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Westlake Legal Group > Posts tagged "Trump, Donald J" (Page 90)

Trump’s Iran Strategy: A Cease-Fire Wrapped in a Strategic Muddle

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-assess-facebookJumbo Trump’s Iran Strategy: A Cease-Fire Wrapped in a Strategic Muddle United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike North Atlantic Treaty Organization Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Embargoes and Sanctions

President Trump opened a small window for diplomacy with Iran on Wednesday, but combined his words with bald threats that made it hard to see how the two countries could break out of their cycle of confrontation and revenge.

The speech was, in many ways, the sound of muddled policy. It showed that after three years in office, Mr. Trump has yet to resolve the two conflicting instincts on national security that emerge from his speeches and his Twitter feed: bellicosity and disengagement.

And he included all the other requisite elements of a Trump policy speech on Iran: burning resentment of President Barack Obama, critiques of his predecessor’s nuclear deal, dubious factual claims and campaign-year self-congratulation.

Mr. Trump did pull back from the brink of war, at least for now. He made clear that he did not plan to respond to the missile attacks on two bases where American troops operate, which seemed calibrated by the Iranians to make a point without creating more human carnage.

But the president also promised to double down on sanctions against Iran, turning again to the economic tool he remained convinced would eventually force the country to choose between ruin and survival. Beyond saying the United States “is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it,” he presented no path forward for the two adversaries of 40 years.

“It certainly sent mixed messages to Iran,” said Karim Sadjadpour, an Iranian-American strategist at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Mr. Sadjadpour called the speech “initially triumphant” as Mr. Trump celebrated his order to kill the most famous military leader in Iran, a man responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American troops. “It was then dismissive toward Iran,” he said, “and then there was an almost throwaway line at the end about what a bright future the Iranians have if they only reshape themselves as the United States demands.”

The risk now is that the uneasy halt after Iran fired 16 missiles early Wednesday at American forces in Iraq will prove temporary. History is filled with examples where missed signals led countries down a path to conflict profoundly not in their interests, notably the cascade of events that led to World War I. Rarer are the examples where a quiet accommodation of each other’s national interests prevailed, as they did when President John F. Kennedy secretly traded Soviet missiles in Cuba for American missiles in Turkey in 1962.

Unlike the Soviets, Iran cannot reach American shores with its arsenal. But the mere fear in the West that Iran could seek revenge by pushing ahead with a nuclear weapon remains its greatest leverage. There was an uneasy sense in the Pentagon on Wednesday that while Iran may not shoot more missiles from its own territory, it will almost certainly return to its specialties of shadow wars and cyberattacks.

Mr. Sadjadpour called the speech “strategically incoherent.” But that can be said about much of Mr. Trump’s Middle East policy in the past few months. The president pulled a small, fairly safe American force out of Syria that was primarily engaged in fighting the Islamic State with Syrian Kurdish allies, claiming it was time to halt “endless wars.” He decided not to respond when Iran first shot down an unmanned American drone and then executed a precision attack on Saudi oil facilities, leaving the impression inside the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps that America’s Middle East ally was not worth defending.

And then, surprising everyone, including his own military advisers, he ordered the targeted killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, Iran’s most important commander, saying that he was planning attacks on American targets, although the administration has offered few details.

Already that decision has led to a host of unintended consequences, including the sending of thousands more United States troops to the Middle East to defend American assets and interests that Mr. Trump only a few months ago suggested are not worth defending.

His answer to that contradiction seems to be to ask NATO to do the job. Presumably he wants allied forces to patrol the Persian Gulf at a time that tanker companies are halting their shipments across the Strait of Hormuz and airlines are avoiding Iraqi and Iranian airspace.

It seems unlikely they will heed his call. NATO’s leading members argue that it was Mr. Trump who picked this fight with Iran, by dumping the 2015 nuclear deal reached during the Obama administration that, in their mind, was working. And, as Mr. Trump himself complains, they do not have the military capability to play the role the United States has played.

“His failure to consult the allies or take their interests into consideration will make it extremely difficult to get their support,” said R. Nicholas Burns, the former American ambassador to NATO during the early days of the Afghanistan war, when Europe did come to America’s aid. “Very few of the allies trust him and will not follow blindly the most anti-NATO president in seven decades.”

The Iranians are betting on exactly that. Their strategy has been to peel Europe, China and Russia — the other nations involved in negotiating the accord — away from the United States. For a long while, they succeeded as European powers kept devising complex plans to counteract American sanctions on Iran.

But the Europeans were eventually outmaneuvered by the United States Treasury Department and unable to convince European companies that doing business with Tehran was worth the risk of losing their access to the American banking system. As a result, Iran’s effort to make up its lost oil revenue all but collapsed.

The Iranians have now resumed producing nuclear material, effectively abandoning the restrictions they agreed to under Mr. Obama. Mr. Trump used his speech on Wednesday to urge the Europeans to recognize that the Obama-era nuclear accord was over, and to get back on board with the United States.

“The time has come for the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Russia and China to recognize this reality,” he said.

The reality Mr. Trump does not want to recognize is that since he dismantled the agreement, Iranian nuclear scientists are months closer to nuclear breakout than they were when they were abiding by the deal’s restrictions.

Mr. Trump now says the new strategy is the old strategy: On Wednesday, he promised “powerful” new sanctions that would “remain until Iran changes its behavior.” He never explained why the sanctions enacted so far — the most severe in modern history, he often says — have failed to prompt that change over the past 18 months.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, a hawk on Iran, had a label for the administration’s Iran policy: “confront and contain.” It is a phrase meant to invoke the Cold War, when the United States faced a much larger and more dangerous enemy in the Soviet Union.

But it is not clear that classic containment works in a world where terrorists and cyberweapons easily cross borders, where attacks are deniable and Western allies at odds with each other.

And containment begets resistance. That seemed clear on the Twitter feed of one of Iran’s leading nuclear negotiators, Saeed Jalili.

Mr. Trump had posted an American flag in the minutes after the killing of General Suleimani. Mr. Jalili waited until the missiles had hit the bases in Iraq with Americans. Then he posted an Iranian flag.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. and Iran Conflict: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166844073_26225afb-7e7c-4369-843a-e5d1ec76f83c-articleLarge U.S. and Iran Conflict: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Speaker Nancy Pelosi before a closed briefing on Iran on Wednesday.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The next battle may be over presidential war powers.

House members plan to vote on Thursday to force President Trump to quickly wind down military action against Iran unless he is given explicit authorization from Congress, said Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Ms. Pelosi made the announcement as lawmakers breathed a sigh of relief on Capitol Hill after Mr. Trump announced he would back away from any military escalation against Tehran.

But congressional Democrats, skeptical of the administration’s case for the drone strike last week that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, said they would press ahead with efforts to rein in the president’s war-making authority.

They said they would move forward with a measure that would require that Mr. Trump cease all military action against Iran within 30 days unless Congress votes to approve it.

The measure stands little chance in the Republican-controlled Senate, but it is certain to ignite a fierce debate over Mr. Trump’s strategy on Iran, and Congress’s role in curtailing a president’s ability to wage war.

Where Republicans have generally praised Mr. Trump for his show of restraint — and for his choice of target in General Suleimani — Democrats “have serious, urgent concerns about the administration’s decision to engage in hostilities against Iran and about its lack of strategy moving forward,” Ms. Pelosi said.

And after a briefing on Iran from administration officials Wednesday, some Republicans, too, were unhappy about the White House’s failure to include lawmakers in the decision-making process.

