The shift seems clearest in the two hardest-hit countries, Italy and Spain, though incomplete and inconsistent data make it hard to be sure.

Italy’s daily tally of confirmed new infections peaked on March 21, at more than 6,500, but for the past week the number has not gone above 5,000. In Spain, the number seems to have reached a plateau, fluctuating for almost two weeks between about 6,400 and more than 9,200, a high that was set last Tuesday.

In each country, the death toll attributed to the coronavirus disease, Covid-19, has reached more than 900 on some days. But it has been lower in the last few days and on Sunday, it dropped sharply. Whether that represents a long-term downward turn is unclear.

To relieve the disastrous burden on health care systems, there must be a decline in the number of active cases — people who are currently infected and have not yet recovered or died. While the number is still rising in Spain and Italy, the growth has slowed dramatically.

Across Western Europe and Scandinavia, the number of new infections recorded daily has fluctuated between 27,000 and 37,000 for almost two weeks. More than 40,000 people have died, and there are more than 400,000 known, active infections. (The outbreak in Eastern Europe is harder to gauge because the information is spottier but the virus still appears to be spreading fast.)

The outlier in the region is Britain, which was slower to be hit by the virus than most of its neighbors and slower to order people to stay at home and businesses to close. There, the number of new infections confirmed is still rising, and hit its high so far on Sunday, at more than 5,900.

A tiger at the Bronx Zoo is infected, and other big cats there appear ill.

Credit…Wildlife Conservation Society/Julie Larsen Maher, via Reuters

A tiger at the Bronx zoo has Covid-19, in what is believed to be a case of what one official called “human-to-cat transmission.”

“This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with Covid-19,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which noted that although only one tiger had been tested, the virus appeared to have infected other animals as well.

“Several lions and tigers at the zoo showed symptoms of respiratory illness,” according to a statement by the Agriculture Department.

Public health officials say they believe that the large cats caught the virus from a zoo employee. The tiger appeared visibly sick by March 27.

In a statement, the Agriculture Department suggested that those infected with the virus should, “out of an abundance of caution,” avoid contact with their pets and other animals.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that it is “aware of a very small number of pets outside the United States reported to be infected” but that it does not have evidence that pets can spread the coronavirus.

Taking steps to insure your future.

If you are among the more than six million Americans applying for unemployment insurance this month, you are most likely doing so for the first time. It’s important to understand how unemployment works and how it can help you in this time of need. We also have tips for making a will and starting an emergency fund.

An alarming number of American students are missing online classes.

Chronic absenteeism is a problem in American education during the best of times, but now, with most U.S. schools closed and lessons being conducted remotely, more students than ever are missing class — not logging on, not checking in or not completing assignments.

The absence numbers appear particularly high in schools with large populations of low-income students, whose access to home computers and internet connections can be spotty. Some teachers report that only half of their students are regularly participating.

The trend is leading to widespread concern among educators, with talk of the potential need for summer sessions, an early start in the fall, or having some or even all students repeat a grade.

Educators say that a subset of students and their parents have dropped out of touch with schools completely — unavailable by phone, email or any other form of communication, as families struggle with the broader economic and health impacts of the coronavirus outbreak.

The scale of the challenge, and the work that will need to be done to catch children up academically and socially, is huge, said Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of the Great City Schools, a network of urban education systems.

He called the prospect of “unfinished learning” from this time “a serious issue that could have implications for years.”

Asylum process grinds to a halt in Greece as a second migrant camp is quarantined.

The crisis in the sprawling refugee camps scattered across Greece deepened on Monday as health officials rushed to test hundreds of migrants after a decision on Sunday to quarantine a second center on the mainland.

More than 100,000 migrants live in facilities across the country — 40,000 of them in overcrowded camps on five islands in the Aegean Sea. Aid groups have urged the Greek authorities to evacuate the island camps, warning of the difficulty of controlling a potential outbreak of the virus in unsanitary and cramped conditions.

But the asylum process has ground to a halt, and transfers from the sprawling tent cities on the islands to the mainland have been suspended.

Still, more people arrive daily from neighboring Turkey, and there are fears that a new crisis is in the making.

The local authorities are not putting new arrivals in existing camps, citing a fear of potential infections, and have yet to find alternative accommodation. On the island of Lesbos, dozens of migrants are sleeping on beaches, some in an old bus at the island’s main port of Mytilene, others in tents and under broken boats, a few dozen in a chapel and others in the mountains, according to news reports there.

On the mainland, a camp in Malakasa, east of Athens, will be locked down for two weeks after a 53-year-old man tested positive for the coronavirus, the authorities said on Sunday.

The minister for immigration and asylum, Notis Mitarakis, said that no cases had been recorded in Greek island camps.

He said that the transfer of migrants to mainland facilities as part of efforts to “decongest” the island camps had been suspended. But he said that the government’s plan to replace overcrowded camps with enclosed detention centers, with tighter security, would proceed.

The plans have been vehemently opposed by residents of the islands who want all facilities shut and who staged protests after a renewed influx of migrants in early March.

Reporting was contributed by Michael Cooper, Jonah Engel Bromwich, Mihir Zaveri, Karen Zraick, Tim Arango, Patricia Mazzei, Zolan Kanno-Youngs, Katie Robertson, Elian Peltier, Stephen Castle, Niki Kitsantonis, Dana Goldstein, Adam Popescu, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Iliana Magra, Marc Santora, Megan Specia, Michael Crowley, Katie Thomas, Maggie Haberman, Roni Rabin, Mark Landler, Stephen Castle, Neil Vigdor, Motoko Rich, Alexandra Stevenson, Tiffany May and Kai Schultz.

