web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 9)

Facing ‘a Lot of Blowback,’ Trump’s Surgeon General Steps Up

WASHINGTON — Dr. Jerome Adams faces two difficult challenges as President Trump’s surgeon general: He’s an African American working for a man routinely accused of racism, and he is a scientist in an administration that has shown contempt for science.

He can live with that.

“If people feel that the president needs to have a different perspective on the African-American community, the one thing I would say is, he’s not going to get it if there aren’t any African Americans in the administration,” Dr. Adams said in an interview, adding, “People are always saying we need more Black voices represented and more Black perspectives represented, but they’re always telling every Black person in the administration you should quit.”

“Those two things don’t fit together,” he said.

Now, as coronavirus cases surge and demands for racial justice roil the nation, Dr. Adams is stepping into more of a starring role. He will be the central figure in a public service campaign aimed at getting Americans to take the pandemic seriously and do what the president, with rare exceptions, does not do: follow public health guidance and wear a mask.

“I’m pleading with your viewers, I’m begging you: Please understand that we are not trying to take away your freedoms when we say wear a face covering,” Dr. Adams said on Monday morning on his boss’s favorite news show, “Fox & Friends.”

That message must compete with relentless criticism that has come his way precisely because of his race and his stature. Critics have called him a “token Black guy” and “a clown.” Representative Maxine Waters, Democrat of California, accused him of spewing Mr. Trump’s “racist dog whistles.”

“His own community is not exactly a fan of this administration, and then they see Jerome up there representing the White House, and he gets a lot of blowback,” said Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health. “At one point he did tell me he was having a pretty rough time.”

At meetings of Mr. Trump’s coronavirus task force, Dr. Adams is often a quiet presence, but he chimes in on his signature issue: racial disparities in health. He said in an interview last week that he had spoken to both Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence about the issue. He was also straightforward about working for a president who has been accused of racism.

“I have a powerful opportunity to have an influence in this administration, and I feel like I need to be at the table,” Dr. Adams said, adding, “That’s how I deal with it.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_174748659_76fdaa60-71f7-417e-8d61-8066b15080b8-articleLarge Facing ‘a Lot of Blowback,’ Trump’s Surgeon General Steps Up United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Surgeon General (US) Race and Ethnicity Polls and Public Opinion Masks Indiana Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Black People Adams, Jerome M (1974- )
Credit…Tara Pixley for The New York Times

Dr. Adams has remained diplomatic on Mr. Trump’s near-constant refusal to wear face masks.

“It’s not my place to say what image the president of the United States should be projecting,” Dr. Adams said. “It’s my place to say, ‘Public, here’s what you need to do to stay safe.’”

#styln-briefing-block { font-family: nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif; background-color: #F3F3F3; padding: 20px; margin: 37px auto; border-radius: 5px; color: #121212; box-sizing: border-box; width: calc(100% – 40px); } #styln-briefing-block a { color: #121212; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { color: #121212; border-bottom: 1px solid #cccccc; font-size: 0.9375rem; line-height: 1.375rem; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link:hover { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 7px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -13px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet:not(:last-child) { margin-bottom: 0.75em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header-section { margin-bottom: 16px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-weight: 700; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; display: inline-block; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header a { text-decoration: none; color: #333; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer { font-size: 14px; margin-top: 1.25em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks { padding-top: 1em; margin-top: 1.75em; border-top: 1px solid #E2E2E3; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks a { font-weight: bold; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a { border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a:hover { border-bottom: 1px solid transparent; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-lb-items { display: grid; grid-template-columns: auto 1fr; grid-column-gap: 20px; grid-row-gap: 15px; line-height: 1.2; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { color: #999; font-size: 12px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time.active a { color: #D0021B; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer-meta { display: flex; justify-content: space-between; align-items: center; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-ts { color: #D0021B; font-size: 11px; display: inline-block; } @media only screen and (min-width: 600px) { #styln-briefing-block { padding: 30px; width: calc(100% – 40px); max-width: 600px; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { font-size: 1.0625rem; line-height: 1.5rem; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 10px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -15px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-size: 17px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { font-size: 13px; } } @media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) { #styln-briefing-block { width: 100%; } }

Updated 2020-07-21T11:44:22.798Z

Dr. Adams has brought on some of the criticism himself. In April, while urging people of color to practice social distancing and wear masks, he turned to colloquialisms, saying, “Do it for your Big Momma!” Critics including Representative Waters, a leading member of the Congressional Black Caucus, assailed him, while Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the government’s leading infectious disease expert — more than three decades Dr. Adams’s senior — leapt to his defense.

“He’s an African-American kid who grew up in an African-American family, so he knows exactly what he’s talking about,” Dr. Fauci said in a recent interview. “I was almost offended by the fact that someone else was offended.”

Dr. Adams has also had difficulty living down a Feb. 29 tweet saying, “Seriously people — STOP BUYING MASKS! They are NOT effective in preventing general public from catching #Coronavirus.” (He was concerned at that time that masks were not available to front-line health workers.)

Dr. Adams has remained circumspect. Interviewed for the “Today” show on NBC before the July 4 holiday, Dr. Adams hedged when asked if people should avoid large gatherings where masks were not required, saying it was not a “yes or no” question. The musician Axl Rose branded him “a coward.”

Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Public opinion research conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services, however, concluded that Dr. Adams was a relatable figure, which is one reason he will be an anchor of new public service advertisements on radio, television, digital platforms and billboards.

The series, which will begin in urban markets, will feature him and other government scientists, including Dr. Fauci, talking with celebrities and sports figures about following public health guidance. In separate outreach efforts, Dr. Adams has recorded a video with the celebrity chef José Andrés, an outspoken Trump critic, and even asked Mr. Rose for help.

A video Dr. Adams posted on Twitter this month of him dancing with his daughter and niece while wearing masks has gone viral.

The son of schoolteachers in rural southeastern Maryland, Dr. Adams said he grew up with Confederate flags and “the N word.” He first saw the Capitol while being airlifted to Children’s National Hospital in Washington after an asthma attack.

Asthma kept him “stuck inside,” he said, reading constantly and being branded a nerd, which helps him “empathize” with “folks who are vulnerable, who are outcasts or forgotten.”

At the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, he studied biochemistry, hoped to become an engineer and met Black doctors — including Dr. Ben Carson, the neurosurgeon who became Mr. Trump’s housing secretary — for the first time. Inspired, he went to Indiana University for medical school and trained in anesthesiology, which he still occasionally practices at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

He also received a degree in public health from the University of California, Berkeley — a “highly unusual choice” for an anesthesiologist, said Dr. Art Reingold, one of Dr. Adams’s professors.

His pursuit of public health was deeply personal. Dr. Adams has one brother who is developmentally disabled and another who has a history of drug-related incarceration. In Indiana, where Dr. Adams settled to practice medicine, he worked in a public hospital, shunning a more lucrative career in private practice. Eventually, he caught the eye of Mr. Pence, then the governor, who made him health commissioner.

In Indiana, Dr. Adams had a pavement-pounding reputation, driving to heavily Black communities all over the state for panel discussions, town hall events and fund-raisers, addressing issues like obesity, infant mortality rates and opioid addiction.

“Trying to improve minority health from the bottom up made him our natural ally,” said Carl Ellison, the president of the Indiana Minority Health Coalition.

Credit…Aaron Borton for The New York Times

The moment that defined Dr. Adams’s Indiana career came early in 2015, in a heavily white, rural part of the state near the Kentucky border, where H.I.V. was spreading with ferocity among intravenous drug users. Indiana law made it illegal to possess a syringe without a prescription. An evangelical Christian, Mr. Pence was morally opposed to needle exchanges, believing they encouraged drug abuse.

One of the first things Dr. Adams saw in Scott County was a Ku Klux Klan flag hanging near a Little League field. He met with the sheriff, with clergy, with skeptical locals. By March, the governor issued an executive order allowing syringes to be distributed in the county.

Dr. Adams was “walking a similar tightrope” to the one in Washington, said State Representative Ed Clere of Indiana, a Republican.

“He managed to carve out a space that allowed him to maintain credibility while also being an effective voice within the administration,” Mr. Clere said.

The surgeon general’s office is what the occupant makes it. It comes with a paltry budget and little power beyond the authority to issue reports and to speak up. Yet some who have served as “the nation’s doctor” have made a profound difference in American life.

In the 1960s, the surgeon general Luther L. Terry took on the tobacco industry and warned of the perils of smoking. C. Everett Koop almost single-handedly pushed President Ronald Reagan to recognize AIDS. In the 1990s, David Satcher publicly contradicted his boss, President Bill Clinton, in backing needle exchange programs for intravenous drug users.

Dr. Satcher, the only other Black man to serve as surgeon general, said he had encouraged Dr. Adams to “hang in there.”

“I’m glad he has,” he added, “even though I’m sure it’s been difficult.”

Credit…Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Like Dr. Satcher, Dr. Adams has made ending racial disparities in health care, a problem that has become glaringly apparently during the coronavirus pandemic, his signature initiative. He said he knew from personal experience that racism — “institutionalized racism, structural racism and sometimes overt racism” — played a role.

As surgeon general, Dr. Adams said, he is neither a Republican nor a Democrat. He has a platform, and he intends to use it: “You’re not always going to get along with and agree with everything your boss says or does in any job, but you stay in that job if you feel like you could have an impact.”

Tony Gillespie, a longtime friend and another member of the Indiana Minority Health Coalition, said that Dr. Adams was “always in that place” where “if you do, you’re wrong; if you don’t, you’re wrong.”

Dr. Adams is in no mood to apologize to his critics.

“Nowhere in this S.G. job description does it say your job is to contradict the president,” he said, using the initials for his title. He has a message for Americans: “Take my health information as health information and not as a political statement.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Expands Federal Crackdown from Portland to Chicago

WASHINGTON — President Trump plans to deploy federal law enforcement to Chicago and threatened on Monday to send agents to other major cities — all controlled by Democrats.

Governors and other officials reacted angrily to the president’s moves, calling it a election-year ploy as they squared off over crime, civil liberties and local control that has spread from Portland, Ore., across the country.

