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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 38)

Mexico’s Top Diplomat to Meet With Pence in Effort to Avoid Trump Tariffs

WASHINGTON — Vice President Mike Pence and other top administration officials will meet Wednesday with Mexico’s top diplomat as both sides try to avert the potentially crippling economic consequences of President Trump’s threat to impose tariffs on all Mexican imports.

Mr. Trump has vowed to impose a 5 percent tariff on all goods from Mexico beginning Monday and to increase the tax to 25 percent by October if Mexico does not prevent migrants from illegally entering the United States. Mr. Trump, speaking Tuesday in London, said that it was “more likely that the tariffs” would be imposed on Monday as he has threatened.

Mexican officials, along with Republican lawmakers, are trying to prevent that outcome. Marcelo Ebrard, the Mexican foreign minister, is scheduled to meet on Wednesday afternoon at the White House with Mr. Pence, a senior administration official said, in an effort to convince the president that Mexico is doing everything it can to help prevent illegal immigration across the United States border. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Robert Lighthizer, the United States Trade Representative, were also expected to attend the meeting.

Mr. Trump, frustrated by what he views as Mexico’s failure to stem the flow of migrants, said he would use broad emergency powers to impose punishing tariffs on the country. But top American officials have spoken in vague terms about what steps Mexico must take, and it remains unclear exactly what Mexico could do to persuade Mr. Trump to back down.

Peter Navarro, a top trade adviser who has advocated using levies to punish Mexico, said in an interview with CNN on Wednesday that Mr. Trump’s threat had gotten the Mexican government’s attention and that the United States might not have to impose the tariffs.

“We believe that these tariffs may not have to go into effect precisely because we have the Mexicans’ attention,” Mr. Navarro said

He outlined several things that Mexico must do to prevent the tariffs, including committing to taking “all the asylum seekers and applying Mexican laws which are much stronger than ours.”

He also urged Mexico to do more to secure its border with Guatemala and tighten check points for migrants within Mexico.

Mr. Ebrard has also expressed optimism, telling reporters on Tuesday in Washington that there was an 80 percent chance that Mr. Trump would not impose the tariffs.

But others in Washington were more doubtful that the two sides could come to a resolution before Monday’s deadline. Carlos Heredia, a professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas in Mexico City, said Tuesday that whatever action Mexico takes to prevent migration into the United States, it was unlikely to satisfy the president.

“If there is any logic to the way that President Trump handles policy, it’s that he likes conflict,” Mr. Heredia said. “I don’t think that there is a way to please Trump.”

Others said that it would take time for Mexico to make the changes the Trump administration was requesting.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155945139_9a32ea36-33a0-4b61-8c14-458ff4b4d4c1-articleLarge Mexico’s Top Diplomat to Meet With Pence in Effort to Avoid Trump Tariffs United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Senate Pompeo, Mike Pence, Mike Pelosi, Nancy International Trade and World Market Illegal Immigration House of Representatives Homeland Security Department Federal Reserve System Ebrard, Marcelo Customs (Tariff)

Marcelo Ebrard, the Mexican foreign minister, on Tuesday at the Capitol in Washington.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

“This is not going to happen in seven days,” said Arturo Sarukhan, a former Mexican ambassador to the United States. “You can’t enforce your way out of a migration crisis.”

Mr. Trump’s threat to tax Mexican products has rattled financial markets and prompted an outcry from businesses that would be affected, including automakers, agricultural companies and retailers. The chairman of the Federal Reserve said on Tuesday that the central bank was watching Mr. Trump’s trade war warily and would act to prevent economic damage from the conflict.

Mr. Trump has made heavy use of tariffs on trading partners from China to Europe, but imposing tariffs on Mexico, the United States’ largest trading partner, would be a significant escalation in the president’s trade war. Mexico is a key supplier of products like fresh tomatoes and grapes; bluejeans; televisions; medical devices; and automobiles. Many companies have created supply chains that snake back and forth across the border — meaning some companies could be forced to pay Mr. Trump’s tariff multiple times as their products travel from farms to factories to consumers.

Businesses are also worried that the president’s move risks derailing what would be his signature trade achievement: passing the newly negotiated North American trade agreement.

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement was signed last year, but it still needs to be ratified by legislators in all three countries. Mexico submitted the text to its Senate hours before Mr. Trump’s threat. But Mexican officials are unlikely to move forward with that vote with the threat of tariffs hanging over them.

Mr. Ebrard, who has been in Washington all week meeting with Trump administration officials and members of Congress, said earlier in the week that Mexico was already enforcing its own immigration laws but argued that there was more the countries could do to work together. He said Mexican officials had come to Washington ready to “design actions together.”

Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, repeated the administration’s demands in an interview with The Hill published on Tuesday. He said Mexico must crack down on illegal crossings from Guatemala, and use American intelligence to target smuggling operations that try to sneak migrants across the border.

Mr. McAleenan also said the administration expects Mexico to help tighten the shared border, even though the Mexican government has agreed to take in migrants while their asylum cases are processed in the United States.

“We can’t have the situation where 1,000 people in one group can cross the border at 4 a.m. without any interdiction or any effort to stop that unlawful activity,” said Mr. McAleenan, citing a group that illegally crossed last week into El Paso. The group of 1,036 migrants was the largest ever recorded by the Department of Homeland Security to cross illegally into the United States.

On Tuesday, Mr. Ebrard met for a half-hour with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and several other Democratic lawmakers.

Republican senators are also mobilizing to prevent the White House from moving ahead with tariffs, warning Mr. Trump on Tuesday that they were almost uniformly opposed to his plans to tax Mexican imports.

Several big states would be hit hard by the proposed tariffs on Mexican products, including Texas, Michigan, California, Illinois and Ohio, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re holding a gun to our own heads,” said Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump, in Interview, Says He Prefers Talk to Military Action on Iran

LONDON — President Trump said in a British TV interview broadcast on Wednesday that there was “a chance” of military action against Iran, after months of threats and an apparent de-escalation of tensions between Tehran and Washington.

Mr. Trump made the remarks on ITV’s “Good Morning Britain” to Piers Morgan, the show’s co-host who was the winner of “The Celebrity Apprentice” in the United States in 2007-8 and someone Mr. Trump considers a friend. They were aired during the third and last day of his state visit to Britain.

[Read the latest about Mr. Trump’s visit in our live briefing.]

When Mr. Morgan asked Mr. Trump whether he was considering military action against Iran, the president, who almost never rules anything out, said: “There is always a chance. Do I want to? No, I’d rather not. But there’s always a chance.” He added, “I’d much rather talk.”

Mr. Trump has told his Pentagon chiefs that he does not want war with Iran, but he has also undercut his national security adviser, John R. Bolton, who has been more hawkish. Mr. Bolton asserted last month, without presenting evidence, that naval mines “almost certainly from Iran” were behind explosions that damaged oil tankers in the Persian Gulf.

But on Sunday, in what appeared to be an easing of the United States’ hard-line policy toward Iran, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the Trump administration was ready to negotiate with Iran’s clerical leaders with “no preconditions.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155942538_4d7633be-86c8-4304-bdfd-0d877b830dc9-articleLarge Trump, in Interview, Says He Prefers Talk to Military Action on Iran United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Morgan, Piers May, Theresa M Great Britain

Mr. Trump and the first lady, Melania Trump, with Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, at Winfield House in London on Tuesday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Mr. Trump’s state visit to Britain has been a whirlwind of ceremonial events with the royal family, including a state banquet on Monday; tea with Prince Charles and his wife, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall; and political and business meetings on Tuesday with Mrs. May and other top officials in which he urged Britain to forge ahead with plans to quit the European Union, dangling the prospect of a “phenomenal” trade deal with the United States.