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump’s Advisers Spar Over Untested Drug

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_171312687_d59a55a7-bd20-414b-b0c2-9aa8f24d7245-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump’s Advisers Spar Over Untested Drug United States Politics and Government Unemployment Trump, Donald J Tests (Medical) Johnson, Boris Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Fauci, Anthony S Epidemics Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Debate roils White House over an untested drug the president insists on promoting.

President Trump doubled down Sunday on his push for the use of an anti-malarial drug against the coronavirus, issuing medical advice that goes well beyond scant evidence of the drug’s effectiveness as well as the advice of doctors and public health experts.

Mr. Trump’s recommendation of hydroxychloroquine, for the second day in a row at a White House briefing, was a striking example of his brazen willingness to distort and outright defy expert opinion and scientific evidence when it does not suit his agenda.

Mr. Trump suggested he was speaking on gut instinct, and acknowledged he had no expertise on the subject.

“But what do I know? I’m not a doctor,” Mr. Trump said, after recommending the anti-malaria drug’s use for coronavirus patients as well as medical personnel at high risk of infection.

“If it does work, it would be a shame we did not do it early,” Mr. Trump said, noting again that the federal government has purchased and stockpiled 29 million doses of the drug.

“What do you have to lose?” Mr. Trump asked, for the second day in a row.

When a reporter asked Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to weigh in on the question of using hydroxychloroquine, Mr. Trump stopped him from answering. As the reporter noted that Dr. Fauci was the president’s medical expert, Mr. Trump made it clear he did not want the doctor to answer.

“He’s answered the question 15 times,” the president said, stepping toward the lectern where Mr. Fauci was standing.

On Saturday, Dr. Fauci had privately challenged rising optimism about the drug’s efficacy during a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the White House’s Situation Room, according to two people familiar with the events. The argument was first reported by the website Axios.

Peter Navarro, the president’s trade adviser who is overseeing supply chain issues related to the coronavirus, plopped a sheaf of folders on the table and said he had seen several studies from various countries, as well as information culled from C.D.C. officials, showing the “clear” efficacy of chloroquines in treating the coronavirus.

Dr. Fauci pushed back, echoing remarks he has made in a series of interviews in the last week that rigorous study is still necessary. Mr. Navarro, an economist by training, shot back that the information he had collected was “science,” according to the people familiar with what took place.

Dr. Megan L. Ranney, an emergency physician at Brown University in Rhode Island, said in an interview on Sunday night that she had never seen an elected official advertise a miracle cure the way Mr. Trump has done.

“There are side effects to hydroxychloroquine,” Dr. Ranney said. “It causes psychiatric symptoms, cardiac problems and a host of other bad side effects.”

Dr. Ranney said hydroxychloroquine could be effective for some patients, but there wasn’t nearly enough scientific evidence to support Mr. Trump’s claims.

“There may be a role for it for some people,” she said, “but to tell Americans ‘you don’t have anything to lose,’ that’s not true. People certainly have something to lose by taking it indiscriminately.”

As many as half of those with the coronavirus could be asymptomatic, Fauci says.

The nation’s leading infectious disease specialist said Sunday night that as many as half the people infected with the virus may not have any symptoms, a much larger estimate than the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave last week.

“It’s somewhere between 25 and 50 percent,” said the specialist, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, during a briefing by President Trump and members of his coronavirus task force on Sunday. He cautioned, however, that it was only an estimate, adding that even the scientists helping lead the nation’s fight against the virus, “the friends that we are, we differ about that.”

In an interview with National Public Radio last week, Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the C.D.C., said as many as 25 percent of people with the virus exhibit no symptoms. The large number of symptom-free cases — and scientists’ changing understanding of just how common such cases are — helps explain why the C.D.C. last week changed its guidance, recommending that all Americans wear a cloth face covering in public settings like grocery stores and pharmacies where they cannot ensure keeping a safe distance from others.

It also underscores the extraordinary challenge of controlling the virus’s spread. Dr. Fauci emphasized that for now his estimate was only a guess and that more testing was needed to figure out exactly how many Americans are carrying the virus without realizing it.

“Then we can answer the question in a scientifically sound way,” he said. “Right now, we’re just guessing.”

Queen Elizabeth II urges Britain to display resolve, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson enters the hospital.

Video

Westlake Legal Group merlin_171307140_3f184596-309a-4ef3-b2b1-a821b2592d8e-videoSixteenByNine3000 Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump’s Advisers Spar Over Untested Drug United States Politics and Government Unemployment Trump, Donald J Tests (Medical) Johnson, Boris Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Fauci, Anthony S Epidemics Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Queen Elizabeth II rallied Britons in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected at least 40,000 in the country. Her remarks were pre-recorded from Windsor Castle, where she is sequestering herself.CreditCredit…Paul Ellis/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II, in a rare televised address on Sunday, tried to rally her fellow Britons to confront the coronavirus pandemic with the resolve and self-discipline that have seen the nation through its greatest trials.

“I am speaking to you at what I know is an increasingly challenging time,” the queen said in taped remarks from Windsor Castle. The virus has infected at least 40,000 people in Britain, including her eldest son and heir, Prince Charles, and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Mr. Johnson was admitted to the hospital for tests, the government said later on Sunday evening, underscoring how the virus has threatened the country’s political establishment.

A spokesman for Mr. Johnson, 55, said on Sunday that the prime minister was still dealing with symptoms of the virus and went to the hospital as a precautionary measure. Downing Street said Mr. Johnson, who was running a high temperature, remained at the helm of the government.

“On the advice of his doctor, the prime minister has tonight been admitted to hospital for tests,” a spokesman said Sunday. “This is a precautionary step, as the prime minister continues to have persistent symptoms of coronavirus 10 days after testing positive for the virus.”