Senator Mike Lee, Republican of Utah, emerged from the briefing visibly angry, complaining of hollow assurances that lawmakers would be consulted.

“Drive-by notification or after-the-fact, lame briefings like the one we just received aren’t adequate,” he said.

Video

transcript

‘Iran Appears to Be Standing Down,’ Trump Says

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.

As long as I’m president of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. Iran appears to be standing down, which is a good thing for all parties concerned, and a very good thing for the world. The American people should be extremely grateful and happy. No Americans were harmed in last night’s attack by the Iranian regime. We suffered no casualties. All of our soldiers are safe, and only minimal damage was sustained at our military bases. The United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime. These powerful sanctions will remain until Iran changes its behavior.

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-prexy-sub1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v5 U.S. and Iran Conflict: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump announced new economic sanctions against Tehran but did not call for more military action against the Iranians during his first formal public remarks about the conflict since ordering the drone strike of Iran’s most important general last week.

“The United States is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it,” Mr. Trump said.

Flanked by Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and other military officials, the president did little to explain his reasoning for ordering the killing of General Suleimani.

“He should have been terminated long ago,” Mr. Trump said.

Early Wednesday, the Iranians retaliated by launching more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where Americans are posted. Mr. Trump said no Americans were killed.

The administration has cited vague intelligence threats against American interests to explain the decision to kill the Iranian general. But many have found its strategy and goals for Iran was conflicting and confusing. Mr. Trump was forced to walk back threats to target Iranian cultural sites after Mr. Esper made clear that such actions would be a war crime.

“As we continue to evaluate options in response to Iranian aggression, the United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime,” Mr. Trump said Wednesday.

The United States already has crippling sanctions in place against Iran. In June, Mr. Trump announced a new round in response to Tehran’s actions against tankers in international waters. And in the spring of 2019, the United States cut off revenues from Iranian oil experts, hitting directly at the heart of the country’s economy.

There were signs Wednesday that the United States and Iran have stepped back from the edge of a war.

The Iranian foreign minister said that his country had “concluded” its attacks on American forces and that it did “not seek escalation or war.” Iran fired more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where United States troops are stationed.

The foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, posted the remarks on Twitter after Iran conducted the strikes in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said that no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. In a short statement released on Wednesday morning, the Joint Command in Baghdad, which includes both Iraqi troops and soldiers from the international coalition, said that neither force “recorded any losses.”

Without American deaths from Iran’s missiles, Mr. Trump may not have felt the same pressure to punch back that he would have confronted with high troop casualties.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 U.S. and Iran Conflict: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the foreign expeditionary Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards, had been planning imminent attacks on American interests. One American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense,” Foreign Minister Zarif said in his Twitter message, adding, “We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

Although Mr. Zarif, said his country had concluded its attack, officials around the region cautioned that the statement did not mean Tehran was done maneuvering, and Iran’s leadership has reiterated its goal of forcing United States troops out of the Middle East.

Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, said Wednesday that General Suleimani had “fought heroically” against jihadist groups and that Europe was safer because of his efforts.

“Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” he wrote.

An influential Iraqi Shiite cleric, Moktada al-Sadr, said on Wednesday that the crisis Iraq was experiencing had ended and called on militia groups not to carry out attacks, Reuters reported.

Mr. al-Sadr said Iraq should still seek to expel foreign troops, but appeared to be laying his hopes in a new Iraqi government. One capable of protecting the nation’s sovereignty and independence should be formed in the next 15 days, he said.

“I call on the Iraqi factions to be deliberate, patient, and not to start military actions, and to shut down the extremist voices of some rogue elements until all political, parliamentary and international methods have been exhausted,” he said.

Mr. al-Sadr’s remarks came after Iranian and American officials made statements attempting to de-escalate the conflict.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq also released a statement on Wednesday saying his government would “continue its intense attempts to prevent escalation” in the simmering conflict.

After Iranian missiles struck bases housing American troops in Iraq on Wednesday, Mr. Abdul Mahdi objected to the violation of his country’s sovereignty. His comments echoed remarks he made after an American drone strike killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Friday, and after the United States struck an Iranian-backed militia in western Iraq in late December.

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a close ally of the president, declared Mr. Trump’s speech on Iran “excellent.” He said Mr. Trump had briefed him the night before.

“I said to the Iranian leadership and people: He’s giving you a pathway to peace — I hope you’ll take it,” Mr. Graham told reporters on Wednesday.

Senator Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, acknowledged that Mr. Trump seemed to pulling American forces off the “path to conventional war.” But pointing to the new set of sanctions the president announced against Iran, he said, “It also doesn’t seem as if we are truly de-escalating.”

“Remember, Iran started their provocations in response to our unilateral set of sanctions,” Mr. Murphy said. “Time will tell, but I’m not sure that this is going to be effective in de-escalating the crisis.”

Addressing the U.S. conflict with Iran on Wednesday, Mr. Trump called on Europeans to abandon the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, as he did in May 2018. His wish is likely to go unheeded.

Just a few hours before the president spoke, top European leaders repeated their commitment to the deal and urged Iran to return to compliance, even in the face of harsh American sanctions.

After the killing of General Suleimani, Iran announced that it no longer would be limited by the deal, but it did not say what it would do, leaving room for both escalation and a return to compliance.

The European Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen, and the bloc’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles, both said the nuclear agreement should be preserved. To that end, Ms. von der Leyen, said Mr. Borrell has been reaching out to all signatories to the deal, including Russia and China.

Iran has, in effect, been making a phased retreat from its obligations under the deal since Mr. Trump abandoned it and reimposed economic sanctions on Iran.

Britain, France and Germany, together with the European Union, Russia, China and the United States negotiated the deal, but only Washington has pulled out of it. Iran has regularly complained that the Europeans are not doing enough to provide Iran the economic benefits it was promised in the deal.

Any country giving Iran financial assistance could run afoul of the sanctions and risk incurring sanctions itself. But both Russia and China have found ways to buy at least some Iranian oil. And some European countries have proposed workarounds to help Iran while complying with U.S. policy.

The Europeans say that the nuclear deal is in their national interests and have pressed Iran to come back into compliance.

The deal, Mr. Borrell said Wednesday, is “today more important than ever, because this is the only place where we can sit together with the Russians and Chinese to talk on a multilateral basis about the many risks that we are facing. It’s one of the most important tools of nonproliferation and regional security.”

Investors signaled their relief after President Trump backed away from further confrontation with Iran. Stocks in the United States climbed to new highs shortly after the conclusion of the president’s speech, in which he said the strikes produced no American casualties and that Iran now “appears to be standing down.”

Oil prices, which had spiked after the missile attacks and fallen hours later, fell further after the televised address. Brent crude, the international benchmark, was down more than 3.5 percent and 4 percent shortly after midday.

At the same time, the S & P 500 was up more roughly 0.7 percent to nearly 3,260. If the market holds that level until the end of the trading day, it would be a record, overtaking the previous high-water mark set on Jan. 2.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said that “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys would open the door to greater American intervention in the region and that such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

A 4.5-magnitude earthquake struck southern Iran just before dawn on Wednesday, the United States Geological Survey reported, in the same region as the troubled Bushehr nuclear power plant.

No casualties were immediately reported, though rescue teams were working at the site, the state-run IRNA news agency said.

The quake was reported about 30 miles from the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear plant, long seen as a safety concern by Western countries. It has been plagued by construction delays and technical problems, and is on an active fault line.

Two more reactors are planned for the same site. Construction on the first of those began in November.