With military-clad agents already sweeping through the streets of Portland, more units were poised to head to Chicago, and Mr. Trump suggested that he would follow suit in New York, Philadelphia, Detroit and other urban centers. Governors and other officials compared his actions to authoritarianism and vowed to pursue legislation or lawsuits to stop him.

The president cast the confrontation in overtly political terms as he seeks an issue that would gain traction with voters at a time when many of his own supporters have soured on his leadership amid a deadly pandemic and economic collapse. Trailing badly in the polls with just over 100 days until the November election, Mr. Trump assailed the “liberal Democrats” running American cities and tied the issue to his presumptive fall opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

“I’m going to do something — that, I can tell you,” Mr. Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. “Because we’re not going to let New York and Chicago and Philadelphia and Detroit and Baltimore and all of these — Oakland is a mess. We’re not going to let this happen in our country. All run by liberal Democrats.”

The president portrayed the nation’s cities as out of control. “Look at what’s going on — all run by Democrats, all run by very liberal Democrats. All run, really, by radical left,” Mr. Trump said. He added: “If Biden got in, that would be true for the country. The whole country would go to hell. And we’re not going to let it go to hell.”

Democrats said the president was the one out of control. Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon said he would introduce legislation to limit the role of federal agents in cities like Portland. “This isn’t just an Oregon crisis,” he said. “It’s an American crisis. We need to stop Trump before this spreads.”

He added, “We won’t let these authoritarian tactics stand.”

Clad in camouflage, federal agents in Portland have snatched protesters off the streets and thrown them into unmarked vehicles without explaining why they were being detained or arrested, according to some of those who have been seized. Oregon’s governor, Kate Brown, has called it “a blatant abuse of power,” and the city’s mayor, Ted Wheeler, called it “an attack on our democracy.” The state attorney general has filed a lawsuit seeking a restraining order against the federal agents for what she called unlawful tactics.

The Trump administration now plans to deploy about 150 Homeland Security Investigations special agents to Chicago in the coming days, according to an official directly involved in the operations. The special agents, known for conducting long-term investigations into serious crimes like human trafficking and terrorism, are expected to be in the city for at least 60 days to help combat violence and would be under the direction of the Justice Department.

Few are denying the city has a violent crime problem. Sixty-three people were shot in Chicago over the past weekend, 12 of them fatally. The White House referred questions to the Department of Homeland Security, which declined to comment, as did the Justice Department.

#styln-briefing-block { font-family: nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif; background-color: #F3F3F3; padding: 20px; margin: 37px auto; border-radius: 5px; color: #121212; box-sizing: border-box; width: calc(100% – 40px); } #styln-briefing-block a { color: #121212; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { color: #121212; border-bottom: 1px solid #cccccc; font-size: 0.9375rem; line-height: 1.375rem; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link:hover { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 7px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -13px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet:not(:last-child) { margin-bottom: 0.75em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header-section { margin-bottom: 16px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-weight: 700; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; display: inline-block; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header a { text-decoration: none; color: #333; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer { font-size: 14px; margin-top: 1.25em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks { padding-top: 1em; margin-top: 1.75em; border-top: 1px solid #E2E2E3; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks a { font-weight: bold; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a { border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a:hover { border-bottom: 1px solid transparent; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-lb-items { display: grid; grid-template-columns: auto 1fr; grid-column-gap: 20px; grid-row-gap: 15px; line-height: 1.2; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { color: #999; font-size: 12px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time.active a { color: #D0021B; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer-meta { display: flex; justify-content: space-between; align-items: center; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-ts { color: #D0021B; font-size: 11px; display: inline-block; } @media only screen and (min-width: 600px) { #styln-briefing-block { padding: 30px; width: calc(100% – 40px); max-width: 600px; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { font-size: 1.0625rem; line-height: 1.5rem; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 10px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -15px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-size: 17px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { font-size: 13px; } } @media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) { #styln-briefing-block { width: 100%; } }

Updated 2020-07-21T00:21:43.818Z

The Department of Homeland Security has put about 2,000 officials from Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration and the Coast Guard on standby to be quickly deployed to cities. At least 200 members of “rapid deployment teams” were sent to Washington, D.C., Portland, Pennsylvania and Seattle, the agency said this month. Many tactical agents from those teams from Customs and Border Protection and ICE are now in Portland.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 20dc-unrest-feds2-articleLarge Trump Expands Federal Crackdown from Portland to Chicago United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Portland (Ore) New York City Homeland Security Department George Floyd Protests (2020) Chicago (Ill)
Credit…Mason Trinca for The New York Times

Some cities have seen increased levels of crime since the protests over George Floyd’s death while in police custody in Minneapolis, but no president in modern times has threatened to send in federal law enforcement over local opposition.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago made clear on Monday that the federal agents would be no more welcome in her city than they have been in Portland. “We don’t need federal agents without any insignia taking people off the street and holding them, I think, unlawfully,” she said at a morning news conference before reports of the deployment were confirmed. “That’s not what we need.”

In a four-page letter to Mr. Trump sent later in the day and obtained by The New York Times, Ms. Lightfoot said if the president really wanted to help Chicago, he should enact gun control, do more to curb the coronavirus and invest in community programs.

“Any other form of militarized assistance within our borders that would not be within our control or within the direct command of the Chicago Police Department would spell disaster,” she wrote.

Trump administration officials said the deployment to Chicago was separate from the operation in Portland, which ostensibly was to protect the federal courthouse there.

But the Homeland Security Investigations agents have broad authority to enforce federal laws in cities, and the Trump administration deployed them this year to so-called sanctuary cities in an enhanced arrest campaign against undocumented immigrants. The administration has also previously deployed federal officials to combat crime in Chicago, including agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The Department of Homeland Security asserted that it was acting within the law, pointing to 40 U.S. Code 1315. Chad F. Wolf, the department’s acting secretary, can deputize officers in any department agency, like ICE, Customs and Border Protection or the Secret Service “as officers and agents for duty in connection with the protection of property owned or occupied by the federal government and persons on the property,” according to the law.

But the federal agents would not be limited to guarding federal property. Under the law, the agents could also conduct investigations of crimes committed against a federal property or federal officer throughout the city.

Carrie Cordero, a senior fellow for the Center for a New American Security, said that the federal statute did provide flexibility to tap members of various agencies to assist in guarding federal property, but that it was never intended to send border agents trained to investigate a drug cartel to crack down on protesters in the streets.

“What’s happening is the administration is using D.H.S. to perform basically a federal policing function, which in my view is unconstitutional and is certainly not what Congress intended when it created the department,” she said.

Stephen I. Vladeck, a law professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said it was not clear how federal agents could occupy the streets of a city that is 99 percent not federal property. “It’s of course the prerogative of the federal government to enforce federal law and protect federal property,” Mr. Vladeck said. “It is not the job of the federal government to be a general police force for all crimes.”

Governors, mayors and other officials from the cities that Mr. Trump named on Monday quickly rejected the uninvited intervention of federal agents.

“It is deeply disturbing that President Trump is once again choosing to spread hateful rhetoric and attempting to suppress the voices of those he doesn’t agree with,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan.

John Roach, a spokesman for Mayor Mike Duggan of Detroit, said the city had not suffered through the problems that others have after Mr. Floyd’s death. “Detroit is one of the few large cities in the country that has experienced no fires, no stores looted and never requested the National Guard during the protests,” he said. “Not sure where the president is getting his information.”

Asked on Monday about whether he had heard the president’s mention of Oakland, Gov. Gavin Newsom of California — not known for his brevity — responded curtly: “No, and we’d reject it.”

In Philadelphia, the district attorney likened the clash to the fight against fascism in World War II and threatened to criminally charge federal agents sent to his city if they exceeded their authority. “Anyone, including federal law enforcement, who unlawfully assaults and kidnaps people will face criminal charges from my office,” said the district attorney, Larry Krasner. “At trial, they will face a Philadelphia jury.”

Mr. Wolf dismissed the complaints, making clear that he had no intention to pull back regardless of the objections. “I don’t need invitations by the state, state mayors, or state governors to do our job,” Mr. Wolf said on Fox News. “We’re going to do that, whether they like us there or not.”

The dispatch of federal agents to cities has become a new front for a president seeking to regain political momentum heading into a fall campaign season. Eager to recast protests against racial injustice after the George Floyd killing into an us-versus-them battle for law and order, Mr. Trump in recent days has repeatedly blamed Democrats for countenancing violence and failing to stand up to crime.

Speaking with reporters in the Oval Office, Mr. Trump said federal agents had “done a fantastic job” in Portland, which was “totally out of control,” and he assailed the governor and other officials there for not welcoming the help. “These are anarchists,” he said. “And the politicians out there, yes, they’re weak, but they’re afraid of these people. They’re actually afraid of these people. And that’s why they say, ‘We don’t want the federal government helping.’”

He said other cities were in similar need of federal intervention, naming some of the nation’s largest urban centers. “How about Chicago?” he said on Monday. “I read the numbers where many people killed over the weekend. We’re looking at Chicago, too. We’re looking at New York.”

The policy closely mirrored the politics. At the same time the president was weighing the use of federal power, his campaign posted an advertisement online showing an elderly lady in her home at night trying to call 911 during a break-in only to be put on hold because the police had been defunded. “You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America,” the ad said.

Peter Baker and Zolan Kanno-Youngs reported from Washington, and Monica Davey from Chicago. Jill Cowan contributed reporting from Los Angeles.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Defying Trump, Lawmakers Move to Strip Military Bases of Confederate Names

Westlake Legal Group 20dc-bases-facebookJumbo Defying Trump, Lawmakers Move to Strip Military Bases of Confederate Names Vetoes (US) United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Senate Republican Party Names, Geographical Military Bases and Installations Law and Legislation House of Representatives Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — Representative Don Bacon, a Republican, had a blunt message for President Trump when a White House aide called him personally early this month and asked that he abandon legislation to strip the names of Confederate leaders from military bases.

“You’re wrong — you need to change,” Mr. Bacon, a second-term Nebraskan and former Air Force brigadier general, told the official, he said in an interview. “We’re the party of Lincoln, the party of emancipation; we’re not the party of Jim Crow. We should be on the right side of this issue.”