The queen called it “a time of disruption in the life of our country: a disruption that has brought grief to some, financial difficulties to many, and enormous changes to the daily lives of us all.”

The appearance was only the fourth time in her 66-year reign that the queen has addressed the British people, apart from her annual Christmas greeting — and it carries a distinct echo of the celebrated radio address her father, George VI, delivered in September 1939, as Britain stood on the brink of war with Germany.

“I hope in the years to come, everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge,” the queen said, “and those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any. That the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet good-humored resolve and of fellow-feeling still characterize this country.”

Mr. Johnson had been in isolation in his residence next door to 10 Downing Street.

On Saturday, his 32-year-old girlfriend, Carrie Symonds, disclosed that she, too, is suffering symptoms. Ms. Symonds is pregnant.

The British foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, is expected to lead the daily cabinet meeting on the pandemic on Monday. Under the government’s succession plan, Mr. Raab would take up Mr. Johnson’s duties if he is incapacitated.

While the queen fully adopted social distancing early in the pandemic, the British government came late to the need for such measures, with Mr. Johnson initially balking at ordering pubs and restaurants to close. He is now an ardent convert and recorded a video from his quarantine urging people — without much success — not to flock to London parks during a sun-kissed spring weekend.

Britain’s response to the pandemic has improved since that shaky start. The government has vowed to conduct 100,000 virus tests a week by the end of April, a tenfold increase over the current rate.

Taking steps to insure your future.

If you are among the more than 6 million Americans applying for unemployment insurance this month, you are likely doing so for the first time. It’s important to understand how unemployment works and how it can help you in this time of need. Plus, tips for making a will and starting an emergency fund.

A tiger at the Bronx Zoo tests positive for the coronavirus, and other big cats there appear ill.

A tiger at the Bronx zoo has been confirmed to be infected with Covid-19, in what is believed to be a case of what one official called “human-to-cat transmission.”

“This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with Covid-19,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which noted that although only one tiger was tested, the virus appeared to have infected other animals as well.

“Several lions and tigers at the zoo showed symptoms of respiratory illness,” according to a statement by the Agriculture Department.

Public health officials believe that the large cats caught the virus from a zoo employee. The tiger appeared visibly sick by March 27.

In a statement, the Agriculture Department suggested that those infected with the virus should, “out of an abundance of caution,” avoid contact with their pets and other animals.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that it is “aware of a very small number of pets outside the United States reported to be infected,” but that it does not have evidence that pets can spread the coronavirus.

The U.S. is undercounting the number of people who have died in the pandemic, experts say.

Hospital officials, public health experts and medical examiners say that official tallies of Americans said to have died in the pandemic do not capture the overall number of virus-related deaths, leaving the public with a limited understanding of the outbreak’s true toll.

Limited resources and a patchwork of decision making from one state or county to the next have contributed to the undercount. With no uniform system for reporting coronavirus-related deaths in the United States, and a continuing shortage of tests, some states and counties have improvised, obfuscated and, at times, backtracked in counting the dead.

Adding to the complications, different jurisdictions are using distinct standards for attributing a death to the coronavirus and, in some cases, relying on techniques that would lower the overall count of fatalities.

A coroner in Indiana wanted to know if the coronavirus had killed a man in early March, but said that her health department denied a test. Paramedics in New York City say that many patients who died at home were never tested for the coronavirus, even if they showed telltale signs of infection.

In Virginia, a funeral director prepared the remains of three people after health workers cautioned her that they each had tested positive. But only one of the three had the virus noted on the death certificate.

Doctors now believe that some deaths in February and early March were likely misidentified as influenza or only described as pneumonia.

Even under typical circumstances, public health experts say that it takes months or years to compile data that is as accurate as possible on deaths in infectious outbreaks.

But they also say that an accurate count of deaths is an essential tool to understand a disease outbreak as it unfolds: The more deadly a disease, the more aggressively the authorities are willing to disrupt normal life. Precise death counts can also inform the federal government on how to target resources, like ventilators from the national stockpile, to the areas of the country with the most desperate need.

Reporting was contributed by Michael Crowley, Katie Thomas, Maggie Haberman, Roni Rabin, Mark Landler and Stephen Castle.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ignoring Expert Opinion, Trump Again Promotes Use of Hydroxychloroquine

President Trump doubled down Sunday on his push for the use of an anti-malarial drug against the coronavirus, issuing medical advice that goes well beyond scant evidence of the drug’s effectiveness as well as the advice of doctors and public health experts.

Mr. Trump’s recommendation of hydroxychloroquine, for the second day in a row at a White House briefing, was a striking example of his brazen willingness to distort and outright defy expert opinion and scientific evidence when it does not suit his agenda.

Standing alongside two top public health officials who have declined to endorse his call for widely administering the drug, Mr. Trump suggested that he was speaking on gut instinct and acknowledged that he had no expertise on the subject.

Saying that the drug is “being tested now,” Mr. Trump said that “there are some very strong, powerful signs” of its potential, although health experts say that the data is extremely limited and that more study of the drug’s effectiveness against the coronavirus is needed.

“But what do I know? I’m not a doctor,” Mr. Trump added.

“If it does work, it would be a shame we did not do it early,” Mr. Trump said, noting again that the federal government had purchased and stockpiled 29 million pills of the drug. “We are sending them to various labs, our military, we’re sending them to the hospitals.”

Mr. Trump, who once predicted that the virus might “miraculously” disappear by April because of warm weather, and who has rejected scientific consensus on issues like climate change, was undaunted by skeptical questioning.

“What do you have to lose?” Mr. Trump asked, for the second day in a row, saying that terminally ill patients should be willing to try any treatment that has shown some promise.