On Wednesday, the president joined Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Theresa May in Portsmouth, on the coast of southern England, at a ceremony to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II.

The president spoke for less than two minutes, reading an excerpt from a prayer that President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered in a radio address on the evening of June 6, 1944, according to White House officials. It said in part:

“Almighty God, our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity. They will need Thy blessings. For the enemy is strong.”

And: “Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.”

In his wide-ranging interview with Mr. Morgan, Mr. Trump was asked about his lack of military service during the Vietnam War, which Mr. Trump has claimed was because of bone spurs in his foot, a claim that has been met with skepticism.

He said he was “never a fan” of that particular war, and insisted that Vietnam had been barely known of. “At that time, nobody ever heard of the country,” he said.

When asked if he would have joined the war effort if not for the bone spurs, Mr. Trump said, “I would not have minded that at all; I would have been honored.”

“I think I make up for it now,” he added.

In the interview, he also cast his ban on transgender people serving in the military as an economic decision and admitted using the word “nasty” in connection with Meghan, Duchess of Sussex.

Piers Morgan with Mr. Trump and his daughter Ivanka in 2014, during an “Apprentice” season.CreditDouglas Gorenstein/NBC

The discussion with Mr. Morgan was aired amid a state visit that has been marked by a long-running feud with the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and protests that brought thousands of people to the streets of London with new and old props, including the Trump baby balloon and one showing the president sitting on a golden toilet.

Mr. Trump, who is often unsettled by reports of protests, sought to play down the demonstrations, calling them “fake news” in a news conference with Mrs. May on Tuesday and tweeting on Wednesday that there were actually “big crowds” supporting him.

Mr. Trump had set the stage for his second trip to Britain as president with other interviews, in The Sun and The Sunday Times, both Rupert Murdoch-owned newspapers. Asked by The Sun’s reporter about criticisms that the former Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s wife, made about him in 2016, Mr. Trump replied, “I didn’t know she was nasty.” He later denied saying the word nasty, even though the exchange had been recorded.

On Wednesday, however, Mr. Trump acknowledged to Mr. Morgan: “They said some of the things that she said and, it’s actually on tape. And I said, ‘Well, I didn’t know she was nasty.’ I wasn’t referring to she’s nasty. I said she was nasty about me. And, essentially, I didn’t know she was nasty about me.”

Mr. Morgan was at his most adversarial when he asked why Mr. Trump claimed to support rights for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgender people, but was enforcing a ban on transgender people serving in the American military.

Mr. Trump repeatedly cast it as an economic decision, and suggested that transgender people were signing up for service as a way to have surgical costs covered.

Prince Harry, right, with Ivanka Trump at Buckingham Palace on Monday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“They take massive amounts of drugs. They have to,” he said, adding, “You’re in the military; you’re not allowed to take any drugs.”

Mr. Morgan interjected: “The U.S. military spends a lot more money, for example, on giving Viagra to servicemen,” he said, “than it does on actual medical bills of transgender people. And so it just seems to me an unnecessary thing for a guy who wants to be supportive of L.G.B.T. rights and the community around the world that you’ve taken this action.”

The president replied: “Well, it is what it is. Look, massive amounts — and also people going in and asking for the operation, you know the operation is $200,000, $250,000, and getting the operation, the recovery period is long and they have to take large amounts of drugs after that for whatever reason, but large amounts, and that’s not the way it is. I mean, you can’t do that.”

He also said that in his meeting with Prince Charles, a brief chat had turned into a 90-minute discussion. “He is really into climate change, and I think that’s great, I mean I want that, I like that,” Mr. Trump said.

The president has denied that climate change exists, and has questioned the science behind it.

In the interview, Mr. Trump seemed impressed that the prince was concerned about the fate of future generations. “I’ll tell you what moved me is his passion for future generations; he’s really not doing this for him,” he told Mr. Morgan. “He’s doing this for future generations.”

But Mr. Trump said he had dismissed the suggestion that the United States should do more. “I did say,” he said, “ ‘Well, the United States right now has among the cleanest climates there are based on all statistics.’ And it’s even getting better.”

He also called the reality of having control of the United States’ nuclear weapons a “terrible responsibility” for him, but one that he was prepared to handle.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mexico’s Foreign Minister to Meet With Pence in Effort to Avoid Trump Tariffs

WASHINGTON — Vice President Mike Pence will meet Wednesday with Mexico’s foreign minister as officials on both sides of the border try to avert the potentially crippling economic consequences of President Trump’s threat to impose tariffs on all Mexican imports.

Mr. Trump has vowed to impose a 5 percent tariff on all goods from Mexico beginning Monday and to increase the tax to 25 percent by October if Mexico does not prevent migrants from illegally entering the United States. Mr. Trump, speaking Tuesday in London, said that it was “more likely that the tariffs” would be imposed on Monday as he has threatened.

Mexican officials, along with Republican lawmakers, are trying to prevent that outcome. Marcelo Ebrard, the Mexican foreign minister, is scheduled to meet on Wednesday afternoon at the White House with Mr. Pence, a senior administration official said, in an effort to convince the president that Mexico is doing everything it can to help prevent illegal immigration across the United States border. As of Tuesday night in London, as he was preparing to leave for Washington, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was also expected to attend the meeting.

Mr. Trump, frustrated by what he views as Mexico’s failure to stem the flow of migrants, said he would use broad emergency powers to impose punishing tariffs on the country. But it remains unclear what Mexico could do to satisfy Mr. Trump and persuade him to back down.

Top American officials have spoken in vague terms about what steps Mexico must take. Still, Mr. Ebrard has expressed optimism, telling reporters on Tuesday in Washington that there was an 80 percent chance that Mr. Trump would not impose the tariffs.

Few in Washington shared his optimism for the high-stakes discussions as the clock ticked toward Monday’s deadline. Carlos Heredia, a professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas in Mexico City, said Tuesday that whatever action Mexico takes to prevent migration into the United States, it was unlikely to satisfy the president.

“If there is any logic to the way that President Trump handles policy, it’s that he likes conflict,” Mr. Heredia said. “I don’t think that there is a way to please Trump.”

Mr. Trump’s threat to tax Mexican products has rattled financial markets and prompted an outcry from businesses that would be affected, including automakers, agricultural companies and retailers. The chairman of the Federal Reserve said on Tuesday that the central bank was watching Mr. Trump’s trade war warily and would act to prevent economic damage from the conflict.

Mr. Trump has made heavy use of tariffs on trading partners from China to Europe, but imposing tariffs on Mexico, the United States’ largest trading partner, would be a significant escalation in the president’s trade war. Mexico is a key supplier of products like fresh tomatoes and grapes; bluejeans; televisions; medical devices; and automobiles. Many companies have created supply chains that snake back and forth across the border — meaning some companies could be forced to pay Mr. Trump’s tariff multiple times as their products travel from farms to factories to consumers.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 05dc-tariffs2-articleLarge Mexico’s Foreign Minister to Meet With Pence in Effort to Avoid Trump Tariffs United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Senate Pompeo, Mike Pence, Mike Pelosi, Nancy International Trade and World Market Illegal Immigration House of Representatives Homeland Security Department Federal Reserve System Ebrard, Marcelo Customs (Tariff)

Marcelo Ebrard, the Mexican foreign minister, on Tuesday at the Mexican Embassy in Washington.CreditAlexander Drago/Reuters

Businesses are also worried that the president’s move risks derailing what would be his signature trade achievement: passing the newly negotiated North American trade agreement.