The quake struck just hours after Iran launched missiles at United States forces based in Iraq and an airliner carrying more than 170 people crashed after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone on board.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people crashed on Wednesday shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian outlets cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital. The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge.

Photographs posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The state-run Iranian Students’ News Agency shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

The plane, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, departed Imam Khomeini International Airport at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Britain and three from Germany, he said.

Video

transcript

Iran Retaliates Against U.S. Forces in Iraq

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. American and Iraqi officials said there were no casualties.

As we continue to evaluate options in response to Iranian aggression, the United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime.

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-live-briefing-live-1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 U.S. and Iran Conflict: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. American and Iraqi officials said there were no casualties.CreditCredit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

A number of international airlines announced that flights would be avoiding the airspace over Iran and Iraq after reports of strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq. The moves also came after the apparently unrelated news of the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane in the early hours of Wednesday near Tehran. Other airlines have canceled flights to the region.

On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The Dutch airline KLM said on Wednesday that it was no longer flying in Iraqi or Iranian airspace “until further notice,” citing security risks. Air France and the Australian carrier Qantas took similar measures, news agencies reported.

The German carrier Lufthansa also announced the temporary cancellation of a daily flight between Frankfurt and Tehran because of the security situation, according to Reuters, but later said it would restart that route on Thursday.

The European Union on Wednesday condemned Iran’s rocket attacks on Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops, urging an end to the “spiral of violence” that has gripped the region. The bloc also urged the continuation of dialogue to calm tensions in the Middle East.

“The latest rocket attacks on air bases in Iraq used by U.S. and coalition forces, among them European forces, are yet another example of escalation and increased confrontation,” said the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles. “It is in no one’s interest to turn up the spiral of violence even further.”

The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said that “the use of weapons must stop now to give space to dialogue,’’ adding, “we all are called upon to do everything possible to rekindle talks, and there cannot be enough of that.’’

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain, speaking in the British Parliament on Wednesday, echoed the calls for calm but said that the Iranian general killed by the United States last week had “blood on his hands.”

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, also condemned the strikes and said was in touch with “all of the parties involved to encourage restraint and responsibility.”

Reporting was contributed by Alissa J. Rubin, Peter Baker, Michael D. Shear, Eileen Sullivan, Falih Hassan, Megan Specia, Ben Hubbard, Steven Erlanger, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Eric Schmitt, Vivian Yee and Catie Edmondson.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

transcript

‘Iran Appears to Be Standing Down,’ Trump Says

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.

As long as I’m president of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. Iran appears to be standing down, which is a good thing for all parties concerned, and a very good thing for the world. The American people should be extremely grateful and happy. No Americans were harmed in last night’s attack by the Iranian regime. We suffered no casualties. All of our soldiers are safe, and only minimal damage was sustained at our military bases. The United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime. These powerful sanctions will remain until Iran changes its behavior.

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-prexy-sub1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v5 Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump announced new economic sanctions against Tehran but did not call for more military action against the Iranians during his first formal public remarks about the conflict since ordering the drone strike of Iran’s most important general last week.

“The United States is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it,” Mr. Trump said.

Flanked by Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and other military officials, the president did little to explain his reasoning for ordering the death of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

“He should have been terminated long ago,” Mr. Trump said.

Early Wednesday, the Iranians retaliated by launching more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where Americans are posted. Mr. Trump said no Americans were killed.

The administration has cited vague intelligence threats against American interests to explain the decision to kill the Iranian general. But many have found its strategy and goals for Iran was conflicting and confusing. Mr. Trump was forced to walk back threats to target Iranian cultural sites after Mr. Esper made clear that such actions would be a war crime.

“As we continue to evaluate options in response to Iranian aggression, the United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime,” Mr. Trump said Wednesday.

The United States already has crippling sanctions in place against Iran. In June, Mr. Trump announced a new round in response to Tehran’s actions against tankers in international waters. And in the spring of 2019, the United States cut off revenues from Iranian oil experts, hitting directly at the heart of the country’s economy.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Celebrating in Tehran with pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said that no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. In a short statement released on Wednesday morning, the Joint Command in Baghdad, which includes both Iraqi troops and soldiers from the international coalition, said that neither force “recorded any losses.”

Without American deaths from Iran’s missiles, Mr. Trump may not have felt the same pressure to punch back that he would have confronted with high troop casualties.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed. Australia, Britain, Denmark, Poland and Sweden, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said that none of their service members had been killed.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

Some Iranian outlets had a different version of events. Fars, a news agency that is associated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said that “at least 80 U.S. troops” had been killed in the strikes, citing an unnamed senior official from the military group.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the foreign expeditionary Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards, had been planning imminent attacks on American interests. One American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense.” Mr. Zarif wrote in his Twitter message, adding, “We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

Although the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said on Wednesday that his country had concluded its attack, officials around the region cautioned that the statement did not mean Tehran was done maneuvering, and Iran’s leadership has reiterated its goal of forcing United States troops out of the Middle East.

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck Al Asad Air Base in western Iraq and another in Erbil, in the north of the country.

Iranian news media reported that the attacks had begun hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial. President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday wrote on Twitter that the general “fought heroically” against a number of jihadist groups and that Europe was safer because of his efforts.

“Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” he posted.

An influential Iraqi Shiite cleric, Moktada al-Sadr, said on Wednesday that the crisis Iraq was experiencing had ended and called on militia groups not to carry out attacks, Reuters reported.

Mr. al-Sadr said Iraq should still seek to expel foreign troops, but appeared to be laying his hopes in a new Iraqi government. One capable of protecting the nation’s sovereignty and independence should be formed in the next 15 days, he said.

“I call on the Iraqi factions to be deliberate, patient, and not to start military actions, and to shut down the extremist voices of some rogue elements until all political, parliamentary and international methods have been exhausted,” he said.

Mr. al-Sadr’s remarks came after Iranian and American officials made statements attempting to de-escalate the conflict.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq also released a statement on Wednesday saying his government would “continue its intense attempts to prevent escalation” in the simmering conflict.

After Iranian missiles struck bases housing American troops in Iraq on Wednesday, Mr. Abdul Mahdi objected to the violation of his country’s sovereignty. His comments echoed remarks he made after an American drone strike killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Friday, and after the United States struck an Iranian-backed militia in western Iraq in late December.

Two bases housing American troops were targeted by Iran in Wednesday’s missile strikes: Al Asad Air Base in Anbar Province and another installation in Erbil, in the Kurdistan region.

In December 2018, President Trump visited American military forces at the Asad base. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi installation that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq, and other international coalition troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a close ally of the president, declared Mr. Trump’s speech on Iran “excellent.” He said Mr. Trump had briefed him the night before.

“I said to the Iranian leadership and people: He’s giving you a pathway to peace — I hope you’ll take it,” Mr. Graham told reporters on Wednesday.

Senator Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, acknowledged that Mr. Trump seemed to pulling American forces off the “path to conventional war.” But pointing to the new set of sanctions the president announced against Iran, he said, “It also doesn’t seem as if we are truly de-escalating.”

“Remember, Iran started their provocations in response to our unilateral set of sanctions,” Mr. Murphy said. “Time will tell, but I’m not sure that this is going to be effective in de-escalating the crisis.”

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said that “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys would open the door to greater American intervention in the region and that such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which, American allies say, no one was killed.

He called Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, considered to have been the second-most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, in his meeting with the council of ministers on Wednesday morning, detailed his country’s larger regional goal in comments directed at the Americans. “You cut off the hand of Qassim Suleimani from his body and we will cut off your feet from the region,” he said.