When a reporter at Sunday’s briefing asked Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to weigh in on the subject, Mr. Trump stopped him from answering. As the reporter noted that Dr. Fauci, who has been far more skeptical about the drug’s potential, was the president’s medical expert, Mr. Trump made it clear he did not want the doctor to answer.

“You know how many times he’s answered that question? Maybe 15 times,” the president said, stepping toward the lectern where Dr. Fauci was standing.

Even as Mr. Trump has promoted the drug, which is also often prescribed for patients with lupus, it has created rifts within his own coronavirus task force. And while many hospitals have chosen to use hydroxychloroquine in a desperate attempt to treat dying patients who have few other options, others have noted that it carries serious risks. In particular, the drug can cause a heart arrhythmia that can lead to cardiac arrest.


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Dr. Megan L. Ranney, an emergency physician at Brown University in Rhode Island, said in an interview on Sunday night that she had never seen an elected official advertise a miracle cure the way Mr. Trump has.

“There are side effects to hydroxychloroquine,” Dr. Ranney said. “It causes psychiatric symptoms, cardiac problems and a host of other bad side effects.”

Dr. Ranney said that the drug could be effective for some patients, but that there was not nearly enough scientific evidence to support Mr. Trump’s claims.

“There may be a role for it for some people,” she said, “but to tell Americans ‘you don’t have anything to lose,’ that’s not true. People certainly have something to lose by taking it indiscriminately.”

Hydroxychloroquine has not been proved to work against Covid-19 in any significant clinical trials. A small trial by Chinese researchers made public last week found that it helped speed the recovery in moderately ill patients, but the study was not peer-reviewed and had significant limitations. Earlier reports from France and China have drawn criticism because they did not include control groups to compare treated patients with untreated ones, and researchers have called the reports anecdotal. Without controls, they said, it is impossible to determine whether the drugs worked.

But Mr. Trump on Sunday dismissed the notion that doctors should wait for further study.

“We don’t have time to go and say, ‘Gee, let’s take a couple of years and test it out,’ and let’s go out and test with the test tubes and the laboratories,” Mr. Trump said. “I’d love to do that, but we have people dying today.”

Mr. Trump is typically joined at his briefings by top medical advisers, including Dr. Fauci and Dr. Deborah L. Birx, his coronavirus coordinator. But the president does most of the talking, and has told several advisers that the briefings give him free airtime and good ratings.

A day earlier, Dr. Fauci had privately challenged rising optimism about the drug’s efficacy during a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the White House’s Situation Room, according to two people familiar with the events who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe a conversation in a sensitive setting. The argument was first reported by the website Axios.

The meeting’s agenda included the question of how the administration would discuss chloroquines. Dr. Stephen Hahn, the Food and Drug Administration commissioner, gave an update on chloroquines, and what various tests and anecdotal evidence had shown. Peter Navarro, the president’s trade adviser who is overseeing supply chain issues related to the coronavirus, asked to join the meeting, said the people briefed on what took place.

Mr. Navarro, who has been pushing to secure chloroquines at the president’s request to provide to caregivers, walked in with a sheaf of folders he had placed on a chair next to him, plopped them on the table and said he had seen studies from various countries, as well as information culled from officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, showing the “clear” efficacy of the drug in treating the coronavirus. Mr. Navarro also argued that the medicine was being used by doctors and nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus fight.

Dr. Fauci pushed back, echoing remarks he has made in interviews in the past week that rigorous study is still necessary. Mr. Navarro, an economist by training, shot back that the information he had collected was “science,” according to the people familiar with the episode.

Vice President Mike Pence tried to tamp down the debate, and as emotions calmed, Mr. Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, advised Mr. Navarro to “take yes for an answer.” The president went to the briefing room lectern a short while later and glowed about chloroquine use, suggesting he might even take it himself despite not having symptoms or evidence of the virus.

Katie Miller, a spokeswoman for Mr. Pence, declined to comment, saying the administration does not discuss events in the Situation Room.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 05dc-virus-trump2-articleLarge Ignoring Expert Opinion, Trump Again Promotes Use of Hydroxychloroquine United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Fauci, Anthony S Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Chloroquine (Drug)
Credit…Mark Moran/The Citizens’ Voice, via Associated Press

Last month, an Arizona man died and his wife was hospitalized after officials said they treated themselves with a deadly home remedy for the coronavirus — a popular fish tank additive that has the same active ingredient as an anti-malaria drug.

Medical professionals are also concerned that a run on hydroxychloroquine for potential coronavirus treatment could create shortages for people who need it for its traditional uses.

In a March 25 joint statement, the American Medical Association and two pharmacists’ associations noted that doctors and pharmacists have been prescribing the drug for their families and colleagues and that some pharmacies and hospitals had purchased “excessive amounts of these medications in anticipation of potentially using them for Covid-19 prevention and treatment.”

“The organizations strongly oppose these actions,” the statement said, citing potential “grave consequences for patients with conditions such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis if the drugs are not available in the community.”

Since patients with heart troubles and other underlying conditions are more likely to be severely affected by the coronavirus, they may also be at higher risk of dangerous side effects from hydroxychloroquine, said Dr. Kenneth B. Klein, a consultant who works for drug companies to design and evaluate their clinical trials.

“What have we got to lose?” Dr. Klein said, echoing Mr. Trump’s remarks. “We’ve got patients to lose from dangerous side effects.”

Mr. Trump did mention the potential risks to patients with heart troubles, but Dr. Klein said that even people with normal hearts are at risk for developing a fatal arrhythmia. And he said other medications could interact with hydroxychloroquine and cause serious medical complications.