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement was signed last year, but it still needs to be ratified by legislators in all three countries. Mexico submitted the text to its Senate hours before Mr. Trump’s threat. But Mexican officials are unlikely to move forward with that vote with the threat of tariffs hanging over them.

Mr. Ebrard, who has been in Washington all week meeting with Trump administration officials and members of Congress, said earlier in the week that Mexico was already enforcing its own immigration laws but argued that there was more the countries could do to work together. He said Mexican officials had come to Washington ready to “design actions together.”

Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, repeated the administration’s demands in an interview with The Hill published on Tuesday. He said Mexico must crack down on illegal crossings from Guatemala, and use American intelligence to target smuggling operations that try to sneak migrants across the border.

Mr. McAleenan also said the administration expects Mexico to help tighten the shared border, even though the Mexican government has agreed to take in migrants while their asylum cases are processed in the United States.

“We can’t have the situation where 1,000 people in one group can cross the border at 4 a.m. without any interdiction or any effort to stop that unlawful activity,” said Mr. McAleenan, citing a group that illegally crossed last week into El Paso. The group of 1,036 migrants was the largest ever recorded by the Department of Homeland Security to cross illegally into the United States.

On Tuesday, Mr. Ebrard met for a half-hour with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and several other Democratic lawmakers.

Republican senators are also mobilizing to prevent the White House from moving ahead with tariffs, warning Mr. Trump on Tuesday that they were almost uniformly opposed to his plans to tax Mexican imports.

Several big states would be hit hard by the proposed tariffs on Mexican products, including Texas, Michigan, California, Illinois and Ohio, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re holding a gun to our own heads,” said Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Senators Look to Force 22 Votes Blocking Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia

Westlake Legal Group 04dc-arms-facebookJumbo Senators Look to Force 22 Votes Blocking Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Senate Saudi Arabia Pompeo, Mike Assassinations and Attempted Assassinations Arms Trade

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan group of senators will try to force nearly two dozen votes rebuking the Trump administration’s decision to declare a national emergency to circumvent Congress and sell billions of dollars of munitions to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

The legislation, led by Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, and Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a Trump ally and once a staunch defender of the kingdom, underscores lawmakers’ fury at the administration’s support for the Saudis after the killing of the dissident Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. And it could grind business in the Senate to a crawl while allowing rare public criticism of President Trump’s administration from members of his own party.

Mr. Trump circumvented Congress late last month by declaring an emergency over Iran and moving forward with arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Jordan that had been blocked by Congress since last year, a decision that immediately drew criticism from lawmakers, who are also furious over the civilian death toll from the Saudi-led air campaign in Yemen.

“We will not stand idly by and allow the president or the secretary of state to further erode congressional review and oversight of arm sales,” Mr. Menendez said in a statement. Referring to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, he added: “Regrettably, Secretary Pompeo’s abuse of this emergency authority has broken the arms sales process. The best thing the secretary of state can do right now is withdraw his emergency certification, immediately submit these sales for the normal congressional review and engage with senators to address our concerns.”

The coalition of senators is hoping to leverage a provision in the Arms Export Control Act that allows lawmakers to introduce what is known as a privileged joint resolution of disapproval against a proposed sale of arms, in essence forcing a debate and a vote. Their plan is to introduce 22 such resolutions, one for each proposed arms sale. A simple majority of lawmakers would need to vote to allow the debate to proceed — and if the measures advanced, the group of senators could monopolize hours of floor time as soon as mid-June.

Winning such support from Republican lawmakers is not out of the question. Members of Congress from both parties were livid early this year when the White House missed a congressional deadline to submit a report detailing whether the administration found Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman personally responsible for Mr. Khashoggi’s death.

And the Senate voted 54 to 46 in March to end American military assistance for the kingdom’s war in Yemen and to curtail presidential war powers, with seven Republican senators breaking ranks to join the resolution and the Democratic conference united in support.

To actually block the arms sales, however, backers of the resolutions would almost certainly need a veto-proof majority, and whether the measures could muster that is another question.

Five other lawmakers joined Mr. Menendez in his drive, including three Republicans: Senator Todd Young of Indiana, Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and Mr. Graham. Mr. Graham said in a statement that he expected “strong bipartisan support” for the resolutions.

“While I understand that Saudi Arabia is a strategic ally, the behavior of Mohammed bin Salman cannot be ignored. Now is not the time to do business as usual with Saudi Arabia,” Mr. Graham said. “I am also very concerned about the precedent these arms sales would set by having the administration go around legitimate concerns of the Congress.”

Senator Christopher S. Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, who first warned of the arms sales and is a sponsor of the legislation, said that “the U.S.-Saudi relationship needs to change, and it’s clear that only Congress can make that happen.”

New outrage emerged Tuesday, when Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, a Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, disclosed that the Energy Department had approved nuclear technology transfers to the kingdom on two occasions after Mr. Khashoggi’s killing in October in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul — including one approved two weeks after his death.

Lawmakers had repeatedly pressed cabinet officials on whether the administration had approved transfers of nuclear expertise from American companies to Saudi Arabia, but it took months for them to receive an answer.

“The alarming realization that the Trump administration signed off on sharing our nuclear know-how with the Saudi regime after it brutally murdered an American resident adds to a disturbing pattern of behavior,” Mr. Kaine said in a statement. “President Trump’s eagerness to give the Saudis anything they want, over bipartisan congressional objection, harms American national security interests.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

House Votes to Give ‘Dreamers’ a Path to Citizenship

Westlake Legal Group 04dc-cong-facebookJumbo House Votes to Give ‘Dreamers’ a Path to Citizenship United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Pelosi, Nancy Immigration and Emigration Illegal Immigration Dream Act (Development, Relief and Education for Minors Act) Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

WASHINGTON — The Democrat-led House passed legislation on Tuesday to grant a path to citizenship to about 2.5 million immigrants whose legal protections President Trump has moved to end, advancing a measure that highlights the bitter partisan differences over immigration.

The bill, which passed 237 to 187, with seven Republicans voting yes, would create a new legal pathway for young undocumented immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children, known as Dreamers, and for those with Temporary Protected Status, granted to immigrants whose countries are ravaged by natural disaster or violence. It is almost certain to die in the Republican-led Senate, where there is no appetite to challenge Mr. Trump on his signature issue and the majority regards it as amnesty for people who have broken the law.

The White House said on Monday that Mr. Trump would veto the measure. But as the vote tally hit 218, representing a majority for passage, scores of Dreamers seated in the House gallery rose to their feet and cheered loudly, chanting, “Si se puede!” and then the English translation, “Yes we can!” It was evidence of the national grass-roots movement they have built over more than a decade to push for permanent legal status.

The Democrats’ immigration measure was notable both for what it did and for what it did not do. It was a grant of legal status for a narrow group of immigrants, not a comprehensive measure to overhaul what lawmakers in both parties concede is a badly broken immigration system and to deal with the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Such a measure passed the Senate in 2013 only to die in a Republican-controlled House.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California said Democrats wanted the narrower measure to become law, but she conceded that it was drafted as a statement of principle and a “bridge to understanding why we need comprehensive immigration reform for an immigration system that embraces the contributions of our newcomers.”

It was the latest example of Democrats’ drive to use their power in the House to challenge Mr. Trump and dramatize their disagreements with Republicans, sending a message to voters about their contrasting values and priorities. As Mr. Trump continues to press for a wall on the southwestern border, stricter asylum standards and more enforcement — and even tariffs to pressure Mexico to block migrants — Democrats spent Tuesday advocating instead for removing the threat of deportation for two of the most sympathetic groups of immigrants.