The sharp exchange between the White House aide and Mr. Bacon, who is facing an unexpectedly difficult re-election race, reflects just how much Mr. Trump has isolated himself — even from members of his own party who rarely break with him — on an issue that has come to the forefront of the political debate amid a national outcry for racial justice.

It will take center stage on Capitol Hill this week, when the House and Senate each consider sweeping annual military bills that contain bipartisan measures mandating that the Pentagon remove Confederate names from military assets. Mr. Trump, who has sought to stoke cultural and political divisions over symbols of the Confederacy, has said he would veto any bill with such a requirement.

The disconnect has raised the prospect of a rare, election-year clash between congressional Republicans and Mr. Trump on the military bill, the measure that authorizes pay raises for American troops and is regarded as must-pass legislation. Despite the president’s unapologetic stance, most Republicans have been unwilling to defend symbols of the Confederacy, and some have warned the president not to force the first veto override of his presidency.

The House voted on Monday to begin consideration of the bill and is expected to pass it this week, as the Senate debates a similar measure slated to be approved next week.

Mr. Trump, who has positioned himself against a growing movement for racial justice, renewed his veto threat in an interview aired Sunday. Mr. Trump told Fox News’s Chris Wallace that he rejected the counsel of military leaders like Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who has called for taking “a hard look” at changing the names of the bases.

“We won two world wars, two world wars, beautiful world wars that were vicious and horrible, and we won them out of Fort Bragg,” Mr. Trump said. “We won them out of all of these forts, and now they want to throw those names away.”

On Monday, Senator James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma, the Republican chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, batted away the prospect of a veto showdown.

“He’s threatened several times to do that, but he also knows that’s the most important bill of the year,” Mr. Inhofe said in a brief interview.

The measures cruising through Congress along bipartisan lines, including Mr. Bacon’s proposal and a separate one in the Senate, led by Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, go much further than an order issued by the Pentagon late last week that effectively banned displays of the Confederate flag on military installations around the world. Ms. Warren’s amendment would require the Pentagon to strip all military assets of names and symbols of the Confederacy within three years. Another measure in House Democrats’ military spending bill would provide the Army with $1 million to rename the installations and other assets.

Few Republicans in Congress have rallied to Mr. Trump’s side on the issue. Senate Republican leaders have moved to avoid a contentious showdown on the issue, ducking a vote on a proposal by Senator Josh Hawley, Republican of Missouri, to remove Ms. Warren’s requirement and replace it with a weaker measure that would instruct the Pentagon to study the issue.

“This cancel movement seeks to divide us, not unite; to erase our history, rather than to reckon with it,” Mr. Hawley said in a speech on the Senate floor, accusing proponents of Ms. Warren’s measure of being driven by “a kind of woke fundamentalism.”

Taking such a vote on the Senate floor would have squeezed several Republicans in tight re-election battles. And Republican leaders in both chambers on Capitol Hill have been largely supportive of the effort to rename the bases.

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, told The Wall Street Journal last week that he would not block the effort to rename the bases, and in an interview with a Louisville radio station, he said he didn’t “have any problem” with renaming the bases for “people who didn’t rebel against the country.” He has urged the president not to veto the bill.

“The issue of Army bases being named after Confederate generals is a legitimate concern in the times in which we live,” said Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina. “I’m OK with a process that the Senate came up with. And there’s a lot of good things in this bill.”

Representative Mac Thornberry of Texas, the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, opposed the measure’s deadlines, saying that it did not give the Pentagon enough time to facilitate community discussion around the change and that the end goal should be “increased understanding and changed hearts.”

“My personal opinion is that the names of some, if not all, of these installations should be changed,” Mr. Thornberry said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

After Dismissing Coronavirus Surge, Trump Will Resume Briefings

Westlake Legal Group 20dc-virus-trump-facebookJumbo After Dismissing Coronavirus Surge, Trump Will Resume Briefings United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Television Ratings (Audience Measurement) Presidential Election of 2020 Pence, Mike Kushner, Jared Hicks, Hope C (1988- ) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Conway, Kellyanne

WASHINGTON — By the time he canceled the show midseason, even President Trump had grown weary of his televised coronavirus briefings. Angry at the reviews, he declared the briefings “not worth the time & effort,” a conclusion shared by his own advisers and allies who had come to see them as hurting more than helping.

But while the freewheeling sessions with their cascades of misinformation and petty outbursts had become self-destructive, nothing else has taken their place as a way for Mr. Trump to get his message out given his lack of success reviving his favorite campaign rallies. And so, the president said on Monday that he was bringing back the virus briefings nearly two months after calling them off.

The decision to resume the briefings amounts to a tacit acknowledgment that the public health crisis that Mr. Trump has sought to put behind him is still ravaging much of the country as he heads toward a fall election season trailing badly in the polls. With new infections, hospitalizations and now deaths on the rise, especially in the South and West, it has become increasingly difficult for the president to simply shrug off the outbreaks as mere “embers” that can be easily smothered.

Even so, as he opted to focus renewed presidential time to discussing the pandemic with the public again amid concern from Republicans that he was not taking it seriously enough, Mr. Trump, a former reality television star, attributed the move not to the increasing threat of the virus but to the fact that the briefings had garnered high television ratings.

“I was doing them and we had a lot of people watching, record numbers watching in the history of cable television. There’s never been anything like it,” Mr. Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. “It’s a great way to get information out to the public as to where we are with the vaccines, with the therapeutics.”

#styln-briefing-block { font-family: nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif; background-color: #F3F3F3; padding: 20px; margin: 37px auto; border-radius: 5px; color: #121212; box-sizing: border-box; width: calc(100% – 40px); } #styln-briefing-block a { color: #121212; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { color: #121212; border-bottom: 1px solid #cccccc; font-size: 0.9375rem; line-height: 1.375rem; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link:hover { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 7px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -13px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet:not(:last-child) { margin-bottom: 0.75em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header-section { margin-bottom: 16px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-weight: 700; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; display: inline-block; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header a { text-decoration: none; color: #333; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer { font-size: 14px; margin-top: 1.25em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks { padding-top: 1em; margin-top: 1.75em; border-top: 1px solid #E2E2E3; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks a { font-weight: bold; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a { border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a:hover { border-bottom: 1px solid transparent; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-lb-items { display: grid; grid-template-columns: auto 1fr; grid-column-gap: 20px; grid-row-gap: 15px; line-height: 1.2; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { color: #999; font-size: 12px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time.active a { color: #D0021B; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer-meta { display: flex; justify-content: space-between; align-items: center; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-ts { color: #D0021B; font-size: 11px; display: inline-block; } @media only screen and (min-width: 600px) { #styln-briefing-block { padding: 30px; width: calc(100% – 40px); max-width: 600px; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { font-size: 1.0625rem; line-height: 1.5rem; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 10px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -15px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-size: 17px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { font-size: 13px; } } @media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) { #styln-briefing-block { width: 100%; } }

Updated 2020-07-21T01:54:13.926Z

He was right about the ratings — his briefings were attracting an average audience around 8.5 million, or roughly the equivalent of the season finale of “The Bachelor” — and he said he would probably start again on Tuesday at 5 p.m., the same hour as before because it would attract viewers. “We had a good slot,” he said.

The briefings could in effect serve as a substitute for the campaign rallies that Mr. Trump tried to restart. His first attempt fizzled when he filled only a third of an arena in Tulsa, Okla., and his second — set for Portsmouth, N.H. — was scrubbed amid concerns that it too would not draw many people, although the campaign cited the weather as the proximate reason for canceling. That one was never rescheduled, even though the campaign said it would be, nor have any other rallies been announced.

Mr. Trump’s aides have grown increasingly uncertain about how to communicate his message on the spread of the virus against the reality of a president who has shown almost no ability to stay focused during the course of scheduled events. For weeks, some Trump advisers have said the White House needs to do more to brief the public on the rise in hospitalizations and deaths.

But the idea of resuming the briefings became another dispute in the eternal turf wars within the Trump team. Two of his closest advisers, Jared Kushner and Hope Hicks, had been fine with the administration conducting virus briefings so long as they were not at the White House complex where Mr. Trump might want to join them. Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, has preferred not drawing attention to the virus at all.

But Kellyanne Conway, the president’s counselor, publicly said that the president’s poll numbers were better when he was doing the briefings and that she hoped he would again. Vice President Mike Pence’s team has also wanted him to do more, but the president’s communications aides bristled at the vice president appearing at them when they thought Mr. Trump should be leading the effort. By the end of last week, Mr. Kushner and Ms. Hicks were rethinking their concerns, according to people familiar with the discussions.

“The pandemic is the No. 1 topic of conversation around family dinner tables and Zoom conversations, so the president is smart to ensure his message is getting into those discussions,” said Cliff Sims, a former White House media aide under Mr. Trump. “If we learned anything during the 2016 campaign and in the White House, it’s that he’s always his own best messenger and our ability to shape the debate is always bolstered by having him out front.”

But Democrats scoffed at the notion that the president would handle the briefings any better this time around. “It’s pretty clear that the resumption of briefings is more about Trump feeding his own ego, in an absence of other forums, and sharing his own distorted version of history directly with his base than it is about sharing fact-based updates with the American public,” said Jen Psaki, a White House communications director under President Barack Obama.

The original coronavirus briefings from March to April were made-for-television events, with scientific information provided by public health experts often overshadowed by a confrontational president castigating governors, lawmakers, China, reporters and others he deemed insufficiently grateful to him for his leadership. He used them to defend his administration’s response to the virus and to promote a pet drug as a possible treatment over the advice of his own experts.

Mr. Trump eventually quit holding them after he was widely mocked for suggesting that people might be able to counter the virus by ingesting or injecting disinfectants like bleach, an offhand comment that sent public health agencies scrambling to warn the public not to try such an approach because it could be fatal.

But in recent weeks, the surge of cases has frustrated Mr. Trump’s effort to play down the seriousness of the continuing pandemic. The United States now records more than twice as many cases each day as it did during the height of the daily briefings, and the number of deaths, which had fallen substantially, has begun to rise again as well.