A 4.5-magnitude earthquake struck southern Iran just before dawn on Wednesday, the United States Geological Survey reported, in the same region as the troubled Bushehr nuclear power plant.

No casualties were immediately reported, though rescue teams were working at the site, the state-run IRNA news agency said.

The quake was reported about 30 miles from the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear plant, long seen as a safety concern by Western countries. It has been plagued by construction delays and technical problems, and is on an active fault line.

Two more reactors are planned for the same site. Construction on the first of those began in November.

The quake struck just hours after Iran launched missiles at United States forces based in Iraq and an airliner carrying more than 170 people crashed after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone on board.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people crashed on Wednesday shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian outlets cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital. The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge.

Photographs posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The state-run Iranian Students’ News Agency shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

The plane, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, departed Imam Khomeini International Airport, which serves Tehran, at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash on Wednesday could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Ukrainian president expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Britain and three from Germany, he said.

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Iran Retaliates Against U.S. Forces in Iraq

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. American and Iraqi officials said there were no casualties.

As we continue to evaluate options in response to Iranian aggression, the United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime.

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-live-briefing-live-1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. American and Iraqi officials said there were no casualties.CreditCredit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

A number of international airlines announced that flights would be avoiding the airspace over Iran and Iraq after reports of strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq. The moves also came after the apparently unrelated news of the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane in the early hours of Wednesday near Tehran. Other airlines have canceled flights to the region.

On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The Dutch airline KLM said on Wednesday that it was no longer flying in Iraqi or Iranian airspace “until further notice,” citing security risks. Air France and the Australian carrier Qantas took similar measures, news agencies reported.

The German carrier Lufthansa also announced the temporary cancellation of a daily flight between Frankfurt and Tehran because of the security situation, according to Reuters, but later said it would restart that route on Thursday.

The European Union on Wednesday condemned Iran’s rocket attacks on Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops, urging an end to the “spiral of violence” that has gripped the region. The bloc also urged the continuation of dialogue to calm tensions in the Middle East after an American drone strike in Iraq that killed an Iranian commander on Friday.

“The latest rocket attacks on air bases in Iraq used by U.S. and coalition forces, among them European forces, are yet another example of escalation and increased confrontation,” said the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles. “It is in no one’s interest to turn up the spiral of violence even further.”

The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said that “the use of weapons must stop now to give space to dialogue,’’ adding, “we all are called upon to do everything possible to rekindle talks and there cannot be enough of that.’’

She also said that the bloc remained committed to trying to preserve the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and reached out to all signatories, including Russia and China. The call to save the deal comes despite Tehran’s phased retreat from its obligations under the agreement after President Trump abandoned it in 2018 and reimposed harsh economic sanctions.

On Saturday, the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles, spoke to the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif. In a letter to European Union foreign ministers, Mr. Borrell wrote that Iran remained committed to the nuclear deal, but “complained about the lack of dividends received,” which is Iran’s usual complaint.

Mr. Zarif “shared my assessment that security in the region would be further undermined if the JCPOA failed. We agreed to discuss in more detail in the near future,” Mr. Borrell wrote.

Mr. Borrell has invited Mr. Zarif, to Brussels, and European foreign ministers will meet there on Friday to discuss the Iran crisis.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain, speaking in the British Parliament on Wednesday, echoed the calls for calm but said that the Iranian general killed by the United States last week had “blood on his hands.”

“Iran should not repeat these reckless and dangerous attacks but must instead pursue urgent de-escalation,” Mr. Johnson said.

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, also condemned the strikes and said that he was in touch with “all of the parties involved to encourage restraint and responsibility.”

“The cycle of violence must stop,” Mr. Le Drian said in a statement on Wednesday. “France for its part remains determined to work toward calming tensions.”

Reporting was contributed by Alissa J. Rubin, Peter Baker, Michael D. Shear, Eileen Sullivan, Falih Hassan, Megan Specia, Ben Hubbard, Steven Erlanger, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Eric Schmitt and Vivian Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

In Address, Trump Announces New Sanctions vs. Iran: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

transcript

‘Iran Appears to Be Standing Down,’ Trump Says

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.

As long as I’m president of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. Iran appears to be standing down, which is a good thing for all parties concerned, and a very good thing for the world. The American people should be extremely grateful and happy. No Americans were harmed in last night’s attack by the Iranian regime. We suffered no casualties. All of our soldiers are safe, and only minimal damage was sustained at our military bases. The United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime. These powerful sanctions will remain until Iran changes its behavior.

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-prexy-sub1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v5 In Address, Trump Announces New Sanctions vs. Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

In an address to the nation, President Trump spoke about the conflict with Iran after its retaliatory strikes on two bases housing American troops, and announced new economic sanctions against Tehran.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump announced new economic sanctions against Tehran but did not call for more military action against the Iranians during his first formal public remarks about the conflict since ordering the drone strike of Iran’s most important general last week.

“The United States is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it,” Mr. Trump said.

Flanked by Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and other military officials, the president did little to explain his reasoning for ordering the death of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

“He should have been terminated long ago,” Mr. Trump said in his remarks.

On Tuesday, the Iranians retaliated by launching more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where Americans are posted. Mr. Trump said no Americans were killed.

The administration has referenced vague intelligence threats against American interests to explain the decision to kill the Iranian general. And even that was conflicting and confusing. Mr. Trump was forced to walk back threats to target Iranian cultural sites after Mr. Esper made clear that such actions would be a war crime.

“As we continue to evaluate options in response to Iranian aggression, the United States will immediately impose additional punishing economic sanctions on the Iranian regime,” Mr. Trump said.

The United States already has crippling sanctions in place against Iran. In June, Mr. Trump announced a new round in response to Tehran’s aggressive actions against tankers in international waters. And in the spring of 2019, the United States cut off revenues from Iranian oil experts, hitting directly at the heart of the country’s economy.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge In Address, Trump Announces New Sanctions vs. Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Celebrating in Tehran with pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

Indications suggest that the United States and Iran have stepped back from the edge of a war.

The Iranian foreign minister said on Wednesday that his country had “concluded” its attacks on American forces and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where United States troops are stationed.

The minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, posted the remarks on Twitter after Iran had conducted the strikes in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said that no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. In a short statement released on Wednesday morning, the Joint Command in Baghdad, which includes both Iraqi troops and soldiers from the international coalition, said that neither force “recorded any losses.”

Without American deaths from Iran’s missiles, Mr. Trump may not have felt the same pressure to punch back that he would have confronted with high troop casualties.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed. Australia, Britain, Denmark, Poland and Sweden, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said that none of their service members had been killed.

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Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

Some Iranian outlets had a different version of events. Fars, a news agency that is associated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said that “at least 80 U.S. troops” had been killed in the strikes, citing an unnamed senior official from the military group.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the foreign expeditionary Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards, had been planning imminent attacks on American interests. One American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense.” Mr. Zarif wrote in his Twitter message, adding, “We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck Al Asad Air Base in western Iraq and another in Erbil, in the north of the country.

Iranian news media reported that the attacks had begun hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial. President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday wrote on Twitter that the general “fought heroically” against a number of jihadist groups and that Europe was safer because of his efforts.

“Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” he posted.

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate’s Republican leader, said he spoke to President Trump on Wednesday night after Iran’s missile strikes and urged the administration to exercise “restraint.”

Speaking on the Senate floor, Mr. McConnell expressed gratitude for what he called the president’s “patience and prudence” in deliberating about the missile strikes, which damaged two Iraqi bases where Americans are stationed.