“Because of Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant policies, millions of immigrants across the country live in constant fear that they will face deportation and potentially be separated from their families,” Representative Nydia M. Velázquez, Democrat of New York, said as she argued in favor of the bill. “Let’s send a strong message to the world that we recognize that immigrants make America America.”

Republicans denounced the bill as a grant of amnesty that would provide an incentive for more illegal immigration at a time when the border with Mexico is already overrun by migrants.

“This bill does nothing to address our crisis,” said Representative Mike D. Rogers, Republican of Alabama. “Instead, it tells an entire generation of illegal immigrants that breaking our laws is rewarded.”

Democrats, Mr. Rogers added, “would rather reward illegal immigrants than secure our borders, enforce our laws and fix this crisis.”

In fact, passage of the legislation follows years of haggling among Mr. Trump and congressional Republicans and Democrats over a plan that would have done both, pairing legal status for the Dreamers and Temporary Protected Status holders with money for a border wall. The negotiations broke down repeatedly, even amid signs that such a measure would have had enough bipartisan support to pass.

Democrats now say they are opposed to any money for a wall. Even as they debated the so-called Dream and Promise Act on Tuesday, they unveiled a spending bill for the Department of Homeland Security that added no new money for border barriers or security measures. Republicans likewise were nearly unanimous in their opposition to protecting Dreamers and Temporary Protected Status holders, arguing that stricter immigration policies must first be imposed.

“This is frankly another green light to those who want to come here seeking freedom from the place that they currently are — which I sympathize with,” said Representative Doug Collins, Republican of Georgia. “But either we have a way to get into our country legally, or we don’t.”

The partisan fight over the bill obscured the complicated political crosscurrents that have long frustrated attempts to forge consensus in Congress on immigration issues. It was that dynamic that prompted President Barack Obama to go around Congress in 2012 and create the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which provided renewable legal status and work permits to about 700,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

Mr. Trump moved in 2017 to rescind DACA, but has been blocked by federal courts as part of a legal challenge that has reached the Supreme Court. The House bill would allow DACA recipients, as well as another 1.6 million immigrants who are eligible for the program but not enrolled, to apply for permanent legal status.

The Trump administration has also terminated or failed to renew Temporary Protected Status for several countries, including El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti, in some cases leading to legal challenges that are still unresolved. The bill approved on Tuesday would allow the roughly 300,000 status holders currently living in the United States, along with as many as 3,600 Liberians who have a similar status known as Deferred Enforced Departure, to earn legal permanent residency and eventual citizenship.

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Senate Republicans Warn White House Against Mexico Tariffs

WASHINGTON — Republican senators sent the White House a sharp message on Tuesday, warning that they were opposed to President Trump’s plans to impose tariffs on Mexican imports, just hours after the president said lawmakers would be “foolish” to try to stop him.

Mr. Trump’s latest threat — 5 percent tariffs on all goods imported from Mexico, rising to as high as 25 percent until the Mexican government stems the flow of migrants — has riled Republican senators who fear its impact on the economy and their home states. They emerged from a closed-door lunch in the Capitol angered by the briefing they received from a deputy White House counsel, Patrick F. Philbin, and Assistant Attorney General Steven A. Engel on the legal basis for imposing new tariffs by declaring a national emergency.

“I want you to take a message back” to the White House, Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, told the attorneys, according to people familiar with the meeting. “You didn’t hear a single yes” from the Republican conference. He called the proposed tariffs a $30 billion tax hike on Texans.

Senator Ron Johnson, Republican of Wisconsin, said he warned the lawyers that the Senate could muster an overwhelming majority to beat back the tariffs, even if Mr. Trump were to veto a resolution disapproving them. Republicans may be broadly supportive of Mr. Trump’s push to build a wall and secure the border, he said, but they are almost uniformly opposed to the imposition of tariffs on Mexico.

“The White House should be concerned about what that vote would result in, because Republicans really don’t like taxing American consumers and businesses,” Mr. Johnson said.

Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, fretted, “We’re holding a gun to our own heads.”

President Trump, just hours before, said he planned to move forward with imposing tariffs on Mexican imports next week as part of his effort to stem the flow of migrants crossing the southern border.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155922771_627f6654-fd1d-4e0f-aca2-21574b3e070d-articleLarge Senate Republicans Warn White House Against Mexico Tariffs United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Illegal Immigration Elections, Senate Customs (Tariff)

“Look, millions of people are flowing through Mexico,” President Trump said at a news conference in London on Tuesday. “That’s unacceptable.”CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“I think it’s more likely that the tariffs go on, and we’ll probably be talking during the time that the tariffs are on, and they’re going to be paid,” Mr. Trump said at a news conference in London with British Prime Minister Theresa May. When asked about Senate Republicans discussing ways to block the tariffs, Mr. Trump said, “I don’t think they will do that.”

He said, “I think if they do, it’s foolish.”

Republicans are still holding out hope that the tariffs can be avoided. Mexico’s foreign minister is leading a delegation to Washington this week to try to defuse the situation with the Trump administration.

“There is not much support for tariffs in my conference, that’s for sure,” Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, said. “Our hope is that the tariffs will be avoided, and we will not have to answer any hypotheticals.”

Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, said he “would not be inclined to vote on a tariff against a friend,” but ventured that “what you’re likely to see is the Mexican government and our government finding some way to work on this collaboratively and not reach a tariff.”

Others were less convinced.

“He’s committed to this,” said Senator John Kennedy, Republican of Louisiana, who spoke with Mr. Trump on Sunday and was sure the president will proceed with the tariffs, regardless of the concerns. “He’s serious as four heart attacks and a stroke. He’s moving forward.”

Any vote to disapprove the tariffs would almost certainly face a presidential veto, meaning that both the House and Senate would have to muster two-thirds majorities to beat Mr. Trump. Opponents would use the same motion of disapproval that they tried to use to block the president from grabbing federal money for a border wall that was not appropriated for that purpose. That motion did pass Congress with significant Republican support, but not enough to overcome Mr. Trump’s veto.

Mr. Johnson warned White House officials that they should not count on a veto override vote going the same way. But Mr. Trump has supporters, and Republicans, especially in the House, have been loath to oppose him on immigration. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, once a moderate on immigration policy, took to Twitter to say he was within his rights to use tariffs to force Mexico’s hand.

Senator John Kennedy, Republican of Louisiana, spoke with Mr. Trump on Sunday about the tariffs.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Senator Kevin Cramer, Republican of North Dakota, expressed support for the president, as did Senator Thom Tillis of North Carolina, who is up for re-election in 2020 and faced blistering criticism after flip-flopping earlier this year on whether he would vote to disapprove of the president’s emergency declaration to build the wall.

“I think Mexico could help us solve the crisis down at the border,” Mr. Tillis told reporters. “What’s the tax on handling 80,000 additional illegal immigrants coming across the border, housing them, adjudicating them? You’ve got to look at the total cost of the prices.”

Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, told reporters on Tuesday that House Democrats still “want to get to yes” on passing Mr. Trump’s new trade deal with Canada and Mexico, an updated North American Free Trade Agreement that could be torpedoed by new tariffs on Mexico. But he declined to forecast whether the House would try to block the tariffs that could stand in the way.

“The problem that we confront in this country is that the president often conducts himself in an erratic fashion as it relates to economic policy, particularly in terms of his deployment of tariffs,” Mr. Jeffries said.

He added: “The administration’s tariff policy is erratic and all over the place. We will see what the Senate Republicans ultimately decide to do, but we will certainly strongly consider proceeding in a way that is appropriate and consistent with our legislative powers.”