White House officials have said in recent days both that the president is too busy to attend coronavirus task force meetings and that he is “working around the clock” on the virus. But even as hospitals fill up and governors reverse decisions to reopen, Mr. Trump has continued to insist that the virus would simply vanish on its own.

In his comments on Monday, he was a little less dismissive. “Frankly, a lot of the country is doing well — a lot of the people don’t say it, as you understand,” he said. “But we’ve have had this big flare-up in Florida, Texas, a couple of other places. And so I think what we’re going to do is I’ll get involved and we’ll start doing briefings.”

Peter Baker reported from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Leans Into False Virus Claims in Combative Fox News Interview

Westlake Legal Group trump-leans-into-false-virus-claims-in-combative-fox-news-interview Trump Leans Into False Virus Claims in Combative Fox News Interview Wallace, Chris (1947- ) United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Rumors and Misinformation Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion Police Reform Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Monuments and Memorials (Structures) George Floyd Protests (2020) Fox News Channel Flags, Emblems and Insignia Fauci, Anthony S Disease Rates Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Black People absentee voting
Westlake Legal Group 19dc-trump-facebookJumbo Trump Leans Into False Virus Claims in Combative Fox News Interview Wallace, Chris (1947- ) United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Rumors and Misinformation Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion Police Reform Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Monuments and Memorials (Structures) George Floyd Protests (2020) Fox News Channel Flags, Emblems and Insignia Fauci, Anthony S Disease Rates Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Black People absentee voting

WASHINGTON — An agitated President Trump offered a string of combative and often dubious assertions in an interview aired Sunday, defending his handling of the coronavirus with misleading evidence, attacking his own health experts, disputing polls showing him trailing in his re-election race and defending people who display the Confederate flag as victims of “cancel culture.”

The president’s remarks, delivered in an interview on “Fox News Sunday,” amounted to a contentious potpourri more commonly found on his Twitter feed and at his political rallies.

The difference this time was a vigorous attempt by the host, Chris Wallace, to fact-check him, leading to several clashes between the two on matters ranging from the coronavirus response to whether Mr. Trump would accept the results of the election should he lose.

  • The president made a litany of false claims about his administration’s handling of the virus, despite evidence that key officials and public health experts advising the president made crucial missteps and played down the spread of the disease this spring. In the interview, Mr. Trump falsely claimed that the United States had “one of the lowest mortality rates in the world” from the virus.

    “That’s not true, sir,” Mr. Wallace said.

    “Do you have the numbers, please?” Mr. Trump said. “Because I heard we had the best mortality rate.”

    The United States has the eighth-worst fatality rate among reported coronavirus cases in the world, and the death rate per 100,000 people — 42.83 — ranks it third-worst, according to data on the countries most affected by the coronavirus compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Trump said that by increasing testing, his administration was “creating trouble for the fake news to come along and say, ‘Oh, we have more cases.’”

  • Mr. Trump falsely claimed that the coronavirus case rate in other countries was lower than in the United States because those nations did not engage in testing. When Mr. Wallace pointed out a low case rate across the European Union, the president suggested it was possible that those countries “don’t test.” And when Mr. Wallace pointed out that the death rate in the United States was rising, Mr. Trump replied by blaming China.

    “Excuse me, it’s all too much, it shouldn’t be one case,” Mr. Trump said. “It came from China. They should’ve never let it escape. They should’ve never let it out. But it is what it is. Take a look at Europe, take a look at the numbers in Europe. And by the way, they’re having cases.”

  • Mr. Trump called Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, an “alarmist” who provided faulty information in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

    “I don’t know that he’s a leaker,” Mr. Trump said during the interview. “He’s a little bit of an alarmist. That’s OK. A little bit of an alarmist.”

    Mr. Trump said that Dr. Fauci had been against his decision to close the borders to travelers from China in January. That is misleading: While Dr. Fauci initially opposed the idea on the grounds that a ban would prevent medical professionals from traveling to hard-hit areas, he supported the decision by the time it was made.

    Mr. Trump also said Dr. Fauci had been against Americans wearing masks. Dr. Fauci has said he does not regret urging Americans not to wear masks in the early days of the pandemic, citing a severe shortage of protective gear for medical professionals at the time.

  • Mr. Trump said he doubted whether Dr. Robert R. Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was correct in predicting that the pandemic would be worse this fall. “I don’t know,” Mr. Trump said. “And I don’t think he knows.”

    He said public health experts and the World Health Organization “got a lot wrong” early on, including a theory that the virus would abate as the weather warmed — one that Mr. Trump himself had promoted repeatedly. Then the president reiterated his earlier claim, unsupported by science, that the virus would suddenly cease one day. “It’s going to disappear, and I’ll be right,” Mr. Trump said. “Because I’ve been right probably more than anybody else.”

  • Mr. Trump insulted Fox News pollsters as “among the worst” when presented with data that showed him trailing former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the presumptive Democratic nominee, claiming that he had seen polls that showed him winning.

    “I understand you still have more than 100 days to this election, but at this point you’re losing,” Mr. Wallace told Mr. Trump after detailing a new Fox News poll that showed Mr. Biden leading the president by eight points, 49 percent to 41 percent, among registered voters.

    “First of all, I’m not losing,” Mr. Trump replied, “because those are fake polls. They were fake in 2016, and now they’re even more fake. The polls were much worse in 2016.”

    But in reality, the Fox News poll was much better for him than another major survey released Sunday. A Washington Post-ABC News poll showed Mr. Biden with a double-digit lead: 55 percent to 40 percent among registered voters. The numbers were part of a slate of polls showing Mr. Biden’s lead widening as the pandemic weighed on the president’s approval ratings.

    Mr. Trump said he was not worried about losing the election with the decision this week to replace his campaign manager, Brad Parscale. Mr. Trump called Mr. Parscale “a great digital guy” before saying that many of his 2016 campaign hands were getting more involved. He did not mention his new campaign manager, Bill Stepien, by name.

  • When told that Mr. Biden was chosen in the Fox poll as the more mentally sound candidate, Mr. Trump disputed that finding and defended his cognitive test results to Mr. Wallace, who said he had taken the same test that the president had bragged about acing this month. Mr. Wallace pointed out that one of the questions asked to identify an elephant.

    “It’s all misrepresentation,” Mr. Trump said. “Because, yes, the first few questions are easy, but I’ll bet you couldn’t even answer the last five questions. I’ll bet you couldn’t. They get very hard, the last five questions.”

  • Mr. Trump suggested that he might not accept the results of the election should he lose. Mr. Wallace, who spent the interview grilling the president — a tactic he has used in other high-profile interviews — pointed out that Mr. Trump said the same thing in 2016.

    “You don’t know until you see,” Mr. Trump said. “It depends. I think mail-in voting is going to rig the election. I really do.”

    Mr. Trump, who has voted by mail, has repeatedly warned, without evidence, that mail elections would involve robbed mailboxes, forged signatures and ballots printed by foreign countries.

  • Mr. Trump again tried to attack Mr. Biden, claiming that the former vice president wanted to defund the police. The president suggested this was evidenced by his work with more progressive Democrats to create a charter pledging to work together on matters including changes to policing.

    “It says nothing about defunding the police,” Mr. Wallace said of that document.

    “Oh really? It says abolish, it says defund. Let’s go! Get me the charter, please,” Mr. Trump said, before demanding to see the document. In a promotional clip of the interview, Mr. Wallace said the president had been unable to find evidence that Mr. Biden sought to defund or abolish the police.

  • When Mr. Wallace asked the president if he could understand why Black people would be angry about their increased likelihood to be killed by the police, Mr. Trump reiterated a claim he made in another interview last week: that white people are fatally shot in high numbers, too.

    “I mean, many, many whites are killed,” Mr. Trump said. “I hate to say, but this is going on for decades.”

    Statistics show that while more white Americans are killed by the police over all, people of color are killed at higher rates.

  • Mr. Trump also refused to back down from supporting people who were against abolishing the Confederate flag, even as Mr. Wallace pointed out that they had used it in defense of slavery. The president equated the movement to pull down the flags and Confederate monuments to “cancel culture,” a term more commonly used to describe a boycott against a person, often a celebrity, who says or does something culturally offensive.

    “And you know, the whole thing with cancel culture, we can’t cancel our whole history,” Mr. Trump said. “We can’t forget that the North and the South fought. We have to remember that. Otherwise we’ll end up fighting again.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

As Trump Ignores Virus Crisis, Republicans Start to Contradict Him

President Trump’s failure to contain the coronavirus outbreak and his refusal to promote clear public-health guidelines have left many senior Republicans despairing that he will ever play a constructive role in addressing the crisis, with some concluding they must work around Mr. Trump and ignore or even contradict his pronouncements.

In recent days, some of the most prominent figures in the G.O.P. outside the White House have broken with Mr. Trump over issues like the value of wearing a mask in public and heeding the advice of health experts like Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, whom the president and other hard-right figures within the administration have subjected to caustic personal criticism.

They appear to be spurred by several overlapping forces, including deteriorating conditions in their own states, Mr. Trump’s seeming indifference to the problem and the approach of a presidential election in which Mr. Trump is badly lagging his Democratic challenger, Joseph R. Biden Jr., in the polls.

Once-reticent Republican governors are now issuing orders on mask-wearing and business restrictions that run counter to Mr. Trump’s demands. Some of those governors have been holding late-night phone calls among themselves to trade ideas and grievances; they have sought out partners in the administration other than the president, including Vice President Mike Pence, who, despite echoing Mr. Trump in public, is seen by governors as far more attentive to the continuing disaster.

“The president got bored with it,” David Carney, an adviser to the Texas governor, Greg Abbott, a Republican, said of the pandemic. He noted that Mr. Abbott directs his requests to Mr. Pence, with whom he speaks two to three times a week.

A handful of Republican lawmakers in the Senate have privately pressed the administration to bring back health briefings led by figures like Dr. Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx, who regularly updated the public during the spring until Mr. Trump upstaged them with his own briefing-room monologues. And in his home state of Kentucky last week, Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, broke with Mr. Trump on nearly every major issue related to the virus.