“As a superpower, we have the capacity to exercise restraint and to respond at a time and place of our choosing, if need be,” Mr. McConnell said. “I believe the president wants to avoid conflict or needless loss of life. But he’s rightly prepared to protect American lives and interests.”

But even as he called for restraint, Mr. McConnell warned Iran not to take further military action against the United States.

“I hope Iran’s leaders do not miscalculate by questioning our collective will in launching further attacks,” he said, adding that Iran should never question “our national will.”

After Mr. Trump’s remarks, Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a close ally of the president, said Mr. Trump had briefed him on his state of thinking Tuesday night, and called the speech “excellent.”

“I said to the Iranian leadership and people, ‘he’s giving you a pathway to peace, I hope you’ll take it,’” Mr. Graham told reporters on Wednesday.

But while acknowledging that Mr. Trump’s speech may have pulled American forces off the “path to conventional war,” Senator Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, warned that “it also doesn’t seem as if we are truly de-escalating,” citing the new set of sanctions the president announced for Iran.

“Remember, Iran started their provocations in response to our unilateral set of sanctions,” Mr. Murphy said. “Time will tell, but I’m not sure that this is going to be effective in de-escalating the crisis.”

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said that “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys would open the door to greater American intervention in the region and that such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which, American allies say, no one was killed.

He called Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, considered to have been the second-most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, in his meeting with the council of ministers on Wednesday morning, detailed his country’s larger regional goal in comments directed at the Americans. “You cut off the hand of Qassim Suleimani from his body and we will cut off your feet from the region,” he said.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq released a statement on Wednesday saying his government would “continue its intense attempts to prevent escalation” in the simmering conflict between Iran and the United States.

After Iranian missile strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq, Mr. Abdul Mahdi objected to the violation of his country’s sovereignty, echoing comments he made after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Friday and after American strikes on an Iranian-backed militia in western Iraq in late December. But Mr. Abdul Mahdi noted that the Iraqis were given some warning about the Iranian strike.

In a statement, he said the government had received an official message from Tehran that the “retaliation” for General Suleimani’s killing had begun and that it would target American sites in Iraq. But there had been no prior warning about the exact locations, he added.

“At the same time, the American side called us as the rockets were falling on the American side,” at the two bases, Mr. Abdul Mahdi said in the statement. He noted that there had been no loss of life on the Iraqi side and no reports of coalition deaths.

Although the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said on Wednesday that his country had concluded its attack, officials around the region cautioned that the statement did not mean Tehran was done maneuvering, and Iran’s leadership has reiterated its goal of forcing United States troops out of the Middle East.

Two bases housing American troops were targeted by Iran in Wednesday’s missile strikes: Al Asad Air Base in Anbar Province and another installation in Erbil, in the Kurdistan region.

In December 2018, President Trump visited American military forces at the Asad base. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi installation that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq, and other international coalition troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people crashed on Wednesday shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian outlets cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital. The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge.

Photographs posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The state-run Iranian Students’ News Agency shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

The plane, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, departed Imam Khomeini International Airport, which serves Tehran, at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash on Wednesday could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Ukrainian president expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Britain and three from Germany, he said.

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Westlake Legal Group 07iran-live-briefing-live-1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 In Address, Trump Announces New Sanctions vs. Iran: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. There was no immediate confirmation of casualties.CreditCredit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

A number of international airlines announced that flights would be avoiding the airspace over Iran and Iraq after reports of strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq. The moves also came after the apparently unrelated news of the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane in the early hours of Wednesday near Tehran. Other airlines have canceled flights to the region.

On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The Dutch airline KLM said on Wednesday that it was no longer flying in Iraqi or Iranian airspace “until further notice,” citing security risks. Air France and the Australian carrier Qantas took similar measures, news agencies reported.

The German carrier Lufthansa also announced the temporary cancellation of a daily flight between Frankfurt and Tehran because of the security situation, according to Reuters, but later said it would restart that route on Thursday.

The European Union on Wednesday condemned Iran’s rocket attacks on Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops, urging an end to the “spiral of violence” that has gripped the region. The bloc also urged the continuation of dialogue to calm tensions in the Middle East after an American drone strike in Iraq that killed an Iranian commander on Friday.

“The latest rocket attacks on air bases in Iraq used by U.S. and coalition forces, among them European forces, are yet another example of escalation and increased confrontation,” said the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles. “It is in no one’s interest to turn up the spiral of violence even further.”

The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said that “the use of weapons must stop now to give space to dialogue,’’ adding, “we all are called upon to do everything possible to rekindle talks and there cannot be enough of that.’’

She also said that the bloc remained committed to trying to preserve the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and reached out to all signatories, including Russia and China. The call to save the deal comes despite Tehran’s phased retreat from its obligations under the agreement after President Trump abandoned it in 2018 and reimposed harsh economic sanctions.

Mr. Borrell has invited the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, to Brussels, and European foreign ministers will meet there on Friday to discuss the Iran crisis.

The two European Union officials spoke before Ms. von der Leyen flew to London for talks on Brexit with Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain. Mr. Johnson, speaking in the British Parliament on Wednesday, echoed the calls for calm but said that the Iranian general killed by the United States last week had “blood on his hands.”

“Iran should not repeat these reckless and dangerous attacks but must instead pursue urgent de-escalation,” Mr. Johnson said.

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, also condemned the strikes and said that he was in touch with “all of the parties involved to encourage restraint and responsibility.”

“The cycle of violence must stop,” Mr. Le Drian said in a statement on Wednesday. “France for its part remains determined to work toward calming tensions.”

Reporting was contributed by Alissa J. Rubin, Peter Baker, Michael D. Shear, Eileen Sullivan, Falih Hassan, Megan Specia, Ben Hubbard, Steven Erlanger, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Eric Schmitt and Vivian Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

At the Edge of a War, U.S. and Iran Appear to Step Back

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-escalation-sub-facebookJumbo At the Edge of a War, U.S. and Iran Appear to Step Back United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iraq Iran

WASHINGTON — After storming to the edge of a cliff this week, early indications suggest that the United States and Iran apparently have decided they do not want to jump, at least not yet.

With initial battle assessments indicating that no Americans were killed in Iranian strikes on two military bases in Iraq on Tuesday, President Trump may not feel the punch-back-or-lose-face pressure he would have confronted with high troop casualties.

Iran’s foreign minister announced early Wednesday that the nation had “concluded proportionate measures” in its retaliation for the killing of the country’s most revered military general in an American drone strike last week.

Mr. Trump, speaking from the White House on Wednesday morning, repeated a pledge to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon — but did not order additional use of force. He vowed more sanctions but also said, “The United States is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it.”

But with Iran’s leadership demanding anew that the United States must leave the region, it is expected that attacks by Tehran’s proxy forces will continue, and Iran’s leadership can, at a time of its choosing, decide whether to launch additional, asymmetrical strikes, especially cyberattacks, against Western interests. And that could bring both countries back to the edge of the cliff again.

There was visible relief among some officials at the Pentagon that the highway to a larger war on which the administration appeared to be speeding may have provided an off-ramp.

For all of the public chest-thumping in the last week, both sides took measures to de-escalate.

Before Tuesday night, Iran made clear that it would launch retaliatory attacks, and that they would come from the official Iranian military, and not proxy groups. The United States, for its part, was monitoring Iranian communications and had plenty of time to prepare to protect American troops in Iraq.

By the end of a long night Tuesday, there was a collective exhaling in the Trump administration’s national security apparatus, and officials indicated they believed things had been contained, for now.