Mr. Trump seemed unimpressed when a reporter noted that Mexican officials say that they’ve increased the number of migrants they’ve apprehended coming into their country from elsewhere in Central America. He offered no specifics on what it would take to keep the tariffs from being imposed.

“Look, millions of people are flowing through Mexico,” Mr. Trump said. “That’s unacceptable.”

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As Trump Dangles Post-Brexit Trade Deal, Some Britons See Opportunism

LONDON — President Trump on Tuesday urged Britain to forge ahead with plans to quit the European Union, reiterating his support for Brexit at a time of acute political crisis, as the prospect of a Britain overly dependent on the United States divided politicians and further inflamed thousands of anti-Trump protesters on the streets.

Mr. Trump dangled the prospect of a “phenomenal” trade deal with the United States if Britain breaks from Europe. But he made clear that in negotiations for such a deal, “everything will be on the table,” including opening Britain’s public health system to American competitors.

Taking credit for having predicted the outcome of Britain’s referendum in 2016, Mr. Trump said he believed Britain could now leave the European Union, even if it fails to make a deal with Brussels by the Oct. 31 deadline.

“I would think that it will happen, and it probably should happen,” Mr. Trump said at a news conference with Prime Minister Theresa May, who will step down as leader of the Conservative Party this week after having repeatedly failed to win approval in Parliament for her negotiated exit agreement.

“This is a great, great country and it wants its own identity,” said Mr. Trump, who had warm words for Mrs. May, even as he repeated that he would have taken a harder line than her in the talks with the European Union.

Relaxed and agreeable on the second day of his state visit to Britain, both in public and in his private meetings, Mr. Trump still seemed on a high after a day of circulating between palaces and mingling with royalty.

If the first day of Mr. Trump’s visit showcased a royal family determined to nurture the “special relationship” with the United States — lavishing their guest with a gilded banquet and a royal cannon salute — Tuesday plunged Mr. Trump into the murkier crosscurrents of British politics, where he remains deeply unpopular.

It also demonstrated, yet again, Mr. Trump’s penchant for barging into the most sensitive political debates of other countries — often turning himself into a lightning rod, which poses challenges for his allies and adversaries alike.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155911254_417ffe17-84cb-4103-ba33-382cca79f4c2-articleLarge As Trump Dangles Post-Brexit Trade Deal, Some Britons See Opportunism United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Politics and Government May, Theresa M London (England) International Relations Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union

An anti-Trump protest on Tuesday in Trafalgar Square.CreditClodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters

Boris Johnson, a pro-Brexit politician and former foreign secretary who is running to replace Mrs. May as the Conservative leader, spoke to Mr. Trump for 20 minutes by phone but declined a face-to-face meeting, citing a busy schedule as he prepares his campaign to replace Mrs. May. She will remain a lame-duck prime minister until the Conservatives elect her replacement this summer.

To many in Britain, Mr. Trump appeared less a friend tossing a lifeline than an opportunist angling to exploit Britain’s estrangement from Europe by pursuing a trade deal that would crack open Britain’s health service and foist chlorinated American chicken on British shoppers.

“This orange blow-in is brashly telling us how to conduct our own international affairs,” wrote Zoe Williams, a columnist at the Guardian, “and listening to him it is clear that a close relationship with Trump’s America would be as far removed from regaining sovereignty as it is possible to imagine. Allied to Trump, we’d be more of a satrapy than a nation state. We would be dominated by a power that was as raw as it was distant.”

Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, echoed those themes in a speech to anti-Trump demonstrators. He condemned Mr. Trump’s war of words with the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and warned that a trade deal with the United States would amount to “offering up our precious National Health Service to private American companies.”

“We will not stand for that,” Mr. Corbyn thundered to a crowd that waved placards with the slogans, “No Brexit. No Trump” and “Brexit = Trump.”

Demonstrators thronged Trafalgar Square and the surrounding streets, massing under the familiar sight of an orange blimp depicting a baby Trump clad in a diaper. A group of women marched in the red uniforms from Margaret Atwood’s novel of oppression, “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Others rallied around a statue that depicted Mr. Trump tweeting while seated on a golden commode.

The protesters divided into groups depending on their grievances: some attacked Mr. Trump on climate change, others on his Venezuela and Middle East policies. But on a rainy day, the turnout appeared smaller than during the president’s last visit to Britain in 2017. Mr. Trump insisted that cheering crowds lined the route of his motorcade and claimed, falsely, that reports of demonstrators were “fake news.”

“I heard there were protests,” Mr. Trump said. “I said, ‘Where are the protests? I don’t see any protests.’ ”

As for Mr. Corbyn, the president said the Labour leader had sought a meeting with him, but that he refused. “He is, where I come from, somewhat of a negative force,” Mr. Trump said.

The opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn of the Labour Party, on Tuesday.CreditTim Ireland/Associated Press

He repeated his critique of Mayor Khan, whom he called a “stone cold loser” on Monday, shortly before landing in London. “He’s been a not very good mayor,” the president said. “Crime is up, lot of problems.”

Still, for this president, it was a restrained performance.

Mr. Trump praised Mr. Johnson, despite the fact that he turned down a meeting with Mr. Trump even after the president had promoted him as a successor to Mrs. May before the trip. Mr. Trump was expected to meet Michael Gove, the environment secretary and a rival of Mr. Johnson’s who is competing for the leader’s post.

“I know Boris; I like him. I’ve liked him for a long time. I think he’d do a very good job,” Mr. Trump said, adding, “I don’t know Michael.”

The president also met with Nigel Farage, the fiery leader of a pro-Brexit party. Mr. Farage was photographed entering Winfield House, the residence of the American ambassador. Afterward, he tweeted, “Good meeting with President Trump — he really believes in Brexit and is loving his trip to London.”

For Mrs. May, who worked for many months to arrange Mr. Trump’s state visit, it was a more bittersweet occasion. She and her husband, Philip, greeted Mr. Trump and the first lady, Melania, outside 10 Downing Street and gave them a tour of Britain’s most famous political address — one that she will soon vacate. After the news conference, the two couples toured the Churchill War Rooms museum.

But Mr. Trump resisted taking another shot at his host, whom he faulted last year for not negotiating aggressively enough with the European Union. The two leaders have often seemed uncomfortable in each other’s presence. But at their final news conference, there was something approaching warmth.

“I seem to remember the president suggested that I sue the European Union,” Mrs. May said, casting a playful glance at Mr. Trump. “Which we didn’t do. We went into negotiation and we came out with a good deal.”

“I would have sued, but that’s O.K.,” Mr. Trump replied with a smile. “I would have sued, and maybe settled, maybe.”

The president hastened to add, “She’s probably a better negotiator than I am,” and said Mrs. May’s negotiations might have teed up a deal with the European Union. Mr. Trump often takes maximalist positions — like threatening to rip up the North American Trade Agreement — as a precursor to further deal-making.

“Perhaps you won’t be given the credit you deserve if they do something,” Mr. Trump said to Mrs. May. “But I think you deserve a lot of credit, I really do.”

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As Trump Dangles Post-Brexit Trade Deal, Some Britons See Opportunism

LONDON — President Trump on Tuesday urged Britain to forge ahead with plans to quit the European Union, reiterating his support for Brexit at a time of acute political crisis, as the prospect of a Britain overly dependent on the United States divided politicians and further inflamed thousands of anti-Trump protesters on the streets.

Mr. Trump dangled the prospect of a “phenomenal” trade deal with the United States if Britain breaks from Europe. But he made clear that in negotiations for such a deal, “everything will be on the table,” including opening Britain’s public health system to American competitors.