Mr. McConnell stressed the importance of mask-wearing, expressed “total” confidence in Dr. Fauci and urged Americans to follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that Mr. Trump has ignored or dismissed.

“The straight talk here that everyone needs to understand is: This is not going away until we get a vaccine,” Mr. McConnell said on Wednesday, contradicting Mr. Trump’s rosy predictions.

The result is a quiet but widening breach between Mr. Trump and leading figures in his party, as the virus burns through major political battlegrounds in the South and the West, like in the states of Arizona, Texas and Georgia.

Amid mounting alarm in a huge portion of the country, Mr. Trump has at times appeared to inhabit a different universe, incorrectly predicting the outbreak would quickly dissipate and falsely claiming the spread of the virus was simply a function of increased testing. With his impatient demands and decrees, Mr. Trump has disrupted efforts to mitigate the crisis while effectively sidelining himself from participating in those efforts.

The emerging rifts in Mr. Trump’s party have been slow to develop, but they have rapidly deepened since a new surge in coronavirus cases began to sweep the country last month.

In the final days of June, the governor of Utah, Gary Herbert, a Republican, joined other governors on a conference call with Mr. Pence and urged the administration to do more to combat a sense of “complacency” about the virus. Mr. Herbert said it would help states like his own if Mr. Trump and Mr. Pence were to encourage mask-wearing on a national scale, according to a recording of the call.

“As a responsible citizen, if you care about your neighbor, if you love your neighbor, let us show the respect necessary by wearing a mask,” Mr. Herbert said, offering language to Mr. Pence and adding, “That’s where I think you and the president can help us out.”

Mr. Pence told Mr. Herbert the suggestion was “duly noted” and said that mask-wearing would be a “very consistent message” from the administration.

But no such appeal was ever forthcoming from Mr. Trump, who asserted days later that the virus would “just disappear.”

Mr. Trump has offered only hedged recommendations on wearing masks and has rarely worn one himself in public; in a Fox interview that was broadcast on Sunday the president said he would not issue a national mask order, because Americans deserve “a certain freedom” on the matter.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_174558564_dd930935-21b7-4760-b15d-fe8d0cb03b94-articleLarge As Trump Ignores Virus Crisis, Republicans Start to Contradict Him United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Republican Party Polls and Public Opinion Masks
Credit…Greg Eans/The Messenger-Inquirer, via Associated Press

Some of the states where outbreaks have worsened most in recent weeks are led by Republicans who spent months avoiding stringent lockdowns, in some cases because state leaders were uneasy about creating space between themselves and a president of their own party who rejected such steps. That dynamic has been particularly pronounced in Southern states like Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, where governors have either continued to resist tough public-health restrictions or have only recently and partially embraced them.

A few Republicans have grown more open with their misgivings about Mr. Trump’s approach, including Gov. Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas, who said this month that he would require people to wear masks at any Trump rallies in his state. After issuing a broad mask mandate last week, Mr. Hutchinson said on the ABC program “This Week” on Sunday that an “example needs to be set by our national leadership” on mask-wearing.

Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio, a Republican, in an interview on “Meet the Press” on NBC, did not answer directly when asked if he had confidence in Mr. Trump’s leadership in the crisis. Mr. DeWine said he had confidence “in this administration” and praised Mr. Pence for “doing an absolutely phenomenal job.”

Judd Deere, a White House spokesman, rejected criticisms of Mr. Trump’s approach.

“Any suggestion that the president is not working around the clock to protect the health and safety of all Americans, lead the whole-of-government response to this pandemic, including expediting vaccine development, and rebuild our economy is utterly false,” Mr. Deere said in a statement.

With only a few exceptions, Republicans have avoided direct confrontation with Mr. Trump. They’ve come to view public criticism as an exercise in political futility — one guaranteed to produce a sour response from Mr. Trump without any chance of changing his behavior.

But many Republican lawmakers have grown exasperated with the administration’s conflicting messages, the open warfare within Mr. Trump’s staff and the president’s demands that states reopen faster or risk punishment from the federal government.

Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, said he wanted the administration to offer more extensive public-health updates to the American people, and condemned the open animosity toward Dr. Fauci by some administration officials, including Peter Navarro, the trade adviser, who wrote an opinion column attacking Dr. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert.

“I want more briefings but, more importantly, I want the whole White House to start acting like a team on a mission to tackle a real problem,” Mr. Sasse said. “Navarro’s Larry, Moe and Curly junior-high slap fight this week is yet another way to undermine public confidence that these guys grasp that tens of thousands of Americans have died and tens of millions are out of work.”

Senator Roy Blunt, Republican of Missouri, was more succinct: “The more they turn the briefings over to the professionals, the better.”

Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

A group of Republican governors have for months held regular conference calls, usually at night and without staff present, according to two party strategists familiar with the conversations. Unlike the virus-focused calls that Mr. Pence leads, there are no Democratic or White House officials on the line, so the conversations have become a sort of safe space where the governors can ask their counterparts for advice, discuss best practices and, if the mood strikes them, vent about the administration and the president’s erratic leadership.

Mr. Trump himself seems less interested in the specific challenges the virus presents and is mostly just frustrated by the reality that it has not disappeared as he has predicted. The disconnect is only growing between him and other party leaders — not to mention voters. A poll published Friday by ABC News and The Washington Post found that a majority of the country strongly disapproved of Mr. Trump’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, and about two-thirds of Americans said they had little or no trust in Mr. Trump’s comments about the disease.

Mr. Trump’s political standing is now so dire that even Republicans who have spent years avoiding direct comment on his behavior are acknowledging his unpopularity in plain terms. Former House Speaker Paul Ryan, for instance, offered a bleak assessment of Mr. Trump’s electoral standing at a recent event hosted by Solamere, a company with close ties to Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, and his family.

According to a partial transcript of the comments, shared by a person close to him, the usually tight-lipped Mr. Ryan said Mr. Trump was losing key voting blocs across the Midwest and in Arizona, a Republican-leaning state that Mr. Ryan described as “presently trending against us.”

While Mr. Ryan did not criticize Mr. Trump’s handling of the outbreak, he said the president could not win re-election this year if he continued losing badly to Mr. Biden among suburban voters who were wary of both candidates but currently favor Mr. Biden.

“Biden is winning over Trump in this category of voters 70 to 30,” Mr. Ryan said, “and if that sticks, he cannot win states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania.”

Some of Mr. Trump’s closest advisers are adamant that the best way forward is to downplay the dangers of the disease. Mark Meadows, the chief of staff, has been particularly forceful in his view that the White House should avoid drawing attention to the virus, according to people familiar with the discussions.

Mr. Meadows has for the most part opposed any briefings about the virus, while other Trump advisers, including Hope Hicks and Jared Kushner, have been open to holding briefings so long as they are not at the White House — where Mr. Trump could show up and commandeer them. Mr. Pence’s team would like to hold more briefings with the health experts, but some of Mr. Trump’s communications aides do not want the vice president to be part of them.

A large number of rank-and-file Republican lawmakers share Mr. Trump’s aversion to the disease-control practices.

Gov. Brian Kemp of Georgia, a Republican closely aligned with Mr. Trump, issued an order on Wednesday blocking local governments from mandating mask-wearing, then sued the mayor of Atlanta, Keisha Lance Bottoms, for imposing such a requirement. Mr. Kemp’s edict came hours after Mr. Trump visited his state, declining to wear a face mask at the Atlanta airport.

Yet some in the G.O.P. now see no alternative to parting ways with Mr. Trump, on policy if not politics.

Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Glenn Hamer, president of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, a powerful business federation in the crucial state, said he saw Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, walking a prudent line — breaking with Mr. Trump’s policy demands but not blasting the president for issuing them.

“Everyone knows that the president doesn’t react well to criticism, constructive or not,” he said.

Mr. Hamer, who was among a group of business leaders who sent a letter to the White House urging the creation of clearer national standards for facial coverings, said Mr. Trump presented a challenge to Republican leaders seeking to foster responsible behavior.

“On the mask side, it is difficult when the leader of the party had been setting a pretty bad example,” Mr. Hamer said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Buying Beans Became a Political Statement

For years, the Goya brand was synonymous with the Latino-American dream. The sheer number of products that lined the grocery store aisles — from refried pinto beans to sazón con azafran seasoning — spoke to the growing number of Hispanic immigrants who bought them. Goya, the nation’s largest Hispanic food company, has sponsored Dominican art shows, mariachi contests and soccer programs.

Advisers to President Trump considered it a victory when Goya’s chief executive, Robert Unanue, agreed to appear at the White House rollout of what it called the Hispanic Prosperity Initiative, an executive order that promised better access to education and employment for Hispanics.

In the Rose Garden on July 9, Mr. Unanue praised Mr. Trump and compared him to his grandfather, who founded Goya.

“We’re all truly blessed at the same time to have a leader like President Trump, who is a builder,” Mr. Unanue said. “And that’s what my grandfather did.”

And just like that, a once-beloved brand became anathema in many Latino homes across the United States. People posted videos and photos of themselves clearing out their pantries and tossing cans of Goya beans into the trash. It became a symbol of political resistance to share recipes for Goya product substitutes. “Oh look, it’s the sound of me Googling ‘how to make your own Adobo,’” Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York wrote on Twitter, referring to a popular seasoning that Goya sells.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_174428367_d3132deb-aeb7-4d7f-a32b-0dba769a5de2-articleLarge How Buying Beans Became a Political Statement United States Unanue, Robert I Trump, Donald J Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Hispanic-Americans Goya Foods Inc
Credit…Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Almost immediately, Trump loyalists pushed back — filling shopping carts full of Goya products and posting videos of themselves dutifully swallowing Goya beans.

By the time Ivanka Trump tweeted an endorsement of Goya, one thing had become clear: In a polarized country, at a polarized time, the buying of beans had become a political act.

Even as Mr. Trump’s support has cratered among many demographics, he has held on to a small but durable slice of Hispanic voters, many of them in Florida, a state full of Cuban Republicans that is known for razor-thin electoral margins.