One administration official said the hope now is for de-escalation. “So far, so good,” Mr. Trump said in his tweet.

Though Iranian officials said their military response had ended, American troops in the region continued to fortify their positions in case of another attack, one military officer in Baghdad said.

A war with Iran would look nothing like any conflict this generation has witnessed, national security and military experts say. It would be felt aboard oil tankers making their way through the Strait of Hormuz and at gas stations in Kansas, in hotels and public plazas in Paris and in the mosques in the United Arab Emirates.

As budget-shattering and far-reaching as the war with Iraq has been, Iran would be far worse.

Any assumption that the Iranian people would welcome an American toppling of their government does not take into account the deep pride that many Iranians have in their national identity, an outpouring that has surfaced in the stampede in Iran during Tuesday’s funeral procession of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the Iranian military commander killed in an American airstrike last week, experts said. More than 50 people died as millions of people flooded the streets for his funeral procession.

“Iranians are nationalistic and would view this as a war being imposed upon them by someone who they see as deliberately picking a fight with them,” said Vali R. Nasr, an Iranian-American and former senior adviser at the State Department. “And they would support hitting back.”

Early Wednesday, Iran said it has finished the official hitting-back phase for now.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched,” Irans foreign minister, Javad Mohammad Zarif, said in a tweet early Wednesday. “We do not seek escalation of war but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

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Trump Backs Away from Further Military Conflict With Iran

WASHINGTON — President Trump backed away from further military confrontation with Iran on Wednesday after a barrage of missiles fired at American troops killed no one and Tehran indicated that would be the end of its retaliation for the killing of a top general.

“Iran appears to be standing down which is a good thing for all parties concerned and a very good thing for the world,” Mr. Trump said in a televised statement from the Grand Foyer of the White House, flanked by his vice president, cabinet secretaries and senior military officers in their uniforms.

The president vowed again not to let Iran obtain a nuclear weapon and warned it against future terrorism or destabilizing actions in the region, but otherwise avoided the threats of additional use of force that had characterized his public remarks in recent days.

Instead, he said he would impose more economic sanctions on Iran and called on NATO allies to become more involved in the Middle East.

“The United States is ready to embrace peace with all who seek it,” he said.

His comments came the morning after Iran fired a reported 22 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq that house United States troops in response to last week’s American drone strike that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, commander of Iran’s elite security and intelligence forces. No American troops were injured or killed in the attacks, the president said.

In the hours since, some analysts expressed cautious optimism that the missile strikes might prove the end of the immediate conflict rather than the start of a larger confrontation that could spiral into a full-fledged war. Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said afterward that Iran had “concluded proportionate measures” in its retribution for General Suleimani’s death, and Mr. Trump’s response seemed to indicate an openness to letting it go without further reprisals since no casualties were reported.

But analysts cautioned that even if the two sides ease off a further military clash in the short term, the conflict could very well play out in other ways in the weeks and months to come. Iran has many proxy groups in the Middle East that could stir trouble in new ways for American troops or American allies like Israel and Saudi Arabia, and American experts remained wary of a possible Iranian cyberstrike on domestic facilities.

President Hassan Rouhani of Iran made clear that his country still saw its mission over the long run as driving the United States out of the Middle East after the killing of General Suleimani. “Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” Mr. Rouhani wrote on Twitter.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s supreme leader, likewise suggested on Wednesday that an incremental operation would not be the end of the clash. “What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said in a speech to a hall filled with imams and others, who chanted, “Death to America!” and “Death to Israel!”

The operation against General Suleimani may prove to have consequences beyond the direct relationship with Iran. Outraged that the general was killed after arriving at Baghdad International Airport, Iraq’s Parliament voted without dissent to expel the 5,000 American troops from the country. Such a decision would still have to be enacted by the caretaker government, but the Pentagon has begun preparing for the possibility of losing its bases in the country nearly 17 years after the invasion ordered by President George W. Bush.

Mr. Trump’s televised statement on Wednesday morning was his first formal effort to explain the situation to the country since ordering the drone strike on General Suleimani last Thursday. He has fired off tweets and spoken with reporters a couple of times since then without making an official speech outlining his thinking.

The administration’s messages up until now have at times been conflicting and confusing. The president was forced to walk back threats to target Iranian cultural sites after his defense secretary made clear that would be a war crime. The American headquarters in Baghdad had drafted a letter saying it was withdrawing from Iraq only to have the Defense Department say it was a draft document with no authority.

And the administration has not given a detailed public explanation of its reasoning for conducting the strike now, given that General Suleimani has been responsible for killing American soldiers and stirring trouble in the region for many years. Officials at times have asserted that the administration was acting to forestall an “imminent” threat and at others have stressed that it was responding to his past actions.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Trump Backs Away from Further Military Conflict With Iran United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Middle East Iraq Iran Defense Department

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

Congressional Democrats have complained that the administration has not been much more forthcoming in a classified war powers notice or in briefings, raising questions about the nature of the intelligence used to justify the drone strike. Gina Haspel, the C.I.A. director, and other administration officials were scheduled to brief the entire House and Senate on Wednesday.

The White House has said the president acted under his constitutional authority to take action in self-defense as well as in keeping with the power granted by Congress in a 2002 measure that authorized Mr. Bush’s invasion. Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she would hold a House vote this week on legislation meant to rein in the president’s ability to go to war with Iran, although such a measure presumably would not be accepted by the Republican-controlled Senate, much less signed into law by Mr. Trump.

But some Democrats urged Mr. Trump to pull back from further military escalation anyway. “Both sides need to find offramps to avoid conflict from spiraling further out of control,” said Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon. “Iran claims it does not seek escalation or war. Now is our chance to let them prove it. President Trump should look at diplomatic options and remember that our greatest strength has never been our military might but our global leadership.”

Even Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, seemed to nudge Mr. Trump not to ratchet up the conflict further. “As a superpower, we have the capacity to exercise restraint and to respond at a time and place of our choosing if need be,” he said on the floor. “I believe the president wants to avoid conflict or needless loss of life, but is rightly prepared to protect American lives and interests.”

General Suleimani, commander of the elite Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, was the architect of Iran’s efforts to extend its influence throughout the Middle East. He helped direct wars in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen as he sought to establish a regional bloc of Shiite power, and he was held responsible by the United States for attacks on American troops in Iraq that killed at least 600 back during the height of the war.

More recently, American officials pointed to General Suleimani as the force behind a Dec. 27 rocket attack on a base in Iraq that killed an American civilian contractor. They said he had traveled the region in recent days as part of preparations for a future attack that could have killed hundreds of Americans; however, they provided scant details and no evidence.

Mr. Trump has seen Iran as the main enemy of the United States since taking office, withdrawing from the nuclear agreement brokered by President Barack Obama and reimposing sanctions in hopes of crippling its economy.

He has signaled in the past that he would be willing to negotiate without preconditions, but diplomacy now appears even unlikelier than before as Tehran vows to abandon constraints in the Obama agreement and proceed with developing its nuclear capabilities.

The Iranian missile strikes, which began early Wednesday morning local time or late Tuesday in Washington, targeted Al Asad Air Base, long a hub for American military operations in Iraq, and another base in Erbil in northern Iraq, which has been a home for Special Operations forces in the fight against the Islamic State both in Iraq and in Syria.

In the hours afterward, Mr. Trump seemed to indicate that the Iranian missiles did no meaningful damage. “All is well!” he wrote on Twitter. “Missiles launched from Iran at two military bases located in Iraq. Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Live Updates: Ayatollah Calls Iran Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in the Face’ to the U.S.