Taking credit for having predicted the outcome of Britain’s referendum in 2016, Mr. Trump said he believed Britain could now leave the European Union, even if it fails to make a deal with Brussels by the Oct. 31 deadline.

“I would think that it will happen, and it probably should happen,” Mr. Trump said at a news conference with Prime Minister Theresa May, who will step down as leader of the Conservative Party this week after having repeatedly failed to win approval in Parliament for her negotiated exit agreement.

“This is a great, great country and it wants its own identity,” said Mr. Trump, who had warm words for Mrs. May, even as he repeated that he would have taken a harder line than her in the talks with the European Union.

Relaxed and agreeable on the second day of his state visit to Britain, both in public and in his private meetings, Mr. Trump still seemed on a high after a day of circulating between palaces and mingling with royalty.

If the first day of Mr. Trump’s visit showcased a royal family determined to nurture the “special relationship” with the United States — lavishing their guest with a gilded banquet and a royal cannon salute — Tuesday plunged Mr. Trump into the murkier crosscurrents of British politics, where he remains deeply unpopular.

It also demonstrated, yet again, Mr. Trump’s penchant for barging into the most sensitive political debates of other countries — often turning himself into a lightning rod, which poses challenges for his allies and adversaries alike.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155911254_417ffe17-84cb-4103-ba33-382cca79f4c2-articleLarge As Trump Dangles Post-Brexit Trade Deal, Some Britons See Opportunism United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Politics and Government May, Theresa M London (England) International Relations Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union

An anti-Trump protest on Tuesday in Trafalgar Square.CreditClodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters

Boris Johnson, a pro-Brexit politician and former foreign secretary who is running to replace Mrs. May as the Conservative leader, spoke to Mr. Trump for 20 minutes by phone but declined a face-to-face meeting, citing a busy schedule as he prepares his campaign to replace Mrs. May. She will remain a lame-duck prime minister until the Conservatives elect her replacement this summer.

To many in Britain, Mr. Trump appeared less a friend tossing a lifeline than an opportunist angling to exploit Britain’s estrangement from Europe by pursuing a trade deal that would crack open Britain’s health service and foist chlorinated American chicken on British shoppers.

“This orange blow-in is brashly telling us how to conduct our own international affairs,” wrote Zoe Williams, a columnist at the Guardian, “and listening to him it is clear that a close relationship with Trump’s America would be as far removed from regaining sovereignty as it is possible to imagine. Allied to Trump, we’d be more of a satrapy than a nation state. We would be dominated by a power that was as raw as it was distant.”

Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, echoed those themes in a speech to anti-Trump demonstrators. He condemned Mr. Trump’s war of words with the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and warned that a trade deal with the United States would amount to “offering up our precious National Health Service to private American companies.”

“We will not stand for that,” Mr. Corbyn thundered to a crowd that waved placards with the slogans, “No Brexit. No Trump” and “Brexit = Trump.”

Demonstrators thronged Trafalgar Square and the surrounding streets, massing under the familiar sight of an orange blimp depicting a baby Trump clad in a diaper. A group of women marched in the red uniforms from Margaret Atwood’s novel of oppression, “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Others rallied around a statue that depicted Mr. Trump tweeting while seated on a golden commode.

The protesters divided into groups depending on their grievances: some attacked Mr. Trump on climate change, others on his Venezuela and Middle East policies. But on a rainy day, the turnout appeared smaller than during the president’s last visit to Britain in 2017. Mr. Trump insisted that cheering crowds lined the route of his motorcade and claimed, falsely, that reports of demonstrators were “fake news.”

“I heard there were protests,” Mr. Trump said. “I said, ‘Where are the protests? I don’t see any protests.’ ”

As for Mr. Corbyn, the president said the Labour leader had sought a meeting with him, but that he refused. “He is, where I come from, somewhat of a negative force,” Mr. Trump said.

The opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn of the Labour Party, on Tuesday.CreditTim Ireland/Associated Press

He repeated his critique of Mayor Khan, whom he called a “stone cold loser” on Monday, shortly before landing in London. “He’s been a not very good mayor,” the president said. “Crime is up, lot of problems.”

Still, for this president, it was a restrained performance.

Mr. Trump praised Mr. Johnson, despite the fact that he turned down a meeting with Mr. Trump even after the president had promoted him as a successor to Mrs. May before the trip. Mr. Trump was expected to meet Michael Gove, the environment secretary and a rival of Mr. Johnson’s who is competing for the leader’s post.

“I know Boris; I like him. I’ve liked him for a long time. I think he’d do a very good job,” Mr. Trump said, adding, “I don’t know Michael.”

The president also met with Nigel Farage, the fiery leader of a pro-Brexit party. Mr. Farage was photographed entering Winfield House, the residence of the American ambassador. Afterward, he tweeted, “Good meeting with President Trump — he really believes in Brexit and is loving his trip to London.”

For Mrs. May, who worked for many months to arrange Mr. Trump’s state visit, it was a more bittersweet occasion. She and her husband, Philip, greeted Mr. Trump and the first lady, Melania, outside 10 Downing Street and gave them a tour of Britain’s most famous political address — one that she will soon vacate. After the news conference, the two couples toured the Churchill War Rooms museum.

But Mr. Trump resisted taking another shot at his host, whom he faulted last year for not negotiating aggressively enough with the European Union. The two leaders have often seemed uncomfortable in each other’s presence. But at their final news conference, there was something approaching warmth.

“I seem to remember the president suggested that I sue the European Union,” Mrs. May said, casting a playful glance at Mr. Trump. “Which we didn’t do. We went into negotiation and we came out with a good deal.”

“I would have sued, but that’s O.K.,” Mr. Trump replied with a smile. “I would have sued, and maybe settled, maybe.”

The president hastened to add, “She’s probably a better negotiator than I am,” and said Mrs. May’s negotiations might have teed up a deal with the European Union. Mr. Trump often takes maximalist positions — like threatening to rip up the North American Trade Agreement — as a precursor to further deal-making.

“Perhaps you won’t be given the credit you deserve if they do something,” Mr. Trump said to Mrs. May. “But I think you deserve a lot of credit, I really do.”

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Trump Meets Farage and May in London: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 04briefing99-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600-v7 Trump Meets Farage and May in London: Live Updates United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J May, Theresa M London (England) Khan, Sadiq Great Britain Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

During a news conference, President Trump and Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain discussed security, trade and Brexit, which Mr. Trump predicted “will happen.”CreditCreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump said at a joint news conference with Prime Minister Theresa May on Tuesday that he believed Brexit would eventually happen, adding that Britain is “a very, very special place and I think it deserves a special place.”

The comments came in the Durbar Court of the foreign office building on the second day of a three-day state visit as the two leaders held a brief but wide-ranging news conference that also touched on a trade deal, Huawei, Mr. Trump’s critics and tariffs on Mexico.

Mr. Trump has been a critic of Britain’s approach to Brexit, suggesting that Britain should take a more aggressive approach, but after saying he did not want to take a strong position, he said, “I think it will happen.”

Britain has been forced to seek an extension with the European Union on its Brexit plan, leading some to wonder if the withdrawal might never happen. For her part, Mrs. May reiterated that the country would be able to negotiate a deal.

“It is important for us to deliver Brexit,” she said. “I continue to believe it’s in the best interest of the British people to leave the E.U. in an orderly fashion, with a deal.”