Polls consistently show Mr. Trump with an approval rating among Hispanic voters hovering around 25 percent, within the lower end of the range that Republican presidents have attracted for decades. Before the coronavirus pandemic tanked the economy, the Trump campaign repeatedly pointed to the low unemployment rate among Hispanics as an indication that the administration was delivering for the community, a group he has also offended with inflammatory remarks about immigration.

Now Goya has fallen into this boiling pot of politics and anger, a strange turn of events for a company that has prided itself on knowing its customers intimately.

With each wave of Hispanic immigrants from Latin America and the Caribbean, Goya has added new products to suit their cuisine, and over the years it has distributed millions of pounds of food to pantries after hurricanes and during the pandemic.

The company was founded in 1936 by Mr. Unanue’s grandparents, who moved from the Basque region of Spain to Puerto Rico, and then New York City, where they sold sardines and olive oil from a storefront on Duane Street in Lower Manhattan.

As the company expanded, it changed its name from Unanue & Sons to Goya Foods — reportedly buying rights to its new name for $1 because it was easier to pronounce than “oo-NA-new-way” — and branched into manufacturing. During the mid-1970s, Joseph Unanue, one of the founders’ four sons, took over as chief executive, and the company relocated to New Jersey. By the time he stepped down, the company had established relationships with Walmart and other big grocers and its annual revenue had grown to $1 billion from $20 million.

Some noted that Robert Unanue’s remarks at the White House showcased the glaring disconnect between the wealthy executive whose family hailed from Spain and the largely working-class Latinos who make up his customer base. The harshest critics questioned whether he considered himself Latino.

Credit…Sergio Flores for The New York Times

The speed and size of the boycott speak to “how raw people in the community feel about the president,” said Clarissa Martinez de Castro, the deputy vice president for policy and advocacy for UnidosUS, a Latino civic engagement organization. She said many Latinos blamed Mr. Trump’s attacks on undocumented immigrants for inciting discrimination and violence against Latinos, particularly the massacre last summer in El Paso.

For the first time, she said, anxieties about racial discrimination have ranked in the top concerns among Latino voters in surveys. But Mr. Trump’s supporters are betting that this is a winning issue for them and that Americans won’t understand or empathize with the boycott.

The day after the Rose Garden ceremony, Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, tweeted: “Goya is a staple of Cuban food. My grandparents ate Goya black beans twice a day for nearly 90 years. And now the Left is trying to cancel Hispanic culture and silence free speech. #BuyGoya.”

And suddenly, the once-beloved Hispanic brand became a cause célèbre on the right.

Mr. Cruz said in an interview that he saw the boycott as an example of “spirit of intolerance.”

“The offense is he dared to say he supported the president,” Mr. Cruz said, adding that “anytime anyone dares disagree from their rigid orthodoxy, they seek to punish, cancel or destroy to the dissenter.”

Mr. Unanue, who has contributed to the campaigns of both Democrats and Republicans and worked with Michelle Obama on an anti-obesity initiative, appeared unprepared for the firestorm. Neither he nor Goya officials responded to requests for comment. But Mr. Unanue defended his remarks at the White House, telling The Wall Street Journal that he went there out of respect. “I remain strong in my convictions that I feel blessed with the leadership of our president,” he told the newspaper.

Trump supporters filmed themselves filling shopping carts full of Goya products, relishing in the opportunity to defend a Hispanic businessman and accuse Democrats of being anti-Latino. Dinesh D’Souza, a conservative political commentator, shared a video of himself swallowing beans, which he admitted he rarely ate.

A few days later, Mr. Trump circulated a photo of himself sitting in the Oval Office, smiling widely and with his thumbs up, in front of several Goya products, including a package of chocolate wafers and coconut milk.

Responding to questions about whether Ms. Trump’s tweet violated federal law forbidding government employees from using their positions to endorse products, Carolina Hurley, a White House spokeswoman, said the president’s daughter “has every right to express her personal support” for the company.

Credit…Samuel Corum for The New York Times

“Only the media and the cancel culture movement would criticize Ivanka for showing her personal support for a company that has been unfairly mocked, boycotted and ridiculed for supporting this administration — one that has consistently fought for and delivered for the Hispanic community,” Ms. Hurley said.

Some political scientists said Mr. Trump appeared eager for the free publicity that came by associating himself with a beloved Hispanic brand.

“It’s the Republican version of ‘Hispandering,’” said Geraldo Cadava, a history professor at Northwestern University and author of “The Hispanic Republican.” “He’s pandering to Hispanics the same way that politicians have peppered their stump speeches with a few words in Spanish. It’s the same kind of signal.”

Mr. Trump has occasionally made visible efforts to reach Hispanic voters. The Hispanic Prosperity Initiative, which included few details, came during a week in which he also met with Venezuelans who had fled socialism and held an interview with Telemundo, a Spanish-language television station. Mr. Trump spoke in the interview about a “road to citizenship” for undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, even as his administration has pledged to fight a Supreme Court decision upholding the Obama-era program that protected them.

It remains to be seen whether Hispanics who do not already support Trump will be swayed by his sudden association with Goya or his attempt to bring Hispanics onto the conservative side of the nation’s long-simmering culture war.

But for a few Latinos, the message resonated.

Alexander Otaola, a Cuban-American in Florida with 105,000 followers on Instagram, issued a video in Spanish that likened the Goya boycott to the destruction of statues and other cultural icons.

“What is Goya in the Latino community? It’s an icon, a statue,” he said in the YouTube video. “The left wants to destroy all icons.”

It is not clear how deeply the boycott has cut into Goya’s bottom line, or whether the impact of the “buycott” has canceled it out. Goya is a privately held company, so its records are not public.

In Jerry’s Supermarket in the predominantly Latino Oak Cliff community in Dallas, Goya products lined the shelves, as usual, and were bought by a steady stream of customers last weekend. In San Antonio’s Alamo Heights community, one cashier said managers of La Michoacana Supermarket have not said they would quit carrying Goya products. Guava paste and Salvadoran pickled salad, among other items, remained on the shelves.

But in Tucson, Ariz., Patrick Robles, a 19-year-old student at the University of Arizona, said his whole family was boycotting Goya products even though the company’s chickpeas had always been perfect for cocido, or Mexican stew.

“It was a punch in the stomach for us,” Mr. Robles said of Mr. Unanue’s comments praising a president who Mr. Robles felt has routinely devalued Latinos. Now, they are going to turn to brands like La Costeña or Rosarita.

But Pamela Ramirez, a 48-year-old Mexican-American small-business consultant in East Los Angeles, said she strongly opposed the Goya boycott. Since there is a large number of Latinos employed by the company, she thinks that boycotting the product could harm her own community. For every one of her Facebook friends who has posted about boycotting the product, Ms. Ramirez bought $10 worth of Goya products and donated them to a food bank, she said.

“You’ve got to put your money where your mouth is,” she said. “If you don’t, then you’re just part of the problem.”

Contributing reporting were Elda Lizzia Cantú, Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio, Marina Trahan Martinez, Erin Coulehan and David Montgomery. Sheelagh McNeill contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Joe Biden’s Strategy Could Help Him Win Wisconsin

ADAMS, Wis. — Nate Zimdars, a Democratic candidate for the Wisconsin State Assembly, arrived at the V.F.W. lodge here after marching in the local Independence Day parade, ready to meet voters at an annual outdoor chicken cookout called the “Chic Nic.” Although the event was hosted by the local Republican Party, Mr. Zimdars was far from nervous being behind enemy lines. He was eager.

The county flipped from blue to red in 2016, Mr. Zimdars noted, which meant it could flip again. Plus, national Democrats had done him a favor — they chose former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. for the top of their ticket.

“Biden comes across as someone who’s moderate and has experience on both sides of the aisle,” Mr. Zimdars said. “My close family and friends, who are a little more on the Republican side of the fence, said if Biden became the nominee they would vote for him.”

Such persuasion is at the core of Mr. Biden’s campaign strategy, designed to bring together moderates, seniors, working-class voters across races and former supporters of President Trump. The approach has helped him jump out to an early lead in polling, both in national surveys and in swing states like Wisconsin, where Mr. Trump won by less than 23,000 votes in 2016. It has also helped him fend off attacks from Mr. Trump, who has sought to cast Mr. Biden as a radical progressive despite his lengthy career as a moderate lawmaker.

But if Mr. Biden hopes to maintain his advantage as November draws near, Wisconsin Democrats like Mr. Zimdars have some advice, akin to the famous medical principle of “do no harm,” or the cautionary words of the hit HBO series “The Wire”: “Keep it boring.”

Being politically milquetoast is Mr. Biden’s appeal, they said, driving his ability to attract progressives in Milwaukee, moderates in suburbs like Waukesha and more rural voters in places like Adams County, one of the 22 counties in the state that voted for Mr. Trump after backing President Barack Obama in 2012.

They don’t lament that Mr. Biden is not a historic candidate like Mr. Obama or Hillary Clinton, or that he lacks bumper-sticker progressive policies like Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders — they’re grateful for it.

Credit…Lauren Justice for The New York Times
Credit…Lauren Justice for The New York Times

After the 2016 election, Mrs. Clinton was lambasted for running a risk-averse campaign that seemed to rely on voters finding Mr. Trump’s conduct inherently repugnant. Four years later, facing a changed electoral landscape, many Wisconsin Democrats think Mr. Biden can win the state with that exact playbook.

Mr. Biden is “the perfect candidate for this area at this time,” said Matt Mareno, the chairman of the Waukesha Democratic Party.