“Then the doctor would have to spend time thinking, could this drug be playing a role, either directly or indirectly?” Dr. Klein said.

Other researchers have noted that while future trials may show a benefit, hydroxychloroquine has disappointed in the past, even though it has been tested as a treatment for other viruses, including influenza.

“Hydroxychloroquine has been studied as a possible antiviral therapy for many decades,” said Dr. Luciana Borio, who oversaw public health preparedness for the National Security Council in Mr. Trump’s White House and was the acting chief scientist at the F.D.A. under President Barack Obama.

“Despite showing evidence of activity against several viruses in the laboratory, it never showed success in randomized clinical trials.”

Michael D. Shear and Neil Vigdor contributed reporting.

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Politics Through the Looking Glass: Virus Scrambles the Left-Right Lines

Westlake Legal Group virus-divide-facebookJumbo-v2 Politics Through the Looking Glass: Virus Scrambles the Left-Right Lines Voting and Voters United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Shutdowns (Institutional) Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion Nationalization of Industry Health Insurance and Managed Care Democratic Party Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Biden, Joseph R Jr

The 2020 edition of the Conservative Political Action Conference in Oxon Hill, Md., in February offered a theme-park version of what was to be President Trump’s re-election message: Under the banner of “America vs. Socialism,” the convention featured anti-Marx branded popcorn, an RV emblazed with the words “Socialism Takes Capitalism Creates” and a children’s book promoting personal freedom and private-property rights.

Speeches included tirades against big government and “Medicare for all.”

“The virus is not going to sink the American economy,” the president’s chief economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, told a packed auditorium. “What is or could sink the American economy is the socialism coming from our friends on the other side of the aisle.” Mr. Trump, the keynote speaker, proclaimed, “We are defeating the radical, socialist Democrats” who “want total control.”

Four weeks later, with the coronavirus sinking the American economy, the federal government was preparing to cut $1,200 checks to tens of millions of citizens, part of a $2 trillion economic stabilization package that was also providing businesses with no-interest loans — likely to be partly forgiven — to pay their employees while they are shuttered. The Trump administration was issuing guidance for Americans to stay inside their homes while weighing a New Deal-style infrastructure program to create jobs.

And the CPAC message seemed a relic from a distant time.

Such is life for the political warriors of the Covid-19 campaign, where, in this pre-peak stage of the crisis, the national political debate is inside out and upside down, sending both sides of the national divide scurrying to figure out where the new political and ideological lines will settle come the fall.

As Republicans prepare for a re-election battle almost certain to hinge on perceptions of the Trump administration’s readiness and efficiency in performing its most solemn duty — to protect American lives — the decades-old debate over government’s role in American life has entered an unfamiliar phase of discombobulation. A president who leads a movement that was galvanized by Ronald Reagan’s motto that the four most terrifying words from the government were “I’m here to help” is now responsible for the largest federal disaster response since the Great Depression.

“The era of limited-government, country-club Republicanism is over,” said Stephen K. Bannon, an ideological architect of Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory.

At the same time, lingering conservative distrust of government and “experts,” combined with a red-and-blue fissure over the severity of the crisis, have surfaced dystopian national divisions: between those taking social-distancing measures seriously and those who view them as resulting from government overreach, between those who would support a prolonged economic shutdown and those who would be willing to trade additional casualties for a faster return to normalcy. “That,” said Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union, “is one of the questions our politics will solve in November.”

In the middle of it all is the president, whose operatic inconsistency about his administration’s role was apparent on Saturday when he predicted “a lot of death” but raised the possibility of relaxed social-distancing guidelines for Easter services.

It is so early in the crisis that both sides are navigating public opinion day to day, uncertain whether the fault lines have been truly scrambled or will re-emerge only hardened once the crisis abates, whenever that is.

“We don’t know what it’s going to look like on the other side of this in terms of people’s attitudes — whether it’s going to have short-term effects or long-term effects,” said Anita Dunn, a senior adviser to former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the likely Democratic presidential nominee.


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The sudden, unprecedented nature of the election cycle has made it impossible to strategize too far ahead: The party conventions, where nominees make their strongest cases, are in doubt; traditional retail politicking, necessary for exciting base voters and winning over converts, is impossible, and voting is facing a potential shift toward more mail-only balloting than ever before in a presidential election.

With the death count mounting last week, the two sides were sparring over whether Mr. Trump’s early declarations that the virus was contained had cost lives.

“He has some great vulnerabilities no matter how many proposals he puts out, and the single greatest one of them is the month of February,” Ms. Dunn said. “The number of people who are sick is significantly greater than it needed to be because this administration didn’t act when it could have — and that is not an issue that is going to go away.”

For their part, Trump campaign aides were trying to go on offense, painting Mr. Biden and the Democrats as working to undermine Mr. Trump as he seeks to lead the country through the crisis as a “wartime president.”

“In January, while the Democrats were entirely focused on impeachment, President Trump took the critical step of restricting travel from China in response to the coronavirus,” the campaign said in a statement. It criticized Mr. Biden for calling Mr. Trump’s response “xenophobic” and pointed to polls showing approval of Mr. Trump’s handling of the pandemic (An ABC News/Ipsos poll on Friday showed his support dipping from an earlier uptick.)

Beyond the back and forth is the question that has rested at the heart of American politics since the New Deal: What is the federal government’s appropriate place in managing public welfare and private behavior?

Democrats view the crisis as vindicating their long-held belief in “the importance of government and the functions that only a government can do,” as Ms. Dunn put it.

Conservatives ascended over the last decade with the anti-government, institutions-skeptical sentiment of the Tea Party, which was itself partly fueled by anger over the bank bailouts and the stimulus measures that followed the 2008 financial crisis.