What Is Brexit? A Simple Guide to Why It Matters and What Happens Next

Jan. 24, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 25brexit-whatisit1sub-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Trump Meets Farage and May in London: Live Updates United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J May, Theresa M London (England) Khan, Sadiq Great Britain Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Mr. Trump started his remarks by thanking the queen, calling her a “fantastic woman,” before turning to the strategic ties between the two countries, citing the areas of shared interest even though the relationship has sometimes been rocky during his tenure: the fight against the Islamic State, support for NATO and the question of how to deal with Iran.

Mrs. May opened by noting the courage and sacrifice of those who gave their lives in World War II, comments that were echoed by Mr. Trump when he first spoke. She said that it was a fitting way to note the “special relationship” between the two countries, citing their shared democratic values and unity of purpose.

While acknowledging that the two countries had differed at times on how to face the challenges they confronted, Mrs. May praised the ways in which they have worked together, pointing out in particular the responses to Russian attempts to poison a former Soviet spy on the streets of England and to a chemical weapons attack in Syria.

Mr. Trump said he had rejected an opportunity to talk with the opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who has been one of his harshest critics in Britain. He also continued his dispute with another fierce critic, the London mayor, Sadiq Khan, calling him, as well as Mr. Corbyn, a “negative force.”

Polls have shown that Mr. Trump is relatively unpopular in Britain, but the president dismissed those claims, saying that coverage of the protests was overblown. “There was great love,” he said.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155907957_bb1f2b4f-d531-4b72-b3ff-00c74bf93afa-articleLarge Trump Meets Farage and May in London: Live Updates United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J May, Theresa M London (England) Khan, Sadiq Great Britain Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

President Trump and Prime Minister Theresa May joined business leaders from both countries at St. James’s Palace on Tuesday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump arrived in Britain on Monday to a welcome full of pageantry: an 82-gun salute at Buckingham Palace and a lavish banquet with members of the royal family.

On Tuesday, Mr. Trump’s schedule was less about pomp and more about business. He began the day with a round-table discussion at St. James’s Palace, alongside Prime Minister Theresa May, business leaders from both countries, and his daughter Ivanka Trump. Trade was at the top of the agenda.

At the start of the meeting, Mr. Trump praised Mrs. May and said that Britain and the United States would come to an agreement on trade. “I think we’ll have a very substantial trade deal,” Mr. Trump said.

Speaking to Mrs. May, who is entering her final weeks as prime minister, he said, to laughter, “I don’t know exactly what your timing is, but stick around, let’s do this deal.”

Later in the day, at a joint news conference, Mr. Trump reiterated that Washington was committed to a “phenomenal” trade deal between the United States and Britain. “There is tremendous potential, I say two, maybe three times more than what we are doing today,” he said.

But the reality of negotiating such a deal is much more complicated, with the future leader of Britain unknown at the moment and the practicalities of the country’s withdrawal from the European Union unsettled.

Brexit supporters see a potential trade deal with the United States as one of the prizes of a complete break with the European Union, but such a pact could be contentious. Some worry that letting in American products would force Britain to lower its food and agricultural standards and could weaken health care in the country.

Mr. Trump said that “everything will be on the table” in negotiations for a trade deal, including the National Health Service, which provides free health care in Britain, and “all of that.”

The remarks immediately set off alarm bells in some parts of Britain. Opponents of Brexit, who have been pushing for a second referendum that would allow voters to pull back from a withdrawal, seized on the remarks.

At the news conference, President Trump was also asked about his decision to impose tariffs on Mexico in an effort to compel the authorities there to take stronger measures against migrants who hope to reach the United States.

“I think it’s more likely that the tariffs go on,” he said. “If they don’t step up and give us security for our nation … look, millions and millions of people are coming through Mexico.”

He said that for every month that Mexico failed to secure the border, the tariffs would continue to rise. But he sought to sound an optimistic note, saying that he believed Mexico would take the necessary measures. “Mexico should step up and stop this onslaught, this invasion into our country,” he said.

Mr. Trump said last week that he would impose a 5 percent tariff on all imported goods from Mexico beginning next Monday, and the tax that would “gradually increase” until the flow of undocumented immigrants is halted.

Boris Johnson declined an invitation for a one-on-one meeting with President Trump, but spoke with him by phone for about 20 minutes.CreditTolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Among the biggest questions hanging over Mr. Trump’s visit was whether he would meet Nigel Farage, a fanatically pro-Brexit politician who powered his upstart party to a win in European elections last month by castigating Prime Minister May and her Conservative Party.

The answer, not surprisingly, was yes. Mr. Farage was seen arriving at the American ambassador’s residence on Tuesday afternoon, and he praised the president afterward on Twitter.

That Mr. Trump would meet with one of Mrs. May’s most vociferous critics, only an hour after heaping praise on the prime minister at a news conference, was another reminder of how weak her party is. And it further bolstered Mr. Farage’s credibility as he seeks influence over the Brexit process, all the more so because Mr. Trump had declined a meeting with Britain’s main opposition figure, Jeremy Corbyn, who leads the Labour Party.

But it was not an entirely untroubled day for Mr. Farage. He was asked to attend a meeting on Wednesday of a committee investigating whether he broke European Parliament rules by accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars, an order he vowed to defy.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly praised Boris Johnson, the leading candidate to replace Mrs. May as prime minister. Before arriving in London, Mr. Trump suggested that he might meet with Mr. Johnson, the former foreign minister, calling him “a friend of mine.”

But Mr. Johnson declined an invitation for a one-on-one meeting with Mr. Trump; the two men did have a 20-minute telephone call Tuesday morning, according to The Press Association.

Mr. Johnson told ITV’s Robert Peston that he had turned down the invitation because it conflicted with a campaign event. He is scheduled to make his case for leadership to Conservative Party members at 8 p.m.

Mr. Trump is also expected to meet with another Tory leader on Wednesday: Michael Gove, the environment minister, who is also a candidate to replace Mrs. May.

In the context of this week — when Labour figures have been pilloried for skipping formal events — Mr. Johnson’s decision could be read as a choice to distance himself from the American president.

Inflating the Trump baby balloon in London on Tuesday.CreditTolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

A giant orange balloon of President Trump, depicted as a scowling baby wearing a diaper, was released over Parliament Square in London on Tuesday, kicking off a day of demonstrations against the president’s state visit.

The same large balloon was the focal point of protests that broke out during Mr. Trump’s working visit last July, his first trip to Britain as president.

Mr. Trump is unpopular around Britain, and especially in London. He has feuded with the city’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, over immigration, terrorism and other issues, and on Monday he belittled the mayor again, accusing him of being “nasty.”

The main protest began at Trafalgar Square as large crowds gathered around a robot depicting Mr. Trump tweeting on a golden toilet. Protesters then marched toward Downing Street, where Mr. Trump was meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May.

The demonstrators had vowed to disrupt every stage of Mr. Trump’s visit by bringing central London to a standstill. Last year, Mr. Trump largely avoided the city and the protests that drew tens of thousands of people there.

Though the crowds appeared much smaller than last year, Trafalgar Square overflowed with groups who said they opposed Mr. Trump’s policies.

“Trump and his racist, divisive policies are not welcome in our country,” said Amy Hunter, one protester.

“Stop Racism, Stop Trump,” one placard read. “Climate change is real, your tan is not,” read another. Some groups wore caps emblazoned with spin on the president’s campaign slogan: “Make America Great Again. Impeach Me.”

“It is so embarrassing that our government has invited this fascist buffoon back to our country and is giving him royal treatment, pulling out the red carpet and wining and dining him with our tax money,” said Ruby Lawson, 38.

“We want to show the world and Trump that this is not O.K. and Trump is not welcome.”

London Mayor Sadiq Khan in March.CreditJack Taylor/Getty Images

The long-running feud between President Trump and Mayor Sadiq Khan showed no signs of abating on Tuesday.