#styln-briefing-block { font-family: nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif; background-color: #F3F3F3; padding: 20px; margin: 37px auto; border-radius: 5px; color: #121212; box-sizing: border-box; width: calc(100% – 40px); } #styln-briefing-block a { color: #121212; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { color: #121212; border-bottom: 1px solid #cccccc; font-size: 0.9375rem; line-height: 1.375rem; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link:hover { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 7px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -13px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet:not(:last-child) { margin-bottom: 0.75em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header-section { margin-bottom: 16px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-weight: 700; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; display: inline-block; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header a { text-decoration: none; color: #333; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer { font-size: 14px; margin-top: 1.25em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks { padding-top: 1em; margin-top: 1.75em; border-top: 1px solid #E2E2E3; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks a { font-weight: bold; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a { border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a:hover { border-bottom: 1px solid transparent; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-lb-items { display: grid; grid-template-columns: auto 1fr; grid-column-gap: 20px; grid-row-gap: 15px; line-height: 1.2; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { color: #999; font-size: 12px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time.active a { color: #D0021B; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer-meta { display: flex; justify-content: space-between; align-items: center; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-ts { color: #D0021B; font-size: 11px; display: inline-block; } @media only screen and (min-width: 600px) { #styln-briefing-block { padding: 30px; width: calc(100% – 40px); max-width: 600px; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { font-size: 1.0625rem; line-height: 1.5rem; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 10px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -15px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-size: 17px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { font-size: 13px; } } @media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) { #styln-briefing-block { width: 100%; } }

Updated 2020-07-17T23:57:44.001Z

“Trump’s whole rallying cry was that he was an outsider coming to fix the establishment, and now he is the establishment,” Mr. Mareno said. “We’re seeing more and more college-educated white voters leaving him and we’re seeing more seniors leave him. We’re seeing that coalition just completely dissolved down to the very core base of his support.”

Several characteristics inform Mr. Biden’s strategy, including his lengthy career as a bipartisan legislator, Mr. Trump’s panned response to the pandemic, and Mr. Biden’s identity as an older white man, the type of politician easily categorized as “presidential.”

There are a range of ways Mr. Biden can build a general election coalition in a battleground state like Wisconsin.

He could focus on winning back voters in low-population areas, where Mrs. Clinton suffered big losses in 2016.

He could build on recent Democratic efforts to target the college-educated white voters that Mr. Trump has, at times, repelled, particularly in suburban counties like Waukesha, Ozaukee and Washington, where Mrs. Clinton outperformed Mr. Obama but also lost some votes to third-party candidates.

Or he could seek to motivate reliable Democratic voters like young people, Black voters and Latino voters in Milwaukee, the Democratic stronghold where voter turnout was down significantly in 2016.

Mr. Biden’s advisers say he will seek to both appeal to persuadable voters and motivate the party’s base, mimicking the successful campaign of Senator Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, a progressive who won re-election in 2018 by an eye-popping 10 points. Mr. Biden led Mr. Trump by 11 points in Wisconsin in a poll by The New York Times and Siena College last month, and more recent polling from other battleground states like Pennsylvania has been even better for him.

Representative Mark Pocan, a Democrat who represents Madison, said Mr. Biden’s campaign had already outpaced Mrs. Clinton’s in terms of investment in and attention to Wisconsin. Mr. Pocan said the Clinton campaign “took the purple state for granted,” citing both a lack of visits and financial support for down-ballot candidates.

“Donald Trump came and lied to us, but at least he showed up,” he said, calling the Democrats’ losses in 2016 a “duh moment” for the party. It was Democratic voter drop-off across Wisconsin — not big Republican turnout — that most helped Mr. Trump win there, he said.

“When one candidate doesn’t campaign and the other one does, you would expect that you might get the results that we got,” Mr. Pocan said. “But no one will ever make that mistake again.”

This does not mean that Mr. Biden has avoided skepticism from core Democratic constituencies like young people and progressive minority voters — the same groups that frequently needled Mrs. Clinton and backed Mr. Biden’s rivals in the primary.

In fact, the same polls that show Mr. Biden securely ahead of Mr. Trump also find Mr. Biden with tepid numbers among young people and minority voters. His favorability rating decreased in a recent survey by NBC and The Wall Street Journal, driven by shifts among younger Democrats.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_174354135_454d8fa5-5b33-4b82-8ab3-9028caf981e9-articleLarge How Joe Biden's Strategy Could Help Him Win Wisconsin Wisconsin Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Biden, Joseph R Jr
Credit…Lauren Justice for The New York Times

At a protest in Milwaukee in support of Black Lives Matter this month, Larissa Gladding, 23, said she viewed voting for Biden as the unfortunate cost of beating Mr. Trump. “It doesn’t even feel like it’s an election about young people or he wants the young vote anymore,” she said, adding that she planned to vote for Mr. Biden anyway.

Dominique Tonneas, 24, who was interviewed at a fireworks show in Muskego and who plans to vote for Mr. Trump in November, said Mr. Biden’s age and long career meant he wouldn’t bring a new perspective to the table. She said she planned to vote for Mr. Trump, who is only a few years younger, because she preferred his economic policies.

What is already clear: The last several months, which have featured the largest protest movement in American history and a pandemic that continues to kill thousands and upend the country’s social and economic fabric, has forced Mr. Biden and Mr. Trump to adjust the structure, and the message, of their campaigns.

Sue Schaetzka, who attended the Chic Nic in Adams, said she voted for Mr. Trump in 2016 and planned to do so again in November. But she said the events of the past few months, and particularly the nation’s response to the coronavirus, had changed the way people in her social circles felt about the president.

Ms. Schaetzka was unsure Mr. Trump could win the state again this year, particularly against a Democrat like Mr. Biden.

“With everything that’s going on with Covid, I know some people are rethinking,” Ms. Schaetzka said.

“People just like Biden more than they like Hillary,” she added. “I don’t know if it’s her past and all that, but they didn’t trust her.”

At the protest in Milwaukee, young liberals said they planned to vote for Mr. Biden, but the exact things that help him appeal to people like Ms. Schaetzka are what makes them begrudging, even resentful, supporters.

They portrayed Mr. Biden as too moderate ideologically and as a doddering elder personally, a critique that mimics the “Sleepy Joe” moniker Mr. Trump has sought to popularize.

Credit…Lauren Justice for The New York Times
Credit…Lauren Justice for The New York Times

Diarelis Rodriguez, who marched in the protest, said she understood the young people who saw Mr. Biden and Mr. Trump as two sides of the same coin.

“Biden is part of the problem. He helped with the War on Drugs and doesn’t really understand the issues we need him to,” said Ms. Rodriguez, 18. “The people I talk to don’t want to vote because they don’t want to participate in a corrupt system.”

But Ms. Rodriguez still said she planned to vote for Mr. Biden in November, though both she and Ms. Gladding wished he embraced more activist rhetoric on matters of racial equality and defunding the police.

There’s a reason he has not. Twenty miles away, leaders of the Waukesha Democratic Party said they recently fielded a phone call from a skeptical voter who said she wanted to vote for Mr. Biden, but she was worried Democrats were becoming hostile to police officers.

A volunteer named Scott Prindl called the woman back. Mr. Prindl, 65, said the woman had family in law enforcement and he does also. During the phone call, he explained the Black Lives Matter movement and its goals, as he saw them.

“The real Black Lives Matter protests are the ones who are peaceful,” Mr. Prindl, who is white, assured the woman over the phone. “It’s outsiders who are coming in and wreaking havoc,” he said, alluding to the destructive political groups that protesters say turned some of the demonstrations violent.

The woman was comforted. She will be voting for Democrats in November, she said, and for Mr. Biden over Mr. Trump.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Inside the Failure: 5 Takeaways on Trump’s Effort to Shift Responsibility

WASHINGTON — President Trump and his top aides decided to shift primary responsibility for the coronavirus response to the states during a critical period of weeks in mid-April, eagerly seizing on overly optimistic predictions that the pandemic was fading so the president could reopen the economy and focus on his re-election, a New York Times investigation found.

The investigation revealed that critical decisions about the handling of the virus during that crucial period were made not by the better known coronavirus task force, but by a small group of White House aides who convened each morning in the office of Mark Meadows, the president’s chief of staff.

One of their goals: to justify declaring victory in the fight against the virus. In that effort they frequently sought validation from Dr. Deborah L. Birx, a highly regarded infectious disease expert, who was the chief evangelist in the West Wing for the idea that infections had peaked and the virus was fading quickly.

Despite warnings from state officials and other public health experts, Mr. Trump stuck to a deliberate strategy by pushing responsibility onto the states almost immediately after introducing reopening guidelines. Then he quickly undermined the guidelines by urging Democratic governors to “liberate” their states from those very restrictions.

Interviews with more than two dozen senior administration officials, state and local health officials, and a review of emails and documents, show how a critical period in mid-April set the nation on a course to a new surge, with the United States logging more than 65,000 new cases of the virus each day.

Here are some of the key findings:

Officials in the West Wing viewed the White House coronavirus task force as dysfunctional, and they were increasingly dismissive of Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist, and officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who they believed had been wrong in their early judgments about the course of the virus.

As a result, important elements of the administration’s strategy were formulated out of sight in Mr. Meadows’s daily meetings, populated by aides who for the most part had no experience with public health emergencies and were taking their cues from the president.

The group convened each morning at 8 as the coronavirus crisis was raging in April. In addition to Dr. Birx, the participants included Joe Grogan, the president’s domestic policy adviser; Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff; Russell T. Vought, the president’s acting budget director; Chris Liddell, a deputy chief of staff, and Jared Kushner, the president’s senior adviser and son-in-law; Hope Hicks, the protector of Mr. Trump’s brand; and Kevin A. Hassett, a top economic adviser.

In the bureaucratese of their meetings, they referred to their goal as orchestrating a “state authority handoff.” As Mr. Meadows would tell people, “Only in Washington, D.C., do they think that they have the answer for all of America.”