Mr. Trump took the White House embracing the movement’s resentment of elites and “experts,” and his administration moved quickly to cut back agencies — including a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention program built to detect and manage potential viral outbreaks — as it vowed to end the Affordable Care Act.

“Now we’re in a crisis where big government is the only thing that can save us, and elites — a combination of these two things that Republicans say they hate,” said Stuart Stevens, a Republican strategist for the George W. Bush and Mitt Romney campaigns who has soured on his party in the Trump era.

So far, Mr. Trump, politically limber to begin with, has sought to have his $2 trillion federal response and eat it, too.

He has shared billing on the front of the mailing for “The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America” with the Centers for Disease Control, an agency some of his supporters view as part of the so-called deep state. And he approved the C.D.C. recommendation that all Americans wear masks.

Yet he said he would not wear a mask himself. He has praised the government’s lead infectious-disease official, Dr. Anthony Fauci, but dismissed Dr. Fauci’s call for a national stay-at-home order, as some Republican governors resist going along with the C.D.C. guidance.

In a sign of the ideological fogginess of the moment, the Trump campaign on Friday argued in an email that Mr. Biden’s plan to add a government-run option to the Affordable Care Act “would end Obamacare as we know it,” as Mr. Trump continues to back a lawsuit seeking to do just that.

Guy Cecil, chairman of the major Democratic super PAC Priorities USA, said the administration’s anti-Obamacare position would prove politically punishing as the pandemic wore on.

“The fact that the administration is still seeking to overturn the Affordable Care Act at a time when more people are being thrown off their health care is only going to become more important,” he said.

It was only a few weeks ago that centrist Democrats were openly fretting that Senator Bernie Sanders’s Medicare for all plan and Andrew Yang’s call for a universal basic income would hurt the entire party with swing voters by feeding the Republicans’ “socialism” theme.

Now, with the swift bipartisan passage of the $2 trillion stimulus, perhaps only the first of its kind, those fears are subsiding.

“It makes it harder to label your opponent a socialist,” said Howard Wolfson, a top strategist for former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York, who ended his presidential bid last month.

The moment is not without irony for Mr. Sanders, whose chances to win the nomination have faded as his signature proposals have appeared to gain greater acceptance. A Morning Consult/Politico poll released last week found that Medicare for all had support from 55 percent of registered voters, up nine percentage points from mid-February.

“I’d love to see you tell me that you can’t campaign on free treatment now,” said Mr. Sanders’s campaign manager, Faiz Shakir. “Because all of our fates depend on everyone being tested and treated.”

With a “Yangwasright” hashtag trending on Twitter, a Marquette University Law School poll of Wisconsin voters found nearly 80 percent generally approved of the government’s direct payments to individuals.

Mr. Bannon, who left the Trump administration in 2017, saw evidence of a national coming together for measures, like a $15 federal minimum wage, to help “the heroes of this catastrophe” — whom he identified as “the truck drivers, the kids at the Amazon plants, police, doctors and nurses.”

He predicted a pandemic-born political realignment in step with his own brand of “economic nationalism,” in which shared resentment over income inequality, corporate greed and global trade policies that gave China so much economic influence in the United States would create a new political coalition drawn from Sanders supporters, working-class Democrats and Republicans.

“What we want is a better deal for the little guy — trade barrier protections, high wages and also entrepreneurialism, not corporate capitalism,” he said.

Republicans close to the White House argued that the party’s primary tenets were unshakable, even in this crisis.

For instance, where Mr. Trump has been hesitant in using the Defense Production Act to compel American factories to produce medical supplies, “Joe Biden and Democrats call for compulsion, which is markedly different,” said Tim Murtaugh, the Trump campaign communications director.

Mr. Trump has likened government mandates for manufacturers to nationalization of industry, a line his supporters presumably would not want him to cross. Parts of his political base are chafing at government moves to control social interactions and shutter businesses to fight the virus.

With that in mind, Mr. Schlapp, the chairman of the American Conservative Union, which runs CPAC, described the huge aid package as restitution, not socialism.

“The conservative principle is when government takes your property and economic rights, they are obligated to come up with a financial settlement,” said Mr. Schlapp, whose wife, Mercedes Schlapp, is a Trump campaign adviser.

Conservatives, he said, are less deferential to government than their liberal counterparts and are not likely to put up with it for long, presaging a potentially intense election-year conflict between left and right over when to end social distancing measures.

“Eventually, we have to ask ourselves, what’s the appropriate level of risk to open it back up,” Mr. Schlapp said. “It will be a showdown, and I think that will tell us a lot about our country.”

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OPEC Meeting Is Delayed as Saudi and Russian Tensions Flare

Westlake Legal Group opec-meeting-is-delayed-as-saudi-and-russian-tensions-flare OPEC Meeting Is Delayed as Saudi and Russian Tensions Flare United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Putin, Vladimir V Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
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A meeting planned for Monday between officials of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, Russia and other oil producers, which had buoyed hopes for a deal to end the turmoil in energy markets, has been put off, according to two OPEC delegates.

The news comes as lingering tensions have surfaced once again between Saudi Arabia, OPEC’s de facto leader, and Russia over who is to blame for the recent collapse in oil prices. On Friday, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin partly blamed Saudi Arabia for the price drop. The Saudis responded with angry statements from their ministers of foreign affairs and energy blaming Russia.

News of the meeting’s delay may roil the markets when trading resumes on Monday. The meeting, which was never officially announced but was widely reported on Friday, added to hopes that OPEC and Russia would agree on production trims.

On Thursday, President Trump said he believed that Russia and the Saudis were nearing a deal to cut production, prompting a surge of nearly 40 percent in oil prices, to about $34 a barrel for Brent crude, the international benchmark.