Mr. Khan, in an interview with Sky News, denounced the American president, describing him as “the poster boy for the far-right movement around the world,” a day after Mr. Trump called the mayor a “stone cold loser” as he arrived in London.

“We disagree with him surely about his policy to ban Muslims from certain countries,” Mr. Khan said, “surely we disagree with his policy to separate children from their parents on the Mexican border, surely we think it’s wrong when he amplifies the tweets from racists in this country.”

Mr. Khan also criticized the British leadership for failing to stand up to Mr. Trump, in particular pointing to the administration’s policies on climate change.

“My point is, Theresa May is so weak as a prime minister and our government is so scared that it wouldn’t say boo to a goose, and I think that’s wrong,” said Mr. Khan, who is a member of the opposition Labour Party.

Mr. Trump then returned fire during his news conference, saying that Mr. Khan was “not a good mayor from what I understand.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in London on Tuesday.CreditPeter Nicholls/Reuters

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo joined the Trump entourage Tuesday morning, overlapping with the president on the final leg of his own European trip, which began in Berlin last week. He attended a meeting with business leaders at St. James’s Palace and then accompanied President Trump to 10 Downing Street.

Mr. Pompeo is the cabinet official who most vocally supports Mr. Trump’s policies and worldview, and so he travels the world to try to turn Mr. Trump’s disparate and often inchoate public musings into reality.

Such was the case last Friday in Berlin, where Mr. Pompeo met with Chancellor Angela Merkel to discuss sensitive issues like Afghanistan, Iran and Ukraine.

In Switzerland, which acts as a conduit between Washington and Tehran, Mr. Pompeo talked with Swiss officials about American efforts to confront Iran. But he sent mixed signals in public proclamations about whether the Trump administration intended to soften or harden its approach.

On Monday, before attending a conference of international entrepreneurs in The Hague, Mr. Pompeo denounced China’s economic policies and repeated the Trump administration’s concerns about allowing Huawei and other Chinese firms to build next-generation 5G communications networks.

“China wants to be the dominant economic and military power of the world, spreading its authoritarian vision for society and its corrupt practices worldwide,” Mr. Pompeo said, at a news conference with the Dutch foreign minister, Stef Blok.

Mr. Trump expressed confidence that the United States and Britain would reach an agreement about the use of products from the Chinese technology giant Huawei that American officials have said poses a national security threat.

During the news conference on Tuesday, Mr. Trump appeared to play down comments by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who has said the United States will limit intelligence-sharing with countries that do not bar Huawei from their 5G telecommunications networks.

“I see absolutely no limitations,” Mr. Trump said.

Britain is considering whether to allow equipment made by Huawei in the next-generation wireless networks, known as 5G, that will be built in the years ahead. The American authorities have called for an outright ban, but some British officials have said such a blanket blockade is not necessary.

“We are going to absolutely have an agreement on Huawei,” Mr. Trump said during a joint news conference with Mrs. May. “We will be able to work out any differences.”

Mrs. May did not speak about Huawei. Actions by the United States in recent weeks have complicated how other countries are crafting policies related to Chinese technology companies. Last month, the United States blacklisted Huawei, limiting American companies’ abilities to provide it with software and components.

Huawei has become a flash point in the broader trade dispute between the United States and China. The debate about Huawei highlights a broader conundrum for European leaders as they try to balance relationships with the world’s two largest economies.

Maggie Haberman, Mark Landler, Ellen Barry, Edward Wong, Ceylan Yeginsu, Adam Satariano Megan Specia, Michael Wolgelenter, Alan Yuhas and Christine Spolar contributed reporting.

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Mexico Will Face Tariffs Next Week, Trump Vows

Westlake Legal Group 04dc-tariffs-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Mexico Will Face Tariffs Next Week, Trump Vows United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Senate International Trade and World Market Illegal Immigration Customs (Tariff)

LONDON — President Trump on Tuesday said he plans to move forward with imposing tariffs on Mexican imports next week as part of his effort to stem the flow of migrants crossing the southern border, and he called Republican senators “foolish” if they try to stop him.

Mr. Trump made the remarks at a news conference with Theresa May, the outgoing British prime minister.

“I think it’s more likely that the tariffs go on, and we’ll probably be talking during the time that the tariffs are on, and they’re going to be paid,” Mr. Trump said. When asked about Senate Republicans discussing ways to block the tariffs, Mr. Trump said, “I don’t think they will do that.”

He said, “I think if they do, it’s foolish.”

Mr. Trump’s latest threat — five percent tariffs on all goods imported from Mexico, rising to as high as 25 percent until the Mexican government stems the flow of migrants — has riled Republican senators who fear its impact on the economy and their home states.

But any vote to disapprove the tariffs would almost certainly face a presidential veto, meaning that both the House and Senate would have to muster two-thirds majorities to beat Mr. Trump. Opponents would use the same motion of disapproval that they tried to use to block the president from grabbing federal money for a border wall that was not appropriated for that purpose. That motion did pass Congress with significant Republican support, but not enough to overcome Mr. Trump’s veto.

And with significant numbers of Republicans backing Mr. Trump’s hard line on immigration, there is little reason to believe opponents of the tariffs could overcome a veto this time.

Senator John Thune of South Dakota, the No. 2 Senate Republican, said on Monday that his colleagues were clearly uneasy with Mr. Trump’s tariff threat. Senators, he said, need to hear from administration officials directly on the “rationale for what they are doing” and on what authority they are imposing the tariffs. He said he hoped the White House would be willing to reach an agreement with Mexico to delay the tariffs “and hopefully find better ways of solving the immigration issues.”

Asked if the Senate could end up voting to try to block this, he said, “My guess is at some point if they continue down this path and they escalated the tariff, Congress is going to want to be heard from for sure.”

“I think the broader economic considerations need to be carefully considered when they are moving forward with any kind of new policy like this, something that is from our standpoint completely new and unheard-of,” he said.

Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa and the Finance Committee chairman, said on Monday he would hold his fire until after a meeting on Wednesday between Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Mexican officials. Mexico’s foreign minister is leading a delegation to Washington this week to try to defuse the situation with the Trump administration. And while Mexican officials have taken steps to crack down on illegal immigration, they have also warned that they could respond with retaliatory measures of their own.

Mr. Grassley added, “I intend to continue saying the same things I’ve been saying” in opposition to the use of tariffs to affect immigration policy.

But Mr. Trump has supporters, and Republicans have been loath to oppose him on immigration. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, once a moderate on immigration policy, took to Twitter to say he was within his rights to use tariffs to force Mexico’s hand.

Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, told reporters on Tuesday that House Democrats still “want to get to yes” on passing Mr. Trump’s new trade deal with Canada and Mexico, an updated North American Free Trade Agreement that could be torpedoed by new tariffs on Mexico. But he declined to forecast whether the House would try to block the tariffs that could stand in the way.

“The problem that we confront in this country is that the president often conducts himself in an erratic fashion as it relates to economic policy, particularly in terms of his deployment of tariffs,” Mr. Jeffries said.

He added: “The administration’s tariff policy is erratic and all over the place. We will see what the Senate Republicans ultimately decide to do, but we will certainly strongly consider proceeding in a way that is appropriate and consistent with our legislative powers.”

Mr. Trump seemed unimpressed when a reporter noted that Mexican officials say that they’ve increased the number of migrants they’ve apprehended coming into their country from elsewhere in Central America. He offered no specifics on what it would take to keep the tariffs from being imposed.

“Look, millions of people are flowing through Mexico,” Mr. Trump said. “That’s unacceptable.”

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