#styln-briefing-block { font-family: nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif; background-color: #F3F3F3; padding: 20px; margin: 37px auto; border-radius: 5px; color: #121212; box-sizing: border-box; width: calc(100% – 40px); } #styln-briefing-block a { color: #121212; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { color: #121212; border-bottom: 1px solid #cccccc; font-size: 0.9375rem; line-height: 1.375rem; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link:hover { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 7px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -13px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet:not(:last-child) { margin-bottom: 0.75em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header-section { margin-bottom: 16px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-weight: 700; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; display: inline-block; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header a { text-decoration: none; color: #333; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer { font-size: 14px; margin-top: 1.25em; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks { padding-top: 1em; margin-top: 1.75em; border-top: 1px solid #E2E2E3; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-briefinglinks a { font-weight: bold; margin-right: 6px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a { border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer a:hover { border-bottom: 1px solid transparent; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { border-bottom: none; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-lb-items { display: grid; grid-template-columns: auto 1fr; grid-column-gap: 20px; grid-row-gap: 15px; line-height: 1.2; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { color: #999; font-size: 12px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time.active a { color: #D0021B; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-footer-meta { display: flex; justify-content: space-between; align-items: center; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-ts { color: #D0021B; font-size: 11px; display: inline-block; } @media only screen and (min-width: 600px) { #styln-briefing-block { padding: 30px; width: calc(100% – 40px); max-width: 600px; } #styln-briefing-block a.briefing-block-link { font-size: 1.0625rem; line-height: 1.5rem; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-bullet::before { content: ‘•’; margin-right: 10px; color: #333; font-size: 12px; margin-left: -15px; top: -2px; position: relative; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-header { font-size: 17px; } #styln-briefing-block .briefing-block-update-time a { font-size: 13px; } } @media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) { #styln-briefing-block { width: 100%; } }

Updated 2020-07-17T23:57:44.001Z

Dr. Birx was more central than publicly known to the judgment inside the West Wing that the virus was under control and on a downward path.

But her model-based assessment of the outlook failed to account for a vital variable: how Mr. Trump’s rush to urge a return to normal would undercut the social distancing and other measures that were holding down the numbers.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_171658584_720c01e8-4d3b-4fb0-9cc4-eda1e442e055-articleLarge Inside the Failure: 5 Takeaways on Trump’s Effort to Shift Responsibility United States Politics and Government United States Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Pence, Mike Newsom, Gavin Meadows, Mark R (1959- ) Liddell, Christopher P Kushner, Jared Italy Hassett, Kevin A Federal-State Relations (US) Fauci, Anthony S Disease Rates Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Birx, Deborah L
Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

During the morning meetings in Mr. Meadows’s office, Dr. Birx almost always delivered what the new team was hoping for: “All metros are stabilizing,” she would tell them, describing the virus as having hit its “peak” around mid-April. The New York area accounted for half of the total cases in the country, she said. The slope was heading in the right direction. “We’re behind the worst of it.”

During much of mid-April, Dr. Birx focused intensely on the experience that Italy had fighting the virus. In her view, it was a particularly positive comparison, telling colleagues that the United States was on the same trajectory as Italy, where there were huge spikes before infections and deaths flattened to close to zero.

Dr. Birx would roam the halls of the White House, sometimes passing out diagrams to bolster her case. “We’ve hit our peak,” she would say, and that message would find its way back to Mr. Trump.

The president quickly came to feel trapped by his own reopening guidelines, which put him in a box of his own making.

States needed declining cases to reopen, or at least a declining rate of positive tests. But more testing meant overall cases were destined to go up, not down, undercutting the president’s insistence that the priority was to get the economy cranked up again.

The result was to intensify Mr. Trump’s remarkable public campaign against testing, which was among the most vivid examples of his rejection of any informed leadership role. And it highlighted how Mr. Trump often ended up at war with his own administration’s experts and stated policies.

Mr. Trump shifted from stressing that the nation was already doing more than any other country to deriding its importance. By June the president was regularly making nonsensical statements like, “If we stop testing right now, we’d have very few cases, if any.”

The president’s bizarre public statements, his refusal to wear a mask and his pressure on states to get their economies going again left governors and state officials scrambling to address a leadership vacuum that complicated their efforts to deal with the virus.

In one case, Gov. Gavin Newsom of California was told that if he wanted the federal government to help obtain the swabs needed to test for the virus, he would have to ask Mr. Trump himself — and thank him.

After offering to help acquire 350,000 testing swabs during an early morning conversation with one of Mr. Newsom’s advisers, Mr. Kushner made it clear that the federal help would hinge on the governor doing him a favor.

Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

“The governor of California, Gavin Newsom, had to call Donald Trump, and ask him for the swabs,” recalled the adviser, Bob Kocher, an Obama-era White House health care official.

Mayor Francis X. Suarez of Miami, a Republican, said that the White House approach had only one focus: reopening businesses, instead of anticipating how cities and states should respond if cases surged again.

“It was all predicated on reduction, open, reduction, open more, reduction, open,” he said. “There was never what happens if there is an increase after you reopen?

Not until early June did White House officials even began to recognize that their assumptions about the course of the pandemic had proved wrong.

In task force meetings, officials discussed whether the spike in cases across the South was related to crowded protests over the killing of George Floyd or perhaps a fleeting side effect of Memorial Day gatherings.

Digging into new data from Dr. Birx, they soon concluded that the virus was in fact spreading with invisible ferocity during the weeks in May when states were opening up with Mr. Trump’s encouragement and many were all but declaring victory.

Even now, there are internal divisions over how far to go in having officials publicly acknowledge the reality of the situation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Weighs In on the Death of John Lewis, One of His Most Vocal Critics

Westlake Legal Group trump-weighs-in-on-the-death-of-john-lewis-one-of-his-most-vocal-critics Trump Weighs In on the Death of John Lewis, One of His Most Vocal Critics United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Lewis, John R

WASHINGTON — The Republican governor of Georgia said that the country will “never be the same” without Representative John Lewis, who died Friday at age 80. The Democratic speaker of the house called Mr. Lewis “a titan of the civil rights movement.” The House minority leader said that Mr. Lewis “never stopped working to improve the lives of others.”

As the bipartisan tributes to Mr. Lewis’s legacy began flowing late Friday evening and Saturday morning, President Trump opted to retweet a flurry of his older posts on Twitter largely focused on disparaging his enemies.

He slammed former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, as corrupt. He called his niece, whose recently published book took an unflinching look at his character, a “mess.” He praised a guest host of Sean Hannity’s Fox News television show.

On Saturday afternoon, after issuing a boilerplate proclamation for flags to be flown Saturday at half-staff at the White House and public buildings, Mr. Trump published a perfunctory message on the passing of one of his most prominent critics.

“Saddened to hear the news of civil rights hero John Lewis passing,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter after finishing a game of golf. “Melania and I send our prayers to he and his family.”

Given their tense history, how Mr. Trump would comment on Mr. Lewis’s passing was an open question. Shortly before Mr. Trump posted his tweet about Mr. Lewis’s death, Representative Karen Bass, Democrat of California, urged the president to not comment at all.

“@realDonaldTrump While the nation mourns the passing of a national hero, please say nothing,” Ms. Bass tweeted. “Please don’t comment on the life of Congressman Lewis. Your press secretary released a statement, leave it at that. Please let us mourn in peace.”

The two men have been at odds since before Mr. Trump’s inauguration, when Mr. Lewis questioned the legitimacy of Mr. Trump’s election and said he would not be in attendance when the president-elect traveled to the Capitol to be sworn in.

“I think the Russians participated in helping this man get elected,” Mr. Lewis said in a television interview days before Mr. Trump took office. “And they helped destroy the candidacy of Hillary Clinton. I don’t plan to attend the inauguration. It will be the first one that I miss since I’ve been in the Congress. You cannot be at home with something that you feel that is wrong, is not right.”

But Mr. Trump, an avid follower of his own news coverage, returned fire the next day, accusing Mr. Lewis of “falsely complaining about the election results” and questioning his leadership.

“Congressman John Lewis should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested) rather than falsely complaining about the election results,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter. “All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

The president-elect’s comments about Mr. Lewis resulted in a torrent of messages from people who lived in Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District, which is majority African-American and home to wealthy areas like Buckhead, as well as the world’s busiest airport and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Apparently still smarting from the snub, Mr. Trump followed up three days later, pointing out on Twitter that Mr. Lewis had also boycotted President George W. Bush’s inauguration.

Mr. Lewis, a Georgia Democrat and son of sharecroppers, dedicated most of his life to fighting for racial equality, whether it was helping to organize the March on Washington in 1963 or supporting protesters calling for justice for George Floyd, who died in police custody in May. He was one of the original Freedom Riders, a group of activists who traveled throughout the American South to protest segregated buses and terminals.

On a march in Selma in 1965, he was beaten by police officers who left scars that would be visible for the rest of Mr. Lewis’s life. And he had little good to say about Mr. Trump’s views on race.

As protests roiled over the death of Mr. Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who died after being pinned under the knee of a white police officer, Mr. Lewis criticized Mr. Trump, who has threatened military action against peaceful protesters and encouraged police officers to be harsher on civilians.

“You cannot stop the call of history,” Mr. Lewis said last month, criticizing Mr. Trump’s enthusiasm for militarizing American cities. “You may use troopers, you may use fire hoses and water, but it cannot be stopped. There cannot be any turning back. We’ve come too far, made too much progress, to stop now or to go back. The world is seeing what is happening, and we are ready to continue to move forward.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_145900647_b669ef9c-cb49-445a-a12f-8c6c59609f0e-articleLarge Trump Weighs In on the Death of John Lewis, One of His Most Vocal Critics United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Lewis, John R
Credit…Melissa Golden for The New York Times

Mr. Lewis, whose colleagues called him “the conscience of Congress,” continued to be an outspoken voice against the administration. In 2018, he said that Mr. Trump was a racist when the president was reported to have referred to Haiti and some African nations as “shithole countries,” and again when Mr. Trump said on Twitter that four Democratic congresswomen of color should “go back” to their home countries.

“I know racism when I see it,” Mr. Lewis said at the time, as the House voted on a resolution to condemn those tweets. “I know racism when I feel it. And at the highest level of our government, there’s no room for racism.”

When the House voted to impeach Mr. Trump in December 2019, Mr. Lewis, as he often did, framed the decision as a historical one.

“When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something,” Mr. Lewis said on the House floor. “To do something. Our children and their children will ask us, ‘What did you do? What did you say?’ For some, this vote may be hard. But we have a mission and a mandate to be on the right side of history.”

The president has a history of ignoring, or even attacking, the legacies of his political foes. In 2018, Mr. Trump’s White House was harshly criticized for initially flying the American flag only briefly at half-staff after the death of Senator John McCain, the Republican of Arizona, who was another vocal critic.

On the day of Mr. McCain’s funeral, Mr. Trump went golfing and tweeted conspiracy theories.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com