The OPEC delegates indicated that further talks would be required before moving ahead with a meeting, which could be rescheduled for later in the week. Saudi Arabia had called for the meeting last Thursday, responding to pressure from President Trump.

In early March, Russia declined to go along with a Saudi-led OPEC proposal to further trim production to deal with the plummeting demand for oil because of the coronavirus epidemic, leading the Saudis to walk away from a three year agreement with Moscow on production trims. Recently, the Saudis have been increasing production and offering steep discounts to their customers.

On Friday, Mr. Putin said that these Saudi actions were one “reason behind the collapse of prices.” The Saudi foreign minister, Prince Faisal bin Farhan al Saud, responded in a statement carried by the official Saudi Press Agency that Mr. Putin’s comments were “fully devoid of truth” and that “Russia was the one that refused the agreement.”

Mr. Putin did indicate that he was willing to have Russia participate in the now delayed meeting.

The Saudis want Russia and other producers to absorb some of the burden of new production trims. They are also hopeful that American oil producers will somehow share in output reductions.

Analysts estimate that because of the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, demand for oil is likely to fall by as much as 25 million barrels a day, or about a quarter of consumption in normal times, meaning that if oil producers don’t reach agreement on output curbs, involuntary shutdowns are likely to occur as refineries and other customers slash their purchases of crude and storage tanks fill up.

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430,000 People Have Traveled From China to U.S. Since Coronavirus Surfaced

Westlake Legal Group 430000-people-have-traveled-from-china-to-u-s-since-coronavirus-surfaced 430,000 People Have Traveled From China to U.S. Since Coronavirus Surfaced Wuhan (China) United States Trump, Donald J Seattle (Wash) San Francisco (Calif) Quarantines Politics and Government Newark (NJ) Los Angeles (Calif) Little Rock (Ark) Epidemics Detroit (Mich) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Chicago (Ill) airports Airport Security Airlines and Airplanes
Westlake Legal Group 00virus-chinaflights-01-facebookJumbo 430,000 People Have Traveled From China to U.S. Since Coronavirus Surfaced Wuhan (China) United States Trump, Donald J Seattle (Wash) San Francisco (Calif) Quarantines Politics and Government Newark (NJ) Los Angeles (Calif) Little Rock (Ark) Epidemics Detroit (Mich) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Chicago (Ill) airports Airport Security Airlines and Airplanes

Since Chinese officials disclosed the outbreak of a mysterious pneumonialike illness to international health officials on New Year’s Eve, at least 430,000 people have arrived in the United States on direct flights from China, including nearly 40,000 in the two months after President Trump imposed restrictions on such travel, according to an analysis of data collected in both countries.

The bulk of the passengers, who were of multiple nationalities, arrived in January, at airports in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Seattle, Newark and Detroit. Thousands of them flew directly from Wuhan, the center of the coronavirus outbreak, as American public health officials were only beginning to assess the risks to the United States.

Flights continued this past week, the data show, with passengers traveling from Beijing to Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York, under rules that exempt Americans and some others from the clampdown that took effect on Feb. 2. In all, 279 flights from China have arrived in the United States since then, and screening procedures have been uneven, interviews show.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly suggested that his travel measures impeded the virus’s spread in the United States. “I do think we were very early, but I also think that we were very smart, because we stopped China,” he said at a briefing on Tuesday, adding, “That was probably the biggest decision we made so far.” Last month, he said, “We’re the ones that kept China out of here.”

But the analysis of the flight and other data by The New York Times shows the travel measures, however effective, may have come too late to have “kept China out,” particularly in light of recent statements from health officials that as many as 25 percent of people infected with the virus may never show symptoms. Many infectious-disease experts suspect that the virus had been spreading undetected for weeks after the first American case was confirmed, in Washington State, on Jan. 20, and that it had continued to be introduced. In fact, no one knows when the virus first arrived in the United States.

During the first half of January, when Chinese officials were underplaying the severity of the outbreak, no travelers from China were screened for potential exposure to the virus. Health screening began in mid-January, but only for a number of travelers who had been in Wuhan and only at the airports in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York. By that time, about 4,000 people had already entered the United States directly from Wuhan, according to VariFlight, an aviation data company based in China. The measures were expanded to all passengers from China two weeks later.

In a statement on Friday, Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman, described Mr. Trump’s travel restrictions as a “bold decisive action which medical professionals say will prove to have saved countless lives.” The policy took effect, he said, at a time when the global health community did not yet “know the level of transmission or asymptomatic spread.”

Trump administration officials have also said they received significant pushback about imposing the restrictions even when they did. At the time, the World Health Organization was not recommending travel restrictions, Chinese officials rebuffed them and some scientists questioned whether curtailing travel would do any good. Some Democrats in Congress said they could lead to discrimination.

In interviews, multiple travelers who arrived after the screening was expanded said they received only passing scrutiny, with minimal follow-up.

“I was surprised at how lax the whole process was,” said Andrew Wu, 31, who landed at Los Angeles International Airport on a flight from Beijing on March 10. “The guy I spoke to read down a list of questions, and he didn’t seem interested in checking out anything.”


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Sabrina Fitch, 23, flew from China to Kennedy International Airport in New York on March 23. She and the 40 or so other passengers had their temperature taken twice while en route and were required to fill out forms about their travels and health, she said.

“Besides looking at our passports, they didn’t question us like we normally are questioned,” said Ms. Fitch, who had been teaching English in China. “So it was kind of weird, because everyone expected the opposite, where you get a lot of questions. But once we filled out the little health form, no one really cared.”