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge Live Updates: Ayatollah Calls Iran Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in the Face’ to the U.S. United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Celebrating in Tehran with pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

The Iranian foreign minister said on Wednesday that his country had “concluded” its attacks on American forces and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where United States troops are stationed.

The minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, posted the remarks on Twitter after Iran had conducted the strikes in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said that no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. In a short statement released on Wednesday morning, the Joint Command in Baghdad, which includes both Iraqi troops and soldiers from the international coalition, said that neither force “recorded any losses.”

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed. Australia, Britain, Denmark, Poland and Sweden, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said that none of their service members had been killed.

Some Iranian outlets had a different version of events. Fars, a news agency that is associated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said that “at least 80 U.S. troops” had been killed in the strikes, citing an unnamed senior official from the military group.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the foreign expeditionary Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards, had been planning imminent attacks on American interests. One American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense.” Mr. Zarif wrote in his Twitter message, adding, “We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Live Updates: Ayatollah Calls Iran Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in the Face’ to the U.S. United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

President Trump suggested that damages and casualties sustained by American forces were minimal. But he also said the assessment of the attacks was ongoing.

“All is well!” he posted on Twitter. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

President Trump planned to address the nation in a speech on Wednesday morning.

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck Al Asad Air Base in western Iraq and another in Erbil, in the north of the country.

Iranian news media reported that the attacks had begun hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial. President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday wrote on Twitter that the general “fought heroically” against a number of jihadist groups and that Europe was safer because of his efforts.

“Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” he posted.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said that “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys would open the door to greater American intervention in the region and that such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which, American allies say, no one was killed.

He called Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, considered to have been the second-most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, in his meeting with the council of ministers on Wednesday morning, detailed his country’s larger regional goal in comments directed at the Americans. “You cut off the hand of Qassim Suleimani from his body and we will cut off your feet from the region,” he said.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq released a statement on Wednesday saying his government would “continue its intense attempts to prevent escalation” in the simmering conflict between Iran and the United States.

After Iranian missile strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq, Mr. Abdul Mahdi objected to the violation of his country’s sovereignty, echoing comments he made after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Friday and after American strikes on an Iranian-backed militia in western Iraq in late December. But Mr. Abdul Mahdi noted that the Iraqis were given some warning about the Iranian strike.

In a statement, he said the government had received an official message from Tehran that the “retaliation” for General Suleimani’s killing had begun and that it would target American sites in Iraq. But there had been no prior warning about the exact locations, he added.

“At the same time, the American side called us as the rockets were falling on the American side,” at the two bases, Mr. Abdul Mahdi said in the statement. He noted that there had been no loss of life on the Iraqi side and no reports of coalition deaths.

Although the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said on Wednesday that his country had concluded its attack, officials around the region cautioned that the statement did not mean Tehran was done maneuvering, and Iran’s leadership has reiterated its goal of forcing United States troops out of the Middle East.

Two bases housing American troops were targeted by Iran in Wednesday’s missile strikes: Al Asad Air Base in Anbar Province and another installation in Erbil, in the Kurdistan region.

In December 2018, President Trump visited American military forces at the Asad base. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi installation that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq, and other international coalition troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people crashed on Wednesday shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian outlets cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital. The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge.

Photographs posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The state-run Iranian Students’ News Agency shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

The plane, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, departed Imam Khomeini International Airport, which serves Tehran, at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash on Wednesday could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Ukrainian president expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Britain and three from Germany, he said.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-live-briefing-live-1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 Live Updates: Ayatollah Calls Iran Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in the Face’ to the U.S. United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. There was no immediate confirmation of casualties.CreditCredit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

A number of international airlines announced that flights would be avoiding the airspace over Iran and Iraq after reports of strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq. The moves also came after the apparently unrelated news of the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane in the early hours of Wednesday near Tehran. Other airlines have canceled flights to the region.

On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The Dutch airline KLM said on Wednesday that it was no longer flying in Iraqi or Iranian airspace “until further notice,” citing security risks. Air France and the Australian carrier Qantas took similar measures, news agencies reported.

The German carrier Lufthansa also announced the temporary cancellation of a daily flight between Frankfurt and Tehran because of the security situation, according to Reuters, but later said it would restart that route on Thursday.

The European Union on Wednesday condemned Iran’s rocket attacks on Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops, urging an end to the “spiral of violence” that has gripped the region. The bloc also urged the continuation of dialogue to calm tensions in the Middle East after an American drone strike in Iraq that killed an Iranian commander on Friday.

“The latest rocket attacks on air bases in Iraq used by U.S. and coalition forces, among them European forces, are yet another example of escalation and increased confrontation,” said the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles. “It is in no one’s interest to turn up the spiral of violence even further.”

The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said that “the use of weapons must stop now to give space to dialogue,’’ adding, “we all are called upon to do everything possible to rekindle talks and there cannot be enough of that.’’

She also said that the bloc remained committed to trying to preserve the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and reached out to all signatories, including Russia and China. The call to save the deal comes despite Tehran’s phased retreat from its obligations under the agreement after President Trump abandoned it in 2018 and reimposed harsh economic sanctions.

Mr. Borrell has invited the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, to Brussels, and European foreign ministers will meet there on Friday to discuss the Iran crisis.

The two European Union officials spoke before Ms. von der Leyen flew to London for talks on Brexit with Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain. Mr. Johnson, speaking in the British Parliament on Wednesday, echoed the calls for calm but said that the Iranian general killed by the United States last week had “blood on his hands.”

“Iran should not repeat these reckless and dangerous attacks but must instead pursue urgent de-escalation,” Mr. Johnson said.

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, also condemned the strikes and said that he was in touch with “all of the parties involved to encourage restraint and responsibility.”

“The cycle of violence must stop,” Mr. Le Drian said in a statement on Wednesday. “France for its part remains determined to work toward calming tensions.”

Oil prices leapt and markets slumped in Asia early on Wednesday, as investors tried to parse reports of missile attacks on military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

But market turmoil eased later in the day after Iran suggested it was finished retaliating — for now — against the United States for the killing last week of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, soared above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday, before easing back. Prices were up 1.4 percent midday in Asia to $69.20 a barrel.

West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel, then eased back. As of midday it was up 1.3 percent.

Stock markets also dropped sharply but clawed back some ground later in the day. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower but closed only 1.2 percent down. Markets in Hong Kong, mainland China and South Korea were down less than 1 percent.

Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of less than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Reporting was contributed by Alissa J. Rubin, Falih Hassan, Megan Specia, Ben Hubbard, Steven Erlanger, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Eric Schmitt and Vivian Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Celebrating in Tehran with pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

The Iranian foreign minister said on Wednesday that his country had “concluded” its attacks on American forces and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where United States troops are stationed.

The minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, posted the remarks on Twitter after Iran had conducted the strikes in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said that no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. In a short statement released on Wednesday morning, the Joint Command in Baghdad, which includes both Iraqi troops and soldiers from the international coalition, said that neither force “recorded any losses.”

Australia, Britain, Denmark, Poland and Sweden, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said that none of their service members had been killed.

Some Iranian news outlets had a different version of events, including Fars News Agency which said “at least 80 U.S. troops” were killed in the strikes. The news outlet, which is associated with Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corp, cited an unnamed senior official from that group.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the foreign expeditionary Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards, was planning imminent attacks on American interests. One American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched,” Mr. Zarif wrote in his Twitter message.

“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

President Trump suggested that damages and casualties sustained by American forces were minimal. But he also said the assessment of the attacks was ongoing.

“All is well!” he posted on Twitter. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck Al Asad Air Base in Baghdad and another in Erbil, in northern Iraq.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed.

Iranian news media reported that the attacks had begun hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial. President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday wrote on Twitter that the general “fought heroically” against a number of jihadist groups and that Europe was safer because of his efforts.

“Our final answer to his assassination will be to kick all US forces out of the region,” he posted.

In December 2018, Mr. Trump visited American military forces at the Asad base in Anbar province. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi installation that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq. Danish troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said that “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys would open the door to greater American intervention in the region and that such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which, American allies say, no one was killed.

He called Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, considered to have been the second-most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, in his meeting with the council of ministers on Wednesday morning, detailed his country’s larger regional goal in comments directed at the Americans. “You cut off the hand of Qassim Suleimani from his body and we will cut off your feet from the region,” he said.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people crashed on Wednesday shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian outlets cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital. The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge.

Photographs posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The state-run Iranian Students’ News Agency shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

The plane, Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, departed Imam Khomeini International Airport, which serves Tehran, at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash on Wednesday could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Ukrainian president expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Britain and three from Germany, he said.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-live-briefing-live-1-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strikes a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iran launched missile attacks on two military bases in Iraq where American and Iraqi forces are stationed, in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in a U.S. airstrike. There was no immediate confirmation of casualties.CreditCredit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

A number of international airlines announced that flights would be avoiding the airspace over Iran and Iraq after reports of strikes on bases housing American troops in Iraq. The moves also came after the apparently unrelated news of the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane in the early hours of Wednesday near Tehran. Other airlines have canceled flights to the region.

On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The Dutch airline KLM said on Wednesday that it was no longer flying in Iraqi or Iranian airspace “until further notice,” citing security risks. Air France and the Australian carrier Qantas took similar measures, news agencies reported.

The German carrier Lufthansa also announced the cancellation of a daily flight between Frankfurt and Tehran because of the security situation, according to Reuters.

Oil prices leapt and markets slumped in Asia early on Wednesday, as investors tried to parse reports of missile attacks on military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

But market turmoil eased later in the day after Iran suggested it was finished retaliating — for now — against the United States for the killing last week of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, soared above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday, before easing back. Prices were up 1.4 percent midday in Asia to $69.20 a barrel.

West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel, then eased back. As of midday it was up 1.3 percent.

Stock markets also dropped sharply but clawed back some ground later in the day. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower but closed only 1.2 percent down. Markets in Hong Kong, mainland China and South Korea were down less than 1 percent.

Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of less than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Reporting was contributed by Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Alissa J. Rubin, Falih Hassan, Megan Specia, Ben Hubbard, Steven Erlanger, Eric Schmitt and Vivian Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranians holding pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani celebrated in Tehran after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

Iran said on Wednesday it had “concluded” its attacks on American forces in Iraq and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif made the remarks in a tweet after Iran conducted the attacks in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. American officials did not, however, confirm if there were any casualties.

Britain, Sweden, Poland, Australia and Denmark, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said none of their service members had been killed.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the guard’s foreign expeditionary Quds Force, was planning imminent attacks on American interests. An American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched,” Mr. Zarif said.

“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

In a tweet, President Trump suggested that damages and casualties sustained by American forces were minimal. But he also said the assessment of the attacks was ongoing.

“All is well!,” he said in a tweet. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck the Al-Asad base in Baghdad and another in Erbil, in northern Iraq.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed.

Iranian news media reported the attacks began hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial.

Hossein Soleimani, the editor in chief of Mashregh, the main Revolutionary Guards news website, said that more than 30 ballistic missiles had been fired at the base at Asad, in Anbar Province, in western Iraq.

In December 2018, Mr. Trump visited American military forces at Al-Asad. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi base that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq. Danish troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed more than 20 missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should could come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys opens the door to greater American intervention in the region and such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which American allies say, no one was killed.

He called General Suleimani, considered the second most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people on Wednesday crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian media cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital.

Photos posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The Iranian Students’ News Agency, a state-run media organization, shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 departed Imam Khomeini International Airport in Tehran at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as political escalations with the United States had the country on edge. On Tuesday, the F.A.A. banned American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The crash could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The president later expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Germany and three from Britain, he said.

The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge. On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft. Several non-American carriers rerouted their flights on Wednesday to avoid Iraq and Iran, according to Flightradar24, a site that tracks airplane transponders.

Oil prices jumped and markets slumped in Asia early on Wednesday, as investors tried to parse reports of missile attacks on military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

But market turmoil eased later in the day after Iran suggested it was finished retaliating — for now — against the United States for the killing last week of General Suleimani.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, jumped above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday, before easing back. Prices were up 1.4 percent midday in Asia to $69.20 a barrel.

West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel, then eased back. As of midday it was up 1.3 percent.

Stock markets also dropped sharply but clawed back some ground later in the day. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower but was down only 1.2 percent. Markets in Hong Kong, mainland China and South Korea were down less than 1 percent.

Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of less than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Reporting was contributed by Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Alissa J. Rubin, Eric Schmitt and Vivan Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran ‘Concludes’ Missile Attacks on Bases; Later, a Plane Crashes: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156239169_98bb8ed8-cecb-48b5-91cd-6f78e6dc7c6d-articleLarge Iran ‘Concludes’ Missile Attacks on Bases; Later, a Plane Crashes: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Mohammad Javad Zarif, Iran’s foreign minister, in Tehran in June.Credit…Abedin Taherkenareh/EPA, via Shutterstock

Iran said on Wednesday it had “concluded” its attacks on American forces in Iraq and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif made the remarks in a tweet after Iran conducted the attacks in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the guard’s foreign expeditionary Quds Force, was planning imminent attacks on American interests. An American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched,” Mr. Zarif said.

“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v10 Iran ‘Concludes’ Missile Attacks on Bases; Later, a Plane Crashes: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

In a tweet, President Trump suggested that damages and casualties sustained by American forces were minimal. But he also said the assessment of the attacks was ongoing.

“All is well!,” he said in a tweet. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

Later, senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks.

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck the Al-Asad base in Baghdad and another in Erbil, in northern Iraq.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed.

Iranian news media reported the attacks began hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial.

Hossein Soleimani, the editor in chief of Mashregh, the main Revolutionary Guards news website, said that more than 30 ballistic missiles had been fired at the base at Asad, in Anbar Province, in western Iraq.

In December 2018, Mr. Trump visited American military forces at Al-Asad. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi base that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq. Danish troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people on Wednesday crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian media cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital.

Photos posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The Iranian Students’ News Agency, a state-run media organization, shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 departed Imam Khomeini International Airport in Tehran at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as political escalations with the United States had the country on edge. On Tuesday, the F.A.A. banned American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The crash could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The president later expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew.

Oil prices jumped and markets slumped in Asia early on Wednesday, as investors tried to parse reports of missile attacks on military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

But market turmoil eased later in the day after Iran suggested it was finished retaliating — for now — against the United States for the killing last week of General Suleimani.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, jumped above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday, before easing back. Prices were up 1.4 percent midday in Asia to $69.20 a barrel.

West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel, then eased back. As of midday it was up 1.3 percent.

Stock markets also dropped sharply but clawed back some ground later in the day. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower but was down only 1.2 percent. Markets in Hong Kong, mainland China and South Korea were down less than 1 percent.

Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of less than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com