In January, before the broad screening was in place, there were over 1,300 direct passenger flights from China to the United States, according to VariFlight and two American firms, MyRadar and FlightAware. About 381,000 travelers flew directly from China to the United States that month, about a quarter of whom were American, according to data from the Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration.

In addition, untold others arrived from China on itineraries that first stopped in another country. While actual passenger counts for indirect fliers were not available, Sofia Boza-Holman, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, said they represented about a quarter of travelers from China. The restrictions, she added, reduced all passengers from the country by about 99 percent.

Mr. Trump issued his first travel restrictions related to the virus on Jan. 31, one day after the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a global health emergency. In a presidential proclamation, he barred foreign nationals from entering the country if they had been in China during the prior two weeks. The order exempted American citizens, green-card holders and their noncitizen relatives — exceptions roundly recognized as necessary to allow residents to return home and prevent families from being separated. It did not apply to flights from Hong Kong and Macau.

About 60 percent of travelers on direct flights from China in February were not American citizens, according to the most recently available government data. Most of the flights were operated by Chinese airlines after American carriers halted theirs.

At a news conference about the restrictions, Alex M. Azar II, the health secretary, repeatedly emphasized that “the risk is low” for Americans. He added, “Our job is to work to keep that that way.”

Health officials also announced an expansion of the screening beyond arrivals from Wuhan. Dr. Robert R. Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, explained that people would be screened for “significant risk, as well as any evidence of symptoms.” If there was no reason for additional examination, “they would be allowed to complete their travel back to their home, where they then will be monitored by the local health departments in a self-monitoring situation in their home.”

The procedures called for screening to be conducted in empty sections of the airports, usually past customs areas. Passengers would line up and spend a minute or two having their temperature taken and being asked about their health and travel history. Those with a fever or self-reported symptoms like a cough would get a medical evaluation, and if they were thought to have been infected or exposed to the virus, they would be sent to a hospital where local health officials would take over.

Passengers would also be given information cards about the virus and symptoms. Later versions advised people to stay at home for two weeks.

In a statement on Thursday, the C.D.C. described the entry screening as “part of a layered approach” that could “slow and reduce the spread of disease” when used with other public health measures.

“We cannot stop all introductions,” the C.D.C. added, noting that the coronavirus pandemic was “especially challenging due to asymptomatic and presymptomatic infections and an incubation period of up to two weeks.”

Separately, on Friday, the Department of Homeland Security said in a statement that the administration’s measures were “unprecedented” and allowed “the U.S. to stay ahead of the outbreak as it developed.”

Passengers including Mr. Wu described a cursory screening process when they arrived in the United States.

Mr. Wu, who has had no symptoms and has not become ill, said he was told to stay inside for 14 days when he landed in Los Angeles. He said he received two reminder messages the next day by email and text, but no further follow-up.

Another traveler, Chandler Jurinka, said his experience on Feb. 29 had an even more haphazard feel. He flew from Beijing to Seattle, with stops in Tokyo and Vancouver.

At the Seattle-Tacoma airport, he said, an immigration officer went through his documents and asked questions unrelated to the virus about his job and life in China. At no point did anyone take his temperature, he said.

“He hands me my passport and forms and says, ‘Oh, by the way, you haven’t been to Wuhan, have you?’” Mr. Jurinka said. “And then he says, ‘You don’t have a fever, right?’”

Like others, he left the airport with a card that recommended two weeks of self-quarantine and a promise that someone would call to check up on him. He said he never got a call.

Other travelers also said the follow-up from local health departments was hit-or-miss. Some received only emails or texts.

Jacinda Passmore, 23, a former English teacher in China who flew into Dallas on March 10, after a layover in Tokyo, got a thorough screening at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport. It took about 40 minutes, she said, before she was cleared for her flight home to Little Rock, Ark.

State health workers later dropped off thermometers at her house and insisted her entire family stay home for two weeks and provide updates on their condition.

“They asked us every day: ‘Have you stayed inside? Have you met anyone? Have you been quarantined?’” Ms. Passmore said. “They’re really nice about it. They said, ‘If you need anything, we can go grocery-shopping for you.’”

Nineteen flights departed Wuhan in January for New York or San Francisco — and the flights were largely full, according to VariFlight. For about 4,000 travelers, there was no enhanced screening.

On Jan. 17, the federal government began screening travelers from Wuhan, but only 400 more passengers arrived on direct flights before Chinese authorities shut down the airport. Scott Liu, 56, a Wuhan native and a textile importer who lives in New York, caught the last commercial flight, on Jan. 22.

Mr. Liu had gone to Wuhan for the Spring Festival on Jan. 6, but decided to come back early as the outbreak worsened. At the Wuhan airport, staff checked his temperature. On the flight, he and other passengers filled a health declaration form, which included questions about symptoms like fever, cough or difficulty breathing.

After they arrived at J.F.K. in New York, the passengers were directed to go through a temperature checkpoint. “It was very fast,” he said. “If your temperature is normal, they will just let you in.”

Mr. Liu said no one asked him questions about his travel history or health, and he received a card with information about what to do if he developed symptoms. At the time, there were no instructions to isolate. Mr. Liu said he and his friends all decided to do so anyway.

“I stayed at home for almost 20 days,” he said.

About 800 passengers on five charter flights were later evacuated from Wuhan by the U.S. government and directed to military bases, where they waited out two weeks of quarantine.

The charter flights began on Jan. 29. Instagram posts from one showed C.D.C. officials in full protective gear on the plane and escorting passengers after landing.

One group of passengers was eventually flown to Omaha to be taken by bus to a National Guard camp for quarantine. Video showed them accompanied by a full police escort, with lights flashing, helicopters overhead and intersections blocked off along the way.

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